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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, May 25, 1878, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
Omlal Journal of the State of Louisiana.
Oftelal Journal of the City of New Orleans.
(woo, 109 Gravier Street.
GEORGE W. DUPRE & GO.,
PROPRIETOBS.
GEORGE W. DUPRE,
g. H, ARBiEY, JOHN AUGUBSTIN,
ALBERT 0. JANIN.
H. J. HEABBEY ......................... EDTro.
BATES OF SU BSR'IIIPTION:
The Daily Demoorat.
One Year .. ....................... S 00
Bix M onth .. -. . -................... 6
Three Months .................... 8 00
One Month ........................ 0
Postage, one year a . 1 0
Payable in Advance.
The Weekly Demoorat.
The Weekly Democrat, a larga elght-page
arer, will be furnished to subscribers at the
fellowing rates:
One Year ..... ............ *
Six Months ..................... I
Three Months ..................... 0
Postage ... .... a a ...i ..Ivan..e.....
NEW ORLEANS, MAY 31, 187r.
Hendricks and Black. Is the latest ticket- a
Sort of Tom-and-Jerry mixture, says the Chl
Cego Tribunr.
Clarkson N. Potter is a collegiate graduate,
a doctor of laws, Is very rich, ilfty-three years
old, and has been eight years in Congress.
There will certainly be two more "Con
federate brigadiers" in the next Congress -
Col. Bob Johnson. in the Senate, from Ar
kansas. and Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, In the
Hous,, from Virginia.
Shades of Gregory and Saladdin ! The Pope
and the Sultan are on the most friendly
terms, and the relations between their respec
tive governments are of the most cordial
character.
That noble gardjlin of the paoe, begorra,
Capt. Holly, is now engaged in teaching his
monkey a variation on an old air. It runs
Somehow this way :
On the wings of love I fly.
From Lotteree to lot o' rve.
Would, it be admissible for Judge Milton
berger to speak of the Lottery Company as
his Braughny antagonist, in view of the legal
proposition that a corporation is an "Intel
lectual body," having neither soul to damn
nor body to beat?
What will the conetituents.of lion. Roger
Q. Mill-, of Texas, say about that misrepre
aentative's vote against the Potter resolu
tion ? If we understand the temper of the
Texas Democracy, R. Q. M. will, in Novem
ber, be elected to stay at home. Texas needs
no representative in Congress who, on any
ground, stands by the " Great Fraud."
According to the weekly report of the Stock
Exchange, May 3, Louisiana State Lottery
Company's stock was quoted at 75 bid and 80
asked. Yesterday from the same source we
learn that the above stock stands as follows:
70 bid and 80 asked, showing a decline of five
points on bids since the third Instant. On
Thursday there were sales of lottery stock
amounting to 265 shares at 70 ! Somebody
seems to be unloading. Perhaps, like Job's
war-horse, he smells the battle from afar.
It is a mistaken apprehension that Charles
Francis Adams is to drop into obscurity be
cause Sam Bowles is dead. There may be
none to nominate him for President
every four years, and for anything that
comes along between times, but when the
average Yankee editor wants "a opinion
as is a opinion," he as surely goes to
the oracular Charles Francis, as Capt.
O-utle did to (hpt. Bunsby. Charles
Francis' latest opinion is of Lord John Rus
sell. The World sent a reporter all the way
to Boston to get it, and seems to think it a
bigger item than Lord John's death itself.
Hon. Stanley Matthews has recommended
(leo. W. Jones, of Caddo, for postmaster of
Shreveport. Perhaps there is not a more full
fledged rascal in the State than this same
Gieo. W. Jones. As a ballot-box stuffer, official
forger, "nigger" lover and scrub generally
he has not his superior in Louisiana. And
. yet from what we know of Stanley, Jones is
just about such a man as we would expect
him to recommend for a Federal office in the
South. If we had such a reputation amongst
honorable men in Louisiana as Stanley Mat
thews has acquired we should swap ourself
off for a uob-tall yellow dog, and then poison
the dog.
That must have been a thrilling scoun in
Congress on Monday last when Humphreys,
of Wisconsin, rose to reply to the argument
of Mr. Kimmel, of Maryland, in favor tof the
abolition of the army, which costs the country
but little less than one-seventh of Its whole
revenue. Says the report: Humphreys went
"'largely into the history of Europe during
the Middle Ages to show that those oountries
only enjoyed large liberties which maintained
large standing armies." It must have been
quite impressive and convincing to hear IIum
phreys tell how the liberties of the Middle
Ages were preserved by the armies of the
Middle Ages. What a lustre the American
Congress derives from the presence of a man
like Humphreys.
A Washington special to the New Orleans
Times yesterday evening says:
At a meeting of the national Democratlic com
* ittee . F. .Jonas made the notable svpech of
he evening. He said the psrty in Louiuiana
was solid it had alven Hayes no pledg's and
ade no trade. The people appreciated the
S re.ident's course in takingl the bayonets away.
thouaght it was not an act of personal favor
Stere was any fraud committed the eountry
Ought to know it. Jonas favored the investi a
-ion. Upon tas amendment deOlaring that
there was no desire to disturb the President's
title Jones voted no, for the r'ason that no
body could tell what would be necessary.
Mr. Jonas correctly represents the Demo
eratic party of Louisiana, and his utter
anoes and vote, as reported by the corres
pondent of the Times, will be cordially en
dorsed throughout this State.
The cause of the rejmoval of Trepoff, the
Infamous chief of the Russian informers and
political spies, has just leaked out. Shortly
ater he was shot by Vera Sassulltbch, the
brave patriot girl, he made his will, leaving
%,00,000 rubles to his fanmily. The Czar knew
thi, for the first time, that Trepoff had been
sbiing his oonfidenoe, and, indignant that
he should have accumulated so much money
i by corrupt practices necessarily, hedismlsse
him from office. This is a very pretty stor3
for the Czar to tell, in order that his conces
sion to the people might not appear so fla
grant; but he should have known that then
is always a way for informers to make money
and it is, what a contomporary would call, a
"pessimist's" view of human nature to sup
pose that any man with the instincts of a do
mostic animal would engage In the loath
some business of an informer out of purn
gratuity. The Russian informer made hit
money by threatening people with Siberia
while our own "Phonician" makes his b)
playing spy for the Louisiana Lottery Comn
pany.
THE BEE ON THE LOTTERY.
We print this morning the translation of at
article from our esteemed contemporary, thi
Blee, relative to the Louisiana Lottery, t(
which we direct attention. That old and in
iluential journal expresses the opinion thai
the lottery monopoly is an evil and wrong it
principle; but thinks that we overestimat(
its power, and that there is no present neces(
sity to make a vigorous war on it. Our con.
temporary, in the course of its article, says
We do not think that the Lottery Company is
as tormidable as our contemporary imavines
During the lanst session we had so many things
to ask of the Legislature that we believed that a
war with the lottery would do more harm than
good, in that It would jeopard the adoption of
important reform measures. Now the Legisla
ture is not in session, and we would still let the
lottery alone if it was not doing its best to
arouse publie opinion by the arrest of citizens
under pretext of enforcing respect for its mo
nopoly.
We are at a loss tocall to mind any reform
measure which was supported in the late
Legislature by the Lottery Company and its
alliesin that body. The Lottery Company
and several other rings organized a powerful
movement to realize a very large sum of
money out of the legislation of the last ses
sion, and the attempt to carry out thati move
ment defeated nearly every measur'e of real
importance to the State. The combination,
just previous to the assembling of the Legis
lature, instituted a great bear movement on
Carondelet street, and when they had got the
State bonds down as low as possible, they
loaded up with them and then began their
celebrated movement to bull them up to
ninety-five cents. Their scheme was to de
feat the call for a constitutional convention;
to force through the amendments and pass
the Moffet Register bill taxing the liquor
dealers twenty per cent of their gross earn
ings. This scheme, they assumed, would ac
complish their purpose; and, if it had been
permitted to go through without any serious
opposition, it would have (lone so, and the
combination, with the Lottery Company at
its head, would have realized an immense
sum of money.
But they met with an unexpected opposi
tion. The DEMOcRAT and its friends in the
House, and the Democrats throughout the
State, opened so vigorous a war upon the
scheme, and the public opinion of the State
was so aggressively against it, that though
it was carried through in a mutilated shape,
its only result was to destroy confidence and
send bonds down. It was so manifest that
the measures were against the popular will
and, therefore, revolutionary, that the move
ment gave a great shock to the credit of
the State, and Its projectors lost almost
as much as they had expected to
win. Nevertheless the lottery combination
held the Legislature In its grip, and if they
lost largely in their "put up" game, the
people were the greatest losers, as they came
out with nothing but a string of abortive
amendments, which they till reject; a Mof
fett register bill, farcicaT as a measure of
revenue and Infamous as a law in a republi
can government, and new and extraordinary
methods of taxation to bear.
This is what the Louisiana Lottery did for
the people of Louisiana in the late Legisla
ture. And this is the reason we fought it
there and desired all our contemporaries and
friends in the Legislature to repeal its cor
ruptly obtained charter. The reforms our
esteemed contemporary hoped and desired
from the last Legislature, and the accom
plishment of which it regarded as of more
importance than the war on the lottery, were
all smothered in the womb by that monopoly.
Again, the Bee says:
We do not believe with the DEMOCRAT that the
Lottery Company has possession of the State,
and threatens to control its destinies and stifle
its liberties. But if that company should en
deavor to exert its influence in our elections, or
to assume a role which does not beholong to it, it
will bring down upon Itself a formidable opepo
eilion. oven on the part of those who look with
indifference on the exis'ence of the lottery; and,
so far as we are concerned, we will consider then
that it is our duty to oppose it with all our in
fluence. No conlderatlon has ever caused us
to fall in our obligations as journalists.
We did not expect to hear any diffrrent
language than this from a journal which has
for so many years labored in the iuterest of
the people and hold the confidence and re
sypet of the whole State. But the Bec: is
mistaken as to the power and purposes of the
Lottery C(ompany. That monopoly may not
now have possession of the State; but it
wields an immense political power in this
city, and it is spending large sums of money
to extentl its influence into the country par
Ishes. In this city now, at this very
time, it is working with shrewdness
and experience to control, as far as possible,
the putarish convention. It owns and is using
wardt politicians in greater numbers thitan over
before, and it is using money without stint,
but judicioily,, to sec:hre for itself a full
representation in the next Legislature. In
deed, we feel perfectly confident that, if a
strong and united move is not made by the
press and people of this city, the Lottery
Company will be largely represented in the
next Legislature, and in the parish and city
oillces. Powerful as it is now, if it succeeds
in the political movement it is at present mak
ing in both city and State, when the next
Legislature adjourns, it will own the State,
if it does not now.
We assure our friend, the fle,, that we are
not mistaken in what we say. Our informa
tion is ample and reliable. The concern
aims to control the next Legislature, the
courts and city government of New Orleans.
Of course, we do not presume to question the
judgment of the Bee. But we are anxious to
have the support of that able and influential
journal in this tight, because we believe that
the best interests of the city and State, and of
the Democratic party, require that the power
of the Lottery to influence our politics should
be broken down.
The Galveston News has crop reports from
forty counties of Texas, showing the acreage
in corn, cotton and other products, and the
condition and prospects of the crops. These
reports are more than favorable. There is an
unprecendented increase in the acreage cul
tivated both in cotton and corn, which cannot
be less than 15 per cent over last year. Only
six out of the forty counties show a stand
still in acreage; all the others showing an in
I crease of from 10 to 40 per cent. The crops
r are everywhere in excellent condition. In
- Fort Bend and other southeastern counties of
- the State, where sugar cane is cultivated,
a there seems to be an earnest and energetic
movement in favor of raising cane instead of
cotton. The consequence is that the acreage
in cane in these, counties is over 100 per cent
greater than In 1877.
e THE REPUBLIOANS AND THE IN
VESTIGATION.
If the Republican party had the slightest
consideration for Hayes there might he some
suspicion of sincerity in the howl they are
raising over the investigation into the meth
ods employed to place him where he is. But
it is a notorious fact that, for him person
ally, they entertain no regard whatever, and
,ever since his inauguration he has been the
target of the abuse of first one and then an
other of the party leaders. He has been
charged with treason to the party in every
commendable act of his administration, and
so violent is the resentment against him that
his administration exists to-day by the tol
erance of the Democrats and out of consid
eration for the concessions they have wrung
from him, rather than by the support of his
own party. His policy has been repu(diated
by the Republican conventions of two States.
and Blaine and Conkling, beyond dispute the
leaders of the party, have denounced him in
unmeasured te.rms, the latter going so far as
to describe 'im and his administration as in
famous. The only reason why the open le
nunciation is not more unanimous is becatuse
there are so many of the leaders of Re
publican sentiment in the same boat with
him. It is to this fact, and not to
any love for Hayes or his administra
tion, that all this howl about "revolu
tion" and "Mexicanizing" the govern
meont is attributable. The readiness with
which it has been taken for granted that this
investigation means, inevitably, the ousting
of Hayes is itself an indication of this fact, as
well as the best evidence as to what the Re
publicans themselves honestly believe in re
gard to this business. If they cared at all for
Hayes they would not give his case away in
advance by any such tacit confession of his
complicity in the frauds by which he bene
fited.
Conkling has affirmed that he has a knowl
edge of facts which will sink Hayes and his
administration in infamy when they are dis
closed, and there can be no doubt but that the
vast majority of the Republican party believe
all that he has said.
If these disclosures affTected Hayes done,
if they involved nothing beyond his disgrace
and expulsion from office; in short, if they
could be limited to the exposure of the fraudu
lent title by which the 'residency is held
and the vacation of that office, not a word of
this talk about "revolution" and "Mcxlicaniz
ing" would we hear.
The ousting of Hayes is not what the Re
publicanus are apprehensive about. They un
derstand just as well as any one else that the
country can Ibe hurt in none of its interests,
can be endangered In no respect by the vindi
cation and assertion of the valid title to the
Presidency, and can have no higher interest
and no higher safety than in the proclaiming
of the invalid title and the overwhelming of
an usurpation.
This cannot hurt the party, but the dis
closures this investigation must inevitably
bring out will hurt it, and it is this they are
afraid of. They know full well that there is
but one power in the land that can drive
Hayes from the Presidency, and that is the
power of public opinion, and there is but one
way in which public sentiment can be aroused
to the accomplishment of this supreme act,
and that is by making known to the people
the full extent and details of the infamous
fraud that has been put upon them. It is
with these disclosures that the Republican
party is concerned, for they fully appreciate
that the same public opinion that will con
sign Hayes to infamy will at the same time
overwhelm the party with utter ruin and dis
grace. This investigation may or it may not
result in the deposing of Hayes; this is a de
batable question; but that it will damn for
ever and eternally the Republican party, the
authors of the conspiracy and crime which
put him in place, and, at the same time, de
frauded the people and brought dishonor to
the c~ountry, there can be no doubt. The sim
ple bringing out of the facts will accomplish
this, and this is all the investigation proposes
to, d(o, leaving it to the country to dispose of
the presidential question afterward and as
suits it best. This exposure, we feel assure(l,
will compel the oustingof Hayes by impeach
ment or some other process, but it will also i
consign to enduring infamy the party that
put him where he is by the means of every
crime that human depravity has ever devised,
from murder to petty larceny. t
The people of rural Illinois are evidently
savages as far as art is concerned. A curious
squabble has just broken out at Rockford, in
Northern Illinois, apropos of the new court
house. The Rookford court-house, It will be
remembered, was blown down last year
by a storm, killing in its fall a number
of persons. In place of this destroyed
building a new edifice has just been
erected by an Illinois architect, which is a
gem in its way. Its designer has evidently
studied European models, and the result is a
building that Paris itself might be proud of.
There is one objection to it, at least the rustic
Rockfordians find it an objection. In the orna
mentation of this building are a number of
young and festive cupids cut in stone, which
the author, after the European style of art,
has left entirely unprovided with pantaloons.
This was entirely too much for the average
Rockfordian, who is singularly American
in his ideas and bitterly opposed to nude
statuary. The result has bean a great deal of
uncomplimentary criticism of these unpan
talooned cupids and considerable public in
dignation against their author. It is said
that the school boys of the town are far too
interested in these statues and that they are
producing bad results among the younger
citizens of Rockford. Moreover, modest mem
bers of the Young Men's Christian Associa
tion and ladies who are called as witnesses to
the court-house are compelled to avert their
eyes when entering the building to avoid
these undraped images; it is also claimed that
venerable horse traders and farmers are fond
of getting off witticisms and jokes at the
expense of these judicial cupids and pro
ducing in consequence a merriment in the
court-house wholly unsuited to the solemnity
that ought to prevail in such a building.
In fine, bitter complaints are made against
these figures by all classes of society in Rock
ford as subverqive of morals and destructive
of the grand old puritanic simplicity of that
Yankee town. The religious element of the
town recently declared emphatically thatthey
preferred morals to a'sthetics, and began a
regular anti-Cupid warfare. An attempt was
made to get the grand jury to indict the archi
tect who erected the building, under the
"lewd picture" ordinance, but this enterprise
signally failed. Rev. Mead Holmes, of Wis
consin, who gained some reputation In Rock
ford as the leader of the movement against
ex-President Jefferson Davis, when that gen
tleman was invited to deliver an address at
the Rockford fair, was then invited to
the town to lead the popular crusade
against the court-house Cupids. Anti
Cupid prayer meetings were held in
all parts of the town, and in a short time
the signatures of nearly every man, woman
and child in the village was obtained
to a petition begging the board of
supervisors to remove the offensive
cupids from the court-house. There was
an angry squabble in the board when this pe
titition came up, but the friends of art finally
prevailed, and the petition was refused. The
matter, however, is not yet wholly ended.
The reverend Mead has not surrendered, and
announces, like Leo the Iconoclast, "ham
mer in hand, will break those cupids yet."
There is great fear that a religious mob will
some day attack the cowurt-house and destroy
these awful little imps of love; to protect the
building from these iconoclasts it has been
found necessary to keep a large ubody of offi
c'ers constantly on duty at the court building.
Such is the story of the Rockford cupids.
Mr. Porter Is still c(ollectilng data conern
ing the indebtedness, expenditures and re
sources of American cities. He has already
received all the information he needts from 130
cities. The showing is not at all agreeable.
The increase in the municipal debts of these
130 cities in the ten years succoeling the war
is no less than $423,0o;,66,;:, notwithstanding
the fact that over $1,00,tx,(5,000 of revenue
had been raised by taxation within this period
and spent. The taxation of these cities in
18;; was $64,0;0,98, while in 1l71; it was $112,
71i1,275. an increase of 89 per cent, while the
increasce in population was only 24 per cent.
TO SUMMER TOURISTS.
The great Jackson Route offers the greatest
inducements to Eastern and European trav
elers this season. It should be known to all
that this line has been immensely improved
during the past year. It has, in fact, been al
most entirely rebuilt. It now has a fine steel
rail track, laid upon new ties and an excellent
road-bed. This enables it to make as fast
time as any line to New York with entire
safety and without the appearance of rapid
running, its connections from CIncinnati and
Chicago being among the finest roads in the
world. The train leaving at 6 p. m., one hour
later than any other line, makes exactly the
same time to New York as its quickest rival.
There are no through cars to New York by any
line. The Jackson Route has but one change
of cars, which is made in Union depot, at
Cincinnati, Chicago or St. Louis.
Passengers lirect to New York by the Jack
son Route pass through the splendid scenery
andcl l air of the Alleghany Mountains. Those
going by Chicago pass by daylight in full
view of Niagara Falls, and also have but one
change of cars from New Orleans to New
York.
ENGINEERS TAKE NOTICE.
THE GREATEST
DISCOVERY OF THE AGE.
C!ASEY'S
BELT
- AND -
OIL COMIPOUND,
TO PREVENT BELTS FROM SLIPPING.
No Friction. No Tearing.
25 Per Cent Gained in Power.
60 Per Cent Saved in Wear.
No establishment where Belting is used
Can Afford to be Without It.
IS NOW BEING USED BY t
-. GAY & CO.. 0. H. ALLEN.
J. fOERSTER, MARGARET'S Bakery
3. J.WICKERI4NG. HENRY & DUNN
A. MARTIN. HENRY OTIS.
P. J. FLANAGHAN, L'HOTE & CO
LAh. DICE MILLS, STAR GINNElRY.
A. A. AGOINNIS'S BONS,.
Liberal discount to the trade. For sale by
I. L LYONS,
CORNEB OF CAMP AND GRAVIEB,
Wholesale Druggist and Importer.
nl1 liv
BOVINE VACCINE VIRUS,
Received daily by
L L. LYONS.
Corner Camp and Gravier streets.
floIR 1y
New Orleans National Bank,
54 Camp street,
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY,
And Government Agent for the Sale of the
New Four Per Cent Bonds,
In denominations of $50 and upwards.
Also. Negotiate All
Government Bonds.
COUPONS AND GOLD CONVERTED.
ALBERT BALDWIN,
my7 lm2dp Presl'ient.
MOUSSELINE DE PARIS
-AND -
WHITE GOODS.
OUR STOCK OF
WIIITE GOODS
BEING NOW COMPLETE, WE INVITE PUR
CHASERS TO CALL AND EX
AMINE SAME.
D. H. IIOLMES,
155 Canal, and 15 Bourbon Sts.
0c28 ly
WANTED.
TO BUY CITY SCRIP, POLICE SCRIP,
ALL KINDS OF CITY INDEBTEDNESS.
W. H. BARNETT. Broker.
38 St. Charles street, opposite St. Charles
HoteL my17 1y lp
ENY OII~·
IAltI1 W WlIll IPItl lIlS,
(A tnrn.aI.n xIorAH,
I. C. LEVI, Jeweler,
105............................Canal Street................... ....10
Offers the above Watches at the latest reduced price list of November lst.
The Watehes are all Patent Ivers. and earanteed feer Tlare Tam'r,
Solid Silver Watch, Waltham or Egin movement....41. a
Solid Silver Watch with open face and fl glass.-........ i
Solid Silver Stem Winder and Setter ............... .
Solid Gold Watch. 2 oz, 24 karat case.................
Solid Gold Watch. 2 oz, se karat case ................... a
`, Solid Gold Stem-winder. 2i oz. 14 karat case........... o
soliSd Goid Stem Winder. 2% oz. 18 karat case....... .. ,
LADIES' WATCHEB.
Solid Gold Watch, 14 karat case........................ - o
S ol.d Gold stem winder, 14 karat case ................... - 0
t. dolid Gold Stem-winder. 18 karat case... .. .......... . go
In addition to the above I have a large assortment of Swiss.
French and German Watches, prices rangig from 0so to 0
For mechanics or laborers the $12 watch or M stem-winde
will give all satisfaction necessary.
I will send watches, diamonds and Jewelry by expresi.
0. O. D.. allowing the purchaser to open package and exam.
Ine same.
I have a complete assortment of Diamonds, Opera, Guard, Vest and Neck hains at price to
correspond with the above I have constantly on hand a large stock of Silverware of all descrimn
tions. (locks. Bronzes and Statuary.
I Make a Specialty of Repairing Fine Watches and Setting Diamonds,
For further particulars, address for Illustrated catalogue,
nos T. o. LEVI. 10e canal Ptrit
American Waltham Watch Agency.
A1. MI. IIILLý, JEWELER,
No. 86 St. Charles street, corner of Commercial Place,
NEW OIRLEANS.
LARGEST ASSORTMENT AND LOWEST PRICES.
Watches for Ladies, Gentlemen, Sporting Men, Meohanies, Laborers and Boy..
RAILtOAD WATCHES A SPECIALTY.
THE AMERICAN WATCH COMPANY
-OF
WALTtIAM, MAWW.,
MANUFACTURE FIVE SIZES
-AND
Thirty-two Distinct Grades of
KEY AND STEM WINDING WATCHES
From a low-priced SILVER WATCH to the mos
expensive GOLD STEM WINDER.
EVERY WATCH GUARAWNEED.
I have made arrangements with the Company to
keep me constantly supplied with a full
line of these celebrated Watches,
and I offer them at
Unprecedentedly Low Prices.
All styles of solid Gold Chaias. Vest Guard. Opera. Leontine and Neck, with a large assortment
of Lockets, all at low prices.
ap211 ly WATCHES REPAIRED AND WIRRANTED.
WHEELER & PIERSON,
SUCCESSORS TO DARCY & WHEELER AND PIERSON & HEWS,
13 and 15 CAMP STREET.
New Styles For Spring
JUST OPENED IN OUR RETAIL DEPARTMENT.
STYLISH BUSINESS SUITS, 015 TO 20O.
SCOTCH CASSIMERE SACK SUITS, $15 TO S20.
BLACK AND BLUE CHEVIOT SUITS, ALL WOOL, 015.
NEW STRIPED WORSTED FROCKS AND VESTS,
WHITE DUCK VESTS, $1, $1 50, AND' 2.
Wholesale Department up stairs, with a Large Stock for Country Trade.
Low Prices. SuZerior Make and Pit, and Polite Attention.
PIANOS AND ORGANS
Of the Most Renowned Makes, at Greatly Reduced
Prices, and on Easy Terms, at
GRUNEWALD HALL
A Magnificent Selection of the Celebrated Pianos of
STEIWAY, KNAlBE, PLTYEI, HAINES ANID FISCRER
Always on hand. Above Pianos are respectfully recomended for their unsurpnsesed numers~
ous Musical Qualities. Durability in this climate, which has made them Justly so poDpalar with
our people and which are Unapproached by any other in this country.
Just received a Fine Selection of the
CELEBRATI'ED ORGAANS
-OF
CLOUGH & WARREN, PRINCE, BURDETT.
The Best In the Market, at reasonable prices. Get my Estimates before you purchase elsewhere
Old Pianos taken in Exchange for New Ones. or repaired at short notie at moderate fgures
SHEET MUSIC, BRASS INSTRUMENTS
In Endless "ariety and at Lower Flaires than at any other House In the Country. Your
patronage is respectfully solicited.
LOUIS GRUNEWAL.D.
jfl 14 to uS Earoene treet, New Orleans.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
35........................ CANAL STREET ........................135
THE LEADING PIANO AND MUSIC DEALER OF THE SOUTH,
Offers the best toned, most perfect and most durable
PIANOS and ORCGANS
Made either in this country or in Europe, at the lowest prices and on the most accommodatlna
terms ever offered.
His Stock consists of the unrivalled, world renowed CHICKERING, the
celebrated and elegant MATHUSHEK, and the fine toned
and low-priced HARDMAN PIANOS.
ESTEY, MASON & HAMLIN AND NEW ENGLAND ORGANS.
Seeend-Hand Pianos from $40 up. New Pianos from $200 up. AU fully Warsanta.
This house has always been renowned for its low prices and fair dealing and will continue to
sunlyt to wor with iood and reliable instruments on the most seasonable term&. TUNIN
AND BEPnUIR A bPECIALTY, myt? ha

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