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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, July 09, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 4

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THE DAILY EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THUHSDAY, JULY 9, 1868.
(Swung dcpiiJi
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
(SUNDAYS BXCKPTBD),
AT THB EVENING TELEGRAPH BUILDING,
NO. 18 & THIRD STREET.
Price, Tbre OenU rr Cory (Double Sheet), or
Eighteen Cents per Week, payable to the Carrier,
and Mailed to Subscribers out of the city at Mne
Dollar per Annum One Dollar anil Firty OenU for
Two Months, Invariably In advance for the period
ordered.
THURSDAY, JULY 9, 18G8.
The Lincoln Monument.
A NUMBHB of gentlemen Lave been far several
years past quietly collecting a sum for the
purpose of erecting a monument In oar city to
the memory of the late President Abraham
Lincoln. For some time little has been heard
of the attempt, but the directors of the enter
prise bare not been asleep. We understand
that recently a meeting was held, and it was
determined to receive proposals for the design
and eixe of the statue. The reputation of
those who have the enterprise in hand for oor
reot taste makes it certain that the choice of
the figure will be all that could be desired.
But the seleotion of the site on which it shall
stand is one in which all the publio cannot but
take a deep interest. There are two positions
talked of. The one is in the centre
of Washington Square. This site certainly
has its advantages. It will greatly add to the
popularity and attractions of that now almost
deserted Square. It will afford a fine view
from all sides. The space around is elear, and
it would, without doubt, look extremely well
both as an ornament and an object of general
interest to that locality. But the other posi
tion we think outnumbers in advantage
Washington Square. We refer to the centre
of Broad street, somewhere between Chesnut
and Market streets. There can be no doubt
but the true policy of our oity is to do all in
its power to make Broad street peculiarly the
street of the city, if not of the country. Natu
rally we have much to aid us in such an
enterprise. The street itself is broad,
and most excellently situated. It
requires now but some judicious
additions to make it pre-eminently the Ameri
can Boulevard. One of the additions would un
doubtedly be furnished in the location of the
monument in the middle of the street, and at
the same time in the middle of the city. Such
a seleotion is extremely common abroad. Paris
and London both of them have such statues
ereoted directly in the middle of the highway,
where all the world can see them. They give
effect to the street at present either from
above or below, and at the same time display
with singular excellence the science of sculp
turing. If the monument was to be placed in
the square, it would not be seen by many of
the visitors to our city. It should be out of
the ordinary tour of travel. But iu Broad
street very eye would enjoy its propor
tions. In whatever light we view it, we think
that Broad and Chesnut, or opposite Penn
Squares, is the best site. We merely throw
out the suggestion to the committee, feeling
sure that they will both seleot the best ariistio
production, and the best position in which to
place an enduriDg monument to the memory
of the man whom all acknowledge a pure
patriot and Union martyr.
General Winfield S. Hancock.
Tub large vote received by General Hancock in
the Demooratio Convention on Wednesday
proves that the industrious efforts of his ad
vocates and friends had not been fruitless.
For some time past they have been making
active exertions in his favor, and among other
agencies employed, a pamphlet was exten
sively circulated in all quarters likely to exert
an influence over the National Convention,
which purported to be a biographical sketch
of General Hancock's life and publio
services, aid which set forth la glowing
terms the record of his valorous achievements
during the war, , and introduced quotations
from his orders and letters while he was sta
tioned at New Orleans, In command of the
Fifth Military Diatriot, to prove that he ad Is
the talents of an accomplished oivilian to his
bravery 3 a soldier. The vote on the
eighteenth ballot shows that he completely
won the hearts of the Southern Democracy by
his controversy with General Grant in regard
to the exeoution of the Reconstruc
tion laws, for he was sustained on that
ballot by the unanimous vote of Alabama, Ar
kansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Missis
sippi, North Carolina, fcouth Carolina, Texas,
and Virginia, which up to a recent period con
stituted the ten unreconstructed States. He
also received one vote from Delaware, four
and a half votes from Kentucky, six and a
half votes from Maryland, and seven votes
from Missouri, thus nearly sweeping the en
tire tier of old slaveholding States, with the
exception of Tennessee, which, "solitary and
alone," adhered to the desperate fortunes of
Andrew Johnson.
The Pleasures of the Park.
Every day of the present oppressive weather
proves the great wisdom of any large city
inventing, lavishing its money on publio im
provements which are of a kind to give plea
sure to the people. We are recalled to the
truth of the real economy of such expenditures
by the throngs which daily crowd the Fair
mount Park and enjoy ita delightful breezes
and ever pleasant shades. There cannot be
found to-day a man in our city who does not
recommend the liberality which induced the
city to purchase the site and prepare it for a
publio pleasure ground. There every class
of the people revel iu innocent and healthy
pleasure. The wealthy from their carriages
enjoy its pleasant paths. The pedestrian
from the ' elegantly laid out walk secures
an equal amount of gratification, the chil
dren enjoying their games on the grass,
And their eeDiors the walks and seats. The
aliiUoa of a Sue band of muslo is one whkh
the people can highly appreciate. It has been
always considered good polioy by the various
monarchs of Europe, to expend large sums of
money in giving pleasure to the people. In
many, we may say in all, of the publio
Parks, at Government expense, first-class
bands are furnished and everything done to
give popular pleasure. Shall we, then, a
government of the people, by the people and
for the people, not be as liberal as the con
tracted policy of European Kings f Every oent
thus spent is a dime well invested, and which
will yield an abundant interest in contributing
happiness.
American Antiquities.
Wiiii.b lately engaged in looking over the
pages of some French illustrated papers, our
attention was arrested by a series of views of
the great Pacifio Railroad, a road about
passing through a country of which soaroe a
path for man was known up to within a very
few years. Our thoughts reverted to the tiuwa
when not only the seotion of country about to
be traversed by the great iron road, but the
entire continent was occupied by numerous
races, some of which have entirely disap
peared, others remaining only in fragments,
while whole tribes have been exterminated.
There are problems connected with the early
history of this country which ethnographers,
naturalists, and arcb.Tologists have attempted
in vain to solve. One of the most interesting,
we think, is the resemblance between some of
the practices of Central America and some
parts of the East, which engaged the attention
of the great Humboldt when he visited this
ccuntry. Since then the researches of Mu3srs.
Stevens, Catherwood, Squire, and others have
shown some of the resemblances to have been
moBt remarkable. A late ingenious writer,
in going over M. de Waldeck's Illustrated
Monuments of Ancient Mwxico, has pointed
out the great likeness existing between the
great temple of Palenqn and the equally
great temple of Buro-Budo in the province of
Kedii, in the Island of Java, in such a manner
as to place beyond all reasonable debate the
common purpose and origin of both. We
cannot enter into the details as rec mnted by
this writer, but will give some of the
most striking. Both are elevated on a series
of graduated platforms or terraces, and are
reached by successive flights of steps faoing
the cardinal points; the chambers of both are
disproportionately small, with no apertures
excepting the doorways for the admission of
air and light; their curved ceilings, formed of
stones overlapping each other triangular
wise, and constituting what is known as the
Cyclopean arch, are precisely alike; the walls
of both are adorned with my tho-hieroglyphi-cal
tablets, in which the head of the Asiatio
elephant is conspicuous, the meaning of whioh
has yet to be deciphered; in the sanctuaries of
both B'huda is represented in colossal diguity
seated oross-legged upon a couch or throne,
sustained by crouching leopards, and be
nignly receiving an offering of fruit and
flowers from a priestess who is kneeling be
fore him.
Among other matters of interest the won
derful decrease of the population north of the
confines of ancient Mexico is not the least.
Two centuries ago the population amounted
te seventeen millions of souls. It is now less
than two millions. Alcoholic liquors, epi
demical diseases, and forced emigration have
aggravated this frightful mortality.
From the appearance of the mounds and
other remains, coupled with the legendary
history related by the Indians, according to
these traditions, an entire nation, both phy
sically and morally distinguished from the
redskins; a race of white men who had been
settled in the country from time immemorial,
were unexpectedly assailed and overwhelmed
by their enemies. The manifest incompletion
of several of the monuments in the valley of
the Ohio, betokens a sudden cessation of labor
on the part of their constructors, and this
would seem to confirm the terrible reality of
the Indian legends. Still, they are conjectures.
All that patient investigation can do is being
done, and we must patiently await future dis
closures, if any will be forthcoming, which
may be of a nature to change or add to the
infoimation which we already possess. Of the
material progress of this country, or rather
what that will be on the completion of this
great chain between the Atlantio and Pacilio
Oceans, our readers need not be told.
Political Fury.
Lht the people understand the sentiments
of the Democracy. At a large meeting
of representative men in New York, a
Colonel Yerger, of Memphis, uttered the fol
lowing epeecb, which needs no comment from
us :
"TDat General Grunt was nowBtopplngboldly
toward a throne, aud would dint; his purple
mantle through the blond (if kucIi patriot as
tliotse present. (A voice ahouted, 'Yiu bet.') "I
bin loyal,' (-aid tue speaker, 'to the Union that
our fathers fought lor, but I hate n Unlou of
blood and plunder, cf oppression aud tyranny,
a Union beaded by a usmplu cabal called the
Cmigrea of the United Htates. (Kuriously.) I
hale it! I spit upon it! (A voire, 'lilt htm
again.') I rouie here to uah protection from the
people of the North."
It would be well for the indignant orators
who are so addicted to "spitting" an opposi
tion sentiment, to remember the rebuff given
by Douglas Jerrold. At one of the London
Clubs an excitable Tory was discussing politics
with an equally excitable Liberal. "I detest
your principles," says Liberal. "Your doo
trines are treasonable," says Tory, "and spit
upon Oliver Cromwell." "And I epit on
Charles I." "Waiter," exclaimed Jerrold,
ringing; "waiter, spittoons for two." The
story is old, but may be useful during the
campaign.
How tub Would Movks In 1851 the London
Punch humorously gave a list of things "lin-
potwihie to be realized." Among them were the
following; ''The unity of Germany, from Prut
Bla;" "The freedom of the Press, from Austria or
Italy;" "The Abolition of Borfdom, from Hus-
ala;" "The Kmanolpallon of a Hlave, from the
United (states." All of these things have been
tbu'.lt.l, uud i'twtoA'c itopuUkUwu a at propiioL 1b
utterly ueHlroytd,
For .President, Horatio Seymour.
Or the 22d ballot, the National Urmooratio
Convention unanimously nominated Horatio
Seymour, of New York, as the candidate for
the Presidency. By so doing, in case Mr
Seymour accepts, the most absurd contradic
tion ever presented by any political party is
presented by the Demooracy. They nominate
their own presiding officer a lack of taste
most astonishing. They nominate a man who
has again and again declined. But the old
story of Csnsar refusing the crown is made
modern. History repeats itself. They nominate
a man who has expressed views on the most
vital issue that of finance whioh are dia
metr!cally opposed to those of the platform.
They must, indeed, have come upon days of
great "publio calamity," as Vallandigbam
said, wLen they must stultify themselves by
inconsistencies bo gross as to be a positive
insult to the intelligence of the Amerioan peo
p'e. With suoh internal dissensions they oan
hardly carry the States which voted for
MoClellan. They have disgraced as well as
defeated themselves by their reckless disre
gard of all show of principle in nominating a
gold man on a greenback platform.
UP RATIO SEYMOUR.
Sketch of the Democratic Candidate for
. the Preairtaatcy .
Hmatio Seymour, who today reoolvod the
Demooratio nominal ion for the Presidency on
the 22d ballot, Is a native of Onondaga county
N. Y and is still in the prime of life and vUor
of manhood. lie was cducaled to the law, In
Whioh tils acquirements are acknowledged to be
of no mean order. Indeed, he bears the re m'a
tlon of being one of the most scholarly and
polished men who have ever bean In publio life
In th's oountry.
JTGovernoY Seymour has long been prominent
as a politician. The first office held by him was
that of Mayor of Uilca, and be wis a member
of the Legislature from 112 to 1315 Inclusive
and was speaker of the Assembly fjr the last
year of his term. With these exceptions, how
ever, we bdlleve that be has never held any
other publio position except that of Governor
of the Bute of New York:. Ho first ran Tor
thatoftlcein ISM, Siadfird E. O lurch bulnj the
I emoorallc oandldate for L'oiUen.i nt-Governor-Alihoi
g i Mr. thuicuwas elected by a small
majority, Seymour's vo'e fell off, and Washing
ton Hunt, the Whig n vnlno-, was eltoted by a
majority of 2U2 votes. In ls.-,2 he was again a
candl with Mr. CI urj.i. and this time both wen
eleoted, Seymour's vote not belugas grdatai
Oiuich's, however, by about 20,000. In
18M, when Seymour aspired for tli
third time to QuberuatorUl honors, he was de
feited by dissensions iu his own party, the
memorable colII ct between the Hards and
Softs being then at its height, and tbe Whig
oandldate receiving 30!) more votes than Sey
mour. Ia 1SG2 he again became a candidate
and ws a second time elected, on the basis of
the popu'ar dissatisfaction with the manner in
whioh the war was I hen being conduoted, bis
majority over General Wadsworth being 10,752
in a total vote of CU2.5 18.
In 1801 h j beoame a candidate for the fifth,
time anl sustained bis third defeat, Governor
Fenton receiving a miijorlty ofi2)3 in a tola1
vote of 730.821.
Governor Seymour presided over the delibe
rations of tbe Chicago Democratic Convention
of 18J1, and was similarly honored by the pre -sent
Convention last Saturday. His iirme has
been associattd with the office of President for
the last eight yer.
British Exi'okis Tije auuual Parliament
ary return shows that in the year 18U7 37,U9ti
tt ns of British copper, wrought and unwrought
Nhcets, nails, etc, and G40 tons of ore were ex
ported from tbe United Kingdom a consider
able increase over the export o 1S0G. In both
yeais India was the largeit customer. The
Import of foreign copper in ISliT lnajuded
73,907 tons of ore, 28,825 tons of regulus, and
38,939 tons of part wrought or unwrougbt cop
per and copper manufactures a smaller
Import than In 18C(i, The export of forolgn
copper (15,959 tons, Including ore, regulus, un.
wrought, part wrought, and manufactures) was
also less than In 1SG6. Of the ore Imported
31,159 tons were taken into Swansea, and 15,910
tons of tbe regulus imported. Tbe returns re.
lallrg to tin show no very remarkable differ
ence from those of I860. 5130 tons of tin, and
30 tons of tin ore and regulus were imported
in 1807, the Straits Settlements being the chief
source of supply; and 4220 tons of British tin,
aud 13:9 ions of foreign tin, were exported
from the United Kingdom, France being tbe
largekt customer; 33,818 tons of zlno were Im
ported In 1867, chiefly from Germany and
Belgium (a larger quantity than In I860), and
12 194 tons of ore of zinc; and 7337 tons of Brit
ish, and 0782 tons of foreign zinc were exported,
both considerably larger quantities thaninlSiiti.
The export of British lead In 1807 comprised 174
tons of ore and 38.G0S tons of pig, rolled, and
other forms of lead, the largest customers being
the United Stales, China, India, and France.
The import into Great Britain of lead, pig, and
bliect, in 18G7 amounted to 45,118 tons (a con
siderable Increase over I860), and of lead ore
9140 tons, Spain aud Sardinia being tbe chief
source of supply; about 800 tons of foreign lead
and lead ore were exported from the fulled
Kingdom.
The Koyal and Titled Pkrsonaoks of
Kuiope are perambulating extensively this
summer. Pi luce Amadeus, second son of the
King of Italy, is going on a cruise. lie will
touch first at I.iHbon, aud see bis sister, the
Qui en ol Portugal; then, avoiding the French
ports, patis to the North Sea and the Baltic, and
have a look at Norway. The Marquis of Has'
Mugs is going to tbe same country on a flsblng
exclusion. Prince Napoleon Is likely to extend
bis trip even beyond Constantinople. It Is said
that the Prince has written to bis cousin, tell
ing him that the Sultan earnestly desires to see
hltn. It is scarcely likely, however, that the
Emperor will go as far as Constantinople.
A Generous Millionaire. The will ol the
late Colonel A. G. Hazard, the powder mil
lionaire, offered at tbe Probate Court, In En
Meld, Ct., on Saturday, appoints Governor Bul
lock, Mrs. Hazard, and his daughter Fanny,
executor; gives (75,000 to the Library Hall to be
erected in Hazard vllle; 83000 to tbe Hazard vllle
Episcopal Church; S2500 to the Uazardvlllo
Methodist Church; 82500 to the South Congrega
tioLal Society In Enneld, and remembers his
grandson, Augustus George Bullock, with a
preteuiol (25.000OU account of bis name. The
whole estate Is estimated as valued at near a
million,
The Legislature or Noam Carolina
stands as followk:
Htnate, IfoHit. Joint Jlallnl
republicans 40 W ioti
Democrat 10 54 01
Republican iiibJ.:io
12
42
Democratic riuscu'i-iWrrUrMa'wltff mi
trcj backs.
ALGERIA.
Frightful Mortality Ames the Arab
. Papsuatloaw
Tbe Mcnilewr deCAlycria publishes a statist-!-csl
table of tbe cleai bs among the Arab o ipula
tlon belonging to tbe military zone durlai the
1HU7 ana tbe first four inuutns of 1303. It
says:
'1 lie number of natives of the civil and aitll
tary teirilories received lulo the any luun aluce
their foundation, In tbe three provluoen, Is
1 1 475. The reilgtous eatabliHi) merits took in
1072, atid there mill remain there 1271. Tu atr
iums bow only coulaln a few hundred men,
women, and children ailll unable to Join their
tribes. Tbe deaths announced up to May I In
these iRwi-nnmed eatabllriQiiienui were ll,.!3"; lit
the religions Louses, 401; and In the hospitals,
22W, making a tolal ol 1U HSI.
The figure of llio e deceased outside oan only
be given approximately. In 1SII7 tue rholern
carried oil hooih KlMHXI persons. In 1S0S, down
io My 1, about. lll.KII. Add to ibexe figures
the amount of 1(1, !M nhove-ineiitioned, and the
Knerallotnl U 217,812. Huch ia the losn ooo
stoned by famine aud choieraln a population
01 a million of sculs. It must not bo to gotten
Dint before the famine there were In Algeria
2 500,(KiO Arabs, out of whom one million were
Knlijle I'.erberpH, who puppor'.ed tne oiIhIh of
IMJend 18K8 without loss. The Arabs of the
civil territory, 200,000 in number, have hail no
TlclttDs todeplor; and those of the Sahara,
1 0 01 0, have had no case of denth from famine.
The i-courKe baN theiefore fallen iiliiioit ex
clusively on the million of Arabs In tbe military
teirltoiy.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
f Jbr additional Hprcial Untirm ir the, infrte Poor
IKST" IN NATUKK'S GB AND CATUKpRAL
m---r flowt-M are in- cenHtrs, nut itielr miraure
Ih hrlel. 1 hat. of Plialon's uew lVrmme. " fc'lor tin
W ayo," nu'lasts tbe Hansons; it limln t lla.e: ex
ponuretoihe air adds to its ()illcoy.hu'. diie not
obllii-raie It. It can only be drowued out Willi soap
slid tn r. Polrt by a' I DnmulM. It
rr vvuKJiirs alconateo (jiaxh-uin
Tablet ot boildiiietl Ulycnrtn tends 1 1 pr-srve
the ftkln from dry liens ana wrinkle, impuru won
cerlnl deKree of softness and delicacy in t!ie com
plex lou, and whiteness to tne skin; Is an excellent
dentifrice, ciatniul to the taste and tonic to the
moiiih ana pnuis : Imparts sweetness to tlie
breath, and rendprs the teeth onnutifuily white. For
sale bv all driiKKtste. K. fc U. A. WRIUUT, N'. 124
CMKBMJT Btreat. 4
BANK OP NOKTII AM-EKICA
x' JlJLY . lm
The Directors have this day declnrpl a semi nnnu 1
Plvlntn" ol bKVKN AND A Ha LF l'KK (!KN t and
TWO AND A HALF PKR VKSV. hXTK A, maklDg
T N 1'B.H CF.fcT. payable on dpmaiiil
A'bii. a Dividend of THKKK "OU ItrilS PKH
t KNT.. belrn iheHiateTax tor IMS of Three Mills on
assessed vnlue of t&Aper Mi a re, winch will he pld to
the biate Treasurer lor account of the H'ockholders;
II. e lax being a den upon the 8 ock until pttd
7 6 41 J. HOCKt.KY, Cashier.
ITT OFFICE OF THK UNION PASSEN
OKK RAILWAY COMPANY, TWS.NTV
THIRD and BKOWN Streets.
FUII.AUBI.I'HIA, July 1, 18A8.
Tbe Board of Directors have This Day declared a
Divldeuo. of ONE DOLLAR AND FIl'Tlf OK NTS
rer share (clear of tax), payable al this Otllce on and
after WEDNESDAY, 15th Inst.
The transler book will be closed from Saturday,
Ilth, until 15th lust. W. II. KE5IBLE.
7 8 Ihstntit Treasurer
p-Jr OFFICE OF THE IUND IN HAND
Ml 'TUAL LI "K INsL'RAJSCli; COMPANY,
No. 112 S. FOUIirn Street. Jci.yH. I8S8.
Notice Is hereby glv-n that Hip Directors h ave this
dy Ctclared a dividend of TEN PKR CK.VT. on lbs
Capital Mock, w hli.li will be paid io the stockholdvrs
or their lesol representatives, on demand.
Ti e D rprtors have iso declared a dividend ot
Flit"! Y PF.K CKNT. on all parilc iatlnii Llle Policies
eliecicd previous to tbe first Mo idy In Seiita uor
lBt. 7im J ( PIXOX. Menretary.
fr3T OFFICE OF THE SECON'I) AND
THIRD 8TRKKT PAsSKNIIKR RAILWAY
COMPANY, NO. 2l& FRANK FORD ROAD,
PlIILADKM'KIA. July 8, llis.
The Board of Director have this day d-cUred a
dtvl end rfTWO PER ("EN I', on the capital st ick,
isyable on and after tbe 10th Ins' ant clear of tax,
to which date the transler books v III be cluxed.
7 9(1 F. Mr i'CIIKLI. CORNKLL. Treasurer,
irSST OFFICE OF THE FAMK IN rURANCE
COMPANY, NO. 4iBCrORUrtreet.
PhII.ADKI.PIII JiIIV 6, 1HS8.
Tbe Board of Tlrectors have ibis day declared a
D'vtdend of THRER PER CEN I'., payable ou de
maud, clear ot all tuxes.
WILLIAMS I. BLANCn AR.D,
7 $ Ct Secretary.
a-vgf" THE ENTERPRISE INSURANCE
COM PANY OF PtflnDELPulA.-OllUe,
No. -100 WALNUT Street, JULY , lsiis.
The Directors have tbls day declared a Dlvl tend ot
FOUR PER CENT, on tbe Cupilal S'oolc of In
Comtiary f"r the laut six mouths payable oadomaud
tree of all taxes.
7 6 I2t ALEXANDER W. WI3TER. Sec'y.
AMERICAN UOUSE, BOSTON. THE
T. kuK&T 1 t'-HT CLASS HOTEL INN E VV
ENGLAND Vertical Railways; Apartments will)
Baitilng aud Water conveniences couuecling, Bil
liard Halls, Telegraph Olllce, and Cafe.
Dm ihsxm LKWis KICE A HO Proprietors.
Kg" RARE MANUFACTURES IS FIXE
b Confections, for Tourists aud lor the Sea side.
STEPHEN F, WHITMAN,
7 3 rn4p No. 1210 MARKET Street
BANK REPORTS.
K2 NINTH QUARTERLY REPORT OF
a39 THE NATIONAL BANK OF THE RE
PUBLIC". Philaokcphia, July 6, lsiis.
RESOURCES.
Loans and discounts $1,193.702 92
tilted S'ates nonoadennshed
with Treasurer of United
States 5M OOO'OO
Hoods on hand... 1 one UU
Beal ebtate (prouucuve... Ui luS'SU
1.957,S6so2
irgol tender notes and cer
ttiiretes f41M75'00
National bauk notes 3U .621 (0
Fractional currency aud
bihUji.h........... 9,729-51
Premiums 0u2."t0
Due lrom other banks CH.IWH7
78Sii0'48
Expenses and taxes. , s.2isu-2l
t2 Sit WSS-21
LIABILITIES. '
Capital stock l.01l0)no
Circulation , 417 Sounu
HepoHltH l,S'Jl,ld4-A
Piofil aud Iomi 30 nil b
12 MID1H21
JOSEPH. P. MUMFOKlT;
7 7 luthtfit Cashier.
NEW THING IN ART,
BERLIN PAINTED PHOTOS.
A. S. ROBINSON,
No 9 0 CHESNDT Street,
Has Just received a superb collection of
B KU LIN PAINTED PUOTOfiKAPHS OF
FLOWERS.
Tbey are exquisite getus of art, nva'll.ig In beauty,
naturalness of tint, aud perfection of form a great
variety of the choicest exotic flowering plants. They
are mounted on boards of three sizes, and sold from
25reuti to 13 aud ft each.
For framing aud the allium they are Incomparably
heantltul a .5
E A Dl READ!
Siorting Goods at a Bargain.
The attention ot the trade aud public Is called to
tbe large assortment ot
Uuuh, rishiiig Tackle, ami other Snorlinj;
Goods,
AT NO. 400 t'HKNNITT SEKEET,
Which Is being sold at yery loir rates to close bail.
din, Bargains in Hue Ouns, Fishing Rods. Base
Ball and Cricket Implements can be bad, and the op
portunity should not be lost. Call at once, aud be
satiBlied as to our very low rates.
7bi C. B. WETCOTT.
J A T ATORIUM
AND PHTIICAI. INSTITUTE,
II ItO AD HTBEET, DHLOff WALNUT.
SWIMMING SEPAltTMENT.
Tbe only Hammer resort In our city, where people
takecomtort In lbs bo -test days, Is the N ATA TO.
1IIDM. tenon Bwluiminx Tickets, and Seaiiu In
ttrnctlon Tickets, n:e sell no? nr.u a acJuction ol
2f per Ctnt, i 3t4p
SUMMER RESORTS.
gUMUEB RESORTS
OW LINE OT PnTLADFLPITTA AND READING
RAILROAD AND BRANCH R&
MANSION UOUSE, JUT. CARBOS,
Mrs. Carotin Wnndsr, Pottsnile T. 0 Schuylkill Co
TUSCAK&RA HOTEL,
Mrs. M. 1m At liter, Tuscarora T. 0, Debar Ik 111 Oo
MANSION BOUSE,
W. F. Hmlty. Mahanoy City T. O., BohnylklU Oo
WHITE HOUSE,
K. A. Mees, Reading
ANDALUSIA,
Henry Weaver, Reading P. O
LIVING SPRINGS HOTEL,
Dr. A. Bmith, Werners vlUe P.O., Boots CO,
COLD SPRINGS HOTEL, ZWn Co.,
Cbar. Rodearmel, Box HO, Harrfcburg P.O.
DOJERTOWN SEMINARY,
L. M. Boons, Boyertowa P. O., Berks Oo,
LIT1Z SPRINGS.
George T. Grlder, Mtls P. O., Lanohater Or.
PERKIOMEN BRIDGE HOTEL,
Davis Longaker, Freelaud P. O., Montgomery Oo.
PROSPECT TERRACE;
Dr. James Palmer, Freeltnd P. O., Montgomer'
County. tu ara
JIIE CATS KILL JIOUKTALN HOUSE.
This favorite HUMMER RESORT, situated on the
CATt-KILL MOUNTAINS, State of New Yorx, and
commatidlng the Boost view In America, having been
recently eolargea, will be open from JUNS 10 to
OCTOBER I.
Terms, $450 per day, or $2800 per week.
B'age cotnect at Cau-klil with all of the Hudson
fl'er Railr-ad trains, aud the day boats from New
ork or Albany
A iso wlm the iitemhotB Thomas PoweM and New
Champion, leaving Pltr l, foot of FRANKLIN
Ptreet. New York, daily, at 5 P. M Paturdays at
P.M. 8 9 2roj CHARLES L. BE AOH. Proprietor ,
3 U R F HOUSE.
Atlantic Cit, New Jersey.
THIS FIRST-CLASH HOTEL will OOen for the
season on 25th JUNE.
Terms, f 3'60 per day, or $20 per week. Address
R. K. TH031im, Proprietor,
Formerly of Congress Mail, Cape Island.
N. B The music will be nnder the direction of Mr
CARL HKNTZ a 15 Bit
CONGRESS HALL,
CArE ISLAM), SEW JEIWE1,
Will receive guests June 23.
Terms $4-00 per day $2.v00 per week.
Flense address,
J. F. CAKE,
6 S tnthsJm
CAVir IPLAND.
"UNITED STATES HOTEL,
ATLANTIC CITY, W. J
W ilibe opened for the reception of guests on
HlII'Khtl, JUNE 27.
ilus under the diiecdon of Simon Hasslcr
Persons wishing to engage rooms can do so by ap-
Ji iOB iu
15ROWN & WOELPPER, Proprietors,
ATLANT'O OfTY or I
No. tct7 R1CHMONU Street
C 2 .1m
LIGHT-HOUSE COTTAGE.
ATLANTIC CITT, N.
This well-known house ban been REMOVED. R(.
MOhtLEU, aud very mnoh KNLAltiEU. wan com
moaiocand comfortable rooms.
Located be.wteu Uoi.ed Hiaua Hotel and th bpach.
T he grounds MirrotinOIng are f inely enciohud i.d
well shaded. On sis lor the house will leave Hie cur
at T). s. Hotel. ISO BAR.
6 12 Hi) JONAH WOTTTON, Proprietor.
PHILADELPHIA HOUSE, CAPE 18I.AN.,
N. J.. IB now oiien for the Summer season. Eiiiul
lies desiring a quiet home at tue mch shorn al a ni.ni
rate prre. will call on uraddrets E, UnlFFIl'II, No,
1104 I H RUN L T Stieet.
Attach) d to the establishment Is a line ot c iachs,
for the accommodation of attests. s it lni
THE TRPJIONT HOL'SK, CAPE MAY, Wil l
be opened on aui alter thu i'ouriu ot J.ily , i.jr
the season.
Terms 12 50 per day, or 5IS ner week.
UUMPHlltV HD8HHS
6 23 1m Propnet jr.
CLOTHING.
S1I0CKISU ACCIDEJiT 0 THEl'Ol UTl!.
Old Mr. Punk was fisiDg Lis gun, witL a
view to Laving it make some patriotic demon
strations of noise. He pointed the weapon to
wards himself, and Mrs. Punk somehow ot
other got the idea that it might go off and hit
him. So she pleasantly remarked in her
blandest tones: "There now, you old fool, it
you are going to shoot yourself, just make a
clean shoot of it, and don't mangle yourself
for me to he bothered with taking care of."
The unfortunate Punk's gun didn't happen
to go off, and he didn't get shot, and Mrs.
Funk didn't have the trouble, of nursing his
mangled remains, but he still lives, to buy
elegant, cheap, and durable garments, suitable
for Summer Wear, at the Great
DROWN STONE CLOTHING HALL
OF
ROCKIIILL & WILSON,
Nos. C03 aud COS CHESNUT STREET,
iliamip PHILADELPHIA.
pRANK CRANELLO,
TAILOR,
No. 921 CHESNUT STREET,
(PENN MUTUAL BUILDINGS),
HAVING SECURED THE SERVICES OF TII
FOLLOWING EMINENT ARTISTb,
JOSEl'lI TACKEY, on Coals,
EllSEST L. MUELLER, on Tauts aud
Vests,
ENTIRE SATISFACTION A8 TO STYLE AND
FIT IH FULLY OUARANI EE1).
bUlTS MADE TO ORDER IN TWENTY-FOUB
HQURM' NOTICE. 618 8m
QLOTHINC! CLOTHING I
EVANS & LEACH,
No. 628 MARKET STREET,
Respectfully Invite the publio generally Io call and
examine their EXTENBIVE blOCJK OF
SUMMER CLOTHING.
Parties requiring a Good Fit at LOW PRICKH, wit
ted, to Uteii ndvantat to Call on m, IU tbsialta
DRY GOODS.
JjA DJES ABOUT TO LEAVE THE
city tor vial' country home or the ea-ihora,
will find ft aT1"11? "ir advantage, before pu
cti.slDa tiMwhrftre, to exaaln
The Extomirf Stock, at Greatly Reduced
Trlcf, of
E. M. NEEDLES A CO.,
No; HOI CHESNUT STREET,'
GIRARD BOW,
roropiiarng a coinaleta auortraent lor proaM or
nouacbald tne, of
IUCFS. KMBROTD.RRTE3 BANDRBCORIKM
FTJFFKH REV H RH) ANC T Ui'K KU HUM
1JNH, CAMRRKH, JAJJNET6r,
PIQUKS, and W II ITS GOODS,
to every variety,
VEim AN VEIL MATERIALS Cf every (J,rr1p-
Hon, tegeiher with au extenaive asaortruetit or
HOUSEHOLD LIKEIJy
AT TEMPTING JPXIIOES
In .very vrldia and quality.
SniRTING.PILLOW.OAOF.SHKKTI'SG, TABL
LINENS. NAfKINd. DOVI.1ICH, FLANMui
DIMITIES FOR hPKKAKl, AND FTKNI.
TURK COVERS, MARSRILLK4. EOj
NEYCOMB, AND OTISHR HPRK DS,
TOWELS AND TOWELLING IN
DAMASK ANDBITUKARACK,
hUMMER RLANKRTS, TA
BLE UOVKR4. Kro. .
ALSO, SfiWRTING. PILLOW-OA8K AND SHI0HT
ING MUSUNa.
E. M. NEEDLES & CO.,
No. HOI OIIESNUT ST II KBIT,
tU
GIRARD ROW-
A PULL LINE OP COL'I) SILKS
IS CHOICE SHADES, AT 2 PBR YARTJ.
MKOBCB l. WIBHAMH.
G
PENED THIS MORNING.
ANOTHER CASE OF THOSE PLAU BILKS.
Black and While Plaids, i
Green and White Plalda, ll-12-Blueaud
White Plaids, ri2)v
Purple and While Plalda, tl'Wt.
One caHft stIU Richer, at 1 28.
WIIIAM' CHEAP TO Rib
I WILL OPEN TDIS MOItNINQ,
IRISH POPLENS IN CHOICK SHADES, FOB TH
SPRING OF 1883, at EO. D. WUnASfM.
EICHTH ST. EMPORIUM
FOR BLACK SILKS.
M White Edge, Heavy, only II 1,
Gro Grains, Heavy, only fi n.
8ro Grains, Extra Heavy, only tl
Lyons Groa Grain, Elegant, only 2 60.
Beat Makes from 12 SO to f6 per yard.
ALL THB ABOVE AT g tthataf r
WINIIAUf'M CHEAP SILK NTOBH.
QUEAT CLOSING OUT SAL I.
$10,000 worth of Summer Dress Goods, at
the Cheap Store of Eighth Street.
A. & J. II. 1URTII0L0MEW,
HO. IBS NORTH KIUIITU STREET.
Lawns reduced to close out.
a. , 1'!rc,e reduced to o!ose one.
Bareges reduced to close out,
. . WnUe woods reduced to close onb
White Pique rednced from al to 145 c-nw
While P que reduced iroui 7 Hi St cents.
PUiue worth 6icen s at H7H cants.
Plq ie worth 6 at bUcrnis
Beat fO cent Hique Iu I lie city.
Percale- w rth 7 ai 23 ceii's
62 cent Alpacas In Peuil, Buff, ttteel, and Blsmark.
at 4 cuits. to close out
Greut rcduu'ion to close out Plaid Muslins, S3, M,
87 to 50 cenli, cheap.
WE ARK CLOSING OUT CHEAP.
No. 16S North EIGHTH Htrnet,
emmtbset ABOVE B AGO.
TDIV1UND YARD & CO.,
Ko. C17 CIIESSUT STKEET,
Are clralng out their
Stock nYhile Gootls, Linens, Shawls, Etc,
BT AUGDSI' L
They Invite the attention of the Trad a. ( 24 lot
GROCERIES, ETC.
QHAMPAGNE8.
A Specialty in our Business.
A fresh Invoice of Cllquot, Boederer.G.H. Mnmm'a,
Jules Momm's.Heldselk, and Carte d'Or. Bold by oa
at the agenta' ulcts In New York aud Ballon.
ALSO, MOSELLES AND OCKS:
Longwoith's Sparkling and Dry Wines,
CL ABETS OF DIFFERENT GRACE,
And a choice variety ot SHERRIES, FINE BB IN
DIES, and COHDIAI S.
HUMS COLTON & CLAJtKE,
Importers of Flue Wines,
S. W. Corner BK0AD and WALJiUT Sts
616tulh PHILADELPHIA.
Af 'K-Jft. -THIS HKWr ItOMrKD Of.
IU Jr'KKevi-rtold Iu Pmiadelphia, at Wl I..H01M'al
old eaiaoiuhed Tea Warehouae, No. KM CilEaaUT
Street.
30
'F.T.N.-JOOO (TllONi HO ANTED
iOfltK at WILIOSCW,
No. I16CI1 E UT riireet.
IXIX CKS1M.-JAVA t'Ol'I'KE, IW LiUUK
OO OoverDn.entBa'g at WILMfU's.
IKUIlMtl IIIICHOKY, fOB MtKIXO
J Uutit-v ric auil sirong. For sale at Wl LWtJI'H
old established Tea Wa.ebouoe, fro. 1U1 CHKaNUT
street.
80
NTS I'K.lt POVND.-OOODNTMOBrO
UlVAlli. 1UA. ' WILSON'S,
No. 236 CHKoN U r Street.
K !VJK pi;hok AWKNE.IW1IBBKAK-
I Ak'I 1 K , at WILSO N Tea Waiehouae.
Ko.atCllhsKIJf Street
SIVTINVM FROM Tlli HI NTTKAS IN TII
t il V , lor sale to-day at W 1 UOM . 8 WliiiHum
CAPE MAY STEAMER.
P O U CAPE MAT.
On TUESDAYS. THURSDAYS, and
Ba I URDAYS.
The splenuld new steamer LADY OF THE LAKE,
Captain INGRAM, leaving Plar IB above Vine
street, every TuedUayl huraday. and Saturday at 1
A. M., and returuiuK fruiu Cape May on Monday,
WeuxeHday, and Friday.
Fake $2'2S, iuoiudlns Carriage Hire,
herviii la...l 60, " '
Children .. II- 6, "
beaaon Tieketa, ia Carrla;e Hire extra
Tbe Lady of I lie Lake Is a li ti sea-boal, has nk.
some slate-room accuuimi'dailoua. aud Is tilled up
with everythiua necetuiary lor the saleiy and ouiuitMt
Of panseugefs. G H. HOUUKLL.
CALVIN T AUG ART.
Ofllce-No. 8 N. DF.LA WA kK avenue. olaH
tEAPSESS. EVK1IY INflrKDMENT THAT
1 . . n L unlul ,n ...I.L LfaA
, auieuoB ana bkiii um -. --m
hearlnK Iu every degree ot deafueas; also. Reaplratora;
alao, Crandall s Patent Crntouaa, surxirlor to any
uiuer. U u.a, i P. MdmiidA. o, inu, Ul Mb A
lUvei,Sriof Chasnuk, I IM

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