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Title:
The colored American. : (Washington, D.C.) 1893-19??
Place of publication:
Washington, D.C.
Geographic coverage:
  • Washington, District of Columbia  |  View more titles from this: City State
Publisher:
Colored American Pub. Co.
Dates of publication:
1893-19??
Description:
  • Began in 1893.
Frequency:
Weekly
Language:
  • English
Subjects:
  • African Americans--Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers.
  • Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers.
Notes:
  • Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.
  • Description based on: No. 20 (Aug. 11, 1894).
  • Latest issue consulted: Vol. 11, no. 23 (Nov. 12, 1904).
  • Microfilmed for the Committee on Negro Studies of the American Council of Learned Societies by the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.
LCCN:
sn 83027091
OCLC:
9948037
ISSN:
1940-7416
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The colored American. November 25, 1899, Image 1

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Colored American

The Colored American began publishing in 1893 under the ownership of Edward Elder Cooper, who had distinguished himself as the founder of the Indianapolis Freeman, the first illustrated African American newspaper. The Colored American operated its presses at 459 C Street in Washington's northwest quadrant. The weekly publication promoted itself as a national Negro newspaper and it carried lengthy feature stories on the achievements of African Americans across the country. Publisher Cooper relied on contributions from such prominent black journalists such as John E. Bruce and Richard W. Thompson to sustain the national scope of his paper, which readers could obtain for a $2.00 annual subscription.

The Colored American included a regular column called "City Paragraphs" that highlighted events in the nation's capital and routinely featured articles on religion, politics, education, military affairs, and black fraternal organizations. The paper distinguished itself by its use of original reporting rather than relying on boiler-plate, filler material taken from other publications. Like other papers, however, it included advertising, much of it geared to black consumers.

The paper ran editorials and political cartoons that championed improved social conditions in the black community and expanded rights for African Americans. Although it held a reputation for political independence, the Colored American was actually staunchly Republican. Cooper allied himself and his paper with Booker T. Washington, and the publisher looked to the famous black educator for financial assistance. Another financial backer was lecturer and activist Mary Church Terrell, a noted African American civil rights advocate who wrote a column for the paper titled "The Women's World," under the pseudonym Euphemia Kirk.

Unfortunately for the Colored American, Cooper proved to be a poor businessman and, because of some unorthodox business practices and extensive debts to creditors, financial problems plagued the paper. It ceased publication in November 1904.

Provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC