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The New Orleans daily Democrat. (New Orleans, La.) 1877-1880, May 27, 1879, Image 4

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DAILY DEMOCRAT.
Oicial Journal of the onstitutional Con
vention of the State of Louisiana.
Office. No. 109 Gravier Stretf.
BA 2'ES OF SUBSCRIPTION:
The Daily Democrat.
One Year .... ...............1.
Six Months ..... .......... .
Three Months .....................
One Month............... :
FPstage, one year...... .... . 00
Payable in Advance.
The Weekly Democrat.
The Weekly J),mmnralt. a large elght- ate
Dp.per, will be furnished to subscribers at the
UOlIowing rates:
One Year.....................1 I7
Six Monih .........................
Three Months................
Payable in Advance.
NSW OBLEANM, MAT 27, 157,.
_._m __m.... ... ----
Of the 128 ports recgnized by law in this
oountry, 30, or more than one-fourth, do not
pay running expenses. The expenses of these
ofilces exceed by $90,000 a year their receipts.
The persons to whom were assigned the
duty of Investigating the resources and
liabilities of Archbishop Purcell, of Cincin
natl, have reported. Ills total assets they
declare, including the Catholic cathedral,
school-house, etc., amount to $776,770 05, and
his liabilities to $3,6!7,651 40-a pretty large
deficit.
The Republicans are anxious to have a
strong team in Ohio this fall. Sherman having
declined the honor of the governorship it is
now i)roposed to run Taft for that position,
with Charles tFster for the second place.
Bishop seems to be the leading man on the
Democratic side.
The Missouri Legislature costs exactly
$7000. That is what the salhon keepers of St.
Louis sly they put up to defeat the bell
punch bill. The Pennsylvania Legislature is
a much more expensive body, the cost of a
single Senator, according to the testimony
given before the committee investigating the
Pittsburg riot bill being from $750 to $20(4
The Constitutional Convention considered
the ordinance presented by the Committees on
Militia and Manufactories yesterday. The
first was adlopted, after some debate, by sub
'stitute. Action on the last was postponed
until the Committee on Taxation is prepared
to report. A number of resolutions were also
considered and disposed of, and some new or
dinances were introduce'd.
In the Molair miscegenation case, which
came up before Judge Woerner, of St. Louis
the other day, the judge decided that a mul
latto was not a negro. The Missouri consti
tution forbids the intermarriage of the races.
The question before Judge Woerner was
whether a quadroon came under the terms of
this law or not. The judge decided In the
negative, holding that any person in whose
veins white blood predominated could not be
oonsidered a negro.
The holders of $5,000,000 of Tennessee bonds
have notified Gov. Marks of their willingness
to accept the terms of the compromise pro
posed by the late Legislature-50 per cent of
the face value of their bonds, and a reduction
of the interest on their new bonds from 6 to 4
per cent. The holders of $19,000,000 State
bonds are yet to be heard from. It is thought
that they also will accept these terms.
The Butlerites have developed a new
scheme In Massachusetts. It is a union be
tween]Butler and the Democrats, by which
--a.ton will be elected Governor and "the
widow" sent to the United States Senate.
Butler's friends are trying to tempt the Dem
-ocrats into this plan by telling them that they
Will find it to their advantage to get Butler
out of the State whatever it may oost. The
only hitch in the arrangement seems to be
that the General is not as willing to spend
$200,000 on a campaign as he was last year.
The Cincinnati (knnmercial Is oonvinoed that
an income tao law will be passed by Con
green. The saontiment in favor of this tax is
strong and gi owing stronger daily. There
have been two attempts to pass the bill this
year, under a lapension of the rule, and the
last time the I lajority for the bill was twice
as large as toe flret. It is impossible, of
course, to get the bill up, as it requires two
thirds of the House to suspend the rules. If,
however, the Committee on Ways and Means
reports the bill, it will pass by a large ma
jority. The tax to be levied under the bill
will be light- all incomes over $2000 being
taxed only two mills. This will yield, it is
thought, about $10,000,000 a year.
The terms of peace between England and
Afghanistan show that Great Britain has
,gained the point for which she went to war.
'The cause of hostilities witlRthe late Ameer
was his refusal to receive the English resi
dent sent to Cabul, and his insult to that
power through its representative. Yakoob
Khan has yielded on this point and a British
resident will in future remain at Cabul to pro
tect the rights and interests of Englishmen
In that country. In addition to this, Afghan
istan surrenders the l'iwar, Khyber and
Peshin passes, so that in case of future difli
cultles between the two powers. England can
march her army into Afghanistan without
any difficulty.
The action of the Southern members in
leaving the line of policy to be adopted by
the Democratic party wholly in the hands of
the Northern members is politic and wise,
at the present time and under present cir
cumstances. The proposed political legisla
tion is in the interests of both sections
it is true. Both are oppressed by the super
visors' law and the presence of soldiers at the
polls may be hereafter as common at the
North as it has been at the South if the laws
go unrepealed. But any suggestions that
may come from that side of the line will not
be distorted in as many shapes as if it origin
ated with the Southern members. The course
adopted will not only produce greater har
mony in the party, but will relieve the South
ern members of a responsibility that is some
what embInarrasing. T''hey naturally are averse
to precipitating a conilict that may injure
the party in the North. Whatever the North
ern Congressmen determine upon as the
wisest and safest ourse ;o pursue will be fol
lowed. In thus teciding the Southern mem
bers have decided wisely and well; especially
a the leaders in whose hands the shaping of
Sthe present policy of the party is eIdt have
shown themselves to be irmn and devoted
friends of this section and entitled to its fullest
L afldence.
BULLDOZING IN OHIO.
The old story of "man's inhumanity to
man" has ACdom met with a more wanton
and brutal exemplification than in the case of
the man Storer, Story or Allen, in the enter
prising village of Batavia, Ohio.
We gave an account of the affair in our
Sunday issue and this morning we re
publish from the Cincinnati Onnmer
cial the version of this outrage as re
lated by the victim of it to a Gommercial
reporter on his arrival In that city. Of the
man himself we know nothing beyond the ac
counts of him in the papers. His crime ap
pears to have been the manifestation of a hu
mane disposition to aid and protect a poor,
penniless woman, who had been cruelly
beaten by her husband, cast out of her home
and sent adrift upon the world, to encounter
its always cold charity under the added igno
miny that attaches to a repudiated wife. Her
worldly possessions seem to have been a hus
band's curse and a few articles of apparel and
household goods. So Storer, or Allen, found
her, a wretched, cast-off wife in the highway,
and his offense consisted of the assistance he
gave her to obey the commands of her brutal
husband. We have read a similar story, but
not so sad a one, some where else. It went
somehow this way:
A certain man went down from Jerusalem to
Jericho, and ell among thieves, who stripped
ihim of his raiment, and wounded him and de
parted, leaving him half dead.
And by chance there came down a certain
priest that way; and when he saw hilm, he pass
ed on the other side.
And likewise a Levite. when be was at the
piace, came and looked on him, and passed by
on the other side.
But a certain Sam-ritan, as he journeyed.
came where he was; and when he saw him, he
had comn passion on him.
And went to him, and bound up his wounds.
pouring in oil and wine, and set him on his own
bha~t and brought him to an inn. and took care
or him.
And on the morrow when he departed, he
toow out two pence, and gave them to tt e host.
and said unto him: Take ('are of him; and
whatsoever thou spendest more, when I come
again I will repay.
Which nowof these three. thinkest thou, was
neighbor unto him that fell among the thieves?
This old story has, perhaps, never been
heard of in Batavia; but could not Garfield,
whose home is not more than a day's journey
removed, and who, at least before he went to
Congress, was a minister of the gospel-could
not he spare a day to go over there and im
press the homely lesson it conveys ?
As for the woman, Mrs. Atchley, the nature
of her offenseo does not appear on the face of
the papers. Whether it was merely one of
those episodes of conjugal life known as a
" family jar," or whether it was a serious vio
lation of marital law, is left to surmise and
speculation. Judging by the code of morals
most familiar to our people, we are obliged to
accept the testimony of the husband, who
was the original prosecutor, that there was
no criminality, but merely a family
row, because he huts taken her back,
and peace and joy now reign in the house of
the Atchley's at Batavia, Ohio. The woman
Atchley having been proven innocent of
crime, upon the admission of her husband,
her accuser, it follows that the offense of
Storer, or Allen, Is limited to that of aiding a
discarded wife, a helpless and homeless wo
man, in her distress-whether with good or
bad Intent-and this seems to be the view of
the case taken by the officers of the law by
whom he was tried and discharged as an in
nocent man.
We already know how one hundred coura
geous men, with masks on their faces, deadly
weapons in their hands and murder in their
hearts, in the dead hour of midnight, broke
down doors, seized this one man, placed a
rope around his neck, dragged him to a
bridge over the Little Miami' river, tied the
end of the rope to a beam of the bridge, and,
with fiendish fury, cast their victim Into the
shallow, rock-bottomed stream below-and
all this in the State of Ohio-the State of
Hayes, of Sherman and of Garfield.
The Cincinnati Commercial now reports the
arrival of the victim in that city. Bruised
and battered, faint from the loss of blood, his
neck marked by the rope, he has crawled
away from the savages of Batavia and is
making his way to the far West.
Such a dastrdly occurrence could happen
anywhere, and it is no more surprising be
cause it occurred near the homes of Hayes,
Garfield and Sherman than was the simi
lar outrage committed at Mount Vernon,
Indiana, last year, where the colored popu
lation was set upon, some hanged, some shot,
and nearly all driven from their homes by
cowardly nd s. Nor do we wish to be
understood 1 condemning these communities
simply because these outrages against law
and society happened in their midst. It is
their misfortune, and we only hope to witness
and testify to their self-vindication.
But we listen with hand to ear for the
shriek of the apostles of human liberty and
enfranchisement. Where is the man whose
profound sympathy for the colored man was
so touchingly displayed when the election re
turns of 1876 were found to be against the
Republican candidates? Whore is the distin
guished financier and chosen successor of
Hayes, who mingled his tears with those of
our own martyred Eliza, when she rehearsed
her carefully conned story before the visiting
statesmen? Where is the army? Where is
Piegan Phil? Will the silent traveler be
called back from over the sea to punish, with
strong arm and merciless hand, the Ku-Klux
of Indiana and the bulldozer of Ohio?
When the perpetrators of the Mount Vernon
massacre and the band of murderous rufllans
of Batavia have been made to feel the strong
arm of the law, the Christian statesmen of
Indiana and Ohio, who love to paint in black
est colors every act of lawlessness committed
at the South, may consistently turn their
eyes from their own homes to find elsewhere
examples of violence and inhumanity. Until
then we say to them, in the language of the
Master: "Thou hypocrite, cast out first the
beam out of thine own eye, and then shalt
thou see clearly to pull out the mote that is
in thy brother's eye."
PROMISCUOUS CHARITY.
Charity begins at home; and this city is
undoubtedly distinguished for its charities.
In the matter of alms to the poor, and aid to
the needy, we doubt if there be a city on the
American continent whose inhabitants give
with such unstinting generosity and hearty
liberality as do the good people of New Or
leans. Her wealth, beauty and fashion have
lately done homage at the altar of this mer
ciful deity. They have xpended time and
toil in their public efforts to feed the hungry,
shield the shelterless, and relieve the suffer
ing and poverty of this city. They have given
their Opera House tableaux, their loan exhi
bitions, their games of living chess, their mili
tary balls and other public entertainments,
as complimentary benefits to those multi
tudinous actors here who are struggling on
the stage of life through the shifting scenes
of poverty, hunger and distress.
The private charities of our people, silently
given, probably far exceed in extent the dona
tions gathered as the net proceeds of popular
entertainments. The offerings to asylums,
retreats for the poor, and similar institutions,
are poured forth by many with unstinting lib
erality, while the alms wasted upon itinerant
beggars, grotesquely deformed cripples and
patched up impostors are misplaced appro
priations whose annual aggregate would cer
tainly amount to a respectable sum.
It is certain that were all the private char
ities that are wasted on impostors properly
expended they would go very far toward re
lieving the miseries of the more worthy poor,
and alleviating the misfortunes of those who
are really suffering.
The pertinacious importunity of profes
sional mendicants has become an intolerable
nuisance--they not only rob the generous
givers, but they rob the deserving poor by
taking the gifts intended for real distress.
Government owes it to society to take from
the streets the miserable deformed beings who
daily shock the sensibilities of our female
population, and care for them at public ex
pense if they be worthy. The burden of such
falls upon the whole people. If they be im
postors they will go to other cities to ply
their vocation.
If we could systematize our charities and
dispense relief through the medium of well
regulated societies, instead of through the
promiscuous distribution of alms, the impos
tors would be more readily detected, and the
deserving poor more quickly and effectively
aided.
The street beggars should be cared for by
the government, and the proud poor should
be relieved through the agency of the noble
minded ladies and gentlemen of Olur city who
are always ready to do good.
Every citizen of means in this city would
cheerfully double his donations if he knew
that only the worthy poor became the reci
pients, and that he could then repel the im
portunities that beset him upon every street
corner without the apprehension of thereby
refusing aid to the victims of real misfor
tune.
WHAT IT ALL MEANS.
The New York Sun calls attention to the 1
following passage from Webster's immortal J
oration on the completion of the Bunker Hill t
monument, which describes, with the spirit
of prophecy, the existing condition of alffairs.
We give the extract, with the Sun's interpo
lations :
Quite too frequent r.,sort Is made to military
fotce; and quito too much of the sulstanuc of
the ueople is consumed in maintaining armles,
not for defense ;igainst foreign eggression bet
fior eJturciug obedience to domoeslo: aehoroly.
Stand1ng aillies areU the Oppressive Iusitru
meats for governing the peovoi in the haL ds of
hereditary and arbitrary monarChs, A military
r"pubil:-a go'erunmeut f]oudetl on mrk else- .
iiuns [like that ot kiayes--lD J. and supported.
only by the sword, is a movement indeed, but
a retrograde and disastrous movemrnt, trom
the regular and old fashioned monarculcalsys- 1
tms. t
If men would enjoy the blessings of republi
Oa governmen't they must govern themselves
by reason, by mutual counsel and consultation,
by a sense and feeling of general Interest, and
by the acquiescence of the niiiuority in the trill of
the majordut, properly expressed las by the re
peal of the army at the pdlls-ED.J; and above
all, the mi ltary must be koept, according to the
language ot our bill of rights, in strict subor
d Wstihn to the civil authority. Wherever this
ldonu is not learned and practiced,there can be
uo p litlcal freedom. Absurd. preposterous is
it, a scoff and a satire on tree forms of constitu
tional liberty, for frames of governm nt to be
prescribed by military leaders [like Birant and
Sherman-.u.] anu the right of suffrage to be
exercised at the point of the sword,
When W ebster gave utterance to this vigor
ous language, the country was, as now, in a
state of profound peace. But the regular
army, then maintained at the public expense,
was scarcely one-third as large as it is to-day.
At that time we tlad quite as many forts to
garrison as to-day,Mnd our Indian frontier was
even more extensive and quite as dangerous
as now. At the timehe spoke, no such mill
tary interferences with civil authority, as
made up the history of the Grant adminis
tration, had ever been attempted in this coun
try. 1 he issue upon which the presence of
the army at the polls is justified, the right of
the Federal government to manage and su
pervise congressional elections, had never
been heard of at that time. On the contrary,
the State control, even as to the manner of
its exercise, over the electoral franchise was
universally recognized, and Congress had not
seen fit to enact any election laws whatever.
What would Webster say had he witnessed I
the uses to which the army has been put in
these latter days? What apprehensions
would he have felt at the present enormous
and costly military establishment, supported
with the people's money, to be held in reserve
for the political purposes of a partisan ad
ministration?
The pending army appropriation bill calls,
in round numbers, for twenty-seven millions
of dollars, to provide for the support of
twenty-five thousand troops. Besides cloth
ing, food and shelter, which are provided
by the government free of charge, each soldier
costs the government not less than eleven
hundred dollars a year.
After reciting this fact, the Sun very per
tinently asks, what number of average
farmers, skilled mechanics and laborers
make this much a year? The very best of
them do not average over $3 50 a day, which
amounts at the end of the year, there being
six working days in the week, to but $1095 50,
and this only in case of constant employment
and without deduction for a single day lst
by sickness or other causes. Out of this the
farmer or mechanic has to support himselif
and his family, pay rent, vpenses in case of
sickness, and for a thoustihd other things
which are supplied to the soldier he helps
to pay to overlook him at the polls and
disarm him of the only weapon of defense
the poor man has, his vote, to protect his
liberties and vested rights. This is the hard
pan of the issue now beftire Congress, and
which the people will have to finally pass
upon in 1880.
The Missouri Legislature is mixed on the
treasury question. Since the loss of a large
amount of State funds in a rotten bank, it has
been impossible to discover the exact financial
condition of the State. The Legislature set
about this difficult task, however, the other
day, and called on both the Treasurer and
Auditor of the State to report the condition
of the State treasury. These two reports
have been presented, but they make "confu
sion worse confounded." The Treasurer de
clares that there will be a surplus of $100,000
in the treasury January 1; the Auditor that
there will be a deficiency of $140,000. The
Legislature did, what might be expected
of it under the circumstances. It received
the Treasurer's statement as the correct one,
and went to work at once to spend that $100,
000 surplus.
New York politics are decidedly .mixed and
crooked. Last year when the Republicans
united with anti-Tammany, elected Cooper
mayor and dispersed the ranks of Kel.ly. there
was wailing and gnashing of teeth In the
wigwam, and the Democracy of the country
was called onto notice the treachery of anti
Tammany, which united with the Republicans
to defeat the regular Democratic organization
of New York city. They have changed their
views slightly since then, however. Gen.
Arthur, Conkling's head jman, has just
patched up a peace between the Republicans
and the Tammanyites In the board of alder
men. The allies now hold complete posses
sion of that body, and are prepared to slaugh
ter Mayor Cooper's appointments. Thus do
things shift in Manhattan.
The manner in which Congressman Bever
ley Douglas died last session is being Investi
gated by the grand jury of the District of
Columbia. His death was due to inflammp
tion of the stomach, supposed to be caused
by an excessive use of alcohol. It was sub
sequently discovered that he had been kicked
in his stomach by a brother Congressman in
a row that occurred a few days before his
death. The grand jury is trying to find out
whether an indictment for manslaughter will
lie against that kicking Congressman. Such
is modern life in Washington.
WAGONW I CAN C CAN ARTI POKEb!
H. N. SORIA,
Is and 20 Union and 15 and17 Perdldo
streets, 0
Sole Agent for the celebrated " STUDErBAKER"
WAGONS, CARTS and SPRING WORK
of all kinds and sizes.
Dealer In Philadelphiaand Western Cane Wag
ons. Carts and Dfays; Timber Wheels; Whteel
barrows of all descriptions; Spokes. Fellows.
Hubs. Shafts. etc; Wheelwright Material.
Orders promptly filled. All work warranted.
de71 y
DR. C. BEARD,O
OCULIST AND AURIST,
14 .-- -e- Canal Street ......142
New Orleans L. Loak Box 1511.
Offlice hours-From 9:90 to 3:so. ita 2dp tf
CARD OF 'I'HANKS.
At a regular meeting of the Marine Engi
neers' Association. No. 15. on Saturday, May 24.
1879, it was resolved to tendrer to the Rev. Dr.
Jas. A. IVY a card of thanks for the presenta
tion of a Bible, which was highly appreclated
by the Order.
CHIAS. LESTER. Acting President.
F. C. CONWAY Cor. Secretary. my27 It
ATTENTION, KNIGHTS.
CASTLE HALL. O)RLFANS LonDO No. 1,
Knights of Pythins.
New Orleans. May 27. 1879.
The officers and members of this lodge are
ordered to assemble in full uniform at the
GhIUNEWALD HALL. at 2:30 o'clock p. m,
sharp, for the purpose of participating in the
parade prior to our annual festival.
The uniformed members of Crescent Lodge
No. 3 and Royal Arch Lodge No. 6 will please
take notice of the above order.
By order of J. C. BEARD. Chancellor Comman
der. H. 8S. MICHEL.
my27 It 2dp Keeper Records and Seals,
356,432
GENUINE SINGER
SEWISG IAlHINES
Sold in 1878.
BEWA RE
of parties offering bogus and done over ma
chines as the IMPROVED SINGER.
Companies have sprung up in every part of
the Union for making an 'imitation Singer
Machine." a
Why are not Pimflar companies formed fot a
making imitations of other Sewing Machines. d
The public will draw its own inference. Gole a
is continually counterfeited; brass and tin never.
Waste No Money on Interior Counterfelts.
PRICES GREATLY REDUCED.
BEND FOR CIBOULAR.
THE SINER MANF'D COMPIlY,
5. E. RUNDLE, Afent,
86 Canal street-615 Magazine street.
AGENT
Butterick & Co.'s Patterns.
mhls am d&w
FOR FIFTEEN DAYS ONLY.
FOR FIFTEEN DAYS ONLY.
OUR ENTIRE STOCK
Of Well Selected and Fresh
DRY GOODS,
AT COST FOR CASH.
PEPIN & BROUSSARD,
1568...........CANAL STREET........... 1I
White Building, corner of Baronne,
P. 8.-Parties in need of DRY GOODS will
find a great advantage in giving us a call before
purchasing elsewhere. oe
Washington Avenue Drug Store,
SCorner Magazine and Washitngten
t NEW ORLEANB.
Oonstantly receiving fresh supplies of x)ure
Drug. Medicines. Ohemicals Patent Medicnee.
0Grbs of all kinds. Brushes, Boaps Perfraery,
1 Toilet and Fancy Articles etc. boral 'l'ooth
Paste, recommended by all who use it as a
very superior dentifrice. It beautifies the teeth
to a fine nearl-like ornament and ra lshing
beauty. Alkaline Bouquet Powder for beauti
fying. softoning and preserving the skin. the
best thiLg f.r prickly heit and eA summer
t Aruptiona, Customers, city and cr~rntry, will
find our stock complete. comprisirg many ar
ticles impossible to enumerate hero, and sold at
j moderate prices. Prsscriptionsk t un niht
and day. R. J. MAHI. 'A.M M. D,.
Drn .ast. Pb armaceutist and Praeti,cal Chemist
cIev gin
DR. JON.AS'
d DICAL llD HYDROUPATC IIISTITTE,
Corner Canal and Burtrandy Streets,
r Electro-Balneologiceral Treatment.
A true specifle in all c'"ases of Bheumatism,
Gout. Neuralgia, caralls and Nervous Dis.
Le eases generally, nose iy
CHARLIES T. DUGAZON, President. W. A. BILLAUD, Secretary.
LOUISIANA ICE MANFPACTURING CO.
Dealers in
MANUFACTURED AND NORTHERN
ICE! ICE!
WORKS :
ON TCHOUPITOULAS STREET, NEAR LOUISIANA AVENUE.
DEPOTS :
Nos. 27 and 29 Front Street,
No. 12 Crossman Street, . No. 60 Bienville Street,
NEW ORLEANS, LA.
ALBERT J. MICHAELIS, Superintendent. DAN. FINLEY, General Solicitor.
FOR THE VERY BEST AND NEVER FADING
PHOTOGRAPHS
- GO TO -
121;CANALiStreet, . 121 CANAL Street.
Touro Bullding. LTouro Bullding.
n n24 Iv
GO TO
E. OFFNER'S,
And look at the NEW STYLES of
DINNER, IEA AND
TOILET SETS.
Also a large variety of
REFRIGERATORS, COOLERS, ICE
CREAM FREEZERS AND
BATH TUBS.
MAKE NO MISTAKE IN THE PLACE.
174 Canal Street,
(Opposite the Varieties Theatre.)
E. OFF-IER.
myll lm 2dp
illE NEW LOUISIANA KEMEI)V.
Greatest Cough Sirup of the age, or of
any age. Product of our swamps. Splen
did for children. NO poison. I'HIR
TEEN pages of names of HOlE REFER.
ENCES, and increasing! Sold by drug.
gists. Depot No. 106 Camp street, N. O.
ia2 6m 2dri
NOTICE TO bTATE TAX AND LICENSF
PAYERS.
All capital tax and license payers in the par
Ish of Orleans. delinquents this year, are hereby
notified that suit wilt be entered against them
on or beft re June 1., in compliance with law,
and are urged to settle at once and avoid costs.
etc. See section 4, act 27. approved February 8.
1879. and also the following resolution, passed
May 19, by the Convention now in session:
"Resolved. That, it is not the intention of this
Convention to take any action calculated to
change the collection of taxes or licenses Day
able for the current year."
B. C. BOND,
Collector Upper District,
Office No. 241 Josephine street.
P. L. BOUNY.
Collector Lower District.
Office St. Louis street. under the State-House.
my23 2W
DECORATION DAY.
The Joseph A. Mower Post G. A. R. hereby
extends a cordial Invitation to all ex-Federal
and Confederate militaryorganiz itions and in
dividuals to participate with us in the beautiful
annual custom of decorating with flowers the
soldiers' graves at Chalmette,
DECORATION DAY. MAY ~o, 1879.
The elegant steamer JOHN W. CANNON will
leave foot of Canal street at 1, a and 5 o'clock.
returning at 2. 4 and 6 o'clock.
Tlckets-Fifty Cents.
To be obtained at Geo. Ellis' bookstore, op
posite Postoffice; Lillenthal's jewelry and See
bold's bookstore. Canal street; J. S. Rivers, sta
tioner. Camp street. and William Hoy, Post
Commander. 25 Decatur street.
Exercises will commence promptly upon the
arrival of the 3 o'clock boat.
WM. ROY, Post Commander.
myll 18 25 27 28 29 30.
JUST RECEIVED!
A large and picked lot of Cheeked. White and
Fancy
CHINA MATTINGS.
WINDOW SHADES.
OIL CLOTHS,
COCOA MATTINGS.
LACE CURTAINS.
UPHOLSTERY GOODB.
A. BROUSSEAU'S SON
17............. Chartrese tret....... ... IL
Prices Lower Than Ever Before
in New Orleans.
Call and see. oe6 2dp ly
J. Levois,
126 Canal Street,
Calls attention o hie
FINEI ASSORTMENT OF
FRENCH CASSIMERES,
For Suits and Pants, in the Newest Shades an"d
Patterns.
CHARVET'S DENTS' SHIRTS,
Now offered at VERY LOW PRICES.
GENTS' HALF HOSE,
Brown. White and Fancy Colored.
GITS' IIIEW CAIBRIC IABDKEICHIEFS,
ETC. oc2o
BODLEY BROTHERB
Have the most complete stock of Cane Wagons.
three and four mule Cane Carts. Ox Carts. Log
Wheels Cotton Wagons. Bagasse Carts. Farm
Carts, lice Carts, Small Carts of every sze. four
I and six seat Family Wagons, iBpring Wagons
for delivering goods, Sokes. Felloes. Shafts,
Hounds. Wagon Material, Axle Grease, Cart
r Boxes, etc. We especiall call attention to our
1 full-sized swedgel d hardened Axles. Chilled
- Boxes and extra toning of all our Carts and
Wagons. Manufactured in our own factories at
t Wheeling, W. Va.. from the best materlal and by
skilled mechanics, we can give a reliable
guarantee meet any compettiona and sueplr
he largest demand.
Depot-131 and 159 ComPon street.
my2 2do9m
HART'S LOAN OF'FICE
48 ..........BARONNE STREET.......... 48
OPPOSITE GAS OFFICE.
* Money loaned on Diamonds. Jewelry. Furni.
ture. Pianos, Mirrors, etc, fe2 ti
NOW IS THE TIME
TO -
BUY SHIRTS.
STORE FOR RENT.
This stock must be promptly reduced and
soet,l indleements are offered to CASB
BUYERS. The assoroent of
MEN'S AND BOYS'
SHIRTS
Is very complete, and at
PRICES EXCEEDINGLY LOW.
All the"NEW GOODS," consisting of
Seasonable Underwear,
Choice Neck Dressing,
-EMBRACING
NEW STYLES OF COLLARS AND CUFFS
And every article in stock will be put at the
lowest prices to effect speedy sales.
No Humbu!t Now is the time to buy Shirts
and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
B. .'". WALSHE,
110-......Cana street..-....110
no22
NOTICE TO STMfE CREDITOB&
ROOMS COMMITmEE ON THE DEBT 0)
the tthte, at the State-House,
New Orleans, April 30. 1879.
The Committee on the Debt of the State. In
accordance with a resolution of the Constitn.
tional Convention, hereby give notice to the
creditors of the State that the committee is pre
Dared to receive propositions relative to the ad.
justment of the bonded and floating debt of the.
State.
Propositions should be submitted in writing
to the chairman of the committee by a syndi
cate or agency. representing each particula
class of indebtedness.
E.. KIDD.
Chairman of Committee.
Address. New Orleans. La.. State-House.
myl tf
NOTICE OF ELECTION.
OFFICE OP CIrIL.SHERBIP,
Parish of Orleans.
New Orleans. May 23, 1879.
By and under authority of a vroclamation
issued by his Excellency Francls T. Nicholls.
Governor of the State of Louisiana. dated on
the twenty-second day of May. las, directlng
an election to be held on THURSDAY. the
twenty-ninth day of May. 1879k to elect a
Reuresentative Delegate of the fifth ward of
the parish of Orleans. in the Constitutional
Convention of this State now in session.
Notice is hereby given that an election willbe
held, in conformity with act No. su of the extra
session of 1877, on THURSDAY, the twenty
ninth day of. May. 1879, from 7 o'clock in the
forenoon until 6 o'clock in the afternoon
throughout the fifth ward of the parish of Os.,
leans. for the purpose of electing a Represents
tive Delegate to represent the said fifth ward il
the Constitutional Convention now in session.
J. R. ALCEE GAUTHBBEAUX.
Civil Sheriff of the Parish of Orleans.
my24 td2dp
LAST CHANCE,
CITY TAXE-S OF LS79.
DEPATMENrT or FINA.E. CT HALLG. .1
New Orleans. May 26.1879. 1
We are placing TAX BILLS of 1879 in court.
and all who pay to this Department, say until
the thirty-first instant. inclusive, can pay the
face of the bill.
On the second of June we will exact interest
from the first of April, besides any costs in
curred.
ALP. H. ISAACSON,
my2i ,t AdminlitratOl.
CIHAMPAGNE
DE MONTIGNT,
-A
&uperior WVine,
AND PUT UP EXPRESSLY FOR THE
Southern Market.
For sale by
HUGH W. MONTGOMERY,
_mys 4160 Common 5tr.
C. A. CHANDLER,
PRACTICAL
t No. 101 Canal street, New Orleans,
Dentistry PRACTICALLY performed in Y
Deits branchs at the very lowst BRATES
most liberal CHARGES. my2 IM_.
ADOLPHE GRACONARD. JOHN SCHUIZW:
GRA1U'NARD & 0SCHNEIDER,
Dealers in fine cu' Chewing. Snuff and SmokJ.-i
TOBACCO,
HAVANA AND DOMESTIC CIGARS.
No. 46 Magazane street,
New Orleans. La.
Brier Root and all.other varieties of pives5oa*
stantly on hand. my16~~D

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