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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, December 04, 1878, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
lW Jourral of the state of heultaum.
l ournal of the City of New Orleans.
N10.. 109 Oravler Street.
gOeRGE W. DUPRE A CO.,
IRBOPRTETOBS.
(4.mO. W. DUPB..
3I-. alk.-EY, JOHN AUGIIUIN,
ALBIRT 0. SANNl1.
3.3. Aii4NeY........................ BoiTOa
RATES OF RUBSHRIPTION:
The Daily Democrat.
W lfonthe ..... ... ... .
red Months " Soo
Ye, r .... :... ..... 1"" "
Payable in AdvSanc
The Weekly Demo*rat
The Weekly Demofat. a large eIght-par
per. will be furnihed to subsorlbers at the
ollowlns rates:
.... . .....................
sayaibl In Advraes.
Wo O*ULwANfs. uIintCEUs0 4. Se.'1.
Col. James H. Hamilton, well known to our
people, is attendlng the convention. The
colonel is an old friend of ours and a genial
Sellow. Iikg may he wave.
A Mobile paper, speaking o.an approach
ing drawing of the Ioulslteana tery, inno
eently inquires: "Why shoulo not Mobile
get the $100,000 prize this time?" Because
the winning number will not be in the wheel.
Under the circumstances Mobile may as well
make up her mind to bleft again.
Gen. W. T. Martin. a gallant and die
Uingulshed Houthern oldler, Is in the city, a
delegate to the Comnercial Conventlon. (Gen.
Martin, who is a resident of Natchez, I. one of
the most honored citizens of our sister State,
lMssisselppl, and we were exceedingly glad to
meet him.
Although it Is more than a year before the
next Senate meets, candidates for the clerk
ship of that body are already mustering their
forces. There will be a perfect army of can
didates, including no less than three ex
Senators, two ex-lRepresentatives, and a
Moore of other political leaders.
There has not been much said about the
Democratic hulldozing in Alabama, and yet
there are greater outrages committed daily
In that State than in any other south of the
line. One poor negro, living in Montgo;n
ery, has not only becr bulldozed Into I)emoc
racy, but actually frightened into editing a
Democratic newspaper. A solid North
should range Itself against outrages aryl
massacres like this.
Jefferson Davis, President of the Confed
eracy, arrived in Now Orleans yesterday. f
The people of Louisiana welcome him Into
their midst. With their fellow-citizens of the
South, and with the lovers of constitutional '
government all over the world they honor
and love him. The presence of Jefferson
Davis here is an honor to New Orleans, and
we feel sure that we echo the heartfelt feel
ings of the people of loueisana, and of the
South and West, whose delegates are here,
when we bid him cordial, loving and
eeverentlal welcome.
We are indebted to Mr. Felix Limet, our
esteemed confrere and contemporary of the I
New Orleans tfer, for a valuable pamphlet, I
which will be distributed to-day among the
members of the Commercial Convention, giv
ing the bassle of the project of a Franco-Amer
loan treaty. We regret that we have not
space to-night to publish it in full, nor time
to consider it in rxlen.o. We call the atten
tion of those who will read it to-day to the
figures published in the table, which clearly ,
show the necessity of action on the part of
our governmten'o It will be seen by reference
to this document that the products and manu
factured goods coming from the United States
pay in France at least two-thirds more than ,
those coming from the countries whose gov- ]
ernments have established a conventional
tariff.
Judge Larremoro, of the Now York Court
of Common Pleas, last week naturalizld a
Chinaman named Wong A h Yee. This actlion
was in accord with that of Judge Tissot,
of New Orleans, but is opposed by that of
Judge Sawyer, of the United States Circuit
of California, and .Judge ('coate, of the IJnitedl
States Circuit COurt of New York. Judge
Choate refused the application or a Chi
naman for naturalization on tho ground
that a similar application had been re
fused by Judge Sawyer, which decision he
felt bound to follow in New York. It is a lit
tie singluar that the United Sita' courts
should lse found the earnest champi,,is of the
citizenship of the negro, whille denying the
rights of cltizenshipl to ('hinamen. and that
the Celestial is compelled to appeal to State
tribunals for them. The case of Wong Ah
Yee will probably be a test of the question, as
his citizenship will be disputed. Judge Larre
more has the spirit of the law as well as
common sense on his side, and must be sus
tained in the end.
That chronic fllicetholttr, the lion. Michael
Hahn, has received the grand bounce at last.
Yesterday the name of the venerable govern
ment pensioner, Henry S. Foote, of Tennes
see, was presentdl to the Senate as Superin
tendent of the New Orleans Mint. The rea
son for the change is said to tI the action of
Superintendent Hlahn in the late election in
the Third District. Hie was accused of aid
lug the canvass of Mr. Acklin by keep
,Lg ,Merchant in the field. and this
emems to have been sufficient ground
or his removal. There will be a stal
wart howl over tile appointment of the
ancient Tennessee politician, of course. It
will be regarded as a reflection upon "the
party" In Louisiana, and will he resented ac
cordingly. The real motive for it will be that
he gets a lucrative position to which many of
the local politicians consider themselves en
titled. He will not be confirmed before steps
will be taken to oust him. That may be safely
relied on. The Louisiana Radical allows no
poaching on his preserves without a fight.
Let Mr. Foote t "ware.
In commenting on the vote of South Caro
lina the Republicans always select the vote
for Governor. As Itampton had no opposi
tlon, this, of course, is no test of the strength
of parties In the Palmetto State. Instead of
the Republican vote of South Carolina being
insignificant, as these journals represent it,
it was quite respectable, exceeding bj 10,000
the National Itepuflican vote of the{ BSate.
There was no Republican candidate in ,the
Fourth District. Excluding the vote of this
district, the Republican vote of South Caro
lina will stand this year 44,270, as compared
with 75,072 in 1876- a decrosse of 40 p'r cnt,
which in an off year in nothing at all remrrk
able. The D)emor tic vote showed buit a
slight Increase ov. r the vote of 1576.
THE LOUISIANA LOTTERY NORTH.
The city asitl ,rities arnd police (of npurmher
of Northern cities have inaugurated Ir the
past month a bitter and determined !war
against lotteries in general and against the
louisiana ttate Lottery in particular Thlses
cities have begun to fool the evil fiTects of this
lottery, although they have sufferedj from It
but insignificantly in comparlcon with Now
Orleans, and they have determined to root it
out before it becomes PO;, ,werful" that It, can
defy the law as it does here. The police, undor
instrucUn,r. ailded the lottery shobs, and
landed their proprietors in jail where most of
tCem remain now. being unable.to procure
bail. This was the system pursuedl in New
York and Philadelphia withthe happy result
of ridding these cities altogether of the Lou
isiana State Lottery and its agents; atd which
had been threatened in Cincinnati witii the
gimilar effect of shutting up the! lottery
offices in that city, These raldesan arrests
have, of course, proved a heavy blow tA the
Louisana State Lottery, cutting off some sec
tions of country from which it hak always
drawn a large and reasonably certarld lncome.
As the smaller towns were threatening to im
itate the example of New York, thd lottery
saw the necessity of doing somethlng in its
defence, or it would be driven entirely out of
the North and have its business' restricted
within the limits of Louisiana, whei , ats its
swindling character is well knowni, it would
scarcely be able to make a meagre living'.
Under these circumstances. the: Louisiana
Lottery has struck a blow in its def4ence and
endeavored to establish its monopoliy in the
lottery business in Kentucky, as well as in
Louisiana. As will be seen in anoith r column
the scheme met with signal and disastrous
failure. The directors of the (Amuminwealth
I)istrlhbution Company, of Louisville, were
just preparing to draw their lottery When they
were arrested at the Instance of thatweill
known Louisiana Lottery agent, ii. 1. Wilde,
and charged with ' setting up, dra.ingv and
promoting a lottery." In other words, the
L ouisiana State Lottery Company, 4lling its
tickets in Kentucky, was endeaveoring Jo es
tablish Itself as a monopoly In that Stale, by
turning informer on other lottery companies.
Iut its resort to the law was not cirowned
with that suceess that has so often awaited
it here, for iH. H. Wilde found hinself that
night locked up in jail with the dllsgreeable
charge of perjury entered against hilm.
It is only in the past few months that the
attention of other States and cities hsav been
called to this disreputable'Louisiana corpora
tion that has been crushing and; deilling oui
State so long. It has only been lin the e last
few months that the lottery has extended Its
operations over other fields, but itlhiis already
attracted official attention in .these ptates
with the result we have shown. This lottery
war has, of course, attracted great attention
In the North, and hardly a New York, Phila
delphia, Cinclnnati or Louisville papers.omes
to us without some reference to it. It seems,
however, to have altogether secaplot'he at
tention of our city contemporaries' who are
apparently unaware of the great1 struggle
going on between this Louisiana monopoly
and the city governments of hial a dozen
Northern cities that are profiting Iby the un
fortunate experlience of Louisiana and crus.h
ing out this monster before it growd too pow
erful for them.
a
THE CONVENTION.
The 'ommercial Convention whlch met~
yesterday in this city Is, in respect: to thet
nutabers and distinguished personnel of the i,
delegations composing It, a great siices. s
The objects it has in view, and the quse
tions It is called to consider are of they most
important character and such as are of para
mount interest to the whole country. -What
ever so Influential a body as this' may say,
composed, as it is, of men of sagacity and
experience, thoroughly coniversani with the
needs of their sections, must have 4 great in
Iluence In procuring legislation Ili behalf of
the interests they represent. * ,
The first and most important objiect,:for the
promotion of which this conventl.mn has as
sernlbled, is to simply afford facllities, eqlual
to those enjoyed by other nations, ?or the
fruits of Amerlcn industry to reach the mar
kets of the world, and to enabli t.o pent up
energies and vast productive capracties of our
country to find employment. Tht resources
of our favored land and the industries of our
people are as yet imperfectly developed. Our
agricultural and mechanical prodlutions have
already assulnlom gigantic proportions and
are Increasing from year to: ycar with
wonderful fecundity. Yet with wur unlim
ited resources of raw matA rial, our
profusion of mineral wealth, our vast
syst'm of lntornal commerce an.l our sur
plus of cheap food, our whole !lommercial
polciy has been directed solely to! supplying
our own markets. The time has' now come
when we must look beyond our own borders
for the sources of demand that will keep alive
the industries which have already developed
a capacity far beyond the needs. .f our own
people. The great questohm is, iw shall we
find access for our products to the !markets of
the world? We have already solved the prob
lem of cheap production, and the question
now is cheap transportation.
Of all the measures that are necessary to
enable our manufacturers and farmers to sell
their products to the world, we reward this as,
by far the most important. ItI matters but
little how much we produce, so ong as we
are without facilities for cheap, and rapid
transportation of our products to uiarket. So
long as the costs of carrying anti handling
offset the cheapness and abundance of pro
duction, we shall be unable to compete with
the other great commercial.nailons of the
world in foreign markets.
In the solution of this diflmlulty nature
has afforded us many and greatiadvantages,
of which we have but to avail ourselves in or
der to defy competition, espeialIy in our
struggle for the trade of . tle continental
countries south of us. Our fitrst duty, of
course, is to improve the vast river system
which finds its embouchure through the
Eads jetties, so as to secure/permanent and
i reliable low water navigation' on all the
- streams tha't find their outlets through the
i Mississippi. Four feet of water for barges to
f St. Paul, at all seasons of the iyear, will put
f grain in Rio or Liverpool for little more than
it costs to put it in New Orlisans now. All this
talk about a deep sea channel to St. Louis,I
and the placing of Cairo on a hill, is Im
practicable nonsense; but such nav
igation as we speak of can and should
be secured. But, granting that such a pro
ject were practicable, wherein would be the
utility of It? No oman going vessel could
aff'Lrd to go to St. Louis for freight that could
be put aboardl them here fronm hargey at a
mere fraction of the expense the trip there
and back would involve. Let thel convention
eschew all such chimnras and keep in mind
that the sole question for it, to consider Is
how the products of the Interior are to reach
the seaboar(l at the least possible cost. Four
feet of water at all seasons will solve this
question as effectually as forty feet. A com
plete and secure levee system and a few
dredgeboats will secure us this depth, and
that Is all we need.
In considering what we shall do to extend
our foreign commerce, the revision of our
tariff and navigation laws, and the extension
of our commercial and postal facilities wtth
other countries are measures of secondary Im
portance only to the improvement of ihe
navigation of the Mississippi river. In seek
Ing the markets of other countries we should
not go to them as mere peddlers seeklng to dis
pose of our wares. We must buy as well as
sell, for exchange Is the only legitimate trade.
Our tariff has for years virtually excluded
from our markets the products of
many of the countries our commer
clal enterprise now proposes to in
vade. This must be done away with, and
reciprocity treaties established which will en
able those countries whose trade we wish to
secure to sell to us upon the same conditlons
that we propose to sell to them. The law
which forbids the protection of the American
flag to ships owned by Americans, unlhes
they were built In this country, should be re
pealed, and American merchants should h.
allowed, as those of other countries are, to
buy and build ships where they can be ob
tained at the smallest cost.
All of these measures will tend to the de
velopment of a large and liberal commercial
spirit in the Rovernr~ent as well as among
the industrial and mercantile classes, a spirit
that will lead us tIo power and wealth, of
which we have, as yet, had scarcely a fore
taste.
FOR THE RELIEF OF THE COURTB.
There is ono suggestlon made by M r. Ilayce
in his message which merits and will doubt- I
less res'ive the mmedllate contsideration of
Congress. We allude to the neesslty of ad
ditional legis..tlon to relieve the Supreme
Court of the United Htates, the Inability of
which to discharge the onerous duties placed
upon it amounts to a practlcal denial of jus
tice. At the present time there are not less
than 900 cases on the do.~ket, of which it will
not be possible for the court to dispose of more
than 300, leaving the work of two years un
touched, besides the number of new cases that
will be docketed at the present term. A mere
statement of the fact is all the argument that
is necessary to convince any one of the Im
mediate necessity of a revision and further
limitation of the far too extenslve appellate
jurisdiction of this tribunal, and of the es
tablishment of inferior courts which will sup
ply All the facilties that suitors require.
Under the existing laws several years must
elapse before a case can be reached, in its
regular course, and this condition of affairs is
growing worse every year by reason of the
enormous increase of litigation, a great deal
of which is of a character so trifling and In
volves such small sums that It should never
have reached the Supreme Court. This evil is
a great drawback to commerce, serves to
bring courts andr the methods of judicial pro
cedure into great 4tarepute, and destroys
credit, or else bases iL au a system of commer
cial ethics which has no compulsory process,
and amounts to nothing more than a sort of
code of honor, such as maintains at the card
table or on the race course. Any debtor who
chooses not to pay from any dishonest pur
pose has only A), put his case in court, and he
is assured live or six years of delay at the
shortest.
Appeals in cases involving sums of $2000
a·e now allowed to the Supreme Court, and
the result is the practical estoppal of justice.
It has been suggested that the Suplreme Court
might, even now, by a judici)ous economy of
time, somewhat facilitate the discharge of
business. For example, Monday of every
week is devoted to the, realding of opinions,
which consumes the entire (lay. IBy simply
calling tihe case and annlouncing that the judlg
ment of the lower court is aflirmedl or re
versed, ani filing the written opinions, this
day might bIe saved. But this would be but
a trilling rellef and would not obviate the
necessity for legislation.
The I'resident recommends "the creation of
additional judges, as proposed" in the Attor
nny General's report, which "would afford a
complete remedy, and would involve an ex
pense at the present rate of salaries of not
more than $60,(a)0 a year."
There are now pending in Congress several
bills proposing various remediies for this oem
harrassment, embodying tihe suggestlion of
Mr. Hayes, the creation ,of an internmdliate
t court of appeals and a further limitation of
the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme
Court.
i In the case of our State Supreme Court this
same embarrassment exists to no less an ex
tent, and the necessity for remedlying it is
even more Imperative. The truth of the busl
I ness is that the .Taole judiciary departmnent,
both State and Fed.ral, must be entirely re
construeted awl the facilities for litigation
t immensely increa.sedi. 'I'he present systems
were organized at a time when the work the
] courts have to perform now was not even
dreamed of. When tley were organized and
their methods of procedure and practice
I established, the trite saying, "time +a money,"
F4 had not the signilicance attached to it now by
t every merchant. Their slow pr(ocesses may
1 have suited the old days of sailing craft and
turnpikes. If the courts are longer to remain
( the arbiters of commerce they must get out
R of the old rut and adapt themselves to the
needs and the spirit of this day of steam and
h electricity, otherwise they will fall into dis
0 repute, and extra judicial arbitrations will
take the place of litigation and commercial
e custom the place of law.
The Union Pacific, Central Pacifine and )so
called) Southern Pacific (Huntington's road'
have decided upon consolidating into one
grand company, so as to be ready to meet
Congress in battle. This triumvirate will
bring forth a most formidable monster--the
richest, strongest, most powerful and most
unscrupulous corporation that has ever ex
isted In this country. The new consolidated
company will start business with a capital of
$462,000,000 and the largest income in the
wo Id. This consolidation is evidently de
signed to oppose Congress and nullify its de
crees. These roads were rather roughly treat
ed last session by the Senate, led by Senator
.hurman, and see that it is necessary for
them to unite and pool their issues, if they
wish to save themselves from ruin. They
have alreadly completely overridden the State
of California, and effo.tively control and rule
its legislation. Their next attempt will be
made on Congress Itself with what result re
mains to is' seen.
Another sat rng lRepublilan candidate for
tie P'resldency has entered the field in the
past few days. A week ago somebody sug
gested Sherman as a compromise candidate
in case (.rant was found impracticable. Since
that time Sherman's cause has been whooped
up, and he now can show (.ite a respectable
following. "IResumption" 'as the first argu
ment made in his favor; it would, It was de
clared, secure him the aid of the Eastern
bankers. Hlouck, of Tennessee, the solitary
representative in Congress of a HSopthern
white Republican constituency, has found an
other recommendation in Hherman. His
brother Is commander-In-chief of the army,
and would be of use in a red hot, bloody shirt
campaign. T'he Sherman campaign may,
therefore, be said to have fairly Ibegun. Croly,
late editor of the New York (raphir, Is travel
ing through the West verking up Sherman's
cause. It is said to be doing well, particu
larly In Democratic circles, scores of Demo
cratic papers having declared that they are
for Sherman -as a Republican candidate for
the Presidency.
The English Liberals propose to follow In
the political footsteps of the United States
and nominate, in future, their candidates for
Parliament by conventions. The Liberals
think that such a course will give them con
trol of the government, and there is no reason
to doubt that it will greatly improve their
chances. There are many objections to the
present English nominating system. In a
great many instanes unknown or unpopular
mIeni are run. Moreover, there beilng no con
vention to select a nominee, two or more LAb
oral candidates for M. P. m:.n, in the late elec
tions, in no less than, twenty districts, thus
dividing the liberal vote and electing ('on
servatives. If this proposed change be car
Srid oult as is promlli.l, and candidates for
'arliamnent are nominated in (treat Britain
by conventions, It will mark a most import
ant epoch in time history of that country, will
conmpl'ete'ly change its political ways, and will
unrldouhtdly udo nlmuh to revolutionize and
republlicauniz the country.
Poor France would appear to have fared
badly In the I'rlin Congress. Russia
got Armenia; England, Cyprus; the only de
mand made by France, the only point In
sisted on by her was that the .ews of Itou
mania should be granted equal rights with
the C(hlstlans of that country. This was In
sistenl on by the Congress, but Its (teclaration
on this point, like most of Its other plans,
has been revxsed and nullified. It seems
impossible to get over the diflenllty. The
governmennt of Roumania, the Parliament,
cannot extend the right of franchise to the
Jews; that right belongs to the people of
Roumania alone, and they are so blgoteltihat
It will never be posslhle to persuade them to
vote in favor of extending the electoral fran
chise to the Jews. The Mahometans of the
I)ohrulscha have been gr,;.`al this right, but
the IRoumanian populaeA fuse to exntlend It to
the Israelites. Unless the treaty powers In
terfere, those people will have to continue to
suffer from dlsfranchisemnent, persecution and
massacre.
There seems to be no reason to doubt that
the Wisconsin delegation In the next lHouse
will stand four to four. IHazelton's (Itep,i
majority can be figured up to ninty-nine
only. On the other hand, his i)omocratlc
opponent, King, Is able to show that a hun
dre.l students at the State Normal School, not
entitled to vote, (lid vote for IIazlte'; that
a hundredl other persons living oundeo the
district came over Into it and votel for Hazel
ton because they heard he was short of votes;
and lastly, that Ilazelton obtained the entire
vote of L'otosi by bribery, promising to pro
cure a postoflicm for that little burg if its in
habitants supported him for Congress. lHere
are votes enough accounted for to elect King
by a respectable majority. Wisconsin will be
another one of the States that will not vote
thanks to an even delegation if the presiden
tial election Is thrown Into the Hlouse.
Advices from WasJington on Monday
statiedl that Senator IBlalne's resolution to
lnvi'stlgate the recent electlions in the South I
was oppoli 'e by Senator Thurman andl other
Noirthoern i)Democratic Slaitors, while the
Southern S~enators insisted that It should he
adopted with amendments enlarging the
scope of tihe investigation so a.s to Include
certain cities and distrlcte in the North. It
appears that the latter succeedev l in so irm
pressingll their views upon the caucus yester
day that they were adloptol after a
very harmonoios session. Already we are
informed of thlie g I efflTct of this
coursei. Th'l resolution was offered with a
view to arouse sictlonall feeling and give rise
te a violent sectional debate. This object is
lIdefeated by the wise advice of the Southern
Senators, and it is Intinated that the resolu
tion will be allowedl to lie on the Vice Presi
dent's (desk. However this may be, the South
has nothing to fear from either debate or in
vestigation, and can afford to court the latter.
The charges that have been so widely circu
lated ,~n be easily refuted. It remains to be
s.er; If the North cannot show more Intlmida
tl'e. and fraudulent pract'ices. Give each sec
tion an impartial hearing and let the tnvestl
gation prosieil.
Virginia's poll-tax law has had a most de
presslng effect on the voters of that State,
both white and black. The falling off In the
vote since 1876 will be fully 42 per cent, or
nearly one-half the whole vote. In the third
district there is a decrease of from 30,000 to
10,1)00 votes, and in the eighth from 27,100 to
7(()1. As many whites appear to have neglected
paying this tax as the negroes; on the other
hand, it may be Mtated that many thousand.
negroes had their poll-taxes paid for them by
the RIepublican Central Committee at Wash
ington. This was the only aid extendled by
that committee to the Southern Republicans.
As a proof of tile antiquity of newspaper
joke's we may cite the fact that several plea
santries of the New Orleans Blulletin are just
now going the rounds of the press. The Bull,
1 tin has been dead and buried these two years
and more, but its jokes still survive. In the
t past two years these jokes have pr:atbly
- traveled thousands of miles, have doubtless
I crossed the Atlantic, and now return to their
f native land for a fresh canvass of America. It
3 takes fully three years for a good joke to r.ike
- a tour of the American press. Having made
- this tour. it returns to its birth-place to be
- reissued as a new joke.
fIALTUMAAIND ELGIN FATliES,
I. C. LLEVI, Jeweler,
108 ............................anal t 8treete.................... ....... 108
Offers the above Watches at the latest reduced price list of November Ist.
Tine Watlsine re all Palhnt l? vers. ane a ursantee rfor Three Years.
Bolid liver Watch, Waltham or Elain movement...- 12 on
Solid ilver Watch, with oven face and flat glams .. 12 0n
S Bolid Silver Stem Winder and Setter..........»"........ 2 oo
Bolid Gold Watch, 2 oz, 14 karat .ase............. 5 o00
Solid Gold Watch. 2 os. is karat ease.......... ..-..-- . 62 o
olid old Stem.winder. 2% oz. 14 karat oan...-.... . 70 00
BolildUold Stem Winder. % on. 18 karat case- - - 0 oo
LADIES' WATOHEB.
S014s}ol Watch. 14 karas...... . $35 on
S8olid old Watch. s karase ..................... 4 0o
Solid old Stem winder. 14 karat case ........._. ..5r on
% olid od Stem-winder. 1 karat case. ........... ~ s oo0
In additlon to the aoe I have a large asnortment of Bwfse,
French and German Watches, prices ranglng from n, to s450.
For mechanics or laborers the 111 watch or m sten -winder
will give all satisfaction neeossaqy .df
I will send watches, diamond ad Jewelry by express
(. O. D.. allowing the purchaser o open package ano exam
Ine same.
I have a complete aisortment of Diamonds. Opera,. Guard. Vest and Neck Ohalne at roies to
corresOond with the above I have constantly on hand a large stock of Silverware of all descrip
I Make a Speclalty of Repairing Fine Watches and Settling Diamonda
For further partioulars, address for Illustrated catalogue.
non I.0. I.31. lro Oanal street.
American Waltham Watch Agency.
No. 86 St. Charles street, corner of Commircial Place,
NEW ORLEANM.
Watches for Ladies, Gentlemen, Mechanics, Laborers and Boys.
Railroad Watches a Specialty.
THE AMEBICAN WATCH COMPANY MANUFACTURE FIVE DIFFERENT BIZEB AND
THIRTY-TWO DISTINCT GRADES OF
KEY AND 1TE4IM WINDING WATCIIEM,
AND EVERY WATCH FULLY GUARANTEELD
The success of these watches has been remarkable
In l tthe Com tany first opened an office In London.
England. The first year only Mw( were sold; the eso
on.I year ltas; the third year 6sts. and the fast year
(1877) 28.000. These witr"hes are now universally
known. and I,2*@,* arc nspeaking for themselves
in the poketR of the people. HNtrh Is thegrowth of
Sthis Grnat Amerlcan Ildustry I havesold overUU
of the watches in different tarts of the South.and as
far as I can learn, ths¥y are all alving satisfaction to
day.
PRICE LIST :
The following Watches are the same size as Illne
tratlon. and are sold under a FULL OUARIANTEU.
,I Solid HSlver Watches. Hunting Case or Open Face
$12; Hold Silver Htnm Winder sre16 . 5$22 and $25; Solid
old Watch. see; Solid Gold Stem Winder. 570, ago.
sw0 and o100o.
LADIES' WATCHES. ONE-THIIP SIZE ILLUS.
TRAT ION.
Bolid Si Blver Watch. $16 and $2o Solid Gold Watoh.
40., 544 and $48; Solid Gold Htem Winder. s6o. esand
s70. Boys' Watches same price as Ladles'. For the
Planter. Farmer or Worklingman the $12 Watch or
the $16 o0 Stem Winder will give all the satlsfactlon
required. Where there Is an Express Office I will
send Watches Collect on Delivery-allowing them to
be examlned; otherwise by registered maill. ost
Rald, at my risk. n receiptt of price. I will sendNew
Illustrated Price List of over one hundred different
Watches. prices $10 to $300, on receipt of address.
A LARGE STOCK OF LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S SOLID GOLD
CHAINS AT LOW PRICES.
A. M. IIILL, JEWELER,
8s............... ST..... . CHARLES TREET................86....8
CORNER COMMERCIAL PLACE.
WHEELER & PIERSON,
13 AND 15 CAMP STREET.
CLOTRINM AT POPULAR PRICES.
JUST RECEIVED IN OUR RETAIL DEPARTMENT.
STYLISH BUSINESS SUITS. 1SS TO $25.
SCOTCH CASSIMERE BACK SUITS. $15 TO $20.
BLACK WORSTED RECEPTION COATS AND VESTS. ArLL PRICES.
FALL OVERCOATS. BTYLISH. 310 TO $16.
BOYS' SCHOOL AND DRESS SUITS. VERY LOW. $S TO $61.
UNDERWEAR. SCARFS. COLLARS. SHIRTS. ETC.. LATEST STYLES.
BUYERS WILL DO WELL TO EXAMINE.
Mupcrior Fit, Low Prileen and Polite AtteVtlion.
LARGE STOCK OF LOW AND MEDIUM CLOTHING FOR COUNTRY TRADE
d01n IN OUR WHOLES~4LE ROOMS UP STAIIRS. ORDERS SOLICITED.
WAGONII CANE CARTS ! n SPO7KES!
H. N. SORIA,.
IS and tO Union and 15 and 17 Perdido
streets,.
Bole Agent for the celebrated "STUDEBA
KEB" WAGONS. OABTB and SPBING WORK
of all kinds and sizee.
Dealer in Philadelphla and Western Cane
Wagons, Carts and Drays; Timber Wheels;
Wheelbarrows of all descriptions SpoLkes, Fel
's. Hubs, Shafts etc.; Wheelwright material.
orders promvtlr filled. All work warranted. a
Jag udvtf
BODLEY BROTHERS
Have the most complete stock of Cane Wagons,
three and four muleOane Carts. Ox Carts. Log
Wheels, Cotton Wagons, Bagasse Carts. Farm
Carts, Rice Carts. Small Carts of every size. four
and six seat Family Wagons. S ring Wagons
for delivering goods: Spokes. Felloes. Shafts,
Hounds. Wagon Mater al, Axle Grease. Cart
Boxes, etc. We especially call attention to our
full-sized swedged and hardened Axles. Chilled
Boxes and extra Ironing of all our Carts and
Wagons. Manufactured in our own factories at
Wheeling. W. Va.. from the best material and by
skilled mechanics, we can give a reliable
guarantee, meet any oompetltlon and supply
the largest demand.
Dept.-1It' and 129 Common street.
fee ly ado
GRUNEWALD'S
MIC EIMI!MIT,
14---22, BARONNE STREET.
Grunewald Hall, New Orleans, Is the
Largest and Most Popular
In the South.
A stock of over
200 PIANOS AND ORGANS
is constantly on hand to select from. General
Sboutthern agency of
TIHE WORLD RENOWNED PIANOS
- OF
STEINWAY & SONS. W. KNABE & CO..
J. & C FIHHER, and I'LEYEL.
WOLF &CO., lParis.)
r and the best European and American ORGANS.
Instruments sold on Easy Monthly Payments
t or at Lowest Cash Prices.
Direct Importation
3 OF STRINGS( VIOLINA, ACCORDEONS. GUI
TARS and MUSIC BOXES.
and all kinds of
BRASS INSTRUMENTS.
PRICES THE LOWEST! QUALITY THE BEST!
SCountry orders solicited and carefully at
e tended to. Address.
e LOUIS GRUNEWALD,
no22 Grunewal Hall. "w Orleans.
CARPETS. CARPETS.
.telvet, Birussels, Ingrains, Wil
tons, Axnlinsters.
A. BROUSSEAU & SON.
17- .........Chartrem Atre ...............
Aro re.eivlng by trno wckly steamars the
newest and flneit pastterns of CARPETING
from English and Northern looms, and sailing
at PRICEX IOWFit TIIAN EVER KNOWN
BEFORE IN NEW' ORLEANH.
Call anI son. o., 2ddly
CA Il 1114[TS .
ELKIN & CO.,
100 ......Canal Street...... 100
Have New Styles of
AXINSTER, VELVET,
BRUS fMELP and INGRAIN.
Just rcolvevd par Toutonla. from Liverpool
English Oil ChAhs and Linoleums.
A large variety of RUGO. MATS and MAT
TINGS. no2Rlm 2dp
U. S. FOUR FER CENT
GOLD BONDS
NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL BANK.
Until further notice this Bank will fill orders
for U. H. Four Per Cent I/old Bonds at par and
accruedl interest in currenuti.
nos Im A. BALDWIN. President.
AMOS PATTEN & *0.,
OOMMISSION MERCHANTS AND
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS.
FANCY GROCERIES AND CANNED GOODS
A BSpecialty.
Bole proprietors of the
ANCHOR BRAND EXPORT LAGEB BEER.
83 Tehaupitoulau street. New Orlesoas
iv12 2dntf
Washington Avenue Drug Store,
Cerner Magazine and Washingten sta.
NEW OBLEANS.
Oonstantly receivina& fresh supplies of
Mredicines. Chemlirals. Patent Medicines,
Com Y of all kinds. Brushes, Soaps, Perfumery
Toilet and Fancy Articles, etc., sold at small
margin. Coral Tooth Paste, recommended by
all who use it as a very superior dentrifee. It
beautifies the teeth to a fine paarl-like orna
ment and rvishbing beauty. Glycerine Cold
Cream for chaptpd lips. fece and hands. Rob
erts' Po4toral Cough Syrup. for catarrh, colds,
bronchi is and pneumonia. Prescriptions put
up night and day. R. J. MAINEGRA. M. D..
Druggist. hiarmaceutlst and Practical Ohemat.
oc2tlV 2dP

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