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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, June 16, 1878, Image 2

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
OOmcial Journal of the State of Louisiana.
SOfieial Journal of the City of New Orleans.
OfRce, 109 Gravier Street.
GEORGE W. DUPRE & CO.,
PBOPRIETOBS.
GEORGE W. DUPRE,
. 1. IHeZABSEY, JOHN AUGUSTIN,
ALBERT C. JANIN.
S. J. HEABSEY ..................... EDITOR.
NEW ORLEANS, JUNE 16, 1978.
LOTTERY HSRNINGS.
We have shown the swindling character of
the daily drawings of the Louisiana State
Lottery Company. That the people now see
Sthrugh this swindle is proved by the failure
and closing-up of several lottery offices
ag..o d town in the past few weeks and by
t:ei mmense falling off in the number of com
moiation tiqkets sold. The lottery manage
Went appreciate this fact; in times past they
depended largely on this daily drawing for
At:i4 r campaign funds; they do so no longer,
i and are concentrating all their energies on
the monthly and grand semi-annual draw
t.gs, which they confidently count on to
turn4m them golden harvests.
x "We have shown how their combination
'su tawingS compared with those of other lot
tWries. Let us see how their monthly draw
Jlgs compare with the lottery schemes of
ether countries; the proportions that the
vrimes therein bear to the tickets sold, the
amount of money that the Lottery Company
asnually pockets.
On this point there is extraordinary ignor
4ace among our people, and for the best of
-.seaons. The Louisiana Lottery Company is
a* monopoly; it forbids, under severe penal
. :. of fine and imprisonment, the sale of any
e its own lottery tickets within this State;
the publication even of any other lottery
;aheme is a crime against the laws of Louisi
oans. Our people, therefore, are unable to
empare Howard's scheme with any other,
are consequently unable to see its swind
toh~racter.
, The last grand drawing of the Louisiana
ory, of which the company is especially
rod, because the capital prize was at last
awn-the drawing of a big prize being re
with surprise, amounting to awe,
by the lottery men themselves, and
out as something extraordinary, wonder
sad unusual-contained 100,000 tickets and
prrizes, or one prize to every 176 tickets.
were really all the prizes awarded, the
return of the price of your ticket
y deserving to be called a prize, unless
is to consider himself lucky for having
from the clutches of the lottery
tlosh.
t-liHow do other lottery schemes compare
this? And is there any truth in the as
n published in the Lottery's defense in
Thureday's Picayune that "the schemes
-he Louisiana Lottery Company are as
as those of any other lottery honestly
educted?"
The oldest lotteries in existence are those of
rany and Italy. Many of these have
,- ee n operatlon for centuries, and during
:heir long career have never had a word said
agalnst their "honesty." Indeed, they are
ei0duated by the government, which holds
ef responsible for their honesty and good
:Lt. Is the Louisiana State Lottery as lib
ral1 as these? Let us see: The Hamburg
lottery, which has been drawn biennially in
t.he free city of Hamburg since 1741, issues
*5,000 tickets and 46,200 prizes; the Royal
. ion Lottery, drawn at Dresden since 1831,
$wardb 50,000 prizes to 100,000 tickets; the
I .1aual Lottery of Brunswick-Luneburg issues
9 85,000 tickets and 44,000 prizes.
The real point, however, the test whether
Sa lottery is a swindle or not, is its net earn
1D g#-the proportion of ticket money which it
.ays back on prizes, and the share that it
drops into its own pockets. Here, indeed, is
:j the feature of the Louisiana Lottery that
i~~ Oh it what it is-the enemy of the people
& iof Louisiana, the grandest of swindles and
humnbugs.
The lottery has always shown the greatest
slinelination to make public its financial
affairs; it endeavors to keep all facts con
nected with its d:awings hidden and dark.
It declines to tell how many tickets there are
In its daily drawings, and seeks to conceal, as
i :'ar as possible, the number in its grand semi
,r annual drawings, neglecting to publish in any
of our lottery papers the number of tickets to
beeold, although it tells in at least a hundred
different places the number of prizes to be
awarded. But an investigation into the
scheme shows the following results: 521; per
sent of the money taken in for tickets is paid
out in prizes, the remainder 474 per cent goes
.ntothe pockets of the Lottery Company.
The gains of the lottery in a year, outside of
!. the daily drawings would be no less than
$1,855,000 were all the tickets sold It is
not to be supposed that this immense
amount is required to carry on a lottery-it
. is more than absurd to pretend so-unless the
management of a lottery includes the man
agement of the press and the Legislature.
Indeed the 15 per cent deducted from the win
n' ngs in the daily drawing are amply suffi
dent to pay, all the legitimate working ex
penses of the lottery.
Instead of being as liberal as other lotte
rles,' the Louisiana Lottery Company pays
back, without exception, the smallest pro
portion of ticket money as prizes, not only of
any lottery now in existence, but of any that
ever existed at any time.
In the Brunswick-Luneburg Lottery, the
R oyal Saxon Lottery, the Hamburg Free
City Lottery, which distribute annually
nearly $8,000,000 of prizes, the whole amount
of money paid in for tickets is paid out again
in prizes, 15 per cent only being deducted for
the cost of management and benevolent pur
poses That is the gross gain of these lotte
rles is 15 per cent; of the Louisiana State
Lottery 47T pet cent; more than three times
as much. These European lotterles find that
15 per cent not only pays for running the lot
tery, but leaves an immense amount over,
every cent of which is given to benevolent
Institutions. The cost of "management" is 3
per cent; the other 12 per cent goes in
charity. What does our lottery give in the
way of charity?
The monthly and semi-annual drawings
lontain $4,000,000 worth of tickets. The lot
,ry'B charity-which means its monopoly
ht-is therefore just 1 per cent on its sale of
thlytickets. Its ticket money is distrib
as follows: To owners of prizes, 52% per
to charity (monopoly right), 1 per cent;
Lottery Company (including the press,
and Lelselature), 10% per cent
That s, its per ontage of gain on the monthly
drawing is four times as great as any other
lottery in existence and five times as great as
any gambling game, including bunco, ever
played in America.
In the defense of the Lottery Company
published in last Thursday's Picayune, Gen
erals Beauregard and Early argue in favor
of the monopoly character of the Louisiana
Lottery on the ground that if lotteries are an
evil "it is better that they should exist as
monopolies than that the right to con
duct them should be general." It is more
than absurd to pretend to the people of Lou
isiana that the Louisiana Lottery seeks to
enforce act No. 9 and the various other acts,
guaranteeing it a monopoly from any vir
tuous consderation, either because lotteries
are immoral or to protect our people from
bogus or fraudulent lotteries abroad; it is
more than absurd to pretend this; it is a
direct insult to the intelligence of the people
of this State.
No; not content with a monopoly grant in
its charter, the lottery bought from half a
dozen Radical Legislatures, at heavy cost,
supplementary laws and acts to prevent any
other lottery tickets being sold or any other
lottery scheme published in the State, because
it well knows that it cannot stand compe
tition; because its terms and prizes and
schemes are so unfair-judged even by the
moral code of gamblers and lotteries-that it
could not sell a dozen tickets in the State
unless protected by just such acts as Nos. 9
and 10.
A COLD S~'MMER.
A Man Frozen to Death Amid Intence
summer Heat.
[Meridian (Miss.) Mercury ]
Mr. James Knox, a young man of the east
ern part of this county, has been strangely
afflicted for about a year. Hot or cold, he
was always affected as If freezing to death.
His case has been examined by several skill
ful physicians, and, we understand, has puz
zled them all. He was constantly using the
devices to warm himself that a man might
who had been chilled by exposure to extreme
cold, sitting around rousing fires, enveloped
in blankets and the house closely shut up,
and this though the weather was at summer
heat. It is said he would sit down by the
fire and hold his head down to it and almost
roast it in the effort to warm. It is a fact that
he put cloths on his head to protect the
scalp from actual burning while doing
thus, and the cloths have been actually
set on fire by the heat he subjected
them to in endeavoring to warm his head.
Some time ago he made a visit to Livings
ton in the hope of being benefited by the
artesian water, when Dr. Webb of that town
saw his case. Lately he had determined to
return to Livingston and try again the wa
ters, and again consulted Dr. Webb, going to
his office for that purpose. He seemed as one
suffering from extreme cold, and asked Dr.
Webb if he had any fire in his office. He told
him he did not, and that it was too hot to have
fire and be comfortable. He said he could not
stand it, and ran out of the office into the
street for the benefit of the sunshine to warm
himself. The next day Dr. Webb had him in
his office again to make a more critical exam
ination of his case, and had him a rousing fire.
He carefully tested with a thermometer the
degree of animal heat he carried and found
it near normal. With all of this trouble
hD lost little flesh, and kept a good appe
tite for food and preserved rather a health
ful look. On Friday he started home
again in a wagon with a Mr. Meadows
driving it. He had not got far out of
Livingston before he wanted to return com
plaining that he was freezing to death, and
wanted to get somewhere to warm. Meadows
insisted on continuing the journey on home,
and drove forward. Knox jumped out of the
wagon and ran off into the woods. Meadows
pursued him, and compelled him to return
and get into the wagon again, and drove on.
He got as far as Mrs. Peteet's-Green Grant's
old place-with him Mrs. Peteet had observed
Meadows driving slowly along the road, and
knowing that he had gone to fetch the sick
man home, went out to the gate to make in
quiry. When Meadows drove up and stopped,
to her inquiry he said he believed Jim Knox
was dying. He was lying stretched helpless
in the bottom of the wagon, and after it had
stopped only gasped a few times and died,
apparently freezing to death last Friday,
with the thermometer at near 90.
The Louisiana Commission.
IChicago Times. June 12.1
A chapter of the secret history of the Louis
iana commission was unearthed by Glover's
committee yesterday, which makes a rather
more serious showing for John Sherman than
anything which has yet been developed. It
seems that Sherman, at the setting out of the
McVeigh commission a year ago last spring,
a pplied to the First National Bank of New
York, a member of the syndicate, for the sum
of $5000 to pay the expenses of the commis
sion, promising that the amount would be re
stored to the bank through an appropriation.
Of course he obtained the $5000, as the First
National Bank expected to have, and has
had, very profitable dealings with the Treas
ury Department. To borrow money in this
way in anticipation of an appropriation was,
however, an unlawful proceeding, and Mr.
Sherman can be made to suffer for it in the
way provided by the constitution and the
laws. Furthermore, the check drawn by the
bank was cashed at the sub-treasury in New
Orleans-another illegal act.
The Senate.
The election of a-Democratic Legislature
in Oregon changes the political qualification
of the next Senate to the following: Certain
Democratic, forty-one; certain Republican,
twenty-six; doubtful, eight; Independent,
one. The prospects favor the election of five
Republicans and three Democrats from those
claimed as doubtful, though if the Democrats
keep on as they have started out, having al
ready gained three Senators in States which
went Republicpn at the presidential election
of 1876, these figures will have to be more
than reversed to meet the state of the case.
Davis, of Illinois, is the Independent. A
Democratic majority of six over all is certain;
a majority of fourteen is probable.
Republicans Walling Over Bad Fortune.
(Cincinnati Commercial. Rep.1
WASHINGTON, June 12.-The loss of the
Oregon Legislature and consequent loss of a
Senator, causes considerable mortification
among Republicans here. They had not
counted upon this, and the case is doubly ag
gravating as it comes at a time when the
party could ill afford it. A handsome work
ing majority is now assured the Democrats
in the Senate after March. The present em
ployees of that body are looking with alarm
upon the prospect, and Democratic aspi
rants for the fat places are already offering.
It is charged by some that Mitchell caused
the loss of the Legislature by his anxiety to
secure his return to the Senate. It is alleged
that he is a weak man and a heavy weight on
the party, and the disaffected elements took
this method to unload him.
Congress.
The following is the representation of the
two parties in the last three Congresses, ac
cording to sections:
1872. 1874. 1876.
R. D. R. D. R. D.
New England....... 26 2 18 10 22 6
Middle States...... 52 15 29 38 37 30
The West .......... 72 26 45 53 65 34
The South.......... 44 49 17 76 8 85
Pacific States....... 3 3 2 4 4 2
Totals..........197 95 111 181 136 156
Stanley Has Made Progress.
[Cincinnati Gazette, Rev.]
Senator Matthews is now one of the best
known, if not the best abused, men in the
United States. If he shall ever be nominated
for the Presidency no one will have occasion
to ask, who is Stanley Matthews ! He has
made great progress, too, tn learning poli
tis. He Will know a deadbeSt, a bummer, or
* trc q· r whn psdim.
SUGAR MACHINERY.
THE EXISTING NECESSITY FOR USING
THE RIGHESF IDPaOVED. MACHIN
ERY ON OUR SUGAR PLATATIONS.
Everywhere that steam machinery has been
applied to agricultural pursuits production
has been increased to an enormous extent.
Within the past quarter of a century the aver
age result of a man's labor, when applied to
producing those crops which furnish food, has
been more than doubled by bringing to his
assistance the improved machinery of modern
times. The greatest improvements have been
made in harvesting machinery from the fact
that there it is most needed, since in almost
any crop that is grown one man can plant and
cultivate more than he can gather.
In the cultivation of sugar invention has
been literally forced to its widest scope. There
the most perfect and ponderous machinery is
needed to properly manipulate the crude pro
duct of the corn fields. Probably no other
crop in the world requires such an outlay of
capital in machinery before its perfected pro
duct can be placed in a marketable shape.
Twenty-five years ago there were nearly
one thousand sugar plantations in Louisiana,
containing steam power mills and machinery.
Many of their immense manufactories were
erected and equipped at a cost each, of over
$100,000, while few steam sugar-houses in the
State cost less than $20,000. The total amount
of capital invested in fitting up the harvesting
machinery of the Louisiana sugar fields was
over twenty-five millions of dollars.
The greatest improvement In the machinery
applied to sugar manufacture was made when
eteam clarifiers, the vacuum pan and centri
fugals were substituted for or added to the
open-kettle apparatus generally used, which
apparatus consisted of a set of open kettles
with sometimes a steam strike pan attached. I
Before the war thole places whose machinery
was improved by the addition of vacuum
pans and centrifugals went rapidly to the
front as far as comparative production was
concerned, and thousand-hogshead crops on
single plantations ceased to be considered as
astounding results. Since the war, the im. E
proved machinery has manifested its immense
advantages over the open boiling apparatus
in the results obtained.
We have no reliable data for the crop of
1877 as to the proportion manufactured in
vaccuo, but of the crop of the preceding year I
the most reliable statistics have been fur- I
nished. These show that the gross crop
manufactured (that shipped to market and
that kept for consumption in the parishes
where it was made), amounted to 190,000,000
pounds of sugar. Of this, 40,000,000 pounds
were made in vacuum pans and 150,000,000
pounds in the open kettle apparatus.
These 40,000,000 pounds were manufactured
on sixty-five plantations, whose manufactor
ies were fitted with the vacuum boiling appar
atus. Each of these places turned out an
average of more than 600,000 pounds of sugar
and 30,000 gallons of molasses (the yield of
molasses having been fifty-six gallons to 1000
pounds clarified sugar.)
The 150,000,000 pounds were made on 720
plantations equipped with the open kettle
boiling apparatus, and also from 254 horse
power mills. Considering the horse-power
mill production as too small to affect the
general calculation, we find that the planta
tions which made open kettle sugar averaged
about 200,000 pounds of sugar and 15,000 gal
lons of molasses (seventy-five gallons to 1000
pounds of sugar the proportion obtained) per
plantation.
The plantation equipped with improved
machinery made nearly three times as much
in quantity as that which followed the old
method of open boiling. It is well known
that the average acreage of the plantations
containing open kettle apparatuses is more
than half that of those fitted with the best
improved boiling machinery, yet the crops
they produced in 1876, and the average crops
they produce almost every year, scarcely ex
ceed one-third of the average of those con
taining the improved machinery.
If it had not been well known (learned by
experiment and found by experience) that the
vacuum pan obtains more sugar from a stated
amount of cane juice than does the open
boiling apparatus, it would only need a
glance at the comparative production of su
gar plantations to prove that it does.
This excess of crystalized sugar from the
vacuum pan islestimated--when the juice or
syrup from sound cane is treated-at from
20 to 25 per cent, with, of course, a diminution
in molasses. The object of sugar machinery
being to extract the greatest possible amount
of sugar from the cane, it seems that the
vacuum pan boiling apparatus should be uni
versally adopted.
The vacuum pan also turns out a much
higher grade of sugar, the difference of
price between the finished prtxoduct of the one
and the crude product of the other being
about two cents per pound.
SThe cane necessary for a crop of 400,000
pounds of sugar to be manufactured in open
kettles, if its syrup were boiled in the most
improved vacuum pan, would give a far bet
ter result. The excess would be 100,000 pounds
of second and third sugar, and the quality of
400,000 pounds of first raised so as to bring a
far greater price; or a gain of at least two
cents per pound on 400,000 pounds of first
sugar, and 100,000 pounds of second and third
additional, whose price would be above the
average of fair kettle sugar. This would be a
total gain of $14,000 on the price obtained for
sugar manufactured in vaccuo, with a slight
loss in molasses and a probable increase of a
few hundred dollars in the actual cost of
manufacture.
Had the entire crop in the State, made in
1876, been treated with vacuum pans, a gain
ofat least 20 per centon the 150,000,000 pounds
of open kettle sugar made that year would
have been the result. The 150,000,000 pounds
of first sugar would have sold at a price
probably two cents per pound higher, and
the State would have made 30,000,000 pounds
more second and third sugar, worth then at
least seven and a half cents per pound.
The advantage of boiling in the vacuum
pan is plainly manifested in the results of so
treating the syrup from sound and sweet
cane. But it shows far more plainly in boil
ing the juice of cane that has been windrowed
after a freeze and left for any length of time.
In fact, often when it has been found utterly
impossible to manufacture a grain of sugar
from frosted cane by boiling in open kettles,
the same syrup when boiled in vaccuo, at the
lowest possible temperature, has been known
to crystalize well and yield as large a pro
portion of sugar as syrup from sound cane
boiled in the ordinary open apparatus.
The crop of 1877 was one in working which
the vacuum pan showed its immense superi
ority. Long after proprietors of open kettle
sugar-houses had abandoned the vain attempt
to manufacture sugar. from their windrowed
cane, neighboring manufacturers, who were
the fortunate owners of vacuum pans, kept
on working, and saved a large proportion of
their crops.
The season, however, was a terrible test to
both styles of boiling apparatus. The vac
uum pan suffered a proportion of loss, but
the great reduction of the crop from its esti
mates was caused because the open kettle
apparatuses were unable to manufacture any
sugar a few days after the terrible freeze of
November 30.
ro summarize the advantages of the
vacuum pan and centrifugals over the open
kettle process of manufacture and to note the
superiority shown:
1. The places equipped with vacuum pans
average three times as much in production as
those fitted with open kettles for boiling.
2. The vacuum pan crystalizes 20 to 25 per
cent more sugar from a given amount of
juice from sound cane than open kettles.
3. The product manufactured in vaccuo
commands about two cents per pound more
on first sugar than that make in open kettles.
4. The extra 20 to 25 per cent gain n seconds
and thirds is a daear gam worth more per
pound than the. average grades of open kettle
sugars.
5. The product of a crop of 800 acres cane,
fair average for grinding, is worth from
$10,000 to $15,000 more than the same product
If manufactured in open kettles.
6. The product of any stated amount of
windrowed cane, if not unfit for manipulation,
treated by vacuum boiling process, is worth
from two to ten times as much as product
from like amount of cane in same condition
treated with open kettles.
7. The vacuum pan turns out grades of
sugar which, under existing revenue laws,
have a higher tariff protection than open
kettle sugars.
As the above noted advantages have been
demonstrated to exist to practice, or are
known to many engaged in the business of
cane culture and sugar manufacture, it seems
singular that such a small proportion of our
sugar-houses are fitted with the vacuum boil
ing apparatus. We learn, however, that a
large number of vacuum pans have been con
structed by the foundries of this city during
the past year, and that many of these will be
ready for the harvesting of the present grow
ing crop of cane. It is to be hoped that the
results of the present crop will be such as to
enable many more to be constructed next
year.
The Improvement in the sugar machinery
of our State will be followed by a correspond
ing increase in the production of her cane
fields, and the standard of the product made
can be so raised as to defy competition, as it
is now made by the comparative few com
plete manufactories among the thousand
sugar-houses in the cane region of Louisiana.
The annual report of the New York super
intendent of life insurance is just out, and
shows an immense decline in business by
nearly all the companies represented in that
State. The number of policies outstanding
December 31 1877, was 14,462 less than at the
same date in the previous year, and the
amount insured in these policies had declined
from $826,227,176 to $782,895,565, a reduction of
over $43,000,000 and this reduction was one
affecting even the strongest and most stable
companies; thus the Equitable's insurances
full off $12,.00,000; the Mutual's $6,700,000, and
the Metropolitan's $7,600,000.
The pavilion of insects in the Paris Exposi
tion is curious; fleas, caterpillars, bugs, spi
ders and cockroaches, with the various pow
ders and paints invented for their extermina
tion, occupy about one-half of the building,
not extensively patronized, however, as the
few adventurous spirits who have been tempt
ed there usually appear uncomfortable on
coming out and as if impressed with the idea
that the noisome insects are not all preserved
specimens.
The only true matches are made by love,
and when two people have really loved--real
ly, from the depths of their very hearts-
nothing can ever quite part them again.
Yonkers Gazette. Hlow beautiful! how tar
rue! how tender! And yet there are hearts
that the world in vain has tried; hearts that
have beat as only one heart can thump; hearts
that the ice-cream spoon, as it were, has fed;
hearts that parted forever because one of the
twain didn't appreciate cold meat.-[Commer
cial Advertiser.
J. B. Walker. D. D. S.. 154 Canal streeý.
The Kennesaw route now carries the fast
mail and exnr.ss to New Ynrk.
MUNICIPAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
REPAIR OF REVETMENT LEVEE.
DEMARTMENT OF IMPROVEMENTS.
Room No. 1s. City Hall.
New Orleans, June 16.1678.
Sealed proposals (for repair of REVET
MENT LEVEE at New Lake End, will be re
ceived at this office until MONDAY, June 17. at
12 o'clock m. Said work to be done in strict
accordance with specifications on file in the
office of the City Surveyor. The city reserves
the right to reject any or all bids.
JOHN McOAFFREY.
jel3 td Administrator.
SEALED PROPOSALS.
DEPARTMENT OF WATERWORKS AND PUBLIO
Buildings, City Hall,
New Orleans. June 10, 1878.
Sealed proposals will be received by the un
drrsigned till FRIDAY, June 21, 1878, at 12
o'clock m., for the altering and repairing of
engine-house of Steam Fire Company No. 24,
according to plans and specifications on file in
the office of the City Surveyor.
The city reserves the right to reject any and
all bids.
Parties making proposals for the work are
required to deposit with the Administrator of
Finance, as evidence of their intention to abide
by the adjudication, the amount of stoo in cash,
which shall be forfeited to the city in case of
failure to sign the contract.
Bidders to whom contract is not awarded
shall have their deposits returned to them on
the day adjudication is made.
Proposals to be indorsed "Proposals for Alter
ing and Repairing Engine-House of Steam
Fire Company No. 24."
JAMES D. EDWARDS.
jell td Administrator.
ENGINEERS TAKE NOTICE.
THE GREATEST
DISCOVERY OF THE AGE.
CAS]EXY'S
BELT
- AND -
OIL COMPOUND,
TO PREVENT BELTS FBOM SLIPPING.
No Friction. No Tearing.
25 Per Cent Gained in Power.
60 Per Cent Saved In Wear.
No establishment where Belting is used
Can Afford to be Without It.
IS NOW BEING USED BT :
E. J. GAY & CO.. C. H. ALLEN,
J. FOERSTER, MARGARET'S Bakery
J. J. WICKEBLING. HENRY & DUNN,
A. MARTIN HENRY OTIS.
P. J. FLANAGHAN, L'HOTE CO.
LA. BIGE MILLS. STATBR GNE .
AA. MAGINNIS'S SONS.
Liberal discount to the trade. For sale by
I. L. LYONS,
CORNER OF CAMP AND GRAVIEI,
Wholesale Druggist and Importer.
ne18 ly
BOVINE VACCINE VIRUS,
Received daily by L L. LYONS
Corner Camp and Gravier streets.
nomsllv
BOUDRO'S RESTAURANT,
LAKE PONTCHARTRAIN,
Is now ready for the reception of guests. The
Restaurant having undergone a thorough over
harling is now in a first class condltion.
All orders left at LEON LAIMOQTHER . 23 St
m tIAýRI meet with B% Proprrietors.
A RARE CHAMNCE AT HILL'S.
I Mlust IIave $15,000 in Sixty Days.
To raise that amount I offer for cash the largest stock of
GOLD WATCHES, JEWELRY AND SOLID GOLD CHAINS
IN NEW ORLEANS,
AT POSITIVELY FIlRST COST.
By actual count my stock includes the following goods. ALL SOLID GOLD, of the best anuality
and finish:
120 GOLD WATCHES, MY ENTIRE STOCK OF DIAMONbS,
80 SOLID GOLD VEST CHAINS, 200 LADIES' SOLID GOLD SETT8,
65 SOLID GOLD OPERA CHAINS, 300 PAIRS EAR DROPS,
45 SOLI) GOI D GUARD CHAINS, 350 SETS SOLID GOLD STUDS,
85 SOLID GOLD NECK CHAINS, 220 PAIRS SOLID GOLD CUFF BUT
155 LAD)IES AND GENTLEMENS' SOLID TONS,
GOLD LOCKETS, 225 CAMEO SEAL RINGS,
75 SOLID GOLD PENCIL CASES, 200 AMETHYST SEAL RINGS,
A FULL LINE OF INITIAL CUFF BUTTONS AND STUDS.
Buyers in the country wishing to avail themselves of this opportunity can have articles sent
C. 0. D.. with privilege of examination, and if not suited return at my expense.
LADIES ESPECIALLY INVITED TO EXAMINE STOCK.
A. 31M. IIILL,
86 ............... ST. CHARLES STREET ..................86
NEW ORLEANS.
_IHILI]V VIE:LaEIN.
This Cut Represents
- , MASON & HAMLIN'S
$190 ORGAN,
REDUCED TO $135,
On easiest payments-- $13 50
cash. and $13 50in 36. 9, 1215 18
21, 24 and 27 months. Freighi
from Boston to be added.
$90 Organ Reduced to $72.
S$7 20 QUARTERLY.
Very blehly improved Pianos,
of J. P. HAILE & CO.. with stool
and cover--40( style reduced to,
$250. on easiest payments known
-sn cash, and $10 a month until
paid.
PHILIP WERLEIN,
135 CANAL STREET,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in,
CHICKERING & SON'S PIANOS;
MATHUSHEK PIANOS.
HALE'S PIANOS,
HARDMAN'S PIaNOS.
ORGANS.
MARON & HAMLIN'S.
EMTEY & CO.'S
'IEW ENGLANi ORGAN CO.'S.
Liberal discount for cash.
Persons at a distance may or
der with the assurance of re
.eiving just as good instruments
s though present to select for*
aemselves. If not found satis
"otory they may be returned at
oyexvense.
...... PHILIP WERLEIN,
. 135 Canal street, N. 0.
PIANOS AND ORGANS
Of the Most Renowned Makes, at Greatly ReduceG
Prices, and on Easy Terms, at
GRUNEWALD HALL.
A Magnificent Selection of the Celebrated Pianos of
STEINWAY, KNABE, PLEYEL, HAINES Nll FISCIER
Always on hand. Above Pianos are respectfully recomended for their unsurpassed numers
ous Musical Qualities, Durability in this climate. which has made them justly so popular Witb
our people and which are Unapproached by any other in this country.
Just received a Fine Selection of the
CELEB~,ATED ORG tOYANS
-OF
CLOUGH & WARREN, PRINCE, BURDETT.
The Best in the Market, at reasonable prices. Get my Estimates before you purchase elsewhere
Old Pianos taken in Exchange for New Ones. or repaired at short notice at moderate flgur
SHEET MUSIC, BRASS INSTRUMENTS
In Endless Variety and at Lower Figures than at any other House in the Country. YoL
patronage is respectfullr solicited. LOUIS GRUNEWALD
yvi 14 to 2! Baronne street. New Orleans.
ANNOUNCEMENT
EXTRAORtDINARY.
o-
FOR THE NEXT THIRTY DAYS WE WILL SELL AT
PRI.[IE COST FOR CASH,
OUR SUPERB ASSORTMENT OF
SATIN, SILK REPS, BROCATEL, COTOLINE AND CASHMIERE
PARLOR SUITS,
FRTENCH PLATE, MANTEL AND PIER MIRROR.*
MOUNTED IN GOLD. AND WALNUT AND GOLD FRAME-.
i -i
ORNAMENTAL AND FANCY
TABLES, PEDESTALS, JARDENNIERS, CARD RECEIVERS, CABINETS, WOR -
TABLES, DESKS AND ORNAMENTAL CHAIRS AND ROCKERS.
We will also sell. AT THE VERY LOWEST MARGIN. all other goods in our immense stoe*.
Our object is to reduce our overcrowded stock, and WE ARE DETERMINED TO SELL. Cal
and make your selections while it is yet time.
ALL GOODS DELIVERED FREE OF CHARGE.
R. M. & B. T. MONTGOMERY,
1JMORESQUE BUILDING,
mhs tf Corner camp and Poeydras treets.
J. C. EGAN. 0. N. OGDEN.
EGAN & OGDEN,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Ofiee, No. 6 Carendelet Lt.,
jee8m i EW ORLEANS.
.J. B. WALKER, D. D. S.
154 .... -Canal street-.....--....II4
CARBEFULLY PEBFORMS ALL OPEUBATION
Dcls ly IN DENT) TBR.

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