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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, July 09, 1868, FIFTH EDITION, Image 6

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THE DAILY -EVENING TELEGRAPH PHILADELPHIA, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 18G8
4
Frequent DiToroc In New England.
JVorn the American Quarterly CAurct Review
for July.
jJo thoughtful man can behold, without
solicitude, the low grade of doineatio morals
which Beem to prevail to a large extent in oar
New England families. The general deoar of
pnblle sentiment in respect to family religion,
the practical neglect of the Holj Scriptures,
the infrequency of family prayer, the reluc
tance of parents to make their children obey,
the transfer of respoasibility for the manners
and morals of children from parents to publio
chool teachers, the common rudeness anl
arrogance of boys and girls, the great preva
lence of uutrutU amongst the young, the li
cense and familiarity of intercourse which is
allowed between the youth of different sexes,
the murder of living but unborn children, the
number of illegitimate births all these are
Buflioient to fill one with consternation and
dismay. To all these signs of demoralization
there is to be added one, which is closely con
nected with them, which fosters them, and is
fostered by them in turn. We refer to the
Tery great and alarmiDg frequency of divorce.
This has grown to be a portentous evil. It is
certaioly one of the moat siguilicant signs of
the real condition of our douwBtio life. It is
communicating a sad coloring to the whole
luner life of the people. It is working its way
from the lower strata of society upwards, and
exerting a decided influence in the control of
public opinion. Its progress is increasing,
and at the present rate, a time
eetms to be rapidly approaching when
the publio sentiment on this point shall
be almost wholly debauched. Lst we
thould seem to be only an alarmist iu this
matter, we will state some fact! wuioh will
fairly illustrate the progress of this social vice
amongst us during the last five year3. Nat to
be too tedious, we select our principal facts
from the statistics of the State of Vermont, as
furnished by its indefatigable Secretary. We
elect Vermont as being by geographical posi
tion the most secluded of the New liagland
States, the least affected by foreign immigra
tion, and by marriages of mixed nationalities,
and probably, with New Hampshire, the most
tenacious in maintaining the traditions and
Bocial morals of the early settlers. Vermont
is divided into fourteen counties, and for the
last five years the population has not mate
rially changed. We find, therefore, that for
the last live years the divorces are as
nearly as possible distributed as follows
amongst the counties: In Addison
county to every 1000 persons the number of
divorces is 1-1, and in Essex couaty, -S. To
the great honor, or rather less shame, of these
counties, this is the smallest proportion to be
ound in any portion of the State. In five
counties, Chittenden, Franklin, Windham,
Orarjge, and Caledonia, the divorces vary in
number from 15 to 1-7 to each 1000 people.
In Orle-aus and Rutland counties, they are 2 to
each 1000 people. In Bennington, Lamoille,
Grand Isle, Washington, and Windsor coun
ties, they number from 2 3 to 2-4 to each 1000.
For the year 1802 there were granted 91 di
vorces; for lb0:i, 105; for 11-04, 101; for 1SU5,
141; for 180'(i, 155; a sufficiently rapid increase
one would think, to alarm the most phlegma
tic mind; a steady increase from 1)1, iu 1802, to
355, in 18GG; the fifth year alone showing
an increase of 70 per cent. be
yond the first year. From another
point of view, however, it comes still
more closely home. Observe that these
divorces have been increasing, while the popu
lation of the State lia-t remained stationary.
The whole number of libels granted in the lat
five years amounts to 51)3. We have then 593
divorces to 315,098 people, or one divorce to
every 532 persons, llere, again, if we deduct
CO per cent, for the children and youth under
eighteen, we have one divorce to every 200
marriageable persons. And as there are two
parties to every divorce, there are two out of
every 200 marriageable persons, or one man
in every 133 men, and one woman in every 133
women, personally concerned in this witter,
liut perhaps a more startling view is derived
from a comparison between the last five years
of divorces, and the last five years of mar
riages. There have been, as we have said, in
five years 593 divorces. There is also an ag
gregate of 11,325 marriages reported during
the same time, which, however, it would be
fair to Btate at 11,400, so as to cover the
number of marriages not reported through ac
cident or carelessness. Compare then 593
divorces with 11,400 marriages, and we have
this result of 1 divorce to every 19 marriages.
Or, in other words, to every 3S persons mar
rird during the last five years, two are con
cerned in a divorce. We might add, that at
this rate there is a certain degree of proba
bility th&t during the next five years, two at
least, out of every 38 persons entering into
the married estate, will be divorced. If the
annual increase of divorces goes on unchecked,
the proportion will be still larger. Finally,
the prospect is very dark Irom another point
of view. The last recorded year of marriages
gives us the number of 2983 (call it 3000, to
compensate for possible errors). This is the
highest number of marriages in this State
in any one year. Now compare this with
the number of divorces, 155, for the same
year. It will be found that whereas, five years
ince there was less than 1 divorce to every
22 marriages, the latest yearly record assures
ns ot 1 divorce to every 19 marriages. It
affords but sorry comfort to reflect that Ver
mont is not alone in the melancholy retrograde
march of domestic morals in New Englaud. In
the State of Massachusetts, things are not
quite so bad, but bad enough, there being
duriog the last five years 1 divorce to 41 mar
riages, and during the last recorded year 1 to
27 marriages. The State of Connecticut shows
a record worse than Vermont. There, the
aggregate of five years of divorces to five
years of marriages is as 1 to 1 1, and during
the last year as 1 to 10. Neither the States
of M aine, Rhode Island, or New Hampshire
have collected full statistics. From the ob
servations we have made, however, and
from the information we have received,
we have no reason to Buppose that either
Ftate can give at the best, bo good a record as
Massachusetts. The estimated number of
divorces in the State of Maine for the last five
years is 950, which, in proportion to the popu
lation, gives one divorce to every 330 meu aud
Woin-n above eighteen years of Bge, placing
Maine upon a very little better standing than
Vermont. So far then as numt ers and calcu
lations can approximate to the exact truth,
the propped is dismal. We well remember
the astonishment and dismay expressed by
two persons who had been obliged to leave
the noithern part of Virgiuia at the close of
the war. When they learned the custom
amongst us in regard to divorces, they both
del laitd, lhat, In all their experience in that
part of Virginia where they lived together for
many years, and where one was born, they
heaid of but thrte instances of divorce, and
then it was invariably at the cost of the
reputation of the offending party and
here (said they) it seems to be' con
sidered only a trifle, and to be almost as
freely tontemplaUd and resorted to as mar
riage. Now what is the law and the practice
in New Kogland f Here again we take for
illustration the law of the State of Vermont,
which is almost identical with that of the
other five States, unless it be Massachusetts.
After Mating that on account of consanguinity,
or insn flitient age, or the idioay or lunacy of
f ne pf the j arties, Pf force oj jj-aui to
obtain consent, or of Impotency, marriages in
certain cases may be declared void from the
beginning; the law goes on to mention these
other causes for which the Supreme Court of
the eonnty in which one or both of the partiea
reside, may grant a divorce, namely: 1.
Adultery in either party. 2. The sentence of
either party to confinement in the Btate l'risou
for three years or longer. 3. Intolerable
severity by either of the parties. 4. Wilful
desertion for three consecutive years. 5. Seven
years' unexplained and Biient absence. 6.
Neglect of the husband to support his wife,
be having sufficient pecuniary ability. All
libels based upon either of these con
ditions, and proved, must be grauted by
the Court. And finally, section forty-two thns
declares: "Whenever a marriage shall be
dissolved, pursuant to the provisions of this
chapter, the parties shall be deemed single
and may lawfully marry again." Here, then,
the law ignores all distinction between separa
tion a men st i for the protection of suffering sub
jects of the State, on the one hand, aud di
vorce a vinculo, on the other hand. The latter
is the only mode of separation recognized in
these statutes as lawful; and in this Slate, and
all the New England States excepting Massa
chusetts, it is employed in all caaes without
distinction. Thus, while 184 bills of divorce
have been granted in Vermont for the last five
years for the cause of adultery, 409 bills,
givirjg exactly the same freedom as to mar
riage, have been grauted for various other
causes: as for wilful desertion 238, intolerable
peverity (exercised in some cases by the wife)
117, refusal to support 11, and for causes
not mentioned 43. The law of Vermont allows
the parties to al these 409 bills, which are
granted for some other cauee than adultery, to
marry again, as if there were no existing divinely-appointed
relations between them.
This estate of marriage is treated by the laws
of Vermont aud other New England States as
if it were never in anywise under the control
of Christ's law; as if its sanctity were a myth;
as if it were the sole creation aud ordinauce of
the State, and to be dealt with and rent
asunder as a simple affair of proletarian cou
veniance aud policy; as if its solemn contract
was hardly bo coercive as that which one
might make with his wood-sawyer; as if all
its vows, spoken and implied, were binding
only bo long as the caprice and humor of the
parties agreed, and then, to be put away with
a slight formality, and a new contract with
another entered into, as one would cast off
old garments, present them to a needy friend,
and reclothe himself in new apparel. Upon
this ground, therefore, we declare the law
prevailing in New England as to divorces, and
the practice under the law, to be treacherous to
lamily union, contrary to Christian morals, a
Bnare to the thoughtless and ignorant, an op
portunity to the depraved, an offense and sin
against the Divine law, and, in short, a
method of legalized polygamy. We cannot
attempt to dwell upon all the painful thoughts
to which this view of the subject gives rise.
The immorality threatens a beautiful and
favored portion of our common couutry with
a cloud of moral evil, scandal, domestic strife,
and debauchery. Families become unsettled.
The relation of husband and wife assumes the
form ot a bare partnership in business. Chil
dren lose their just inheritance of baptism, of
borne ties, of family name, and family honor.
The registration reports may record that the
number of illegitimate children in this State
average less than in England, but their num
bers would be fearfully increased should we
apply the eame laws here as there iu respect
to matrimony and divor e. Legalized divorce
is not known in Kogland as it is here. There is
but one cause acknowledged there which
can dissolve the marriage tie. Our phi
lanthropistsand our demagogues may in
veigh against Mormonirin, or they may
hold up to execration that repulsive feature
of the old Southern slavery which
held as nothing the matrimonial bonds be
tween the slaves; but here, in this free State,
the very same thing is done by freemen, and
is legalized by the law of the State, and we
Buppose there are men to be found who glory
in it, and view it as a sign of progress. Oue
of our clergy, who was for several years chap
lain to a haw England State Prison, came to
suspect that men might easily be victims of a
conspiracy to thrust them into the State I'ri
Bon lor three years or more, that their wives
might marry a preferred suitor. The dissolv
ing of home ties amongst the people is some
times most bewildering. We lately heard of
an instance of divorce, in which one of two
daughters, after the father aud mother sepa
rated, went to live with her mother's mother.
There she took her grandmother's surname.
Her mother afterwards married, and this
daughter then went to live with her, and took
the name of her mother's second husband, by
which name she now desires to be known, but
of course she is known by all the three name3.
In the meantime her sister went to live with
her father, who also married again, and she is
known by ber father's name. How can chil
dren under such circumstances retain any re
verence for home or domestic ties, or learn to
value them except upon merely mercenary
grounds ? The fact is, that although publio
sentiment revolts at the simultaneous poly
gamy of the Mormons, yet, in New Eoglaud
the course of things appears to be tend
ing towards that which moralists and
jurists call successive polygamy. Can we re
gard such things with patience? Ought they
to be allowed to poison our domestic aud social
life ? Is not the law and practice under it
viewed by the light of the Christian law, im
moral and corrupt f We pas to the third
point, the causes of this extraordinary fre
quency of divorce. These are not difficult to
describe. First, and before all, the cause
and provocation to many divorces is the very
facility with which they are obtained. It is
bo easy on account of weariness, incompati
bility of temper, longings for forbidden plea
sures, unsatisfied vanity, covetonsness, ca
pricious likes and dislikes, to obtain a legal
divorce, that it is obtained. That license
which would hardly be thought of, if abso
lutely prohibited, is readily seized, when
it is thrust into the hand, pressed
upon the mind, proclaimed to the
ear, and assured to possession by compliance
only with a slight formality. Human nature
cannot resist this temptation. The facility
with which divorces are granted, and the so
called freedom which it oilers to marry again,
present a most attractive bait to young,
thoughtless, shallow, vain, or desiguing per
sons. There is really nothing to hinder a fre
quent change of husbands or wives, as the
case may be. Those who enter into the mar
ried estate are always conscious that they
need not bear the yoke longer thau they wish
to. It can be thrown off by a slight artilice,
either by mutual agreement, or at the will of
one of them. Each divorce bows the seeds for
others. It is the town talk. The newspapers
give the often disgusting particulars, with an
unholy relibh. The men give the details of it
in the tavern, over the counter, and at the
noonday rest. The women gossip over it,
month after month, at their calls,
tea-drinkings, or sociables. The chil
dren Lear it discussed freely by their elders
at the daily meals, with comments and
details often that they should not hear. They
all, men, women, and children, Bee that it is a
legal act, frequently occurring, recognized by
the Statute Law, and accepted by the people.
They see the actors in it, and their children,
living in the same reputation as heretofore,
and they hear them extenuating and justifying
their course. Thty t ee the Supreme Court of
the county, which they have been trained to
regard as the very impersonation of jtntice
and dignity, sanctioning the dissolution of the
marriage tie. They see Justices of the I'eaoe,
perhaps, sometimes, Ministers of the Gospel,
uniting these divorced persons again with
others in holy matrimony. And what is the
result f What can it be, other thau the general
corruption of the publio conscience, and con
temptuous disregard for the appeals of the few
remaining fastidious, reverent, and religious
citizens.
One part of the remedy must be for the
clergy and laity both to educate the publio
mind and conscience as t the Bolemuity,
religiousness aud indissolubility of marriage,
and to endeavor to reform it. Another reme
dial means, wbich we may hope is generally
practised by our clergy, must be to ascertain
the facts when parties apply for marriage, aud
to decline to join in holy matrimony either of
two divorced parties, both being alive, except
it be the innocent party to a divorce, grauted
only upon the ground of adultery. Again,
the statute law of every State should, so far
as practicable, solemnize and dignify the estate
ol marriage, by preventing all hasty, secret,
illegal, and irresponsible marriages. In the
State of Vermont, as the law now stands,
since abolishing the publication of the bans, it
regulates only the age and degree of relation
ship of the parties, it forbids polygamy, it
names the authorized miuisteis aud pro
vides a form of certificate of marriage
when consummated. Besides this, there
is absolutely no law in Vermont on
the FtiVject. Men ' and women, known
and unknown, publicly and privately, at any
hour of the day or, night, without signature,
without witnesses, without identification,
clandestinely or otherwise, upon the bare im
pulse of the moment, or by deliberate plot
ting, are allowed to follow out any device or
desire which their own prudence, passion,
folly, or cunning may dictate. The law gives
no attention or respect to the subject which
tends to dignify and vindioate the true honor
or marriage. It affords the officiating minister
no protection against deceit or fraud. It does
nothing to identify the parties for the sake of
peace and good order of the community. It
gives the friends of the innocent and uusus
pectirg no opportunity to detect and expose
profligate designs. Is does nothing to secure
the family circle from possible invasion. It
simply ignores, as far as possible, the whole
subject. In these sentiments, we doubt not,
our readers most heartily concur. Should
not then the ttatute law of every State es
tablish "precautions aud protective for
malities" by which the parties to a marriage
shall be distinctly identified as citizens iu
their respective communities; by which their
intention of marriage shall be duly signed in
the presence of competent residents, and regis
tered by the proper officer; by which a definite
interval of time may be allowed after the re
gistration, witnesses required to be present at
the marriage, aud a certificate or license fur
nished for the assurance of the officiating
Minister of Justice, perhaps to be counter
signed by him, aud returned to the office of
the Town Clerk I 'these simple requirements
will procure creator respect for the union thus
solemnized. They will put no bar to the mar
riage of any honest citizen, whatever be his
rank or station; they will protect the com
munity to some extent against the misfortune
of ill judged, hasty, clandestine, and
perhaps criminal unions; and by thus
elevating the views ot the people as to mar
riage, they will contribute, it is hoped and
believed, to lessen the number of divorces.
And finally, efforts shall be made, all good
men united, and the publio sentiment aroused
where practicable, to procure such change in
the law as shall prohibit the dissolution of the
marriage bond except only in case of the adul
tery of one of the parties; increasing also, if
need be, the pains and penalties incurred by
adultery; and in special cases of hardship au
thorizing separation, if necessary be, a mensa
et tltoro; leaving the way open to tuture recon
ciliation of the parties, but absolutely re
fusing permiscion to marry again while both
the parties live, and treating all such marriages
as criminal.
One Year of the Kcw Dominion.
FVomj the Montreal H'ltnt us, July 3 J
Our Dominion is now a year old. How does
it work i. Iu Cauada we have appointed for it
a day of rejoicing, liut has our rejoicing
been the bounding pulse of national life, or
simply the comtort ot being olt work on a hot
day f Every one can now judge for himself
whether the feelings drawn forth by such an
occasion are closely akin or not to those
manifested by our neighbors on the 4th
of this month, or by ourselves on the
Queen's birthday. Young Canada, at least,
should feel this consciousness of national
life, if there were anything to draw
it forth; but, wanting thin, the sentiment
seems to be but shallow. Most people seem
to look upon it as a matter chiefly interesting
to the political schemers with whom it origi
nated. Very different is the state of affairs in
Nova Scotia. There tbey grind their teeth in
voluntarily whenever the word confederation
is mentioned. The state of feeling is described
by well-informed people there as being too
deep for utterance; and, as it takes the form
of a wide-spread and deep-seated movement
toward annexation, it is not to be wondered
that public expressions should be much
more guarded than private ones. That
a stoiiu is brewing there seems very
likely to be an established fact before
next Dominion Day. The desire of Great
liritain to preserve the loyalty of her colonial
subjects, aud the integrity of her empire,
whatever it may amount to, appears to have
been of late smothered among what were to
Englishmen weightier matters, and theadvo
cate for a betrayed l'rovince could be feund
but in Mr. liright, an acknowledged revolu
tionist, who, it is possible, would object very
little to the annexation of all the Provinces to
the United States. It is to be hoped that wis
dom, if not justice, will prevail among our own
legislators, and that, instead of denying the
most patent facts, they will set themselves
to conciliate by liberal measures the affections
of their lellow-oitizens so grievously outraged,
and save their pet scheme, and us as a people,
from irretrievable ruin.
The lobster factory at Englishman's
River, Maine, is putting up about 3000 lobsters
a day. It has taken in over 90,000 already.
About three tons of the refuse are thrown out
from the factory each day, which the farmers
are using to enrich their laims.
LEGAL NOTICES.
IN THE DISTRICT COURT 0? TtIR
.1 UNIT M 8'U'i'Ki) kOR THE EASTERN DJ.6
TBlCT OF l'NbVLVAl4.
IN BNKhtPTCy.
The undersigned hereby gives inn ire or his appoint
ment as Assignee of KVAN DALHYMPLK. of (tie
ci y ol Philadelphia, county of Philadelphia, aud
Siaieof penutyivania, within Bald Dlnnci. who lia
been arjudged a bankrupt upon hl own pelUlou, by
the District Court uf said District.
JuHN ROUKRTH. Assignee,
.No,.l: M. SIXTH ntrewf.
lift' 0(1 at Philadelphia, June 24. IH'iS. H27alulhaw
T ETTEKS TESTA 11 KNTAHV UPON THE
J J KHale or 1'A R TH EN I A MASOV, deceased,
having been granted to the undersigned, all persons
In debt to Hie asld fcstate are ru,uemed K uiake pay
ment, aid those having Calais until ml Hit) same to
Jiresent I he in wliliout delay to N A 111 AN S. BKltK
.EY, Executor, No ii, N, WAlJkrt sjmtt ( ilMi
SPECIAL NOTICES.
OFFICE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
(OMPANY
Philadelphia, May IS, lass.
NOTICE TO BTOCKHOLDJCU8.-In pursuance Of
resolutions adopted by the Board ol Directors at a
stated meeting held this day, notice Is hereby given
to the Stockholders of this Company, that tbey will
have the privilege ol subscribing, either directly or
by substitution nnder such rules as may be prescribed
therelor, for Twenty-five Per Cent, ot additional
Stock at Par, In proportion to their respective Inter
ests as they stand registered on the books of the
Company, May 20, 1668,
Holders of lens than four Shares will be entitled to
subscribe for a full share, and those holding more
Shares than a multiple of four Shares wUl be entitled
to an additional Share.
Subscriptions to the new Stock will be received on
and after May 80, 1S68, and the privilege of subscrib
ing will cease on the loth day of July, 1HS.
The Instalments on account of the new Bliarc shall
be paid In cash, as follows:
let. Twenty live Per Cent, at the time of subscrip
tion, on or before the 30th day of July, lfcGS,
2d. Tvtenly-flve Per Cent, on or before rue lstb day
Of December, 1868.
8d. Twenty-five Per Cent, on or before the lGth day
ol June, 1R69.
tb. Twenty-five Per Cent, on or before the 15th day
ot December, 18ii, or It Stockholders should prefer
the whole amount may be paid up at once, or any
remaining Instalments may be paid up In full at the
time of the payment of the second or third Instal
ment, and each luntalment paid up, shall be entitled
to a pro rata dividend that may be declared on lull
Shares. THOMAS M. FIRTH,
1 14 llw Treasurer.
rT" PHILADELPHIA A5D READING
BA1LROAD COMPANY. OUlce No. 227 S.
FOURTH Hi reel. Philadelphia, May 27, 1K68.
NOTICK To the holder) of bonds of the PUILA
DKLl'llIA AND KKADINO RAILROAD COM
PANY due April 1, 1S7U.
The Company offer to exchange any of these bonds,
of tlOXO each, at any time before the (lati Hrst day of
October next at par for a new mortgage boud of equal
amount bearing Beven per cett, lntere t, clear of
United States and State taxes, having twenty-live
year to run.
The bonds not surrendered on or before the 1st of
October next will be paid at maturity, In accordance
with their teuor. S. BfiADFOKl),
S281U1 Treasurer,
PHILADELPHIA AND READING
T1A11.Ui.A1J COMPANY.
PiiiLaiiki.i'HIA, Jane 25, 1S68,
niviiiKM) isuriciu.
The Transfer Buokn ol ih is Company will be closed
on '1 UKMJA Y, June 30, aud be reopened on I'llUttS
DAY, July 16, IHl.H.
A dividend of IVE PERCENT, has been declared
on Lie Preferred and Oouin.on btock, clear of na.l.jnal
and Slate tax, uavabie on Common SUjck on and
alter JUDY 15 to the holdeis thereof, as they shall
maud regiHiered on the booko of the Company on the
EU u instant. All payuo eat in in ouicp.
66 2iu b. BKADt'OKD, Treasurer.
UY ORDER OP THE COURT OF
COMMON I'Dfc.AH a slock vote ot itie MEK-
CANTII.K D1BKAKY COM PA N Y will be taken OO
tlm fnimwinu iriinised auit nduienl to the Ch trier:
Section 5 Tlie Board of Dlrecuire shall nave full
nower to make and alter such Kules aod llylasas
tin y may deem necessary lor the weli-belug aud ue
niaiiugemeul or ine anairs 01 me company: noviueu,
ni'li I lawn are not reuunnant to nor iuconslneut
with this Charter, er with ine Constitution aud laws
01 i iiia pta e or oi tue uniiea mates.
Tim nnlla will be ouened In tbe LIBRARY, on
MONDaY.Jul' 6. and coned HATUkDaV, J.ily 11.
The hours lor voting will be. on Mond.y. Wednes
day, aud Friday, Irum 10 A.M. to 2 P. M aim on
Tuesday, 'Jburnaay. ana etaturuay, irom n r. ai.
The vole will ba by ballot, each snare ol at'ick being
emliled to one vote, which muai be pi vaunted lu
persun.
JOHN LARDNRR, Becordlng Secretary
Philadelphia. July 1, IbM. 7 2 Jt
KJSf BATCH KLOR'S HAIR DYE. THIS
splendid Hair Dve la the nest In tue wo Id;
the only true and perfect !ye: harmless, reliable,
li stauianeous; no dlxappotn intent: no ridiculous
unu; lemeoies ine ii i etiecis or oau uyes; luviKorawn
and lei ves the Hair noli and beautif ul, black or brown.
hoia by all Druvglfts and Perfumers; and properly
appll.dat Bachelor's wig Factory, No. is B0.4D
bireei, rtew lorn. tiuiwi
PRINCIPAL DEPOT
tOB TBI BAL Of
UNITED 8TA1ES REVENUE STAMPS
I Jo. S04, OIIE8NUT Strat3
CENTRAL DEPOT
No. 103 South FIFTH Stt'
I One door below Obesnnl street),
ESTABLISHED 136 3S.
onr stock comprises all tue denomination prl Ue
by the tioveruiueui.
ALL ORDKR8 FILLED AND FOHWA RLiiD BY
Mail or txpnuba immki'Iatkly UPOitf UK
CelPTi a matter of great Uupurtauce.
Drafts on Philadelphia Post Office Orders, arena
backs, aud National Bank Note, received lu pay
meuk Thetollowlug rates ot oommiaalon are allowed
Ou .-..TWU Pa.R CJM1
From 10 luu............ ...FOURl PUR CH1NT
From (1UU upwarUa...FUUi. aMD A HALF tMJi VI
Tbe (Commission Is pavablu in stamp.
All orders, etc, should be addressed M
TAMP AdEtlCI,
No. SHOO. GIIE8NUT Sti-esvt
paiLABKLPBIA.
OP.DJDR8 RECEIVED FOR STAMPED CHECKS
IlKAl'lt), Kf CltlflH, BILL H HAMJ, jLtO and lut
best ates ol commission allowed.
We have constantly on band
UNITED STATES POSTAGE bTAMPS OF ALL
KINDS, AND
.GOVERNMENT SALES.
OFF1CK AKT yUARlKRM ArfTKR
UNITED bTAljLB AllMY. j. lUJUlktAHU
buret.
I HI!. DELPHI A, JlllV 1, I IMS.
Will be told at nilollc nnnLli.n mi HA I'IJKDaY. the
lllh Instant, at II o'clock, A M., oi thn prsuiitcg
lately orcuplrd by h Army Me 'leal Drrtmiit,
situate on the i side of Smh MrenL aimve nxiard.
in in is a ly, an iae lanres.siieds, and materials siMied
mrrcon y mi i n itn Mates.
'1 be ahovv-unnird nntennH will bn si ld In one lot,
and the burcbaxer wl I be allowed until th 8 1st to
remove ilie came, after winch date the around on
which lliey are situated will bsturuou over to the
owner.
1 KHMK,-Ten per cnt. or the pnrci mony to
he ttald In ranh st the time of nccentaucs of bid:
balance 10 be psid wi'hlu five days.
Any additional Iniormallou Ueairea win oa iur
nlsbed by the nuderslatied. r.rr-
7 t Bvf. CM and A. Q.'.M." U. JntV.
SAi.B OF CONDEMNED feUUSISTUNCli
kiokm.
Civic. Cuntr Cowmissaut or Brn'tsTKycs). )
District Indian Tkmkitohv.
tour Oinsox. C N.. June II, IH't3. )
At public anctlou, at Fori (1II-,oii, Cnerokee N inn,
en li e 1Mb day ol July, lhhs, at 8 o'clock, a, M., eou
elbtuKo': . mn
in? barrels of Flour.
6KI pdunns of boda Crsrltprs.
16tallon Ci riitnber Pickle
4Tii gallon fahbHiiP and Union Pickles,
If., gallons Id Ixeo Pickles.
& gallons Unions.
Si KKllons eauer Krttt.
The ahove sioies to be sold without reierve, to th
hiKhem b dder. , .
Terms- Cash, In Oovernment funds, on dy or ale
Ti e Mirrsiul bidders to rtinove stores wuniu
tweuly-lntir hours.
Hi order ol MaJorOeueral PJierKan.
A. F. lilH kWHI L,
Brevet T leut Col A O. M . U M. A.,
?! Ct lef Q. M. anf C. H.. lilst. Ind Ter.
SALE OP CONTEMNED QUARTER II AS
lEK'tt PBOffcHTV.
Orrii-c Chikf Quartrrmartbr,
DlHTHICTOF TH K IMHAN 1 tHKI IUHV, V
FIHT UIIIKIIN. C. N., Jun- II, INtiS.J
At Pub'Ic Auction, at Korl Uibsn. Cherokee Na
tion cohbImIiik ol llosplial and mherT not, Clothing,
I'.iankeis. HHrjiets, Army Wssnns, Wagon Covers
I'm kirc UtennilH, Flans, and niininrntiH oilier arti
cles, ail to be sold without reserve to the highest
buiCer.
hale to Iske plsre at FnrtGlnsnn, C. N on the 15th
dav of July, luis at 8 o'clock A. M.
Tern's Cash, iu Goverumeut lunds, to be paid on
day of sale.
f-uriensinl bidders to remove stores within twenty
four hours.
Jjy Older ot Mnjor-Oeneral Sheridan.
A F. BUCK WELL,
Brevet Llfntenart-Colonel, A. 4. M., I). . A.,
I jib 6t Chief 11 M.. l'IMrict ludian Territory.
OVERNEVIENT,
PROPERTY AT PRIVATE SALE
TIttttttvto rn
fi n ivir tv, iju.
TKiVfH. frUl I'AKLK FUH HPUIITINU PU Kf-oKS,
AND HILDKh N'ri LAWN TKNTS. AWN1NJ-.
FARSK. bADDLKS. UORbK HHF.WiH. tLY
Tm, kto. pit IT IN CO..
6 18 thstuim No 71 North 6KOOND Mi reet.
SHIPPING
ffffs FOKCHAhLKSrOS DIUfiCI
Ji4LiL.8!t Binship PKU.Mh.l H KIM Is nov
r.-THE
now loading
ai c. pe s wharf, font ol WALNUT street and will
positively sail maTUKDAY next, 11m Instant, at.10
o click A. M f or freight, apply to
K. a SOI'DF.R A CO.,
?74t No. 8 DOCK Ktreet Wnar'.
Troll BOSTUS-VIA NKWI'OUT AND FALL
KlVJi.lt.
Tbe BO&'l ON and NEWPORT LINE, bv the splen
did and superior Hteamers NEWPORT, METRO
FOLlw, OLD COftONY, an1 K M PI K it BTATK.of
great atrenglh aud speed, cons'ruoted expreaslv tor
the navigation of Loug 1-land Sound, running In
connection with tbe OLD COLONY AND NEW
PORT RAILROAD. -4
Leave rin.u -in, rutuu iiiv.it, root or ALUR
RA Y HI reel.
Tbe steamer NEWPORT, Captain Brown, leaves
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, at 4 P. M., lauding
at Newport.
1 he steamer OLD COLONY. Captain Simmons,
leaves Tuesday. Thursday, aud Saturday, at 4 1 M.,
lamilUK ai leworu
Thee steamers are fitted np with commodious
state-rooms water-tight compartments, and every
arrangement lor the securi 'y and comfort of pansen
ei rs, w ho are afforded by Kits route a night's rest ion
board, and ou arrival at SEW OR T proceed per rail
road again, reaching Boston early ou the following
morning.
A baggage master Is attached to each steamer, who
receives aud tickets the baggnge, aud accompanies
tbe mme to Its destination.
A steamer ruusln connection with this linn between
NEWPORT and PRO VXDENCK dully, tsuudays ex
cep. ed.
rel ht to Boston Is taken at the same rates as by
any other regular line, and forwarded with the great
eat expedition by an express train, which leaves
N KV, PORT every uiortiii k (Sundays excepted), at 7
o'clock, lot BiiHton and New Bedford, arriving at lis
deMlnatlon about It A. M.
Fer freight or r assage, apply on board, or at the
offlre. on PIER 28, NOR! It RIVER. For mate-rooms
and berths apply on hoard, or It It Is desirable to so
cure itaem In advance. ftLKFJ1thJtt Agt.
817 Ha. 72 B HO AD WAV New York.
SAFETY, SPEED, AND COMFORT.
H U K T H E i; REDUCTION IN PajWaUh.
KATEt.
Favorite passenger steamers ot tbe ANCHOR LINE
sail every f A'l t' HLA Y with pas engers lor
LIVEFPOOb, OI.AMIOW, AN I' DEIUIT,
from Pier No 2u Norih River.
Bates of passage pa able lu currency.
To Liverpool, ulagow, and Derry, .cabins 90 and
$76, according to local Ion.
xctirslon tickets, good for twelve months, f 160.
Intermediate, Sd; bteeragn i-'i.
Prepaid cerllbctes Irom tbeae ports. tfi.
Paseengrs bonked to and from Hamburg, Rotter
dam, Antwerp, Havre, etc at very low rafw.
or further Information app.y at the Company's
Otlice, No. SBOWLlNO OmJiKN. New York.
HKNUKR-ON BltUlUKRS.
loavctd Imposition, paaeng-rs will please come
direct to the office, aa this Company does not employ
runners. iM
LONDON AND NEW YORK STEAMSHIP
A.INK
Passage to London direct, '110,(75. and $10 ourrency.
Excursion tickets at reduced rates available for 8
mouths.
A'l ALANTA.
BKI.LONA.
CELL A.
V M. PENN.
Freight will be taken and through bills ot lading
given to Havre, Antwerp, Roliero am, Aiualerdaiu
and Dunkirk,
Forp esase apply to ROBERT N CLARK, No, 26
BROADWA Y, New ork.
For freight aoply at ro. H SOUTH street, 17. Y.
taetl WOW LAND A AHUNWALL, Agents.
CMJNAKD LINK OF EXTRA STEAMERS',
J BETWEEN NEW YORK AND L V a. Hl'OOL,
CA1 LINM AT QUKEN-tTOWN.
FROM NEW YORK EVER WK.DNE3DAY.
TRIPOLI. ALEPPO,
RATES OF PASSAGE:
Cabin $!)o Gold.
bieemge lb Currency.
tteeiage tickets from Liverpool or Queeustown at
lowest rates.
For Freight and Cabin PassBge, apply at No. i
Bowling Green.
For bteerage Passage, apply at No. 69 Broadway
a2t cusard.
o
NLY DIRECT LINE TO FRANCE.
THE OKVFR L TRANS ATI A NT IO COMPANY'S
MAIL tT E A Mt H 1 1'.-H HKTWKhjN NEW-YORK
AttD HAVRE. CAf LINU AT BrkKitT.
The splendid new vessel on this favorite rooto for
the Coullueut will sail from Pier No. to NOR F ti
River:
a I'uLFONh, Leraarle
Pr HE1RK.... Duchesne
VlLl.E 1E IMRlo Suriuont
ST. LAURENT Btcaude
PRICE OF PaSSAOE in bOLD (including wine),
TO JBHEsT OR WAV E.
First Cablu. $16o or 4jM; Mecoud Cabin $83.
TO PARIS,
Including Pallway Tickets, furnished on board,
Flint Cabin, $IU5or $I4; Hecond CaliHi, $.
Ttute iftiimti i fo not carry ttffruil'patunuei i.
MkIIi ai attendance free ol charge.
American travelers going to or ro urnlng from the
Comment of Europe, by taking the s earners of this
Hue, avoid unnecessary rlakH from transit bv Englinh
raila)s and crosalng the channel, besides saving
time, trouble, and eit-nn.
tEO. MACKENZIE. Agent.
t26t No. 68 Jl ROADWAY.
IJOD LA NDl CEMETERY CO M PAN V.
1h loi lowing lnabvrs and OlilOcra have
been eltcied l r the year iw.H;
Wm. H, Mooie.
r.l.i n, rule., i-resmeni.
Wm W Keen.
Huniuel h. llnuu,
(il'iitfc ialleu,
Ferdinand J. ureer,
Oo'.rge L liusuy,
l-err.lai v unit Treannrer- .IU4 H ToWNSRVD.
j.r win urf Ole,
It. A. King
The Kianeuera have passed a rennlii Ion requiring
both I.otbi Idrrs aud VlMU.rs to preseut unset at 'he
etiliance lor admission to the Cemetery. Tiikn
may be bad al the otlice of tbe Company, No 8g
ARt II tret. or of any ot Hie Managers, 7 ij
piTLERf WEAVER & CO..
MANUFACTURERS Of
MANILLA AND TARRED CORDAGE, CORDS
TWINES, ETC.,
No. 23 North WATER Mireet. and
NO, 22 North DELAWARE Avenue.
! PHILADELPHIA.
EDWJM H. FTTLKB, MK'HAIL Wbavkb.
CvamaJ) 7. Clothjkjk. Hi
SHIPPING.
iTfrfr8TEAM TO LIVERPOOL, CALLISG
5'..t!;ifei2i AT QUEKN9TOWN.
Btaies aud British uoverumenis, for carrjlng the
I1TY OF BALTIMORE.. -..Batnrdar. Jnlv H
an min.
El NA (Via lanix).. nonnay, July is
11TV Of jiusiun - naiurnay, juiy is
CITV OF ANIWKhl' Saturday. July 2
CITY OK NF.W YOR4(Tia Halifax) Tuesday, Jnly ti
CU T tir rAHiw ...aswrnay, August i
I'l'lY OF LONDON Matnrday. Aagust
and e.ch sun eeaing Haitimay ana alternate stonaayj
at noon, from l'ler rno. is AUiii'H itiver. .
xa'is of passage by the MU Steamer SAttiUtu
tViKr BAl UIlltAJl- . . .
Paynole In Oold. Parable In Ourrency.
first Cabin $lon steerage,
to London lsr
to London.,
" to Paris 1 ml " to Paris...... SO
Paesnsehv the Mnnitat aiamers: Cabin. S90 goldj
(steerage. 1x5. current. It n ten ot nasaue from Newi
York to Hal. fax Cabin, $ir. Steerage, $10, lo goldJ
i a sengers also lorwarned to Havre, Hamburg, tire
uieii. eic , at moderate rates, pteerage pessage iron
Liverpool or Uoeenntown. ttu. currency. TlcKeia cat
be bought here by persous sending tor their nTlendrj
r or luriuer lulormation, "Pl"y at me uompany
tuico, jwt.i i, uauh Agent,
No. 15 HKOAUWAY, New York,
Or, O'DONNEI.L A FAULK, Managers,
12 vj No. 411 CHKSSUr Street, Phiia,
rvffTs NORTH AMERICAN STEAMSIIIlI
Sbioufrt List to Callfarsklai via PimdJ
llallcaad.
NEW AR-tANOKMENT.
Pall'nc from New Yo. k on t-e 6th and soth r'
EV lAi JIuiSTii.Of the key belore wuto tuesedae
lar on Bniioay.
ssage lower than by any other line.
For Inroim.tlou 'Ioi--bs
D. N. ". RflNOTON, Ant.
Pier Ne. 4NOIU K MVKK New York,
Or 1 HUM AH H. Hb'A RLE,
No. 217 WAt.N U f Klreet. I'biluilel, hla. fm.
W. II. WEBB, l-rvvden'. vill AS. OA N A, VlcPrH
Ulllcr-tl .Xt'H A NHK Pine .New York. 18ua
-firrsv passaok to and from gekai
mUA.&- blUIVil.N AMI IRKLaND
liV o!EaMH IP A is II halliiMt PACKET,
A l' RK.lit L'f.D nA I KS.
DRAFTS AVAILABLE THRvlUOHOUT FIft
LANI-, IIIKI.AMI. M.O'i'LAMt.ASU WALES.
Fur particular apply to
Ta P -CO 111". BUOTHEitH A CO.,
No. 86 bOUTU Street, and No. 24 HHUM-WA Y,
Or to l it. MH T. SKARLB,
II N 217 W A LN UT T)truet.
NEW EXPRESS L1SB TO ALE'S
Jtinb. audria. tuuruelou n. and WashiiictniJ
ii. c. vm Liiesnpeaxe anu uetaware ca iai. with con
nectlonsat Alexandria Irom tbe most direct rout
lor L nchuurg, ttrtstoi, Kuoxvlile, Nauhvhle, Daltoi
anu uie oouinwesi.
Steamers leave regularly from tbe Art t wharf Abo"
juarsei street.
Frelghtteclved dally. p CLYDE A CO.,
No. 14 North and S iiuh Wuarves.
J. B. DAVIDSON, Agent at Georgetown.
M. ELDRIDUE A Co., Agents at Alexandria, VI
gii-ia. i
fPfK NOIICE.-FOK NEW YORK, VI
bmUuDIImWAIIK ANU KARITAN UiNAi,
The hteaui PronellerH lit' tlila HnM will n..i..manf
loading on SA1 UiiDA Y, 20th lnslaut, leaving dull
no uaum.
THROUGH IN 24 HOnBH.
Goods forwarded by all the Hues going ontofNe
o'i. BiTin, mv, uiu r est. rree oi coiumisotun,
ireighls received at our usual low rates.
WILLIAM P. Ci YDE A CO.. Agents
ro. 14 .. WHARVES, Philadelphia.
JAMFS HAN U, Agent.
xo. nv a jjL bireei.. corner oi noum, iNew xor
' PHILADELPHIA. UICIIMON
tZ AND NRhULK STEAMSHIP LINE.
'IhltOlUll FREIGHT All LINE TO TH
Wlilit AKU wtsr,
EVKKV H4TI!RIAV.
At noon, from FIRST WHARF above MABKM
Sirtel.
THROUGH BATES and THROUGH RECEIPT!
iu an poins iu xorin auu ou.n i aroi ina. via fee
uoaru Air Line nauroail. concec.ing al JPortsajoui
aud lo Lyucbbnrg. Va. . Tennessee and the Wu.i
Virginia aud Tennessee Air Line and Rlcnmond ail
xniiviiie janroau.
Freight HANDLED BUT OCE, and taken.
low Eh Raim than any dth ir.it. i.ikj
Tbe regularity safety, aud cheapness of this ron
cctnmeiiU It to the l unlic as tun most desirable m
dium for carrying eveiv descrlotinn ol Ireiuht.
No charge for commission, drayage. or any expenJ
vi nimirr,
Steamships Insured at lowest rates.
Irtlght received dully.
WILLIAM P. CLYDE A CO.,
No. 14 North and Somh WHARVES.
V
w. p. PORTER, Ageut at KlcUmoud and Cld
ITlllt.
T, P CROW ELL A CO., Agents at Norfolk. R 1
FOR NEW YORK-SWIFr-SURl
C ti at, on and niter lue Stli ot March, leaving daily i
12 M. mid s . M.. coaneoilug wiiii all IS or Hi em hi,
For lrelwlit. which will he taken on nocommodatl
Lorma uim xr t.n UMI.l.l A ti M lUIIMt Afvt
1 lj r-'o. l;t2H. UKLAWAltK Avenue
LORILLARD'S OUISIDE LIN
FOR NEW YORK.
UntAl REDUCT1UN IN PHKKIHTft.
Goods oy weh hi. u ueuis per 100 lbs gruss.
Measnremenl goods. 4 cenLS nr nuh.n lout.
Freights received al all limes, and Insurance god
Rn .rru ti, iiiier-VIKUUia Jer cent.
For further lnfurmalluu, apply to
JrtfTV V OTTT.-
7 22 Her 19 North WharvesJ
LIVERPOOL AND GREAT WESIURN STfiA
COMPAAt.
t he following FIRST CLAS8 IRON 8TE AMSHIM
duiii espresso lor ineisew Yoig trade, ara Intend
torall regulaily between NEW YuRK aud LIVE
ruuu, L-aniuK i viicsADluwAi viz :
M A N H A 1 TAjx , MINNESOTA,
COLORADO, NEBRAMKAT
with other first-class steamers building.
From Pier No. Hi Kaxt kii.r.
CaMo (the accommodaitous being equal to any I
t'Bjjw .iraiuoi , guiu, return iicxeis, siov, goiu:
bttfi.g, ti& cinreiicv.
'iaia to bring out passengers from Europe ca
be (limliied op reasonable terms. For freight or yu
sage !i"y
WILLIAMS A OUION, No. 71 WALL Street.
j;or Bteerage passage in I'ias
VILLIAMS A GUlON.No. 29 BROAD
WA1
STEAMBOAT LINES.
BRISTOL LIN
BETWEEN SEW YORK AND B0ST01
VIA BRISTOL,
For PROVIDENCE, TAUNTON. NEW BEDFOfl
CAPE COD, auo ail points of railway cou.iuuni
tlou. Eaai and North.
'J be new and splendid steamers BRISTOL a
PRuVlDENt E. leave Pier ISO. 4u NORIH R1VW
fool of .auai Ktreet. adlolulug Debraaaee street rer
New org, al 6 P. M. uallv. buudaya exoepted, cj
netting wnn sitaniooai tram at uriaoi at sn a. i
arriving In Boston at ( A. M.. lu time to connect w
all the iiiornlug trains .rom that city. The most i
airaole auo tileaaut rou e to the WhI'e Mountal
Travel ers lor tnat point ran mike direct cona
tlons by way of Providence aud Worcester or B sti
(Mate-rooms and Tickets seemed at otlice en Pier.
New (irk. 1
6 1 6m H. O. BRIOOS, General Manager
OPPOSITION TO MONOPOLY!
AUC AtttUDr Will IHIV9 ANl
Street Wharf, rluladeluh la. for Wilmington, dal
at !( A. M and 4 P. M.j returning, leave WlimlugJ
lor fiiuaueipuia. iv a. ju. abu t r. m.
bUUCVD SATK8 OF rAUIO-
From Wllmlngiou to Philadelphia, 2UO.
From Chester and Hook lo Philadelphia, 100.
From Philade phla to WllmliigKin, 2oc
From Chester and Hook lo Wilmington, loo.
round trip tickets, u cent's,
For further Dartlculara Ina u Ira on board.
L. W. BURNS, I
28tf Captaif
(w'iTJTJ. FOR CHESTER, nOOK, A
swaiiti i rv
r'iLMINU 1 UN At 8 80 aud U 60 A
The sUau-er'S, M. FELTON and ARIFL lei
OlX-NUT btreet v harf (aluudays exceu edi at
ami 0'6o A. M .. and 8'tU P, M.. rutttruiug leave V
uilugtun a ff'M) A.M.. aud H'M P, M. HtcpplnJ
cnehier ana ileus eacn way.
Fare, luceuie between all point,
Excursion tickets, IS ccuis. good to return by elt
boat. s 8
m - TI I 1 a ii i ... t.J,( tx a. Attu AM
rraw. iimr i hfi mm imrt trr
abksbn.-Kbt'on hleuuiboat Line. The steatuh
lui.ift rUHhfiai leaves ARCH Street Wuart.
Tr.iitou, stopping at Tacouy, Tor rend ule, Bevai;
iiuiiihKitui, iirisuot, itiorence Rcbbms' Wharf,
While Hill.
Leaves Arch Btreet Wharf; Leaves South Trento
Saiurilay, Jul 4 12t A. M I Saturday, July 4, 4 J
buuduy July I, tu uuriiugiou, Bristol, aud In
meuiate lanututs, leaves Arch street whan at s A,
and 2 P. Ir.: leaves Br.stol at lo A. M. aud 4 P.
Monday, July 8. 1 P.M Monday, July 6,6 i
Tueeday, 7, 1 P.M Tuesday, 7, 4 I
Wed'day, " 8, IV P.M I Wed'dav, V 8. B! I
Thursday, ' , 2 P.M Thursday, " 1
Frldav. " in V M U-rlday. " 10. 1
Fare to Trenton, 40 cents each way; lu termed
places, zo cents.
DAILY EXCUR6I0NS. T
is
n endid Bteamuoat juun A. w .
A. W
iN ..iw. itaveo CU hJSK u I oireei. yv uari, ruiiaaa,, al
o'clock aud ( o'clik P. M., for Burl lug ton a
Rriatol. touching at Rlverton. Torrendale, Aadalus
aud Beverly. Returning, leaves Bristol at ? o'cloi
A. M.and 4 P. M.
jvaje, ceuu eacb wy: Excursion 40 ou. ill it

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