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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, June 15, 1878, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83026413/1878-06-15/ed-1/seq-4/

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DEJMŽORA!.
l nreal of the Mate of Lstdha a,.
4NuW leurmaof the City of New Orteaa5.
(owe, 109 G,.ver stret.
*O3msG3 'W. DVPIPa * 00,
WIIOPBIETORIS
GlloIGUl W. DUPU,
ur ci. IAN M U
AATZ8 01 BOUBB tRLPTION:
The tady DN woorat.
V lelIn Advance.
r,-,"rdV Weekly Demooret.
ly] Democrat alarge eight-page
e unsedo ubscribers at tile
lie
ute 4
" 'arable inAdvance. 0
SWW OWLUL&N, JUN 15, 1875.
,,, WEEKLY DEMOOBAT.
g call the special attention of our busi
Oemmunity to the excellence of the
DaIMOonAT as an advertising medl
The circulation of the WEria L DEMo
throughout Louisiana, Arkansas, Mis
Alabama, Georgia and Texas is
to that of no other paper In the
It contains the latest news from
and commercial centree and the
oien of reading matter. Send in
des early.
E llabeth Jenkins, mother of Mrs.
died in Prince George county, Mary
on the seventh instant, aged eighty
season appears to have been
all around, and Pappenhelm has
the only sufferer. Pauline Markham
been sold out by her employees in St.
Hampton has purchased a cottage at
Va., where his family will reside
the summer, and he also whenever the
Shise office will admit of his leaving
State.
ti girl refused at the altar the
day to marry a man because his breath
Whisky. If that young lady really
10 marry, she had better leave Cinoln
come to New Orleans.
ta Loues Jockey Club propose to erect
ent to the memory of McWhirter,
fo.rd's splendid raoer that broke down
;! so game at the recent meeting of
The memory of that gallant strug
G ero'es to be appropriately perpetuated.
George C. Ellison, chief engineer of the
at Representatives, is to be tried a
time at Washington on the seven
of June, for the killing of David
about a year ago. On the first trial
failed to agree. Hon. E. J. Ellis Is
for the defense.
handsome mansion of Thomas C. Per-1
i'Abbevlle, 8. C., was recently burned.
in this house that the very last official
of the Confederate government tran
President Davis and his Cabinet
the night at Mr. Perrin's on their re
SRichmond, and It was at his house
it was formally determined to disband. 4
schooner Eothen leaves New York this
on her arctic voyage in search of,the
of Sir John Franklin. Capt. Barry,
discovery of the spoons bearing Sir I
' crest led to this expedition, goes in
Lieut. Schwatka, of the Third
States Cavalry. commands the search
y. "Esqulmaux loe," of the Polaris
on, is one of the crew.
I oseph E. Johnston declines to say
in regard to the Grant-Taylor con
y. His note t lGen. Taylor, he says,
a private communic itton, and should not
been used without his consent. He is
tUthorlzed by his Informant, and can say
on the subject. He believes, how
that Gen. Taylor's statement is true,
regrets that he cannot join him in the
istatement was made to a New York
ad reporter.
'i1.~ , McClellan also declines to have any
t:1g to say on the subject. He is frank
,Phgh to say he knows nothing of the matter
qOspt by hearsay, and he declines perempto
:ly to pass any criticisms on Gen. Grant's
ti tary movements.
.:ather (lenin, the old missionary to the
has just returned from Sitting Bull's
4gp, and gives a very interesting account to
ei*Row York Hetraid correspondent of the
a~u strength and resources of the Sioux.
tltttUng Bull, who is but thirty-eight years of
'a .e is his dear friend and calls him brother.
:ther Genin estimates his force at 24,000
.s*rlore, all well armed, with an abundance
ait &amunition, which has been freely sup
gisedthem by traders. Seventeen men are
:. Wstantly employed filling cartridges.
even refill the old Henry
u cartridges, using a paste made
ea the composition taken from matches
s: an eaploslve. A congress of all the tribes
,4_t the Sioux nation has been called by Sitting
ffWll to meet in June. The question to be de
,grmined is, whether they shall unite as a
and come South. The country where
are now cannot support them, and Sit
Bull says he wants his old country on
Yeallowstone. He will not fight if he can
It. He does not want to go on a reserva
and wants no supplies from the govern
AlU he asks is a country of his own,
he and his people can live to them
Father Genin thinks it would be folly
`provoke a war with him, as his capacity to
on an endless and bloody struggle is
to be overestimated. It strikes us
Bull's proposition is a very sensi
well as a just one. Let him be assigned
to be exclusively his own, and get
| uis~rvatoons and the thieving, rob
both upon the 1aas and
POLMIOB, XOIOPOLhiB AnD LOT h
The names of Generals Beauregard and Ear
ly, who have entered the lists as champions of
the Louisiana Lottery Company, are of such
great weight that we deem it necessary, even
at the risk of becoming tedious, to this morn
ing further review their defense of the insti
tution, printed in the Picayune Thursday and
in the Tames yesterday morning.
We have already exposed by facts on record
and statements which we can prove,that these
eminent gentlemen have been Crossly im
posed upon, and that their assertion that
"the managers of the company were in sym
pathy with the Democratic party, and were
active and earnest supporters of the present
government," is not in accordance with his
tory. Before proceeding to discuss other por
tions of the manifesto of Generals Beauregard
and Early, we shall press upon their attention
two or three additional facts on this particular
point. Besides the contested seat of the four
teenth ward of this parish, which the lottery
influence decided against the Democrats and
in favor of a Radical negro, there was a
contest for one of the seats from the parish of
Avoyelles. Mr. Barbin was the Democratic
contestant; on the other hand a disreputable
carpet-bagger,Souer,held and claimed the seat.
After a thorough and impartial investigation
of the controversy the Committee on Elec
tions reported in favor of Mr. Barbin, who
had undoubtedly been elected. Boner,
however, was one of the instruments
of the Lottery Company. He held the
seat and had been bought up with the bal
ance of the Radical members; therefore, not
withstanding the week and perilous major
ity the Democrats held in the House, the lot
tery determined to stand by their Radical
tool, and, if possible, make him secure in his
seat. When the issue came to a final vote the
Radicals voted solidly for Souer, and the
Democrats, with three exceptions, voted for
Mr. Barbin. The three exceptions were Gen.
Young, of Claiborne, and Messrs. Wilde and
Peralta, of this city. Gen. Young and Mr.
Peralta voted with the Radicals and Mr.
Wilde dodged the vote. Messrs. Wilde and
Peralta are employees of the Lottery Com
pany, and Gen. Young had been, from the
time he entered the House, in the lottery in
terest. Mr. Barbin was seated, it is true, but
he was seated because the Lottery Company
could not exercise influence enough to defeat
him.
Generals Beauregard and Early will, we
have no doubt, concede that a man is very apt
to vote on the side on which he has risked his
money in betting. Now if Mr. Howard and
the lottery men generally had been the true
and consistent Democrats these distinguished
gentlemen represent them to be, and to have
been, they would not have been found betting
largely on Packard and Hayes. And yet this I
is just what they did do. Whether they will I
acknowledge it now or not we are not pre- i
pared to say; but it will not be diffcult to I
prove it on several of them, if they deny it. -
Mr. Howard himself was in New York in the I
latter part of September, 1876, and we have
before us a letter written, from that city, on
the twenty-fifth of September of that year, to
the New Orleans DEMOCRAT by a stockholder
in the Lottery Company, in which we find
this brief but significant sentence: "Charles
T. Howard is also here, betting wildly that
Tilden will not carry a single Northern State."
But why discuss this subject further. The
Louisiana Lottery has not, and in the nature
of things cannot have, any honest and
patriotic political aflilliations. It will herd al
ways with the party that is "in," and Its inter
ests will always force it to pursue methods
calculated to debase and corrupt the party t
that it affiliates with and turn it against the
public good. Warmoth, Kellogg, Ludeling,
Hawkins and Dibble made it Radical, because t
Radicalism itself was political debauchery. e
But not even Beauregard and Early-no,
though Lee himself, and all the soldiers, liv- t
ing and dead, who followed the banners of the
(~onfederacy should lend their voices to swell
the argument--could make it honestly Demo
cratic.
THIE BIEATITTIEA OF A MONOPOLY.
Perhaps the most novel feature in the de
fense set up by Generals Beauregard and
Early for the Loulsiala Lottery Company
is the following:
As to the objection that the Louisiana State
Lottery is a monopoly, we do not see that it is
a very sertos one but are of olinlon that it is
f )r the better that the charter confers a monoD
",lv. It lotteries are all great evils, than it is
better that they should exbit as monopolies
than that the right to conduct them should be
general.
In one paragraph these gentlemen assure
the community that thby are so deeply im
bued with Democracy that they refused to
associate themselves with the Lottery Com
pany until they had satisfied themselves
that its managers were all dyed-in-the-wool
Democrats, and in the next paragraph they
broadly, unreservedly and unequivocally as
sert that there is no serious objection to a
gigantic monopoly; indeed, they tell us that
in their opinion monopolies are a blessing to
the people. We cannot understand this sort
of Democracy. We have always believed
that monopolies of all descriptions were ob
noxious to true Democracy and repugnant to
the genius of republican institutions. And yet
we do not believe the doctrine of monopolies
has ever been so broadly presented and un
qualifiedly defended since the Parliament
of 1597, when Queen Elizabeth said "she hoped
her dutiful and lovingsubjects would not take
away her prerogative (to grant monopolies),
the choicest flower in her garden and the
principal and head pearl in her crown and
diadem." But even in that time the perni
cious effects of monopolies had been so plainly
demonstrated that the Parliament, backed by
the people, finally compelled the great Queen
to yield to their demands, and abolish them
all.
It has been said that corporations have no
soul. This might be said with more justice of
corporations with monopoly rights. These
latter destroy all honest and legitimate
competition, and then, as they grow
strong and rich, dominate every other
interest. If the monopoly be of a
business which yields rich returns-such,
for instance, as a lottery-it soon becomes, not
legitimately, bi t through the corrupting
power of its wealth, more powerful even than
the State; it gathers around it other rings;
pushes its influence into politics, and soon is
sues its imperious directions to governors,
carries legislatures in its pocket, controls the
decisions of courts and sneers contemptuous
ly at "the people," on whom it feeds and
whose rights and interests it disregards. A
political ring, such as the Tweed ring in
New York, is not so dangerous to the public
interests as a monopoly such as the Louisiana
State Lottery. A political ring has no char
ter; its henchmen in the Legislature cannot
refuse to break it down, beeause it has vested
rights; actsaseha*No. 9 oi 187 4 anot be,
pbuml tegIpsba~6 Wtnwsb
pefteral lIberty of thcms who trepaas upon
its privileeas; courts which it has bought
up cannot deolde that it cannot be interfered
with for two or three generations, because it
has "vested rights." Nay, when the rascall
ties of such a ring are exposed; when the
press has shown that it has corruptly Inter
fered in legislation, and that it is debauching
politics and society, it goes to pieces at once;
its members are chased from one end of the
world to the other, captured, tried, convicted
and imprisoned. It is very different, in the
case of a monopoly such as the one our hon
ored and distinguished fellow-citizens, Gen
erals Beauregard and Early, are defending.
The corrupt acts of such an institution
may be shown up. It may be proven
that it has influenced courts; that it has
bribed legislatures; that it has grossly
violated its charter; that it has deceived,
swindled and defrauded the poor, ignorant
and credulous of the community; thdt it Is
using bribery, intimidation and every other
corrupt influence to control politics. But it
cannot be destroyed. A brigade of great
lawyers are ever ready to defend its chartered
right. Courts and legislatures dare not in
fringe its "vested rights," and thus it may
go on for fifteen years longer a curse to the
State, growing richer each year; and at the
expiration of its charter it may so have the
State in its grasp as to direct the Legislature
it will have assembled, and the Governor it
may have elected, to renew its charter for an
other quarter of a century.
No monopoly has ever surrendered its
charter; no monopoly has ever respected the
law unless forced to do so. It is only the
wrath of an indignant people, excited beyond
endurance, that can overawe and defeat the
mighty agencies which a monopoly like the
Louisiana State Lottery can gather to its
support. Nay, we assure Generals Beaure
gard and Early that they are greatly mis
taken on this point. Even If they are right
in every other position they have taken, they
are wrong here. A monopoly of any sort is a
pernicious thing; a monopoly of a gambling
privilege or of any other vice is a withering
curse to any community.
There are other points in the manifesto of
Generals Beauregard and Early we had in
tended to review, but these articles have
been so long that we shall desist. And now
in conclusion we will again express our pro
foundest respect for these distinguished men,
who won a glorious renown in the defense of
a cause dear to the heart of every Southern
man. The people of Louisiana, nay, let us
say the people of the whole South, can never
cease to love these veterans of the Confederacy.
To us it has been a painful duty to take issue
with them, and we should never, under any cir
cumstances, have done so-had not their card
rendered a review of it by the DEMOoBAT an
imperative though regretful duty. We have
treated them with the profound respect and
regard we feel for them, and nothing they
may say can force us to speak of them save
in terms of affection and respect. With this
article we conclude the only chapter on the
lottery it has given us pain to write.
THE NEXT HOUSE.
The control of the Senate is already assured
to the Democrats after the fourth of March i
next, and this fact will only serve to stimu
late the Republicans to greater exertions to
secure a majority in the House of Represent- I
atives. How they propose to do this has I
already, in a measure, been disclosed. The
policy of the campaign seems to be entirely
partisan with the free use of all the money that
can be obtained in doubtful districts. This
plan of operations has already been disclosed
by the Republican committee at Washington.
It has also been indicated that extraordinary
exertions will be made in all Southern dis
tricts where it is believed possible to make a
successful canvass. In these districts the
campaign is to be conducted by speakers from
the North and by the most lavish expenditure
of money. In view of these facts it becomes
of interest to know where are the doubt
ful districts in the various States of
the Union. A full House contains 293
members. There is one vacancy from this
State, caused by the death of Judge Leonard
and the Democrats have twenty majority.
The House is composed of the following dele
gations from the various sections: New Eng
land is represented by twenty-two Republic
ans and six Democrats; the Middle States
that is, New York, New Jersey and Pennsyl
vania-are represented by thirty-seven Re
publicans and thirty Democrats; the Western
States have sixty-five Republicans and thirty
four Democrats; the South has eight Repub
licans and eighty-four Democrats, and the
Pacific States, four Republicans and two
Democrats.'
Of the New England States, the Phila
delphia Times says:
Of the six New England Democratic members
one was secured by the action of the vresent
House in ousting the Renublican who was re
turned from the Third District of Massachu
setts with a mejotity of five: in New Hamp
shire the single Democratic memb r was elect
ed by a majority of forty-three. and in Connec
ticut one had less than 200 majority.
The Times thinks the Democrats can only
expect to hold their own in these States, with
a serious probability of losing two of the six
districts now represented by Democrats. In
the Middle States the majorities are all pro
nounced, and there appears but little proba
bility of changing them.
In New York, however, there are three dis
tricts that gave at the last election less than
500 majority, and four that gave less than
1000. In all these the prospects of the Demo
crats are the better, and, if carried, will add
two more to the Democratic representation,
making it 18 to 15 Republicans, instead of 16
to 17, as it now stands. In Pennsylvania
there are three districts with less than 1000
majority, two Democratic and one Republi
can. Of these districts the Times cannot
make any estimate, and leaves them doubt
ful. The real contest will lie in the West,
and there the Democrats have every advan
tage. The redistricting of Ohio alone will
operate, with absolute certainty, a Demo
cratic gain of four, and perhaps five, from
that State alone. In Missouri, the four Re
publicans now in Congress from that State
are not less certain of defeat. Here is a cer
tain gain of eight, and perhaps nine, mem
bers from the West, with no probability of
a greater loss than three or four in New
England and the Middle States.
In the South the outlook for the Republi
cans is even more gloomy. Of the Southern
Republicans, one is from North Carolina, one
from Florida, one from Virginia, one from
Louisiana, two from Tennessee and three
from South Carolina. In South Carolina the
Republicans will lose certainly one, if not two
of the three districts. The Democrats of Judge
Leonard's district believe that they can carry
that district if a violent Republican is nomi
noted, and PlaPB*k's ia,·r alon vt the dis
a candidate makes the ohances of the Demo
Lt crate excellent indeed.
d It will be safe to assume that whatever
t changes occur in the South will be favorable
I- to the Democrats. In this State there are but
e two doubtful districts, Judge Leonard's and
Mr. Acklen's, and there is a fair chance of
g carrying both of these.
From the Pacific States the Democrats have
e alreadyscored one gain, from Oregon, and
d the last elections in all these States point to
e further gains. So far the outlook is alto
gether favorable to the Democrats, and it
does not appear where the Republican gains
r. are to come from to change the politics of the
E House as it now stands. The Indications
Q point with certainty to an increased Demo
s cratic majority, and the absolute control by
V that party of the legislative departments of
, the government. So mote it be.
I _____ [____
tl~- -- - --- nu innmn n nllluuu ln
SENATOR HILL'S SECRET.
The utterances attributed to Senator Ben
Hill by the Washington correspondent of the
New York TimeR, in regard to the Wormley
conference and the solemn engagement en
tered into by the forty-two ex-Confederates in
Congress to oppose all attempts to frustrate
the counting of the electoral votes for Hayes,
are certainly veryextraordinary. So extraor
dinary, indeed, are they that we can scarcely
believe them to be true. It passes belief that
so many honorable Southern men, of sufflolent
repute and influence to obtain seats in Con
gress as the representatives of the solid Dem
ocratic South, could be tmd who would enter
into such a secret comumation as Senator
Hill descrlbes. Yet Senator Hill is made to
speak by the card and his declarations are
positive and explicit, and so easily susceptible
of proof that there can be no diffi
culty in substantiating all that he
says, if it be true. This he will
doubtless be called upon to do. The Southern
people will certainly not allow such a revela
tion as this to go by unchallenged. They
will certainly ask for a showing of hands all
round in regard to this extraordinary league.
They will demand to know upon what provo
cation it was entered into, and what there
was to justify a course which, in the light
Senator Hill has left it, was certainly a very
base and cowardly piece of business, a thing
the Southern people would have rejected at
the time and will surely rebuke now and in
all future time.
We prefer to reserve our comments till we
know more of this affair. It comes to us so
suddenly and is, withal, so improbable that
we are not prepared to say that of it which it
appears from the light before us deserves to
be said.
The great Jackson Route has now on
sale excursion tickets to the beautiful
summer resorts of the Northwest at
very low rates. They will remain on sale till
September 30, and will be good to return till
October 31, They include such well known
points as Waukesha, Oo6nomowoc and Green
Lake, Wisconsin; St. Paul, Minnesota; Grand
Haven and Mackinaw, Michigan, and Niagara
Falls besides numerous others of peraps
equal attractions. There are no more desira
ble places at which to spend the summer than
these cool and healthful resorts, situated in
the lovely lake district of Wisconsin, or on
the noble Lake Michigan and Niagara river.
Boarding is cheap and of the best quality;
and at many of them are mineral springs
particularly adapted to the cure of complaints
engendered by a Southern climate, All are
easily accessible from large cities and com
bine with their associations the benefits of
rural life.
To reach them the great Jackson Route is
the shortest, quickest and only direct line.
It is in excellent order, having been practi
cally rebuilt with steel rails. No one passing
over it can fall to notice the smooth track ab
sence of dust, and thoroughly satisfactory
condition of everything about it. Pullman
cars run through to Chicago and Cincinnati
without change, and there is no change of
cars from there to nearly, if not quite, all the
points to which excursion tickets are sold.
Books, maps and folders, giving full de
scriptions of the Northwestern watering
places and the routes and rates thereto can
be had at the office of the great Jackson Route,
No. 22 Camp street, under City Hotel, where
every one intending to spend the summer
away from this city is invited to call before
deciding to go elsewhere.
The great Jackson route is also without a
superior as a line to New York and all the
principal Eastern cities, reaching them with
but one change of cars.
WAiONS I CANE CARTS I SPOKESI
H. N. SORIA,
18 and 20 Union and 16 and 17 Perdido
streets.
Bole Agent for the celebrated "STUDEBA
KER" WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer in Philadel hia and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions ; Spokes. Fel
loes. Hubs, Shafts, etc. Wheelwright material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
Jac 2dptf
BODLEY BROTHERS,
1I7 and 19..Common street..12t anm 139
Between St. Charles and City Hotels.
FARM AND PLANTATION WAGONB.
Cane Carts. Bagasse Carts., Small Carts of all
sizes, Timber Wheels, Wheelbarrows, Sokes,
Felloes, Shafts. Wagon Material. Axle Grease,
etc.
This is the oldestand largestw on establish
ment in the South, manufacturing their own
work and guaranteeing everything they sell.
fes ly 2dp
J. LEVOIS,
126 CANAL STREET,
Is now preparing to make large importations
of French, British and German
DRY GOODS,
in the Fall, including an elegant assortment of
the latest novelties in French
DRESS GOODS,
and being desirous of selling as many of the
Goods now in store as possible during the
summer months, has made great reductions in
prices, and respectfully requests purchasers to
call and examine the goods and prices.
J. LEVOIS,
je9 Su Th Sa 2do 126 Canal street.
DLR CHARLES LANAUX,
DENTIST,
Omee-No. s3 Royal Street,
Between Conti and St. Louis streets.
mylss m ldo
WANTED.
TO BUT CITY SCRIP, POLICE SCRIP,
. AqD -
ALL KINDS OF CITY INDEBTEDNESS.
W. H. BABNETT. Broker.
5as e as aies ase. 9exits t8, asrles
ha~d . ,~lig !!'b
AGENCY OF
IALTHA AND EG111 ATCHIS,
I. C. L.EVI, Jeweler,
O ............................ Wa l Street............ . .
Offers the above Watches at me latest reduced priee lise of November IeL
Tr. Wateae are all Patent ImrsM. and ilaruantee Ier Thre TeaHrl
Solid v.er aat, Waltham o tr s h ent..*..-- m q
Solid ever Wael. ith oesrae -nalM.-....
Solid 811 term inder ietter ... .............
S Bol atcP, s. os 14 karat eaee..... . .. . . p--«* .
Bo roý° Wteh, 9 e oe, 1S ka at csee......a e.......... »..
M. or 29 os
SBod m Stem Winde. s% os. S karat aee- ..... uI
LADI.E' W*TOas.,
oll old Watah, 1 karst case...................... m.
ey Sol old Watoh, 1R karat .ee .......................... .
S Sol old L8tSm winder, 14 karat case ....................
Solid old Stem-winder. s1 karat ease..... ........ ,.
In addition to the abve I have a large usrtmeat I
French and German Watches, pricesrangiw. m . to
- For mechanics or laborers the KS watol or sete.wa
will give all satsfaOtion necessary.
I will send watches. dlamondt and Jewer br ymesra..
0. 0. D., allowina the purchaser to open pe ame ana
ine same.
I have a oomlete sMortent of Diamonds, Overa. Guard, Vest and Weok (O ains tai m
oorresDond wi thte above. I have eonstantly on hand a large stook of Silverware of al 4.
tionas, locks. Bronzes and Statuary.
I Make a Specialty of Repairing Fine Watches and Setting Diamadg.
Nor further particulars, address for illustrated catalogue,
not t. O. LEVI. t0s Ocal salm
: ~ ~~~~~~~~~~ II l II IHI I i · I 1[n
A RARE CHANCE AT HILL'S.
I uIust IIave $15,000 in Sixty Days.
To raise that amount I offer for cash the largest stock of
6OLD WITCHES, JEWELRY AND SDLID 60D BllNM S
IN NEW ORLEANS,
A'r PO:IT 'IVELY I-I0eST COST.
By actual count my stock includes the following goods, ALL SOLID GOLD, of the best quality
and finish:
120 GOLD WATCHES, MY ENTIRE STOCK OF DIAMONDS,
80 SOLID GOLD VEST CHAINS, 200 LADIES' SOLID GOLD SETTS,
65 SOLID GOLD OPERA CHAINS, 800 PAIRS EAR DROPS,
45 SOLID GOLD GUARD CHAINS, 850 SETS SOLID GOLD STUDS
85 SOLID GOLD NECK CHAINS, 220 PAIRS SOLID GOLD CUFF BUT.
156 LADIES AND GENTLEMENS' SOLID TONS,
GOLD LOCKETS, 225 CAMEO SEAL RINGS,
75 SOLID GOLD PENCIL CASES, 200 AMETHYST SEAL RIN8%.
A FULL LINE,OF INITIAL CUFF BUTTONS AND STUDS.
Bnyers in the country wishing to avail thAmselves of this opportunity cars have articles seat
C. O. D., with privilege of examination, and if not suited return at my expense.
LADIES ESPECIALLY INVITED TO EXAMINE STOCK.
A. M1. HILL,
86.' ................... ST. CHARLES STREET..............86
NEW ORLEANS.
-t - t - t ~ ti - -
•PIIIILI-P WVZEILEIIY.
This Cut Represents
SM IASI & HIIMfS
$190 ORGA',
REDUCED TO $185,
On easiest payments- 1. so
S cash,and$13s501n36,, 102.5I
21, 24 and 27 months. Freit
from Boston to be added.
$90 Organ Reduceit $7Z'
$7 Z2 QUABTERLY.
Yery highly imvroved Pia1
of J. P. HALE CO.. witho
and cover-s400 style reduced io
$250. on easiest payments knor
- cash. and 10o a month untiB
PHILIP WERLEIN,
185 CANAL STREET..
Wholesale and Retsil Dealeril
CHIOKERING A SON'SP M (%
M&TFRUHREK PIANOS,
HALE'S PIANOS,
HAIIDMAN'$ PI .NOS,
M A ORGANLS.
MARON & HAMLIN'8.
E'TEY & CO.'BS.
NfEW ENGLAND ORGAN O0.'8.
Liberal discount for cash.
Persons at a distance may 0
der with the assurance of ro
'elving just as good Instruments
a though present to. select for
iemselves. If not found sati
otory they may be returned at
. .__ - iyexpen .LIP WERLEIN
S 135 Canal street, NO.
PIANOS AND ORGANS
Of the Most Renowned Makes, at Greatly Redace
Prices, and on Easy Terms, at
GRUNEWALD HALL.
A Magniflcent Selection of the Oelebrated Pianos of
STEINWAY, KIABE, PLYEEL, HAIIES AllD FISHE
Always on hand. Above Pianos are respectfully recomended for their unsurpassed nawe.
ons Musical Qualities. Durability in this climate, which has made them Justly so poDllar wih
our people and which are Unapproached by any other in this country.
Just received a Fine Selection of the
CELEBRA=I'ED ORGIANS
-OF
CLOUGH & WARREN, PRINCE, BURDETT.
The Best in the Market. at reasonable prices. Get my Estimates before you purchase elsewheb
Old Pianos taken in Exchange for New Ones. or repaired at short notice at moderatalgumt
SHEET MUSIC, BRASS INSTRUMENTS
In Endless Variety and at Lower Figures than at any other House in the Country. Tonl
patronage is respectfully solicited.
LOUIS GRUNEteWALD,
Jyl 14 to a vrlennne ,treet New OEUes.
MOUSSEEIdE DE PARIS
WHITE GOODS.
OUB STOCK OF
WHITE GOODS
BEING NOW COMPLETE, WE INVITE PUB
CHASERS TO CALL AND EX
AMINE SAME.
D. LH. IOL1WMES,
165 0aal and 15 Beurbea Sta.
-
YELLOW FEVER, DIPHTHEEIA
- AND ALL -
CONTAGIOUS DISEASES,
Can b .prevPnted or eradifated by the free use
of CALVERT'S No. 6 CABBOLIC ACID.
F. C. CALVERT & CO..
Bradford Manchaeter Mannfacturers.
EIIILAY & TIOMPBON,
Wholsale Afentas
je2 3Sot New Oreans, Ia.
EALAKOFF BITTEBR,
The best stomachic sad tonio soverelrg remedy
for Dyspelpia. Excellent for an anti-mala.gi
morning beveragea
law PrIse-P-m aai sesnkam.
or sale in all qanratlnes by
ALPH. WALS
hola 3ste a.j.w I
iwasm w aFl 0icwe et, o , .e

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