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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, June 14, 1878, Image 4

Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83026413/1878-06-14/ed-1/seq-4/

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ýIk.id of tae Stiit of Leusiana.
Cr o ity of N few Orlenau
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PROPIEIIETOB.
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Tb. DW17 Demoarort.
In
Mb. :Weeb:ly Dlsio:rr:.
.> a'.ibl. In Adveaoe. sý
'.p ' ` 3A`10, JU1M8 14. 1t393
M TinLY DE00RAT.
r cAll the speolal attention of our busl
gatmmiunity to the excellence of the
I DnMOXoAT as an advertising medi
'II airoulation of the WamnLY Dawo
throughout Louislana, Arkansas, Mis
.Alabama, Georgia and Texas is
to that of no other paper in the
It contains the latest news from
and commercial centres and the
ae of reading matter. Send In
searly.
lae applied for a divorce in Cin
the plea that her husband obtained
ias pretenses. He said he owned a
le and was a Ger nan Count, and he
owmthe livery stable and was no' a
we had the pleasure of viewing
crayon portrait, life else, of our
a Hon. Allen Jumel, State Auditor.
Was from the hands of Mme. Hen
, whose studio is on the corner of
(ºtamp, in the same building with
pkshtogph gallery. The pioturebears
marks of the true artist's "own sweet
hand," and is, withal, one of the
of portraiture we have seen for
Ow head of "Letters from the Peo
t from a prominent citisen a long
able review of the "Canal Bank
" We have not had time to ex
martile closely nor the law which it
As we understand the question
believe that the suit ought to have
tot final decision. At the same
are satisfied that the Assistant At
and the Auditor, both of whom
above suspicion, have acted
to their best judgment. They may
a.is~ a mistake, and we believe they
Blut we no not believe their motives
saalled. We shall discuss the subject
after further investigation.
that there are people in New
already begin to feel the tentacles
ash, the Louiselana Lottery. The
s oopy of aletteraddressed to the
artiary to law to advertise and sell in
and • tate lottery tickets? If it is
the authorities take it in hand and
traffic? It seems to me that.
bsiness which takes from this lcity
than $100,000 monthly should attract
tion of those who have the power to
are paid to protect our intereste,
be comelled, if possible, to sup
I. is done so publicly, and
so ,that a want of knowl
ayot be ded.
amusing, indeed, to witness the sollo
tle anxiety, the impatience of the Re
togo back on their work in Louis
inee Anderson has begun to tell the
The New York Times insists that the
ti by which the party wrought the
oemnected with the electoral fraud
n. right whatever to expect the party
e the responsibility for them or to
but repudiate them (or their
But the Pimes does not eay one
about Hayes' going out, or the relin
t of the spoils gained by the audac
Smasality of these very men whom it
xhious to repudiate. In this treachory
and its like are even worse than
He had the courage of the high
while the receivers of the goods he
something to gain, are even too
ly to keep faith with him. The low,
, covert cunning of Fhgan cannot be
ious to the bold audacity of Bill
that is, after both are found out.
anoe and Italy have accepted the Invita_
e~ the United States to hold an interna
. onference on the subject of metallic
y standards. The conference will doubt
be held at Paris, and its conclusions will
.o importance. These will principally be
tton of silver, which is unques
y essential to the prosperity of all na
I . The world cannot afford to adopt the
s-te standard of gold, thus subjecting com
to the sudden contraction which would
Strm the destruction of the real money
Cter of silver. France has always
ed the double standard, her five-franc
Sbeing legal tender just as our silver dol
But the main question will be to rec
the different values of silver estab
by the Latin Union and the United
and to establish a uniform standard.
and the other nations of the Latin
make 15' ounces of silver equal to 1 of
and restrict the silver coinage. Our
al .rld is 16 ounces of silver to 1 of gold,
~f this ratio is adopted we will go on as
aWesent, while the nations who are parties
tle conference will have to recoin and reis
, their silver.
.Of the 108 candidates for the constitutional
floj in California already nominated
ve are lawyers, twenty-nine are farm
are merchants and business men,
",are miners, three are doctors, thirteen
seven journalists or printers and
is a selool teacher. Forty-four have not
ss~ifled by the news reports. Most of
e nominees of the workingmen. and
y to..oclassified mainly with bust
trade workers and farmers. The
have nominmtedseveral lawyers
and r atmmeacl and the
Frw y
In prosecuting the war against the Loulhl
ana Lottery Company the DaroloaKt has re
trained from attacking the relations of Gan
erals Beauregard and Early with that lastitu
tion. Whatever odium the public has attached
to this gigantic and demoralizing monopoly,
none of it has been permitted by this people
to fall upon the names of these distinguished
and long honored soldiers and gentlemen.
That they have thousr".t proper to associate
their honored names with the institution and
give it the moral support of their high char
acter and justly illustlous reputation has
been certainly a subject of general regret
throughout the South. But, amongst us all,
no voice has been lifted up to denounce them,
and we do not believe that there is any man
who knows anything about them who believe
that they have been influenced by other than
their honest convictions of right and justice.
In attacking the lottery, therefore, we are
not attacking Generals Beauregard and Early
but what we believe to be a gigantic evil in
our social and political systems. They take a
radically different view of the lottery from
what we do. Neither they nor we, we trust,
are insincere. But certain it is that one or
the other party is wrong, and without as
sailing the motives and purposes of such
honorable men, we shall continue to appeal
to the people of Louisiana for a decision of
the issue between us in the next election of
members of the Legislature.
But, jealous as we are of the names and
reputations of these eminent soldiers, we do
not ourselves, and we trust the public will
not attach a particle more weight to the de
fense of the lottery monopoly made by them,
and promulgated yesterday through the
Pi•aune, than their arguments are in
trinsically worth, or than if they had been
presented by any other individuals. Great
names can give no value to weak, sophisti
cal or inconsistent arguments, and that such
arguments are sometimes presented under
the authority of great names, the plea for the
lottery presented yesterday in the Picayune
conclusively proves.
The first position taken by Generals Beau
regard and Early in favor of the Louisiana
State Lottery is embodied in the following
paragraph:
We believe that a comparison between the
schemes of the Loulselna State Lottery and
those of any other lottery will show that the
former are as li bral as those of any lottery
that le honestly oonducted.
We shall show that this proposition is ut
terly untenable.
TIR LOUISIANA LOTr'IY AND OTHlI1 LOT
A comparison between the schemes of the
Louisiana State Lottery and those of any
other lottery will not show that the former
are as liberal as those of any other lottery
that is honestly conducted. According to its
charter it was required to offer such schemes,
but It has not complied with its charter In this
respect. On the contrary, it has established
schemes so absolutely unfair and so much more
against the ticket holders than the schemes of
other lotteries that wd feel we are justi
fed, even it all its drawings are fairly made,
as Generals Beauregard and Early exprees the
belief that they are, in denouncing It as a swin
dle. One of the objects of the Lottery Com
pany enumerated in its charter Is, "to estab
lish a solvent and reliable home institution
for the sale of lottery, policy and combination
tickets, devices and certificates, or fractional
parts thereof, at terms and prices in just pro
portion to the prisee to be drawn."
Now we invite the distinguished defenders
of this company to follow us and see if it has
not most scandalously failed to carry out this
object of Its creation.
The following schedule shows the just pro
portion established by this gigantic monopoly
between the prices of Its tickets and devices
and the prizes to be drawn:
LOUIBIANA STATE LOTTERYT ATES.
Day. C.iatal
Ballots. Glais. Saddles. No. Saddles.
Monday .. 75-12 $s150 24 $ 50 se00
Tuesday ....78-13 145 22 4 s00
Wednesday.75-14 120 20 4 300
Thursday ..8-12 170 25 5 300
Frlday ......75-11 190 25 5 30o
Saturdy. .78-13 145 22 300
Based on $1 invested.
Now the following schedule shows the pro
portion established by all other lotteries in,
or which have existed in, the United States
between the prices of tickets and the prizes to
be drawn:
Day. Capital
Ballots. Gigs. Saidles. No. Saddlle.
Monday ....75-12 5225 832 $5 $500
Tuesdav.... 78-1 200 32 5 500
Wednesday.75-14 150 24 4 50 o00
Thursday 78-12 225 34 5 500
Friday ..... 5-11 300 :36 5 500
iLaurday 78-13 200 32 5 500
Based on st invested.
Thus it will be seen that when the Louisi
ana Lottery pays $150, $24, $4 50 and $300,
honest and just lotteries pay $225, $32, $5 and
$500. Here are figures which at once show that
Generals Beauregard and Early are mistaken
when they assert that the schemes of the Lou
isIana Lottery are as liberal as those of any
other lottery. Lottery men in this city have
several times attempted to bet on the num
bers advertised by the Lottery Company, and
pay all the losses they might incur on the
scale of the latter scheme; in other words,
to take the same chances with the lottery
and pay prizes from 30 to 60 per cent greater
than those paid by the lottery. One lottery
man engaged extensively in this business,
who was arrested and imprisoned by the Lot
tery Company under act No. 9, tells us that
he can even increase these prizes, if unmo
lested, and make a&handsome fortune at the
business.
Only a few days ago we printed an exhaust
Ive analysis of the Louisiana Lottery schemes
and the schemes of foreign lotteries, which
we wish that Generals Beauregard and Early
had read before they promulgated "their de
fense," and from which we reproduce the fol
lowing extract:
The oomb'nation, or Genoese lottery, which is
the system on which the daily drawing of the
Louisiana Lottery Company is conducted, has
been in exittence for centuries. Italy, France,
Austria and Bavaria carried on this kind of lot
tery for years, but none of thee governments
ever thought of suggesting such ridiculously
small prizes as those off.tred by the Louisiana
Lottery Comiony. In Autria the rule is that
the capital prize shall be 60 000 times as great as
the cost of the ticket; in Bavaria it is eo4,o times
as great: in Louisiana it is only 5100 times as
great. .Bavaria and Austria derived immense
revenues from the sale of lottery tickets; what,
then, muat be the income of our Lottery Com
pany, which, although the cba ,cesare thesame
as in Austriaor Bavaria. gives prizes 92 per cent
less?
This eapital prize of $5100. or, as we had better
call i $1275 is really the only prize worth men
tioning in the daily drawing of the Louisiana
Lottery. There are three other prizes-of the
fourth, fifth and sixth numbers drawn; seventh.
eighth and ninth numbers; tenth, eleventh and
twelfth numbers. These prizes are nominally
$1250. lees 15 Der cent: but as a whole ticket never
draws a prize in the Louisiana Lottery, these
prizes in reality amount to only one-quarter of
81so. iae that inevitable is per cent; in other
words, to $25 59. That is, with ts 07a tickets the
Lnuiiana Ote Company offalers one rise of
urs and three of s3 ey . Was Wiu ev-r
more inamoasa? Do the Ri sain
Bows A.4 . mr _.
-i9 c"s they have lavItd in his
o ra..t tor Company n a eihty
Old NM4hhTlp5shll hlaaeslf, nad t4d 0di
ag-aint the 1ittsrfr,,m o eariest ohil dlod
to the dday of his death and bought a ticket
very daywo have Lune ~himslf winner
of only side so ter having spent about oeo,o0n
on the Lottery Company.
Such is the real character of the daily
policy and combination drawings of the Lou
isdana Lottery Company. The oalculations
were made by a thorough mathematician, and
no flaw can be found in them. They show
that the concern is in its nature a swindle
upon the public. There is no necessity to
practice cheating in running such a scheme
as this; the scheme Is the very essence of
cheating itself. The thousands of ignorant
and credulous people who read the flaming
advertisements of the Lottery Company, and
who are seduced and tempted by every con
ceivable means to invest their money In these
daily drawings, cannot calculate their chances
themselves, nor, we fear, fully comprehend
these results after they have been worked
out for ahem. The ignorant and credulous
minds will believe the advertisements; the
flaming posters; the placards on the band
wagons; the dream books; the delusive hopes
of their own infatuated minds and hearts in
preference to our figures, and they will go on
in their folly, vainly spending their money
for policy and combination tickets until a
legislature assembles here which the Lottery
Company has not money enough to control,
which will repeal its charter and relieve this
community of a blighting curse.
T.if LOUISIANA LOTTERY (OMPANY A DEMO
CRATIO INSTITUTION.
Generals Beauregard and Early have im
bibed the belief that the Louisiana State Lot
tery Is a Democratio-Conservative institution.
They say in the course of their defense of it:
Before entering into the arrangement for su
nerintending thel prinolpal drawings of the
Lotisiana Sate Lottery, we took care to as
certain that all the wansgement of the com
Bany were in sympath with the Damooratio or
onservative party of the State. and became
satisfied that they were active and earnest sup
porters of the present Governor as well as of
the Legislature, which was in sympathy with
him, the political condition generally known as
the statue in quo being then in ex tence.
The Louisiana State Lottery Company from
the day of Its inception to the closing hours
of the last disastrous session of the Legisla
ture, has never played any honest or patriotic
part in polities. It has been on both sides;
but whatever side it espoused it espoused in
its own interest, and whatever power it has
evergiven either to Radicalism or to the Dem
ooratic party has been in the way of corrup
tion. It was created by a Radical Legisla
ture and by votes that were notoriously
purchased. The obnoxious acts of 1874,
which were enacted, in Its interest, by
the Radical Legislature of that year
were also purchased. From 1868 to 1876
the Radical party controlled the State. The
legislatures were composed of Radicals, the
Governors were Radicals, most ill of the
Judges and magistrates were Radicals, and
the Louisiana Lottery Company was created,
sustained, fostered and protected by all these.
It is a notorious fact that it gave largely to
the Radical campaign fund. An entirely hon
est and truthful man, who was an employee
of the company, Informs us that at one time
Mr. Howard gave emphatic instructions to
all the employees of the company to vote for
H. C. Dibble, oneof the most obnoxious carpet
baggers in the State. In the spring of 1876, a
large stockholder in the company told
us that Mr. Howard declared that he was not
a Democrat, and that he expected all persons
employed by the Lottery Company to vote
the Republican ticket. As the campaign pro
gressed, the signs in the political skies became
so plain that he changed his position. But
he and his newspaper were but luke
warm supporters of the Democratic
ticket; indeed, they. were regarded rather
as disorganizers than as allies. If the success
of our cause had depended upon the aid it re
ceived from the lottery party, we should have
been overwhelmingly defeated and the domi
nation of Radicalism prolonged yet four
years in Louisiana.
But when the fight was over and it was
evident that Radicalism had run its pestif
erous course in Louisiana, the lottery ring
grew bold and aggressive as lions, and, as
we remarked a day or two since, with
banners flying, marched over into the
Democratic camp. This is not the manner
in which Generals Beauregard and Early
have been wont to espouse a cause. They did
not wait to see how the tide of battle was
going to roll before they drew their swords
and took sides. When the great war be
tween States with which their names are
gloriously and immortally associated began,
the one obeyed the call of Virginia, the
other that of Louisiana, and, through
marches and battles, through victory and
sad defeat, they followed the flag of their
country until its stars went down on a sea
of blood and their light was quenched in
the cloud of universal ruin. If such men
shall investigate the true political asso
ciations and history of the Louisiana
Lottery Company, we believe they will
not be willing to stand by the assertion that
it is or has been, in a true and proper sense,
a Democratic or Conservative institution.
They are not of the breed of men who ap
plaud the zeal in a fight (such as that through
which Louisiana passed for ten years) which
is developed after the victory is won and
displayed only in plundering the battlefield.
As to the part the Lottery Company played
in dissolving the Packard and organizing the
Democratic Legislature we do not care to
speak. Others may tell that story. We were
not parties to the business, and feeble and
impotent though our pen may be, it will never
be used to defend the uses which the Lottery
Company claims our party put it to in that
fearful crisis.
We have less hesitation in speaking of the
use the Lottery Company made of its influ
ence in the Legislature after that body was
organized. That it advanced a single Demo
cratic measure we defy any one to show; that
it vigilantly and unscrupulously pursued the
advancement of its own interests to the detri
ment of the State and the Democratic party is
matter of record. Generals Beauregard and
Early, continuing relative to the political
phase of the question, say:
If, now, we can be satisfied that the managers
of the company are seeking or favoring the re
turn to power in this State of the Radical or
Republican party, or are conducting any of the
operations of the company fraudulently or dis
nonestly, we will withdraw from all connection
with it.
We shall not attempt to prove that the Lot
tery Company is seeking or favoring the re
turn to power of Radicalism as it existed in
this State previous to the inauguration of the
present government. That would be a gross
and impracticable folly; and the managers of
the lottery have had too much experience in
business politics to attempt what they, as
enelbte men, ndermtand to be imposesble.
V j6WO 04 Otl~po~ tn Lauwt Oay Y~
is ready at any time to taty 1tf with the
eenmies of th~e-lemoeratle party wihe, to sub,
serve its own Interests, it becoomes necessary
to do so.
Generals Beauregard and Early are both ac
quainted with the fact that the Democrats
had a very small working majority in the
House, and that several members of that
majority were utterly unrelable. With this
slim majority of Demooiats, the seat for the
Fourteenth Ward of this city was in contest
between one Dejole, a colored Radical, and
Mr. Ferguson, a straight Democrat, hostile
to the lottery interest. Dejole was seated by
one majority through the influence and agents
of the Lottery cbmpany. We presume Gen
erals Beauregard and Early will accept Mr.
Howard's statement on this point.
During the session of the Legislature a
committee of investigation was appointed by
the House to inquire Into this and other
charges made by the DEMOCRAT. Mr. Dupre,
one of the proprietors of this paper, being be
fore that committee, testified as follows:
I learned from Mr. Howard that Mr. Dejole
could not have been seated if the report of the
Judiciary Committee had been the same on the
bill o repeal the act creating the Lottery Com
pany as it was in the eases of the Slaughter
house and Gas companies,
Mr. Howard was summoned, and testified
relative to thtb particular charge as follows:
I did state that in my opinion Mr. Deioie
would not have been seated but for the unfair
action of the Judiciary Committee in making a
distinction between the Lottery Company and
other monopolies in their report upon meas
ureh affecting monopolies.
To Mr. Lea-I stated that I believed that Mr.
Dpjole was seated because the Judiciary Com
mittee had treated the Lottery Company un
fairly.
We call attention to three facts here: 1. The
Democrats in the House had a bare majority
in that body, and several of those unreliable
and thoroughly under the control of the Lot
tery Company, as was every Radical Repre
sentative.
2. Mr. Howard distinctly admits that the
negro Radical, Dejole, was seated over the
Democrat, Ferguson, because the Democratle
Judiciary Committee reported adversely to
the interests of the Lottery Company.
8. That the question as to who was actually
elected had no weight whatever In settling the
title to the contested seat. The matter was
settled in favor of the negro Radical simply
and solely because the action of the Judiciary
Committee indicated that there was a strong
Democratic hostility to the lottery.
These facts must convince any unpreju
diced man that the Lottery Company would
not have hesitated in 1878 to throw the control
of the Legislature into the hands of the same
Radicals who had for ten years been outrag
ing and plundering this State, and that it ac
tually did do all that it could to that end; for
if, as Mr. Howard testified, a negro Radical
was seated in the House over a Democrat be
cause the action or report of a committee,
with a Democratic majority, did not please
the Lottery Company, we presume no one
will be absurd enough to deny that the out
rage, or rather the rascality, was committed
through the influence of the Lottery Com
pany.
If Generals Beauregard and Early can con
template these facts and then affirm that the
Louisiana Lottery Company is a Democratic
Institution, or that the Democratic party can
trust it any longer than it Is willing to identify
itself with the lottery and support all of its
schemes, we are very much mistaken in their
political sagacity. And yet we have given but
one case in a number at hand, and which we
will present at another time.
The singular view Generals Beauregard and
Early have presented of the monopoly feature
of the Louisiana Lottery Company, is so re
markable, new and entertaining, that we re
serve the discussion of it, with some other
points of "their defense," for a special article
to-morrow.
The great Jackson Route has now on
sale excursion tickets to the beautiful
summer resorts of the Northwest at
very low rates. They will remain on sale till
September 80, and will be good to return till
October 31 They include such well known
points as Waukesha, Oconomowoc and Green
Lake, Wisconsin; St. Paul, Minnesota; Grand
Haven and Mackinaw, Michigan, and Aisgar
Falls, besides numerous others of perhaps
equal attractions. There are no more desira
ble places at which to spend the summer than
these cool and healthful resorts, situated in
the lovely lake district of Wisconsin, or on
the noble Lake Michigan and Niagara river.
Boarding is cheap and of the best qualty;
and at many of them are mineral springs
particularly adapted to the cure of complaints
engendered by a Southern climate. All are
easily accessible from large cities, and com
bine with their associations the benefits of
rural life.
To reach them the great Jackson Route is
the shortest, quickest and only direct line.
It is in excellent order, having been practi
cally rebuilt with steel rails. No one passing
over it can fail to notice the smooth track, ab
sence of dust, and thoroughly satisfactory
condition of everything about it. Pullman
cars run through to Chicago and Cincinnati
without change, and there is no change of
cars from there to nearly, if not quite, all the
points to which excursion tickets are sold.
Books, maps and folders, giving full de
scriptions of the Northwestern watering
places and the routes and rates thereto can
be had at theoffice of the great Jackson Route,
No. 22 Camp street, under City Hotel, where
every one intending to spend the summer
away from this city is invited to call before
deciding to go elsewhere.
The great Jackson route is also without a
superior as a line to New York and all the
principal Eastern cities, reaching them with
but one change of cars.
WAGONS ! CANE CARTS I SPOKES !
H. N. SORIA,
18 and 20 Union and 15 and 17 Perdido
streets,
Sole Agent for the celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer in PhiladelDhia and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descrt ttons; SBokes, Fel
loes, Hubs. Shafts, etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filed. All work warranted.
Jas 2dttt
BODLEY BROTHERS,
121 and 129..ConusOn street..127 and 129
Between St. Charles and City Hotels.
FARM AND PLANTATION WAGONS.
Cane Carts. Bagasse Carts. Small Carts of all
sizes, Timber Wheels, Wheelbarrows. Spokes.
Felloes. Shafts. Wagon Material. Axle Grease.
etc.
this is the oldest and largest wagon establish
ment in the South, manufacturing their own
work and guaranteeing everything they sell.
fe ly 2do
FOR FAMILY USE!
THE
"ANCHOR BRAND"
- OF -
EXPORT LAGER BEER,
(In quarts and pints).
Being unequaled in Purity and Flavor, is
eseilally adapted to Family UsA, and is a most
delightful and wholesome summer beverage.
It is brewed expressly for the Southern
market, and warranted to keep in any climate.
aaufeturred solely for
AMOS PATTEN & 00.,
IamsaBuaWorsalw iTehopditols stree
WiATRAM AND ELGIIL E1TCBESI
I. Cý. LEVI. Jeweler,
1ls.................... ..r....Canal Etweet................3 JO
Offera the above Watohe at the latest reduced price list of November as,.
The WatieNe are aH Patent Levers. sad Ouaramntesd fer Threus V.
Sold Wliver athyt ope g e sanafnszgiasa....... .
S il 1er w an t ter .............. ...t. r
odGod Wtot,2oP. Ikarat ease..................
Sod old Stmh r2 % or s. 14 karat oa es..............
oU0.ld - . 0o014 1o t 1st a easr..... .... m
SLADI6S' WATOHBl.
1. toe l sto 14 ott . ....... ... o ose .
e oslo Watch. IS arat ase.............
, ol od Stem wInder. 14 karat es.............«. - N
S oliGold Stom-winder, 18 karat csee................ og
In adl tin to to e .etos I have asare a toen of
Fr eno and German Watches prides ranng from t0 to
or mechanics or laborers the ioi watoh or rm ste.-l
Swi gve all satisf0 ion seeeaar. .
will send watches, diamonds and jewelry bfye.y
0. 0. D., allowing the purehaser to open packagens ai
ie same.
I have co~mletTo a.erent of Diamonds. Oier., Guard, Vest atndNeck hai~f ak r to~
jrtes n. .lnh the above I have constantly on hand .a large setook of Silverware of aUsd.ls.
S Tons, JoE. ronazess a Statura,. l
I Make a Specialty of Repairing Fine Watches and Setting DIamonwd
For further particulara. address for Illustrated catalogue,
noi T.O0. LUVI. e COanal IrNe
A RARE CHANCE AT HILL'S.
I RMusat hiaver O15,000 in Sixty Days.
To raise that amount I offer for cash the larget st stok of
OD WATCHES, JEWELRY AND SOLID OLD CRINS1
IN NEW ORLEANS,
Art PLý4)MITIrIVELY I3'IItST OOST.
By sotual count my stock Includes the following goods. ALL SOLID GOLD. of the best uaslity
and finish: .
120 GOLD WATCHES, MY ENTIRE STOCK OF DIAMONDS
80 SOLID GOLD VEST CHAINS, 200 LADIES'.SOLID GOLD SETTS,
65 SOLID GOLD OPERA CHAINS, 800 PAIRS EAR DROPS,
465 0LID GOlD GUARD CHAINS, 850 SETSN OLID GOLD STUDS,
86 SOLID GOLD NECK CHAINS, 220 PAIRS SOLID GOLD CUFF BUT.
156 LADIE) ' AND GENTLEMENS' SOLID TONS,
GOLD LOCKETS, 225 CAMEO SEAL RINGS,
75 SOLID GOLD PENCIL CASES, 200 AMETHYST SEAL RINGS,
A FULL LINE OF INITIAL CUFF BUTTONS AND STUDS.
Buyers In the country wishing to avail themselves of this opportunity can have artloles seat
C. 0. D., with privilege of examination, and if not suited return at my expense.
LADIES ESPECIALLY INVITED TO EXAMINE STOCK.
A. M. IHILL,
86 .................ST. CHARLES STREET ................... .g
NEW ORLEANS.
WHEELER & PIERSON,
SUCCESSORS TO DAROY & WHEELER AND PIEBRON .& HEWS,
13 and 15 CAMP STR1W1T.
Clothing for Hot Weather
BLACK ALPACA FROCKS AND SACKS, $2 50 TO $8.
BLACK MERINO SUITS FOR CLERGYMEN.
BLACK ALPACA VESTS-VERY LIGHT.
WHITE DUCK VESTS, $1, $1 50 AND $2.
DUSTERS, BROWN LINEN AND CHECK SUITS.
LISLE THREAD, JACONET AND GAUZE UNDERSHIRTS.
PRICES REDUCED ON ALL FANCY CASS. AND CHEVIOT SUITS.
Before taking STOCK, we offer all goods in our WHOLESALE STOCK at Reduaed
Prices to close out. Suite at $4. $5, $6 and $8, and other low priced goods equally chap.
Cash buyers will do well to look at
WHEELER & PIERRON. 12 and 15 Camp at.
PHILIP 'tVERtLEIlN.
This Cut Represents
MASON H& 1Il IS1
-" $190 ORGAN,
REDUCED TO $135,
On easiest payments - SiS M
cash, and $la moin , 6.9,18 15,
21, 24 and 27 months. r
from Boston to be added.
$90 Organ Reduced to $7L.
$7 sw QUARTERLY.
Ver' blhs imAro v
of J.P.HALE & 0.. .th ol
and cover--4o0 style redueed to
$250, on easiest payments]RoWr
-s cash, and lo a moath ntui
paid.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
135 CANAL STREET,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer I
CHICKERING & SON'S PIANOS
MA4PHUSREK PIANOS,
HALE'S PIANOS.
HAIDMAN''S PIANOS.
ORGANS.
MARON & HAMLIN'8,
E4TEY & CO.'8,
NEW ENGLA'~D.ORGAN O0.',
].tberal discount for eash.
Persons at a distance may or
der with the assurance of tU
el vin just as good instrnmen
a though prepent to selectf0
- emselves. If not found sati
mtory they may be returned at
- exense.
`-- - § ]PHILIP WEBIZIN.
---__- _ 135 Canal street, . O.,
PIANOS AND ORGANS
Of the Most Renowned Makes, at Greatly Beducel
Prices, and on Easy Terms, at
GRUNEWALD HALL.
A Magnifcent Selection of the Celebrated Pianos of
STEINWAY, KNABE, PLETEL, HI ES A1111 FISC
Always on hand. Above Pianos are respectfully recomended for their unsurpassed anusnE
ous Musical Qualities, Durability in this climate, which has made them justly so popular Wit.
our people and which are Unapproached by any other in this country.
Just received a Fine Selection of the
OCELEBRATIED ORG -ANTS
-OF
CLOUGH & WARREN, PRINCE, BURDETT.
The Best in the Market, at reasonable prices. Get my Estimates before you purchase elmeaemiI
Old Pianos taken in Exchange for New Ones. or repaired at short notice at moderate Anot .
SHEET MUSIC, BRASS INSTRUMENTS
In Endless Variety and at Lower Figures than at any other House in the Oountsy, teltn*
patronage is respettfully solicited,. O.A
LOUIS GRUm NEWATD.
iyj 14 1 Ni "n , hew Osl-tn, ;.

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