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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, July 09, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAli, EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1868.
SritllT OF THE PRESS.
EDITORIAL OPINIONS OF THH LKADINO JOUBSAI.B
VPOR CUBBBNT TOPICS COMPILED BV8RT
BAT FOB Tfill IVKtfWQ TBLBOBAFH.
A Very Foolish Liar
From th If, Y. Tribun.
The late Republican National Convention,
in ita platform,
Resolved, The guaranten by Congress of equal
SuirruKe io all lo ai men H tne S iiitli w.ts U
raanded by every cmslder-itloii of puoho
snfety.of tirailtiule, HD'1 of Jus Ice, ami muni b
malnielurd; whim lue queni inn of suin-nRe in
all the loyal Stales properly Oeloun to the peo
ple of those elates."
ThaNational Intelligencer, commenting there
on, thus Bbainelerisly ji;
This Is a specimen of tlie'llberty and eqallty,
and fraternity ' which rttlloitlin prates hoouImo
constantly. It ofira a premium to barbarism,
and puis Intelllgeuoe uuder tbe ban. The
ooioted man of tbe Norib, who U comparatively
lnatrucled, and la VHHlly hiKlier la tbe hooUI
and moral soale tbau ine plantation Biiinlio,
Who hardly knows bla own name, In declared
unfit toecjny tbeelecilve Irauculse; while tbe
poor, degraded creature. fresh from the r Ice
swamps, ta pronounced competent to make con.
8tltuluna and lawa lor tbe white mo,anil to
control bis properly and personal liberty. Hidl
oallam has onecieed f r tbe HoUib aud another
for tbe North, each applicable to the same rn08.
"Tbe black man Ih treated as an lxbmaelite
or Pariah In the North, where he la absolutely
powerless, and where hia combined race cannot
carry a alrgle Congressional District. Chicago
.puts a brand upon his brow like that of Cain."
The Tribune has never, during ita twenty
seven years' existence, held or proclaimed any
other basis of government than that of the
equal rights of all men. We fought for that
piinciple as heartily in 184(1, when we polled
but e;),UUU votes lor it in uis oiaie, as m iou,
when we more than doubled that number; and
as heartily as we do now, when it is the cher
ished oreed of at least 300,000 of our New
York fellow-oitizens. Yet we do not quite see
by what right New York or Massachusetts shall
prescribe the conditions of suffrage iu Illinois;
though we see very clearly how and why the
people of the loyal States should insist, in resto
ring Rebel States to self government, that the
loyal people of ttiote States should have a voice
in their government henceforth, and not be put
under the feet of their Kebel ex-masters. We
may be oonvincd, by the coarse of events,
that the nation has power and right to decree
equal rights to citizens in every State; and we
deeply regret that the Federal Constitution
did not expressly so prescribe. As yet, how
ever, we rest on the Chicago platform, as
above quoted. Yet can there be a secoud liar
so brazen as to assert that we thereby "de
clare the colored man of the North unfit to
enjoy the elective franchise," and "put a
brand on his brow lik that of Cain V
The Copperheads.
from the N. Y. Timet.
It is quite evident that the Democratic
party requires the discipline of another great
defeat to bring it to its senses. The Copper
head element is rampaut, insolent, aud defiant.
Often overthrown, frequently cowed, some
times apparently ready to give up the ghost,
it yet persists in forcing itself to the fore
ground at every opportunity, and is always
ready to attempt to beize the reins and manage
the party for its owu behoof. Nothing could
more strikingly display the desperate nature
of the faction than its conduct at the present
Democratic Convention.
If the Copperheads were capable of being
taught, they would have learned wisdom from
the events of the last eight years. They would
hve learned that the vat majority of the
American people are utterly aud unalterably
opposed to their ptinciples, their policy, their
schemes, their past course, their present pre
tensions, and their future supremacy. They
would have discovered the impossibility of
now effecting the object of their desires; they
would have found out the futility of opposing
the national will and the national destiny.
But it seems these Copperheads have learned
nothing at all. They come along here with
all their old airs and assumptions. They
claim tbe right to rule the Democratic party;
and the Democratic) party lacks the courage
and the spirit to resent their pretensions, and
spurn their presence. Nothing, therefore, re
mains for the Democratic party but another
great defeat. The Republicans are well pre
pared to administer it. The people will not
tolerate the supremacy of this old Copperhead
faction. As they have heretofore overthrown
it whenever it has shown itself, so they must
again overthrow it, and with that overthrow
crush ont its existence. After such an expe
rience, one may suppose that even the Demo
cracy will learn something.
Cauglil iu the Manner.
From the IVibune.
The World Is a loud-mouthed oracle of that
school of political philosophy which affliun
that "The world is governed too much,"
rather than too badly, aud holds that what
ever goes beyond keeping men from breaking
eaoh other's heads and picking each other's
pockets is outside of the proper functions of
tbe State. Yet, see how it abjures and tram
ples on its own doctrine in the following:
"A Fkmai.k Slavic Thadk. There seems to
be no doubt Iba', au Infamous trtttlc, which
has for years beeu can led on between Loudon
and tbe great towns of Northern Ueruiuuy, has
been opened bi-tweev those tow us aud New
Yoik. Tbe North tiermau Journals (and not
tbe North German Journals only) come to ui
with adverliHemeuls dated In Crosby, Mercer
and other notorious streets of thisclty, In whlcli
the advertisers In vile well-educated and rne
able young Ueinv-tn ladles of good family, to
come out io Anie'l'M us governesses.' Aeuoies
In Hamburg- aud Kiomnj. are establlsbod to
provide the victims ol this i melons trade with
tbe means of ri tichlLin New York, and harpies,
ready at New York wharves upon ttielr arrival,
aoon put Itiem bey on I tbe reacb of numan help.
IjBOKi ae Is too weak to brand fits villainy us
It deserves to be branded, but tbe law cannot
be too wpak to anest Its progress. Tbe Coin
misKloneiH ol Emigration aud trie municipal
authorities ox both sides of tbe Atlantic should
lone no time In taking active and efficient s'eps
for putting a stop to ibis laooncelvubly horrible
form of the slave trade."
We need hardly say that the Tribune
heartily assents to the World's propositions.
We only insist that the same protection be
extended to Americans that tUt World solicits
for Germans. "This atrocious trade" has
long been flourishing here, aud will be so long
as houses of infamous resort are allowed to
exist. livery brothel is a perpetual conspi
racy against the purity aud happiness of
every unprotected young wotmu in the coun
try. "Harpies" are not merely "ready" to
clutch friendless girls at the wharves; they
eeize those who come in frim the country;
and they have emissaries and scouts looking
in every direction for those who may be made
their victims. So long as the traffi ) in female
rain is tolerated and gainful, so long will
Ameiioan girls be day by day lured into its
- tawdry saloons by every species of deception
and fraud to siuk thence into lower, though
not fouler, depths of pollution and infamy.
There can be no sa'ety for unprotected inno
cence until an aroused and chastened public
sentiment Bhall indigna-tly, resistlessly de
mand the utter extermination of houses of ill
fame.
So with regard to gambling. The blackleg
is as palpably, flagrantly a publio enemy as
the bawd. He robi our young men of their
money, their honesty, their self reppwt; min
ing Luudredj" every yaar, aad thus atojiil
recruiting the armies of Satan. Probably, a I
fall ball oi tne villains 01 oar cur those who
live by rasoality and alory in it took their
first steps on their downward road in making
their way to a gambling-house.
We know it is said Man's perverted passions
will have gratification. If that plea is good
for anything, it avails the advertisers con
demned by the World as much as others. Bat
theie is no force in it. It is not human frailty
that we war upon, but the cold-blooded vil
lainy that takes advantage of that frailty in
pursuit of sordid gain. Men will steal and
forge. Yet we do not tolerate seminaries for
perfecting neophytes in forgery and theft.
Gambling and lewdness might not be eradi
cated by the sternest legal repression, but they
would be reduced to their lowest dimensions.
If our laws simply confiscated the premises
perverted, with their owner's privity, to the
vile uses of the blackleg or the lib-rtiu, there
would be a ppeedy cessation of such advertis
ing as the World so preperly deprecates. Vice
would grovel in caverns aud cower in rags,
instead of rioting in palaces aud flaunting ia
gorgeous apparel. And there will yet, we
trust, be matured and developed a publio
f entiment that will demand and secure sterner
laws than we now have, and public prosecu
tors quite other than A. Oakey ilall.
Andy Johnson's Fare well Addrexs.
From the If. Y. Herald.
Messrs. F. W. Coggill, William II. Appleton,
and a half dozen other persons having written
a letter to President Johnson asking the privi
lege of presenting his name "to the Demo
cratic Convention as n candidate for the ot&oe
of President of the United States," he ha3 in
timated that "IJarkls is willin'," that is, "if
deemed desirable for tbe preservation and
unity of the conservative interests of the
country." But he wants "a call so general
and unequivocal" that it will amount to an
endorsement of his course by the people, aud
he thinks "that in the present temper el par
ties" no such endorsement can be reasonably
expected.
Mr. Johnson then proceeds to a philosophi
cal review of the present political condition of
things, which gives to his historical letter the
character somewhat of a farewell address after
the fashion of George Washington aud Andrew
Jackson. A pretty good address it is, too;
and it ccmes to the windward within hailing
distance of the Democratic platform. Among
other things which he has vainly tried to do
against a two-thirds vote of each house of
CoDgress, he mentions his efforts to check ex
travagant expenditures and to lighten the bur
dens ot taxation. And all this time he has
been like John Tyler, or like Rome, "when
Ca-sar had a party, and l'ompey and
Crassus each had a party, and the com
monwealth had none." But while Mr.
Johnson has had to fight a radical Con
gress since the close of the war, and has
had to bear and suffer many things in silence
for the sake of the people, he says, "I cannot
complain if the people have not been able to
make my cause thoroughly their own." But
until the people wake up to the extravagant,
reckless, and oppressive partisan schemes of
Congress, "the nation will have to be content
with delusive hopes and promises of better
times." That is as true as Gospel. Mr. John
eon's views upon this important matter are
seasonable and well put. The people must
wake up, er they aie gone. L'ke a true phi
loEopher, while he is not very sanguine of the
immediate approach of the milleuium, "in
the present temper of parties," aud while he
is "in the bauds of the people (including this
Democratic Convention) aud at their disposal,"
he thinks, in any event, he can look calmly on
tbe present course of events, and "patiently
await the verdict of the future." So he can,
and so, we hope, he will. He thinks that Old
Thad. fctevensandBen Butler and the radicals
generally, in the late impeachment, "have
done the worst that factiou can do for the
present;" from which it is evident that
"honest Andy" is not much frightened by
these new impeachment resolutions. Finally,
he expresses the hope to the Democracy that
in the selection of their candidate "the publio
good and leading and well-defined principles
will not be sacrificed to the mere purpose of
party ascendancy." In a modest way this is
an appeal against Pendleton aud any man of
that type, and a strong hint in favor of some
such constitutional conservative as Johnson,
Chase, Doolittle, or Dixon.
In a word, while this letter of Mr. Johnson's
is a dignified bid for the Democratic nomina
tion it is at the same time a warning to the
Democratic Convention, and in reading it we
are reminded of another philosopher's beauti
ful and consoling words "blessed is he who
don't expect anything, for he shall not be dis
appointed." The British Neutrality Laws.
From the If. Y. Time.
In its many columns of comment upon the
report of the Commissioners on the Neutrality
Laws, the London Times has made no more
incisive and vital thrust into the main ques
tion than by its remarks upon the existing
distinction between ships and contraband of
war. Indeed, its observation upon that
point touches one of the main springs of the
pending international controversy. "There
ia this difference, " said the Tiuu-s, "between
ships and other warlike stores, that the latter
must be taken to some place in the possession
of the belligerent, and thence directed against
his adversary, while the ship may never go
near the belligerent's territory at all." That
is very true, and that is precisely one of the
reasons why Auieiica complained of the insuf
ficiency of the present theories of tho inter
national law on this topic, for the preservation
of commerce from the raids ot cruisers fitted
out in neutral ports.
Had the Alabama, for example, been com
pelled to run the risk of the blockade which
we establibhed, had she been forced to euter
a Southern port in order to acquire bellige
rent rights or the status of a C mtederate ship,
the whole question now pending between us
and Kuglaud would be essentially changed.
Had she attempted to run the blockade as an
unwarlike ship and succeeded, aud then again
put out, armed, equipped aud manned as a
ship-of-war, doubtless we should have looked
on her depredations iu a different light. On
the other hand, had she failed and been cap
tured, that would have been the end of the
story.
In other wordi, what made the case of the
ship more exasperating thau the case of
powder, shot, or other munitions of war, was
this that these latter were ordinarily run
through the blockade before they could be
come Confederate property, or could be used
against us; but the Alabama, by virtue of the
liiitieh recognition which she obtained as a
belligerent ship, did not need to run the
blockade. She hoisted Confederate colors
without having seen a Confederate port; and
the English assisted her pretensions by taking
no steps to overhaul her and bring her into
their wustody.
The London Times well says that under the
present principle, Theodore himself might
have had a score of armed vessels of French,
or American build on the sea. Indeed, the
debate in our Senates on Mr. Chandler's
famous Abyssinian revolution will illustrate
this point. It was then suggested, and the.
American preps took up the hint wi'h great
alacrity, that the "reouitlou" of Aysbiu!
would justify Theodore in subsidizing the
piratical craft of Amertoan adventurers, wio,
without ever eoinir within 0000 miles of Theo
dore's domain, would prey upon British com
merce. And surely they might fly the
Abyssinian flag with as much propriety as
the Alabama did the Confederate, though the
absurdity of their forming a part of the
"Abt sslnian nary" would b very apparent.
Tristram onanay s latner ana unole had a
famous debate on the question whether Bohe
mia could have had a seaport. The former
thought, with a thorough belief in Omnipo
tence, that it could, if God willed. "I think
not," gravely replies my uncle Toby. The
Confederacy, under the English view, had a
navy wben it had not a port. Towards the
elope of the war, when every single harbor was
in tbe possession of our troops, the Eaglish-
buill corsairs were sallying from foreigu coal-
ine stations and ravaging our oomtnenie. Tbe
Alabama, from the day she was launched tili
Wlnslow blew her out of water, never saw a
Confederate port. "It is evident," says the
Times, "that the line of prohibition must be
drawn by the neutral btate so as to include
ships," and we quite agree with that senti
ment. That was the chief aim, indeed, of the
labors or the late commission.
Senator Kamsey's Mistakes.
From the World.
The bill introduced into the Senate by Mr.
Ramsey, of Minnesota, to regulate our traie
with Kanada, in most respects the satin as
that of Mr. Beaman's, is liable to the objection
as to the monopoly it would confer on the
route to Canada via Portland, aud in some
other particulars. But it has the additional
and praiseworthy characteristic of embodying
a held and comprehensive attempt to extend
reciprocity to goods manufactured in each
country from tbe materials produced in it,
subject in each case to a duty of five per cent.
Of course there would be infinite frauds in
carrying this plan into practice. None could
tell whether cloth of certain kinds was made
from Canadian or other wool, and so on of
many other manufactures, so that we should
be adopting to a considerable erctent a five per
cent, tariff on the manufactures not only of
Canada, but of the world. Oaths might be
exacted, but custom-house oaths of this kind
made in foreigu countries are not much more
ellicacious than those of radical Senators and
Representatives at Washington to support the
Constitution of the United Sta'es.
Besides, a mere duty of five per cent, would
by no means counterbalance tbe superior ad
vantages of Canada for niauufacturiug, con
ferred upon her by our large debt and the
monstrous and ill-adjusted method of pro
viding for it. Iu many of those articles of
which Canada produces the raw material,
such as Mr. Ramsey proposes toatmitata
duty of five per cent., her people would have
an item of five per cent, advantage to begin
with, and in iron for machinery, rails, loco'
motives and ships or boats for transit on
every point as to general cheapness Canada
would have enormous advantages. But in
other respects Mr. Ramsey's bill indicates very
little reflection. For instance, according to
the bill, whisky made from cheap Canadian
grain might be admitted at a duty of five per
cent, bo long as the bill remained in force
we fcbould have no power to prevent this, and
should be at the mercy ot the CiUMians, who
could thus cut us off from what ought to be an
important and proper source of our excise
revenue.
Mr. Ramsey specifically adds agricultural
implements to the list of articles to be ad
mitted at five per cent. A few j'ears ago we
exported them on a very large scale to Canada;
but the Canadian tariff transferred the manu
facture to the northern side of the frontier.
Wood and iron are the materials used. The
Canadians have wood more than five per cent,
cheaper thau our oppressively taxed people,
and have iron yet cheaper by many times
over, consequently, if iur. Kamsey s system
were likely to be permanent, it would transfer
the manufacture of agricultural implements
from this to the other side. Ploughs are agri
cultural implements, and iron ploughs are no
exception to the plain rule. Nor are iron
steam-ploughs, with all their machinery, to
be reasonably excepted. But it is easy to see
that, with iron free of duty, tbe Canadians
could completely drive our people out of the
market in our own country.
Their advantages would be quite as great in
making iron ships. We name this to show
how diffioult it is to make any miuor change
in our very oomplex system without making
far wider derangements than are at hrst ob
vious. Scarcely anything is better entitled to
be free of dutv than agricultural implements,
but the same might be said of ships, railroad
iron, tools, etc., etc. What is needed is to
give our manufacturers a fair chance of making
good articles at low prices, as well as to insist
on fair competition. It is unjust to subject
them to competition when they are fettered by
high prices on all that enters into production
to tie them down and then insist on their
running a race where they furnish heavy
stakes.
All these difficulties are the result of prefer
ring btute force to statesmanlike prudence and
skill. We became wedded in much haste to
the idea that a national debt is a national
blessing. The bonds are indissoluble, aud we
are now at the beginning of tbe same long
buniness wherein we shall have ample time to
repent.
Xore Iiohliery TrcpoM'd.
From the AT. Y. Keening J-u.it.
Iron now costs, by reason of the high tariff,
twice as much as it ought. Congress, to favor
a finall and already wealthy class, ol winch
Mr. Tbaddeus Stevens is only one of the repre
sentatives, has so arranged taxation as to
double the price of iron, one of the chief neces
saries of lite, to the worktugmeu of the coun
try. Cheap iron Is as necessary to tho com
fort of the farmers and'meouaincs of the coun
try as cheap bread. Double the price of iron.
and you double the price of ploughs, mowing
machines, hoes, harrows, hammers, plaues,
axes, nails; you largely increase the cost of
every barn, stable, shed, aud farm-house;
you diminish the meaus of every mau who
works with his hands, of every farmer, me
chanic, and laboring man in the land, ex
cept the few who are engaged in the produc
tion of iron.
To double the price of iron, then, is to In
flict distress upon the whole country; to make
every workinguiau's family poorer. Yet this
is what the tariff men in Congress have done,
and they are not even satisfied with this
They now propose to increase still more the
price of this necessary of life. Mr. Moorhead,
of Pennsylvania, a wealthy iron master, is with
febaineiess eurontery pushing a tanu bill,
whose principal object is largely to increase
the already onerous and wicked duties on iron,
and thus give the few wealthy American iron
masters the power to increase still more the
price of this necessary of life to the millions of
farmers ana woiKingmen who must use U ia
its various forms.
The Tribune urges Republican members to
hasten back to Washington to help to pass
this increased tariff. Does this mean that the
Republican party is to have this iniquitous
measure fathered upon it ? Are the Republi
can leaders willing to go into the Presidential
canvara as the authors or supporters of a
meaEurs which bitterly wrongs every work
legman In the oountry, merely to put more
money into the pockets of a few rich mo nop -lists
?
It is amazing to see the folly of souii Re
publican politicians, who permit their part.,'
to be used in this and other ways, by school
ing and grasping monopolists, to wring tnon-y
irom tbe impoverished and tax burieun l
people. Congress apparently means to a Monro
without completing the recouslrnctiou ot th
States, that important measure which, for the
sake of the Republican party's future, a well
as for the country's pood, ought to bs seulei
and put out of tbe way before the Presidential
election, lmt it would seem that, with all
the pressureof important nufluished busiue-is,
it will make time to hurry through this inju
rious tarill bill.
We warn the Republican leader that thy
cannot go before the country this fall bearing
the responsibility of such a lull. They ou-
not face the American people if they abet such
a robbery. 1 bey will be denounced every
where as the allies of a small baud of greedy
and unscrupulous monopolists; and it will not
do to say that the Democrats are just as bad.
If this bill is passed, it must be by Republican
votes; the Republicans alone can prevent its
passage; aud they will be extremely unwise if
they do not.
It is not safe for them to trust in this can
vass, as they have in several before, to the
folly of the Democrats. The Democrats,
whomever they nominate, will make a vigo
rous canvass; they will expose all the sins
of omission and commission, of the Repub
lican majority in Congress; and it is mvl
ness in the Republicans to put this last and
deadly weapon iuto the hands of their oppo
nents. Where Uesls the Responsibility'!
From the N. Y. Commercial AUvertistr,
'I thank God that tbe strife ot arms has
censed, and that once more In the great cou-
venutdisol our parly we oau call ibrougti tne
wbole roll of Hlatee, and find men to aus.vcr to
each," Seymour's Speech.
Governor Seymour thanks God that all of
the States are once more represented in a Na
tional Convention. But to whom is this grati
fying result due f is it the Democratic party
which in 1804 declared in the Chicago Con
vention, over which this same Governor Sey
mour presided, that the war was "a failure,"
aud should be stopped The country was at
that time enshrouded in gloom, and the Rebel
prospects were brightening. Ihen it was that
the Democratic party solemnly declared that
no fuither efforts should be made to overcome
them. In so many words it affirmed that the
prosecution of the war had been of no avail,
aud that the time had come to let the insur
gents go in peace and establish a separate
Government ot their own.
The great and patriotic Republican organ
ization, however, which had conducts 1 the
war to that point, never thought of hesitating
or faltering. On the contrary, it pushed for
ward with renewed zeal and determination,
and as a result Wade Hampton, William Pres
ton, Napoleon tor rest, C. C Langdon, aud
other Southern politicians are gathered to-day
in the city ot JNew lork to nominate a candi
date for the whole United States, instead of
assembling at Richmond, Charleston, or Mont
gomery to designate Jefferson Davis, Rcbert E.
Lee, or John C. Breckinridge as President of a
Southern Confederacy. To the Republican
party, and that party alone, is due the fact
that the Tammany Convention to day embraces
delegates from below Mason and Dixon's line.
Governor Seymour's speech, which is sur
charged with passion and anger as no other
address of his ever was, dwells much on the
vast debt, depreciated currency, and Imavy
taxes of the country. But the party which he
to-day represents brought all of these ills
upon the country. When the Southern States
threatened to secede if Abraham Lincoln was
chosen President, the Democratic party of the
North encouraged their threats aud menaces
An ex-Dainocratio President assured them
that he, along with others, would rush to
their rescue were any force attempted. Other
Democratic leaders, at Aleriden, Connec icut.
and elsewhere, declared that a Northern army
would have to march over their dead bodies
before reaching Dixie. Democratic sheets.
here in the metropolis, promised a huudred
thousand defenders to the South from New
York alone in the event of war. And one of
them had a Rebel flag prepared to unfurl to
the breeze opposite the way from where we
are now writing.
Encouraged by such "manifestations" the
Southern leaders inaugurated secession. A
Democratic President, instead of crushing the
initiatory movements, looked calmly ou and
declared that he had no power or authority to
save the republio from going to pieces. While
Floyd, as Secretary ot War, stealthily con
veyed war material from the Northern to the
Southern arsenals, the other members of the
Democratic Cabinet as stealthily and secretly
plotted against tbe nation's lite.
ihen it was that our national burdens, over
which Governor Seymour fairly raves and
foams, began. The Democratic party had en
couraged the fiery Southerner to assail the
Government, and the Republican party has
tened to its defense, calling upon the country
for men and money. As the war continued,
the Democratic party, as such, vigorously op
posed it, continuing to give moral as well as
material support to the insurgents, and dis
couraging enlibtments.
By thus keeping up a constant Lire from the
rear on the Government, it compelled still
greater outlays of men and material, and
swelled the public debt. State and local taxes
are now being paid all over the country be
cauee the Democratic party prevented volun
teeiing, encouraged "tkedaddling," aud hence
necessitated the payment of heavy bounties.
We, heie in New York, are paying taxes to-day
for property destroyed by Governor Seymour's
"Jrietds," when in the Summer of lbUli they
rioted at will through our streets, aud under
the belief that they had Ids encourage
ment and sanction, plundered public aud
private dwellings, audhotdonu unoffendiLg
men, women and children. It is because of
such deeds, because the 1 niocratio party, as
such, continued disloyal until the end of the
conflict, that we are now saddled with national,
State and local burdens. Had the Democratic
party been loyal to the country, there would
have been no rebellion, no secession, aud no na
tional debt. Had the Democratic party be
come loyal on the outbreak of the rebellion,
that rebellion would have been overcomeyears
earlier, and our national burdens would have
been correspondingly less.
CORN E X O II A X G E
ItAO MANUKACIOllY.
JOHN T. liAILKV St CO.,
K1.MOVK1) TO
N, E. corner ol M ItK E l' and WATER troets
Philadelphia.
DEALERS IN UAIla ND BAQQIXU
Of every drKorlptlnt), for
Grain, Flour, ball, bnper-Plioapbaie of Lime, Hone
Dliat. Etc
I.are and small OUNN Y B AOS constantly on hand.
Also, WOOL BAl'KH.
JtiiN T. Bailkv. Jamhw Cascadkn-.
WILLIAM 8. GRANT,
COM M leKION M ItCH A NT,
He.8B. DIXaWAKK Aveuue, l'lillauelpbla,
Pnpnnt's Dunpowder, Helloed Nitre. Charcoal, Eta
W. linker t C'o.' Liiocola'e Coco- id Hruuia.
Crocker, llros, life Co.' Yellow Metal bueuinlng.
Bnliasnd Nalla.
gOf
fiar nuu rr riTinicn Til If. IMC II
eut pilot) I'Hlulor Lauittaana umii
Acuity
ii iiiiiiTnv.
till 1U4?
K9, fiVVl'tt WW.
213 & 220
S. FRONT ST.
OFFER TO TUB TRADE, IN L0T8, "
FIKK RYE AM) BOURBON WHISKIES, IV BOm
Of 180C, 1HOO, 1807, mid H-OH.
AIS FKIE F11VE ME A1VD BUMBOfl WHISKIES,
Of GREAT AGE, ranging from to 184S.
Liberal contract will be entered Into for lots, n bond at Distillery, of this years' manufutaM
WATCHES, JEWELRY, ETC.
iVNft LADOMUS & CQ
'DIAMOND DEALERS & .UtWKLlCUSl
WATCIIKS. JKWEI.KY A SILTKH 1TAIIK.
.WATCHES and JEWELRY REPAIRED.
02 Chestnut 8t, Phila
WATCH E 3 OF THE FINEST MAKER,
DIAMOID ASD OTHER JEWELRY.
Of the latest styles.
SOLID SILVER AND PLATED- WARS, ETC. ETC.
SMALL BTUDS FOR EYELET HOLES,
A large assortment JuBt receive!, with a variety of
suiting
I5tp
We keep lwys on ban an assortment of
1AIIE' AND VENTS' "riNB WATCHES'
Of the best American end Foreign Maker, all w!
ranted to e!ve complete satisfaction, and at
QBEATLY REDUCED PRICES.
FAR 11 Ot BROTHER
Importers of Watches, Jewelry, Musical Boxes, ato.
11 llsmthlrpj Ho. 824 CHE8NUT St., below Fourth.
Kflpenlal attention riven to repairing Wale be bji
Musical Boxes bv F1KST-CLABH workmen.
TUHRET CLOCKS
O. W. RCHHELL,
Importer aud dealer In fine Watches,
French Clocks, Gold Jewelry, Etc., No. 22 N. SIXTH
Street, having received the agency ot
STEVENS' PATENT TOWER CLOCKS,
Is prepared to make estimates and contract" for pat
log np these Clocks for Town Halls, Churches,
School Houses. Etc., in the full assurance that they
are the best and cheapest
TURRET CLOCKS
In the United States,
Inquiries by mall promptly answered. S26
LUMBER.
1868.
SPRUCE JOIST.
SPRUCE JOIST,
HEMLOCK.
HEMLOCK.
1868.
1 QCiQ SEASONED CLEAR PINK. 1 QQ
lOUO. BEAtSONED CLE iK PINE. lOOO.
CHOICE PATTERN PINE.
BPANIHU CEDAR, FOR PATTERNS,
K1C1) CEDA R.
1 Qf'Q FLORIDA FLOURJNO.
1C5UO. FLORIDA FLOORING.
CAROLINA FLOORING.
i8a
VIKUUMA
delaware flooiungi
ash flooring,
walnut flooring,
florida step boards.
rail plank.
1 qi;q walnut bdis. ad plank, t dq
lOOO. WALNUT BDS AND PLANK. lOUO.
WALNUT BOARDS.
WALNUT PLAN K.
1 Ct'Q UNDERTAKERS' LUUBKR. 1DQ
lOUO. UNDER TAKERS' LUMBER, J.OOO.
RED CEDAR.
WALNUT AND PfNK.
1808.
SEASONED POPLAR.
SEASONED CHERRY.
1808.
WHITE OAK PLANK AND BOARDS.
HICKORY.
IGfjQ CIwAR BOX MAKERS' IQiq
lOUO. CIGAR BOX MAKERS' lOuCS.
SPANISH CEDAR BOX BOARDS,
FOR BALE LOW.
lQQ CAROLINA SCANTLING. 1Q.Q
lODO. CAROLINA H. T. BILLS. XOOO.
NORWAY BCANTL1NG.
1868.
CEDAR SHINGLES. 1 0Q
CYPRfcWS HHINGLEa lOOO.
MA.ULE, BROTHER A CO.,
No. 2500 SOUTH Street.
HI
T. P. GALYIN & CO.,
LUMBER COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
JS11ACKAMAX0N STREET WHARF,
BELOW SLOATS MILLS,
(socam-kd), PHILADELPHIA,
AGENTS FOR SOUTHERN AND EASTERN Mann
faclurtrs of YELLOW I'lNK aud SPRUCE 'T1MBEK
BOABDS. etc., shall be liui py to lurulnn orders ai
wnoleHfcle raits, deliverable at any acce Bible purl.
Constantly receiving aud ou haud at our wharf
f-OCTHERN FUiOfeJNG. SUANlLING. HlilN
GLE. KAbTERN LA1UH, PICKETS BKD-8LA TS.
hPBUCE, HEMLOCK. ELEOT MICHIGAN AflU
CANADA PLANK AND BOARDS, AND H AO
MA1CC bHIP KNEES. 1 31 Sluluj
ALLonvniTIIWILL REDELIVKUKII
AT AN Y IMHTQKTntMITT I'KO (I PTLi,
u
KITED STATES BUILDEKS' MILL, N0
X4,wi, snauciii ijuin iu street.
ESLEH j- DRO.t PROPRIETORS.
Always on band, tuade of the Best Seasoned Lnmbsi
at low prices,
WOOD MOULDINGS, BRACKETS, BALUSTER
AND NEWELS.
Newels, Balusters, Brackets, and Wood Moulding!
WOCD MOULDINGS, BRACKETS. BALUBTURb
AND NEWELS.
Walnut and Ash Hand Railing. 8, Hi, and f Inches
BUTTERNUT, CHE3NUT,
MOULDINGS to order,
AND
WALNUT
UI
GROCERIES, ETC.
rpo FAMILIES RESIDING IN THE RURAL
DISTRICTS.
We are prepared, as heretofore, to snpply families
at their etiuutry residences with every description ot
FINK GROCERIES, TEAS, ETC.,
ALBKUT V. KOHKBTS,
Dealer In Floe Groceries,
m,rp Corner ELEVENTH and VINE SU.
TRUSSES.
fU "btELEY'S 11 AUD RUBBER TRUSS.'
No. lo47 CAESNUT Btreel. Tula Truss cor
rm uy applied will cure aud retain with ease the most
u lllcult rupture; alwas clean, light, easy, sale, aud
CfiuiorUblfe, UHed II. bathing, Bu.'d to form, never
rusu), breaks, soils, becouiu liiuber. or moves from
place. NoBtrapi'lug.Hard Rubber Abdominal Sup.
porter, by which the Mothers, Cuipulenl, aud Ladle
siilterlng with Female weak ueas, will hud relief and
perlectsupporl; very lltrht, ueat. aud euVotiml. Pile
Iusirunieuis bboulder Braces, Elasilo Stocklugs for
weak limbs. Huspenlous, elo. Also, large slock heel
Leather Truaaea, halt usual price. Lady In ai.tenrt.
anoe. IWiwfna
QEORCE PLOWMAN.
CARPENTER AND BUILDE2,
REMOVED
To No. IU DOCK BLrcot,
I FINE WATCHES.
t
Eh
218 220
S. FRONT ST.
BRANDY, WINE, GIN. ETC.
NEALL & McBRIDE,
tHPOBTEBfl OF
BRANDIES, WINES, GINS, ETC.,
AND DISTILLERS OF
FlfiE OLD RYE, B0URE01 AND !D!tQKGAKEU
W II I S It Y,
PUEE AND UNADULTERATED,
No. l&l South FRONT Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
Liquor by (he B -ttle and Demljnbn faratnnefl
exprensly for family tnd medlulnal purposes. Ordaia
by mall will be pronntly attended to. 1 Xthatorp
liAMPAUNl!..-AN INVOICE OP "PLAHI
Lore" Chanipague, lm i.oried aud for sale by
126 WALN VI and ' GRANITE Street
JAUAH i:AKl'rAIKM lit
CHAMPAGNE. AN INVOICE OF "GOLD
Lac" ChaL.pagne, Importer and for sale by
JAtoES CARST4IRS, fa.,
IK WALNUT and 21 O KA N I fE Street.
CHAMPAGNE. AN INVOICE OP "GLO
rla" Champagne. Imported aud fur sale by
IU 1 WAI Nim A'j
C ABSTAINS' OLIVE 0IL.-AN INVOICB
ol the above, for sale by w"
J M ES CAR8TATRH. JR..
12fl WA LN UT and ti a KA N1TE Street.
INSTRUCTION.
gTEVEBSU ALE IN8TITUTB.
BOARDING SCHOOL FOR VOUNG LADIES.
Terms Board, Tuition, etc. -per scholastic yea,t6C
NO EXTRAS,
areolars at Messrs. Fairbanks A Ewlng's, No. m
CHESNTJT Street; also at Messrs. T. B. Peterson A
Brothers', No. 806 CHESNUT Street.
Address, personally or by note,
H FOSTER BROWNE, Principal,
10 It thmtf
Booth Am boy. N. J.
MILLINERY.
MRS. R. DILLON,
rf HON,
833 AND S3S SOUTH NTKEJffT
Baa large assortment of
MILLINERY.
Ladles'. Misses', aud Children's Silk, Velvet, Felt,
Straw and Fancy Bonnet and Hats of the latest
ityle Also, S'lks, Velveia, Ribbons, Crape,
Feathers, Flowers. Frames, etc., wholesale and
retail; siai
FURNISHING GOODS, SHIRTS,&Q
H. 8. K. C.
Harris' Seamless Kid Gloves.
SVERT PAIR WABBAKTED,
EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOB BENTS' GLOVES.
J. W. SCOTT & CO.,
I27rp HO. SI CHESNUT VTHCET.
pATEUT SIIOULDER-SEAM
SIIIBT MASCFACTOBT,
AHDGENTtKMES'S rDBNUBINS STOBBJ
PERFECT FITTING SHIR IB AND DRAWERS
nade from measurement at very shon notice.
All other artlolea of GENTLEMEN'S DRESS
4O0DU in frill variety.
WIHCHESTEB A OOh
tig . No. 9im C FT ff K NUT Htraes.
CARRIAGES.
GARDNER & FLEMING '
CAItRIAQK BUILDERS,
o. 214 SOUTH FIFTH STREET,
BELOW WALNUT.
An assortment of NEW AND SECOND-HAND
CARRIAGES always on hand at REASONABLE
prices. esfmwma
DYEING, SCOURING, ETC.
FRENCH STEAM
SCOURING.
ALDEDYLL, MARX & CO.:
no. iaa ojhi klevehtu stbebt
AND
. BIO HIH NTKKET. rSlOmW
JGAS FIXTURES.
GAS FIXTURES.
MlbKEY, MERRILL A TUACKAliA,
No. 718 CUKMNUT Street,
manufacturers of Gas Fixtures, Lamps, etc., etc.;
would call the attention of tbe public to their large ana
elegant aasuruueut ol Gas Cnaudellers, Pendanas,
Bracket, etc. They also Introduce gas-pipes Into
dwellings and public bulldlugs, and altsnd to extendi
lug, alterlDg. aud repairing gas-pipe.
All work warranted. U lj
-HE STEAM GENERATOR
MAXCFACTUKING COMPANY
OF PENAIIYLTAMIA,
CAPITAL, 8100,000
This Company are now prepared to furnish
WIKUAMU'N PATENT IMPROVED STEAM
(iENEBATOU,
Of any power required, upon two weeks' notice. They
have been introduced In tula city, and thoroughly
tested, with most satisfactory results, and are sold
UNDER GUARANTEE OF ABSOLUTE BAFBTT
FROM DESTRUCTIVE EXPLOSION. They am
Cheaper in first cost, and In expense of erection, more,
economical In fuel, durable and convenient In DM
than any other apparatus for generatlug steam,
orricE or cobpabt,
(ROOMS Nob. I and )t
No, 6Ca WALNUT BTREET
NELSON J. NICEERSON, President.
KDWABD U. GRAHAM,
mint juelry aud lr una:

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