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The evening world. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, October 10, 1887, LAST EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/1887-10-10/ed-1/seq-5/

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W M AMP8EMTCNT8.
I .J3D STREET TABERNACLE
LPEDNESDAY NEXT
If IT M( WILL RK OPENED
W&Jmil TI1E KXIItnlTlON 07
WH M. DE MUNKACSY'S
1 . 1 CHEAT UEL1OI0U8 FAINTMO,
'CHRIST
II ON
I CALVARY.
HJ? v At the 23d St. Tabernacle.
K CHARLES 8BDKLMEYBR, Proprietor.
$L Calvary " is a worthy companion to his
H KChriBt boforo Pilato." It has the isamo su-
M j&rb dramatio force, the snmo intense real-
H Jf'ss, the samo wondorfnl power of making
t oo divine element apparent without tho
H JVightost departure from tho bare historical
W jWcts- Christian World, March 6, 1885.
WHYS
Ml of tub
ft MERRIMAC
R r ifflo witor
I MIAVAL BATTLE.
H I Thi panorama, after an unprecedented sneoe of two
1 freer, wUl eoon be oloeed.
Ml ( MADISON AVE. AND S9TII ST.
ifW f OPEN DAY AND EVENING.
mjmS I Within one block of OentralPark.
aw The great painti.... ,. .. MM.n.iNwet 139 6th are., near
W 37thst.. daily from 8 A.M. to 10 P.M. Admission. 3So.
Ab T A TO BTRKET THEATIIK. Oor 6th are.
PI!. Matlnre ftstnrdaynnly during this eng agement.
D MIMN1E PAllEE
(tmI a two pUrn. A double bill
M THE RING AND THE KEEPER
HI AND
H MY SWEETHEART.
Hjj 3.RAND OPERA HOUSE.
BsBsT TT Referred seat, orchestra etrele And beloonr. BOo.
WM Wed.l MR. AND MRS. MoKIIK RANKIN ISaV.
IB Mat. IN TIIK UOLDKN GIANT. Mat.
JH Next weok-OLARA MORRIS.
fi' MARPLE'S JUSTIFICATION.
Sm Br ROBERT O. T. STETEES.
M &Kv flPpW0 G to asa'ai there
An wc wK7y WM Bt"to at e
nVL ttt? te. workB our or UT
yl 'AlTO 5alnH0B up the road, and
S ''VVo-! )1 Sho thought it probable
ujB LXpHa thateomoof tho Btrik.
,'lfB AfAViLt? ers wou t"8 wan.
llW. "sSSwarisJc tiering and drift this
IbV SSfflHU lV$v woy nnt fr'Enten tho
IMj BMWiWlrl j V, . , women folks. He did
US 'ffiHJE no knaw' 1 ne could
'IS ijv 5$-J??!sii?I altogether trust tho
19 VtS';6.new hancl but tho
!H b iwitnIi,?'S'ar'ou" weat flow? bo
ism. hBI in (y.i.fi? mai' a irtuo of a
m $Jffim0T$ "Bill," said he,
fl isSESMir " yu'ro doin' chores
II la?JMirMKCTl j nigh the house. S'po-
Ifl K7t&5&iui i sen you eeP yonr ey8
ffl iPIWaflopen an1 drive off
III I IfM Wtramps. Mis' Marple's
"Pc ;4 p"""- hoss - proud, an' I'm
SJ " v Sjc bound for a vanduo
B whore a blue grass colt's to bo sold; Bo back
H 'snfternoon."
-VJ Bo Martha sewing on the porch saw the
BJ man.
H " Who's that ?" she asked Rosy. " 'Pears
il like he's not familiar to mo him down there
jH by tho branch ?"
' Hj Bosy's pretty faco had grown Lancastrian
H out of its usual Yorkishnoss, and she pioked
H ot the letter lying in her lap.
j H ' ' You hear mo ?" her mothor said.
,H llocy looked up.
H " It's tho now farm hand, mother."
''9 "Now farm-hand," repeated Martha, irri-
yU tably dragging hor work up over her knee ;
&fl " 'pears to mo it's always tho new farm-hand
' 9 nowadays. Sam's not doin' his duty by me,
S totin' on now hands all the time. Last one
I'm drunk up overythin', your cologne-water
1 m an' tho eperitH on tho toad with soven toes.
VW I'm not clearly got over billin' tho bridges
IJm 'bout him an' my watch ho walked off with,
VJ but a new ono's took on. Barn's not doin'
,tJJP his duty by mo no how. How long's this ono
J1F been hero ?"
jr,f " I should say over a mouth, mother."
Jkl " Should you 't Queer I havo never saw
im , him before."
tm " You'vo soon very liltlo for a month,"
tiH llosy retorted.
! "Only your impudenoo," her mother cried,
'H n " on' I uon't want to suu much more of that;
! I toll y.rti. Seen I Iseouyour undaughtor.
J 'liness, an' tho i'ons entered my soul liko it
j entered Joseph's when his brethren Bold him
19 into slavery. A mother's done sold by her
ill , children over an' over j poro white or rich
;' whito, low down or high up, it's all a'ono."
! "Hut, mothor "
"iw " Now, llosy, stop right thore. I tell you
lm now, as I told you a hundred times, nothin'
yV can coma of it.1'
19 " JIe'8 Bick," and Rosy began to cry,
KB , "Hick!" oohood hor mothor, ironically.
U9 " An' what am I ? I tell you John Oroll shall
, never enter this family. I hato him I hato
8m tho whole tribe of 'em. Bickl What I been
ikw for years an years, an' all through thorn
, what I been but a sour, igu'ant woman, with
,'BJ no ambition to be moro ? Au' yot my daugh.
'Af.. ter, my onliost daughter, can come to me an'
''fB say she cares for tho man act'ally cares for
li ,ra W would leave mo any minute to go to
; H him."
' '.-W-i " Didn't you leave your mother when yon
iBb, 1 marriod father ? and I don't understand your
IBS j Kttitude toward John "
jBK j " When X maxriod our fathsr I doo tho
(mmml
iS u&JttWtlll
WmrmWs44ISmf7StmmmMm
mm faces.
VfK DO NOT KNOW WHEN WK HAVE BERN 80
MANY BRIGHT I5YB8 AMD MUNNY FAUCM
IN TA,OT. BU01I A TUROIIO OV DELlailTUD
laTTI.B ONhH A8 GRKETED OUR GRUAT
HALF-PRICE HAI.K OV OIlII.UItBN'M
OLOyilINO I.AHT WRKK. IT Tf AS BUOII A
OARD'1 TO ATTBAOT ATTENTION TO OUR
IMMKNbB UBNURAIi HTOCK THAT WE
FROPOHU TO DCPI.ICATK TUB 1MDU0H
niENTH. A8 FOLLOVTSt UERB ARE 2,000
UNBU PANTS ZTOIl HOYS-rKIlFKOT OKAIr
IM THEIR WAY-AT 30 CBNTft. L'UII.DUBN'H
OVRRC'OATM AT 83 1 MOTOINO BUTTER IN
THE OITY AT 09. BOYS' MUITH, I.ONO
FANTS. AT SO AND 0t FORMERLY (10 AND
12. CHIJ.lmRN'S OAHHIMBKBH. tORDU
KOYH AND PLAITED MUITH AT 3 1 RE.
DDOED FROM St. LAWN TENNIH PI.ANNBIi
HIIIRT WA1KT3, ALWAYS SOLD AT l. NOW
IS CENTS, AMD. TO ADD TO THE HAPPINESS
OF THE BOYS. TIIBY OAN HELP THEMSELVES
TO OUR SO.OENT rOLO OAPH AT 8 CENTS I
Mil! Sir l ; ii,
Broadway, Cor. Grand St)
8th Ave.. Cor. 49th St
AMUSEMENTS.
IJOOLE-S THEATRE.
." i betimen 4th are. and Bmadwu.
&W$ adaingraV
'aovENTN. EASTLYNNE.
4 AIATINBRS-Mon., WedT, Thnra.. Bat.
Week of Oct, 17, by amncement with A. M.
PALMER, the Madleon Bqnare 11 AZKL KIRKE.
H.R.JACOBS'S SD AVE. THEATRE.
CORNER S18T ST.
Prlces.lOo.; Res.Soats,20a&30o.
IIoqm pk4. Not eren fUndlo room.
Uatlna Mondftr. WftdnMdftTand S&tardar,
UAJtTLKY UAiirUKLL'Jl "OUO."
Oct. 17-tukAvilbur OPERA. CO.
A OADEMT OF MUBIO. 14th ft. and Irrlor PLuw.
A 4TIIWKKK. KTonlnoatS. Mt. 8t. at 3.
Liaborato prod action of tho Utott London Melodrama.
A DARK SEGRET.
Xncladlnxthe MARVELLOUS AQUATIU SUENX,
TIIIilThNI.KY IIEI1ATTA.
Reeerred eeaU. 6po.. 15c., Ill, Famllr clrele. S5o
GENERAL ADMISSION, Wo.
DOOKSTADER'S.
nuNiNEaa nou.ntNU.
Cleveland's Western Trip.
Volunteer and Thistle.
"FAM. OFNEwnAIIYLON.''
THREE NEW BONOS.
Erenlntm, 8.80. Saturday Matinee, 3.80.
BUOU OPERA-HOUSE. LAST WEEK.
Ereninra and Satorday Matinee at 3.
SALISBURY TROUBADOURS,
in their lateat anoeeu,
THE HUBIMING BIRD.
T YOKUAl TIIK.aTKR. 4th are. and 33d, at.
Jj Becini 8.15 with EDITHA'S BUROLAR, At 8.45
TIIK OltKAT PI Mi PKAKL.
TI1U UKKAT PINK I'KAKI..
Tlltt JltKAV PINK PBAltli.
WEDNESDAY MATINKB.
THE HIOHB8T BD3DER AND EDITHA'S BUROLAR
5 TO AVE. THEATRE, 4TH WEEK.
ETenlncat8. riatnrdaT Matinee at 3.
MRS. LANOTRY.
aeoomnanled far MAURICE BARRYMQRB and her
own oompanr in her aneoeiafnl production
AS IN A LOdKINO OLASS.
Splendid aoenery and appolntmenta.
VT Under the direetlon ofj-MrnENRr B. ABBEY
TUESDAY. OOT.
Oonuneneement of the REGULAR REASON with the
prodnotlonofSYDNEY GRUNDY'S comedy drama,
THE MOUSE TRAP.
Beate now on tale.
nllALlA Ererr ereneinr. oomedr niooeea.
X DROP OFTORSON.
Satordaj, Jnnkermana Inspeetor Braealf .
Monday, Ueinrioh Boetel, II Troratore.
worst bit o' work over I done. I cared for
your father like few women cares for their
husband, 'pears to mo. An' how was I re
warded ? Listen 1 it's timo you was told,
then you'll understand my ' attitude,' as you
call it. Your father'd been engaged to John
Croll's mother, on' when she married Oroll
he askod me to have him an' I had him soon
enough, and then ho showed mo I wasn't
much to him an' ho went to tho war. There ?
Now you got the story now you understand
my ' attitude ' at last. Act as you think best;
it's either John Oroll or mo, not both."
Martha breathed heavily; her face was set
and stem. She had told something that had
been her secret for years, and it wrung her
somo to let her daughter know.thnt she had
been an unloved wife Sho glanced under her
lashes at the girl, and found that Rosy's tears
were dried and that she was regarding her
mother, probably inwardly commenting
on tho thin, faded hair and sallow faco, and
scarcoly considering it strange that tho
fathor had been moro drawn to the beautiful
Mrs. Oroll, who oven in her old ago was
pleasant to look upon, and who had kept up
with tho times marvellously. Martha grew
restive under tho scrutiny.
" Well ? " sho said at last.
" You aro a brave woman, mother," Rosy
returned with a touch of sarcasm, as she
folded the letter and put it in hor pocket.
" I givo him up at last. But you should havo
told mo in tho beginning. There i do not
soy it was hard for you to toll mo even now;
I know it was."
"I a'posed'' you didn't caro for him very
6trong,"i-her mothor dryly remarked, puz
zled over her easy victory.
" I caro moro for him in giving him up,"
Rosy hostenod to Bay, and complicating tho
puzzle, " than I should did I go to him
against your wishes. And poor father 1 "
" Poro who?'' cried Martha, throwing her
sewing away from her. " Poro who ? "
Rosy was apallod at tho storm she had
raised.
"Hush!" sho cried. "Tho man will
hear." a
"What do I care who hears? What you
mean by pore father ? And mo go I lcavo
met gollf
She switched her rocking chair around
until her back was to her daughter ; sho was
trembling in every limb, her nostrils dilated,
a dull flush coming to her cheek. " Go I"
Rosy left the porch, left tho garden, and
sped away to a refuge she and John had
made their own in the days of their first hap.
piness.
This refuge was an enclosure formed by
four elms of unknown age, and whose limbs
swept the ground and encircled a space about
twenty feet square
Hero John Oroll and Rosy hod plighted their
troth, and here Rosy had waited in vain for
him when her mother had refused to sanction
their union. Here sho came after sho had
mado her plea for the last timo and trained
thereby tho saddest satisfaction had heard
tho story of hor father's defoctiou, the causa
of her mothor's constant complaint and irri.
tability. She know now that patriotism had
not taken her father to war; sbo could realize
hor mother's accusations and jealousy. John
had told her that his mother find Raid Martha
Pierson loved the ground Thaddous Marple
trod upon, and when he was shot down at
Ohancellorsvillo, Martha, instead of grioving
as the people had a right to expect her to
grieve, cad " turned to stone " and became a
cold, angered woman, rebelling against tho
deorpo of Providence. To-day Rosy could
understand that coldness ana anger her
mother had accused herself of Bending her
husband to his death; no wonder sho had rare,
ly spoken of tho dead fathor to tho daughter,
had curtly put aestop to natural questions
when the child was old enough to know that
other girls had fathers and she had nouo.
Did she pity her mother ? Sho pitied her
father 1 Her mother should have softened after
tho husband's death, should have altogether
melted when she know that young John Oroll
favored Rosy, and should have seen in their
marringo an expiation of her own offence if
eveq according to the lex tallonU. Instead of
which, when sho had marked the growing in.
timacy between John and Rosy, she forbade
the girl to speak to him, and without Kay
other reason than that it was her will.
It was all too late for tyrannous edict: Rosy
had CTOTitated. to John from, tho flnt, am,
i
.. I' ... i I. li.V & J.-&A :i: " J .
$3,750,000.00
Already paid to more t han
1,000 WIDOWS
AND
5,000 ORPHANS
t the deeeaaed member by the
ffiDTOAL RESERVE FID
LIPB ASSOCIATION,
Home Office, Potter Building
38 Park, Row Now York.
Thle Aaeoolatlon continue to rarntah
LIFE INSURANCE
.... at-
ONE-HALF THE USUAL COST.
IT HAS
191,260,000.00 Cash Surplus,
92,000,000.00 Assots.
It 1j payinc tn eaah more than
S4.000.00 Per Day
to the Vn&m and Orphana, one death claim bet n paid
on an attr a ' erery day in the year.
Ita Cash Bnrplna U lnoreaalnf at the rate of more than
SI, 000.00 Per Day,
ThU Association baa alraadr aaTad to 1U membara by
induction of premium, at omn pared with tha rata
charged bj tho monopoly Ufa Lnraranoa oompanlea,
moro than
$ 1 4,000,000.00 SAVED.
PnriherpartienUnfarnlahed at Horn. Office, 88 Park
Row, New York.
Board of Dlroctors nnd Cduiioll Officers
of
Mutual Rosens Fond Life Association.
EDWARD R, HARPER, Freetdent, New York City.
ALFRED TAYLOR. Vloe.Preaident, Attorney, New
OUArLeS R, BISSELL, Treeeurer, OapltaUrt, New
8 Hon. "A'ENRY OVERSTOLZ. Preetdent Fifth Na
onal Bank, ei-Miyor. St. Louie, Mo.
JOHNJ.AOKER.Paat Qrand Maater A. O. U. W
SAafuEL A. ROBrNRON, M. D.. Chairman Inrert
ment Ooiuoiitto, Wrat New Brtahton, Btaten Ialand,N.Y.
WM. II. DROWN, Wholeaele Drag. Baltimore, Md.
ANTHONY N. URADY, President Municipal Uaa
Co., Albany. N. Y. . .
SAMUELW. VTRAY, Qrand Secretary A. L. H..
Philadelphia. Pa. . .
NEWELL W. BLOBS, Resident Vloe-Pretldent Great
Britain. London, Knaland. .. .. .. .
jAMks W. DOWDEN, M. D., Medical Director, New
York City. . .
OEOR11E P. LAWRIB, Wholeaele Dry .floods, of
Martin. llufTnm ft On., 40 White St., New York Olty.
FKEDKUIOT. 11RAMAN, Secretary, New York City.
Hon. HENRY J. RE1NMUND, Comptroller (late Su
perintendent uf Insuranoe. State of Ohin)
8nreon.Om. Sir W. dUYER HUNTER, M, P.,
F. R. O. P., K. O. M. O., M. D.. Chief Medical Dl
reotnr for flreat nritatn, London, Knxland.
THOS. W. JOHNSON, Wholesale Dry Goods, John
eon. Sutton A Oo.. Baltimore, Md. ..
WARRINU KENNEDY, Wholesale Dry Oooda. Tor
onto. Ont,
lion. HENRY L. LAMB, lata Dank Superintendent
ftate of New York, Troy, N. Y. . . .
THOS. P. BALDWIN,. WboleulaOotton Oooda, Bald
win A Cui le, Baltimore, Md.
WM. WILSON. Manufacturer, Toronto, Oni. ,
FREDERICKS. PARKER, Chairman Death OUlra
Committee, Attorney, New York City. .
WIlilAM MILLER, Director of Acenclea, New York
Oltr.
K. D. LTJDWIO, Superintendent, Erie. Pa.
OEORQE R. MoCUESNUY, Adjuster, New York
City.
J. M. STEVENSON and B. W. T. AMSDEN, Aaairt
uit Secretaries, Now York City.
JULIUS W. iCRAFFT, Oaanler, New York City.
B. O. BLOBS, Inspector of Axents.
. THE CENTRAL TRUST COMPANY
OF NEW YORK,
TRUSTEE OF TONTINE ltESERVB FUND.
hearing nothing from her own mothor and
knowing that John's mother had known her
parents in their young days sho had ques
tioned John, who in turn questioned his
mothor, and then sympathetically informed
Rosy that her fathor had been a vastly good.
natured man, very tender in his relations
with his wif o, who had not been an peaceful
in her marriod Ufa as sho should have been,
and who altered unwarrantably after her hus
band's death. All this had brought John and
Rosy closer together.
Martha turned against hor daughtor then,
especially as sho buw developing in tho girl a
naturo liko her own persistent, warring till
sho gained hor end, and perhaps never know,
ing when she had gained it. Rut Rosy suffi
ciently respected hor mother's expressed dis
like to keep John in tho background. Tho
two mado a haven of tho old elms, and hero
they planned as to what wero tho best means
to overcome Mrs. Marple's prejudices which
John accounted for on tho scoro that sho
vividly recalled old times and hatod thoso
who woro associates then and who, whon her
own sorrow camo, wero still happy, and woro
still on tho heights whilo slio dwelt in tho
nether gloom and elected herself an outcast
accounted for by thinking that she enviously
rcsontod tho joy of tho world that had passed
over her own distress as of small account: joy,
to her, must over bo a thing to stranglo, there,
fore she would not countenance tho happiness
of hor daughter. John got Rosy to reason as
feebly as ho did, and thoy set about devising
means of mollifying tho widowed soul. Rosy
relied too much upon her woman tact ; sho
began to quote John's mothor, how young sho
looked, how tenderly she reverted to old
times, how sho too had lost a husband and
instead of becoming embittered spoko with
dewy eyes of a reunion in heaven, and do.
sired but ono thing moro on earth toad.
vanco her son's happiness.
And Martha heard all this and mado no
comment.
Then John told Rosy, after they conolndcd
that they had softened hor, to tell hor mothor
that he would wait on her tho following day
and sue for Rosy's hand.
" Toll him to como to-day," Martha said,
and Rosy flew down to tho four elms where
John awaited her to know tho rosult of hor
conference with hor mother, and brought
him to tho houso. Sho did not know at tho
timo w hat went on between John and her
mother. Sho heard tho murmur of their
voices in tho parlor as sho impatiently walked
about tho hall ; sho expected ovory moment
to see tho parlor door open and to hear
her mothor call hor uamo for sho know
John'j? powers of argument and how every
untenablo objection and all her mother's
objections must bo untenablo must disap
pear before his impassioned arguments. In.
stead of which tho parlor door opened only
to let out John, whito of face and with com.
pressed lips. Ho looked at Rosy.
" It is all over. Good by 1" ho said.
Ho did not oven offer to take her hand.
Sho was rooted to tho spot. Ho went past
her out tho hall door. Sho could not have
movod from whoro sho stood, and her mother
did not como from tho parlor. Pretty soon,
though, sho began to fool shaky, and it was
not long beforo she sank into a chair and put
her cold hands up over her fuco. She was
conscious of rustling garments near at hand.
" Rosy," her mother said, bharply, " you're
more undaughtcrly than I thought."
That wus all ; not a word of compassion,
not a word of sympathy; selfish to the last.
And Rosy was too proud to ask u word of
explanation. Hut bho haunted tho four alms,
oxpoctiug John. Ho did not meet her there.
Two days after his interview with her mother
she beard that ho had started for tho West,
and without a word of good by to her I
What could her mothor havo said to him ?
Day after day sho sat in the houso, trying to
understand tier mother, who grimly wont
about tho ordinary household duties, railed
at Sam Pcnnel, dusted tho china shepherdess
and tho dagucrrotypt s on tha what-not in tho
parlor, and sewed in tho rocking-chair on tho
porch. Then Rosy would go down to tho
four elms and wait for John, who never came.
Three months passed away, and not a word
from John, not a word from hor mothor.
Needless to speak of her misery, hor hoping
against hope, her savage prido that kept her
silent to the verge of madness. And then to
day cama and his letter. lie had been ill,
was still ill on nranch in tho far West j bo
flfWfe' -i-l- -,VtliTAlAiwrF
NO WOMAN CAN AFFORD iffi(jlrj
. to refuse a fair trial to an arti- 7. J lA
cle which saves one-half the time and labor ( r7w
of washing and house-cleaning, and pro- I fj')'I
duces better results than any soap known, j l
Such an article is JAMES PYLE'S I j SjX
PEARLINE. The many millions of '' f V
packages of Pearline consumed annually, I jtr
testify to its merits, likewise the many C i t i
imitations ; beware of these, they anni- ' J II
hilate the dirt and the clothing with it. fegggg
Hurd, Waite & Co.,
Fulton St., opposite Plorrepont,
BROOKLYN.
.i '
Canton Silks Lowast Yetl
aMNOH CANTON BILKS, somo 75 pUoea
(specially designed for evening dresses , tea
dresses and embroidery purposes), will bo
offered by us to-morrow at 71 CENTS per
yard, in full line of evening shades.
These goods aro selling toay as a great
bargain by leading houses at 75o., and are
richly worth $1.
DEMORAXJZZNG
CUT IN FINE DRESS GOODS.
PARISIAN WIDE WALE SUITING,
I I -2 Yards Wide,
(Every thread pure wool), to bo sacrificed for
6Do, per yard.
100 PIECES OP THESE GOODS will bo
offered, our patrons on Tuesday, shown in
snch popular shades as browns, blues, greens,
olives and cardinals.
NOTE. That somo conception of the LM
P0RTAN0E of this bargain may be formed
beforehand, wo state that this is the SAME
IDENTICAL FABRIC that competing
houses In New Tori aro RETAILING NOW
AT $1.25, as incomprohensiblo as it may
appear.
HURD, WAITE ft CO.,
BROOKLYN.
loved her as she had never doubted that he
loved hor, and ho bogged her to come to him.
No mention of her mother, morelvpleading
that she would assert hor rights of woman
hood and love. This letter in hor hand, she
sought hor mother. The result is known.
Now she know what her mother had said to
John that day in the parlor and that had
sealed his lips and caused him to try to give
her up. Tho offoct of tho trial had Dcen his
serious illness.
So she loved him as she had never loved
him beforo. And yet sho dared not acccdo
to his prayer. Her father had wronged her
mother, and on John's mothor's account!
Women regard tho wrongs to the affections
with other eyes than men. John could glo
riously, selfishly soo in her father's feeling
for his mother but the strongest reason that
Rosy should marry tho son of tho loved
woman it had been transmitted feeling that
had attracted John to Rosy and Rosy to John,
for it must bo that John's mother had cared
for Rosy's father, and thero had come a
lovor's quarrel and two marriages in piquo,
which fact Rony's mothor had almost sub.
stantiatcd. Yes, John, after going through
a spell of sickness, could all at onco reason
that Rosy was hold to him by double ties.
Hut Rosy must respect her mother's wrong,
must pity her dead father John's mother had
been tho cause of Rosy's father's doath only
a little less direotly than his wife had been.
And now Rosy must give John up? Sho was in
tho olm inolosure; sho flung herself to tho
earth, not strengthened by tho contact as ho
of old had been ; sho buried her faco in her
hands and thought and thought. Must her
lifo bo liko hor mother's, hard and bitter, be.
cause of withheld happiness?
Not liko hor mother's, for John loved her 1
Still mon were but mon had not his mother's
refusal to marry tho man she loved caused
that man to marry another woman? John
would marry again, and there would bo ano
ther woman liko her mother would it be
John's wif o, or the woman ho loved ? Tot
dared sho against her mother's wishes ? Not
her mother's wishes.but her mothor's chances
of eternity; for sho knew that hatred such as
her mothor's, irritability suoh as hers, meant
a small holding to divine promises and a be.
liof in tho final readjustment of earthly diffi
culties; to go against her mother now meant
a destruction of tho littlo faith left by tho
ruin of many hopes, of much love.
And how. oven in heaven, could that ono
earthly difficulty bo adjusted ? how could
tho wffo bo loved by tho husband whon he
loved somo ono elso ? Ah, tho sin was hor
father's i he had made hor mother as she was,
hod weakenod tho strong woman-faith in dl
vino things, had ruined the lifo of his daugh.
tor, had virtually committed suicide.
And John's life without hor would be as
hor father's! Nay, it all rovolved about
John's mothor after all ; sho had driven a
loving man to do as ho had done, she had
made a loviug woman a spiritual failure)
John's mother was tho sinner, she must take
the responsibility of tho wrong-doing. And
yet sho had been loved !
Must Rosy bo liko John's mother? must
sho bo responsible for bis acts, for hlsprob.
ablo wife's unhappiness? Poor mother!
She pitied her mother for the first time, folt
drawn towards her, saw in her John's wifo of
twenty jears hence. And then she took
John's lotter from hor pocket, tore up a bit
of Bward and laying it there covered tho
mould over it. bho buried her hopo of hap.
piness with that letter , sho would take tho
responsibility similar to that of John's
mother for sake of her own ill-used, suffer,
ing mother.
It was very quiot under the elms, but a
littlo bird on ono of tho trocs suddenly bo.
Can to sing. That song was moro than sho
could bear ; sho wreathed her arras around
her head and rocked herself to and fro tho
very ecstasy of griof.
Sho know that tho bird stoppod singing, as
though it had been frightened away; sho
heard the crisping of tree branches. Hor
head on her knee, Bho did not look up, sod.
den with grief as sho was.
Had sho raised her eyes she would have
seen a grizzled faco set in a frame of leaves,
pair of burning eyes fixed upon her. These
eyes had watched her bury the letter, bad
noted her conflict with herself before that
they noticed hor convulsed form settling
into a dead calm that was the presage or
more than tho detiUi of the moro bodj. Then,,
i
ffjfefft timmmllltimbmVtitffobL
PINE BALSAM!
Nature's Eemedy.
It oontelna no morphine, apian, or any InirMlent In
Jwriou to the most delicate eonstltntlnn. We do not
elalm the Balaam will enre ererr disease, but we dfi claim
It la one ot the best remedies In the market for the lm-!n?dJV.,,V!r,.?.,.-20.u.OIIH
OOLDS, .BRONCHITIS..
CATARRH, ASTHMA, o.. and complaints of the Pol
nonary Orcan-nerlly. We do not elalm It will cure
consumption, hut we.do elalm It will aire treat relief to
the pttlentx The Pine Balaam dree Immediate relief tn
Wnooplns Oouih, prerenUnt thestranilinjtand distress
usually onnneoved with the disease. It Is pfeaaant to the
taste. Children nerer refuse to take It. On trial will
Ktlsfy any on. of lUjrreat merit. We are reeelrlnc a
r,e number of eertlneatee roluntarily sent u by thoso
who hare alien the Balaam a trial, some of which will be
found below I
. Drooiltk, March 9, 1887.
! BOTUttttr-Dear .Blrt I cannot recommend your
Pin i Balaam toohlrhly, I tun been sick for the last
eight yean, and had. number of doctor. Your Pine
Balsam, I can honestly say, benefitted me more than all
of tpem. I eatuot praise the Balsam too highly.
MRS?Yil?ffiuiffio. 170 Mth si.
- - BaooaXTir, March 14, 1887.
, J, Dt7artrr-Dear Bin I consider your Pine Balsam
nraltub e. During -the past rariabla winter my two
little children, a weU a myself, nan been particularly
rabjeot to eoughe and colds, and In erery caae they hare
been entirely broken up by a few dose of the Pin. Bal
aam, Your Uulr. ,
MRS; P. B. THOMPSON. SOI 8ta st.
,, JaMalcu.L. I., April, 1887.
Mb. Bubjuza Dear Siri I had . bad oough and
raised a. great deal, especially nlghta. Oould not sleep.
OodLiTerOll did not rellereme. A friend sent me.
JwtUe of your Pin. Balaam. Was not .going to tak.lt,
but waa advised to try It, Happy was libit I did. My
oough left main a few day, fierer had: anything help
me so soon. Shall always keep a bottle of It in tho house,
aa I do not want to be without it, and adrlse my many
friends to do the same. I will nnture to say that yon win
ell all yon can make, and aa fast it is mde. Your
respectfully, R. BRUSH.
. BlioOaXTif, June IB, 1887.
Ma, J. BtmiLX Dear Sin Your Pin. Balsam
prores to be the rery best oough cure I hare mt met
with. Han tried number ot oough medicines, but your
Pine Balaam gan m. the apeedlest relief of them all.
It goes right to thespoi. Very truly yours,
T R. A. BKNDALL, S78 8th st.
. . . BHOOST.TX, Jnne 23, 1887.
J, Bunattt IBS fifth Annua- Haring been troubled
with a Mrer. oough, nd fter using medicine for eom.
weeks, and reeerrlog no relief, 1 was recommended to try
the Pine Balsam, and I procured a bottle, and In . nry
Ihort ttm. waa cured. ' 1 found great relief after uslog the
lalaamforonday., I can hlgnly reoommend it to all
Buffering from oolds and coughs.
P. J. PLYIfN, 16T Huntington St., Brooklyn.
. nnoagxTW, Jon JO, M8y
J, StraUtZtZfUeea your Pin. Balsam, and my expert
once with It encourages the ballet that it will do all yon
olaimforta. Am reoommending it to my friend a an
efficient and speedy nmedy for Ih. our. ot oough ami
oolda. Vary respectfully.
Yf. H.llKNDRIOKSON, SS3 Third t.
Wholesale AgentciDeridM, Stlger AOo,, E8 Barclay
street. New Yorki and Town A Eder, 02 Fulton ttwt,
Brooklyn, and for sale by dtsggtat generally.
little by littlo, tho faco 'withdrew, .the leaves
wrapped over tho aperture it had made, and
only Rosy and the four old elms were there.
Concluaea oi Tuesaav'3 Eyinimo Wosld.)
PEOFESfflONAL OHAPEE0NE8.
Ladle. Who Find It Lucrative to Servo aa
Social Factotum..
lFhiUd4tpta Mvrrapk'i WatMnglm Ltntr,
I don't know jaat what to call her. Sue belongs
peculiarly to Waalunirton and Is born ot the neces
sities ot the place. Bhe Is several or rather there
are several of her. If jou are a lady and happen
to be electod to Washington society through hav
ing yonr husband chosen to alt In the legislative
halls or to hold other place of honor auder the
Federal Government, yon may And her useful.
Bho teaches how to entertain and clears away the
thorns from your path on your entranco to Wash
ington society.
Tho wives and daughters of new Congresimen
and officials are frequently thrown Into society
without previous preparation. From the quiet of
a country homo this la a terrlblo transition. There
aro ladles hero in Watblngton whoao husbands
havo been army or navy omccri. They have
spent years In society and havo held and atUl hold
high rank. The myaterlea of form and usago aro
familiar to them, but the death or retirement of
their husband bavo reduced their finance below
the figures of their extravagant tastes. These
ladles now sustain their position In society by lead.
Ing the uninitiated through the mysterious mazes.
They teach tho wives of new Senators and mem
bera from the baclc district the polite forms and
?llot them safely through a winter In Washington,
'ho relation they hold to the novice la that
of a superior, who condescends to take the
part of u friendly adviser or cbaperone. They
aro courted, followed and paldf They aro
women who have been belles In society In the paat,
and who dictate 1U forma now. They now make a
business of pleaauro. They advbio their patron
what to wear, how to furnish their houie, bow to
talk and act, bow to set their tables, how to re
celvo callers sod who to receive; when to call,
how to call and who to call on. They tell them
the difference between an ordinary tea and a high
tea; between a dinner party and a luncheon. They
rub tho dust off their dialect and teach them polite
forma ot speech, and tell them what to talk about.
They lead them around the circle and teach by
example. These champcrona aro not known ua
such except to those who employ them, and they
aro the moat courted of all society. They are
expert In Washington life.
In tho morning, when tbey are not circling tho
rounds of aoclety, they act the part of private con
versationalists. There are always a number of
wealthy ladle who, on account of not yet know lug
the waya of aoclety, or ot 111 health, or, perhaps.,
beoauao they aro In mourning, aro cot In tho social
swim.
As conversationalist,, these queens and facto
tums of aoclety bring all the gossip and goings on
In aoclety In a morning call upon those wealthy
victim of seclusion. They tell theui who held
receptions last night and who wan there: what
they wore, what they said, and what Mas said about
them. They relate the latest private scandal; tell
what different picnic think of each other, and how
each la measured up by tho whMo of soolfij.
Thev report how long Mr. talked with Miss
Millions, and repeat what "society" thought
of It. They discuss tbo engagements made, to be
made, and broken off. All tho little bits of gossip,
small talk, and auandal they Cirry with euat
memory aa to all the Interesting details, and keep
their secluded patrons aa well posted aa If they
were among the most gay. They lighten up a
melancholy morning. .
Somo of the moat foahlonable women who have
long been the "loaders" of society earu lit ihla
way the means to keep up their establishment and
to maintain thrmaehea In fashionable luxury.
The wives and daughter of aomo famous meu.
now dead, are profeMlonal leader of society, and
live by thilr profession.
Mr. (rnut Not Anxious fur hoclety,
Ifreet fAe CAieago rWfti..
Tho widow of acn. Giant boa determined not to
become a social power. I have no means of know
tug how much she was Inclined that way, nor how
long ahe really considered the question beforo
deciding It in the negative; but It I certain that tho
Astor-Vanderbllt clique ot wealth and faehlon gave
to her the opportunity, and that sho has declined
to come out cf her uulct retirement Into social
activity. The talk at Newport all summer, and in
Fifth avenue this fall, wni, that Mra. orant and
the younger portion of the Grant family would
figure conspicuously In next winter's swell
dom. It waa understood that Mra. Nellie
Uraut-Sartoria and Mrs. Frederick Dent Grant
were getting extensive wardrobe ready for the
campaign, and the tendency waa to welcome thoso
attractive ladlea right Into the Inner circle. Tho
1 hli(oilci dlsttncUou oi the arants, their fair dc-,
'''"-"- I,""'"l"ll- -l- -1- i '.i jfft-3, HWCmu
GREATEST OVERCOAT SALE 1
Alt the Lowest Prices II
ON RECORD. I
In addition to our groat SUIt J9
ASaSfcv SALE of Sacks and 4"button IJ
alpPsA Cutaway Suits at $6.00, $8.00, 9
'llA $10.00, which are worth $15.00, '!
AwlMv. " $ 8-00, $20.00 and $25.00, we , 'M
Mi ' have placed on our counters $$J
W 8,000 Fall and iDlerOiercoalSfcJ
fflfrj. . In Meltons, Cassimeres, Dlag&'. j
W onals, Kerseys, Worsteds, Bea- QH
vers, Elysians and CMnchllias,6 ?Mkm
TniSKLROART CLOCK VtTLL BR OIYRN KVKRY ... . . .awawH
PUROHASKK OF 14.0 WORTH OFOLOT1IINU nil B1ZBS t finn fit OTflPViHidxr rrawawaai
OltOVKIl. THIBCU-UKISIIRONZKANPSILVKR, tt" B",oa U" " BVUiyUUUy. 8gB
WITH HW1K8 ttOVKMKNTS. AND WILL KKKP jXY'&mWM
CriRKKOTTlMR, THIS IS BEYOND DOUBT Til TlVf VAIIB ftUAIAr vUSbHawanai
CO.vrLlEST liOUVKNlll RVKR UlVKN IN THU TAKE YOUR CHOICE. rJir3Bawgwi
0ITV jUSwawi
$6.00, $8.00, $10.00 and $.2.00; B
WORTH 91 2.00, $ I B.OO, 920.00 AND 920.OO. JH
TAKE ADVANTAGE, CALL EARLY and secure the best, 'H
Overcoat and Suit for the least money ever offered in any 1MB
clothing1 house in the United States. ' Vifll
Immense stock of Boys' and Children's Clothing at propor- B
tlonately low prices. r"
A. H. KING & CO., 1
627 AND 629 BROADWAY, ffl
BETWEEN DLEEOKER AND HOUSTON STS. ' ' 1H
OPEN RTRNINOH UNTIL P. iH
tLrLLuTOno. PATENT nUPLBCTOaU,
the cheapest and beat light known for lighting Churches,
Halls, Ktorea, Store Windows, Factories, Foundries,
Docks, Depot and general use.
I. P. FRINK, 55 1 Pearl St.,N.Y.
F1AYI IRUT rniNit'a patent
UMILIUI1I1 DAY1.10UT nEFUJCTorxa
light dark and gloomy Offloea, Store. Factories, Xt.,
without the nee of gaa or other artlflolal light also re
flector for gaa, oil or electric light.
I. P. FRINK. 55 1 Poarl St., M.Y.
COBTATVS-EXTERMINATORS kill Cockroaches,
Rats, Bedbugs, Mice, Roaches! Infallible remedies!
pot polsorions. 403 Broorae st.
MUBlOAIi.
"J I0TOR D. WTERNER, professor of music Tnor
V ougb Instruction given upon the piano, violin and.
wrntt l Professor Wlerner, with hi well-trained orchee.
tie, la always warmly welcomed at danolng parti, where
tile renal 0 give, genuine recreation I mails rooms, 0
'Jarlton ay., Brooklyn.
HOUSES, APARTMENTS & KOOMS.
Apartment, and Hoom, To It Untarnished.
Writ Side.
TTATTS ST., IT, 19. 31. near Varlck siNew apart-
Yv ment of three ronmt all improvement, and mirror
I mantel for small families rente, $18, $17.
grco of wealth, and their pleasant personalities
combined to nt them to shine as acquisitions to
"our beat famine." The thing was regarded as
being settled. But this week Mrs. Grant has put
her Slxty-alxth street realdenco Into the hands of
a real-estate agent to sell, and she Intends to live
In a Fifth avenue apartment-house. Her estab
lishment will there be comfortable, even lux
urious, but not suitable for the giving of notable
entertainment. She might have become at will a
social lloncis In New York. Bhe has preferred a
calmer life.
Growing; Fat on Deer.
1Vost IS. rStbultlphla ZMMle.J
"Beer wagon drivers cat less and drink more
than any class of people living. " The speaker was
a big brewer and knew what ho was talking about.
"Yea," ho continued, " the wagon drivers drink
beer so frequently and so continuously that they
are almost constantly In ajdrowsy condition. They
drink mechanically whether they want It or not,
and I never knew ono to refuse- an Invitation to
bavo more. They seem to think It la their duty to
swill all the beer they can put down. They get
Into the habit at the brewery. Every brewery
has what la called a tap-room, which Is
nothing more nor less than a free bar. Deer is
always, on tup there and the employees
have free access to It, with the privilege of helping
themselves whenever thoy please. Whenever a
broweryman goes to the tap-room for beer ha
never drinks fewer than two glasses. Theso aro
turned off In the twinkling of an eye. The men
drink so much that they lose their natural Inclina
tion to cat liko other people. They seldom eat a
hearty meal, a bite now and again between drinks
being sufficient to appease the appetite There aro
few brewery men who drink lea than a hundred
glasses of beer a day, and I know of some who
never go to bed without taking In that number and
twenty-nvo more. "
m
lie Never Called for Them.
oei London Socftty.I
At a Northern port the other day a prominent
civil aervant loat hi travelling-bag. It waa found
by a constable and opened at the police station,
and the contents were two pairs of gloves a tooth
pick, a bottle of muatache-dye, five packeta of
cigarettes, a pot of rouge, a shoe-horn, a box of
cachoua, a aet of false teeth set In gold and a
ddzen of corn-plasters. This catalogue was duly
published In the local press so that tho man who
tost the bag might know the thlnga were all there;
but somehow ho seems to have become discour
aged, for ho never called.
e
Cored Illm Somewhat.
From Vxrit Jtztkang..
I was In bad health, so I spent a couple ot
mouths travelling In Spain.
" Has It cured you t"
Yea-of travelling."
No Cams for Alarm.
Diner at French Table d'Hote Ileavens t waiter.
You have ruined my trousers with that soup.
Wa'tr Have no alarm, monsieur, it will not
stain.
STAGE STARS AT HOME.
Lnngtry lives at tho Albomarle.
Lew DockfitadoT asks lils.irientls to call on
blra at tho Hturtevont.
T. Henry French lives en o-arpon in luxuri
ous apartments at Delmonioo's.
Gcorcie Cowan lives close tn the roof of a
bin Hat and revels in floriculture.
SI mo. Cottrolly drives ont every day from
her house in West Fifty-soventh street.
Oeorcu Fawrctt Howe lives in a curiosity
thop near Fifth neuuo and Twenty-third
street.
Frederick ltobinson has an astonishing dis
play of llehini! tacklo in his upurtments at
tho New York Uotel.
James IOwis, his wifo, and a handsomo set
ter that is nearly potted to death occupy
upartmouts in tho " Jex."
"Aunt" Louiso Eldridgo's flat, in East
Thirteenth street, isn museum of professional
souvenirs and photographs.
Louiso Dillon and Sadio Bigolow Bhow
thoir callers handsome embroidery work in
West Twenty-fourth street.
Helen Bancroft boasts of the most com
fortable armchair in Now York at her rooms
in West Twenty.flfth streot.
Edward Bothern and his brother Sam have
apartments iu West Twenty-third street,
wnere " Young Ned " spends much of his
leisure Bkutoliinc in block and white. (
" latO T0T 0AH AaW
BCTeaMl BEOURB On 9fl
Ducal German GovernmontBond, HH
the next redemption of which take plao. 'QceH
TUESDAY. NOYEMDEH. t. i9fl
These bom. are .hare. In a loan, the inter vflH
at or wbleta la paid ont In prrmfntn. taareat" 'joaHmal
.tlmeayerirlT, Every band I. entitled to JutamBal
TIlUEK DKAWINH ANNUli,Y, JPamal
rintll eacn and every bond la redeemed wWi je . ir3aaB.
.rarer sr .mailer premium. Every bondnjUMT' KvOamVal
dmT one or the following premium, aa.taerd . 73nWW
ore no BOLANKH. sbvammal
One Preminm-SIark 2S3.0UO " IflH
One Premium-Mark IfiO.OOO ,Ti2saaH
One Premium-Mark 00,000 " '.SIB
One Premlnm Mark 00,000, AVa. '' ,?HB
Erery bond secured from n with $3 on or before Mai vLamaBi
1st of November, cntU 0 P. M., 1 entitled to to. whoG , f 9MM
nremlnm that may be drawn thereon on that date. .r ,V3ana.
Out-of-town orders sent in REGISTERED LETTHRJt V'SsHM
and Inclosing $3 will secure on. of thee, bond for tb. . n XKLbbV
next drawing. Ilaltnoo payable la monthly butt-r ? jKMtal
For orders, circulars or any other Information call oaeaf! v'tpJflBH
address i . ifM
EDW. SANDERS & GO,, Bwkm.S-M
SIS Broadway, corner Pulton St.. Now Yoxfct r J'l?SlM
City. Established In lB7g., .' SaU
DIVIDENDS FOE CLERKS. ilH
Co-operation In the OfBces of Same f (Jut -t-vi-iSbH
Wall Street Broken. .P'VBai
It is only within a few years past that tits $ JtH
principal of co-operation has been carried MM
into the stock brokorago business In WaU 4nmi
street. Evon yot it has not been introduced 'j - -'jB
very extensively, and there ore only two or F
throe firms which now go to the extent of j-H
Kiving all their employees n direct share la, jjH
the profits of tho business. One of these, tH
however, is ono of tho largest nnd most infln- 1H
cntial commission houses on the street. It . VjfLftai
was the house that took the initiative in, thisj V-anH
system, and it has proved so STtcosfaltfa,
its results that other firms haejfi'i;i2M
emboldened to follow in its footstops.JTh jrtlB
first dividend was declared by the &$). jTljH
question about ten years ago, and so quieuy. ;" '.B
and unobtrusively was the system managed, I IH
that very few outside of tho office knew -of. Vaimai
its existenco for many years. : F.''jH
Under this plan a certain fixed pexentaga' JH
of tho profitB of the firm are set apart at that y H
end of every year to be paid out in dividend "
to the employees of the house. Not a single siamal
ono is neglected, and every one, 'from tha HS
head bookkeeper down to the humblest office) . Jjaftfl
boy in tho establishment, receives bis prow 9
iiortionnto sharo of the sum thus set apart. " aVB
t is dh ided among the various clerks in pro-. StgEfl
portion to tho length of their service In tha VPflB:
firm and to the amount of their salaries, imU
Naturally each one's dividend goes on in- ,flH
creasing each year, not by it very large) IftjJIB
amount, but proportionate to the increased' !JB
term of services, unless it should happen yjraM
that tho firm'c profits for that year wero very raaB
much bolow tho average, when there would 339
probably bo a slight reduction all around. fi-iH
In other words the idea of the dividend, sys- ZvaLm
tern is that each employee has a share in the) N3HH
business of tho firm, or, as one of 'them ex- A9H
presets it: " Wo each feel as though we were '1fljl
lufinitcsimal junior partners in the concern yttS.
and thero is naturally a striving on the part 'JfBJ
of each ono to contribute as much as he can ' tjj
personally to increasing tho firm's business. , Jnfl
tor by so doing ho is really correspondingly mM
benefiting himself." ifll
Tho experiment, although the system- has) ?mM
boon almost too long in operation to deserve ,rfS
that term, has shown that clerks to wham i wjH
given an interest in tho business in vhls man 'jm
ner aro much moro efficient than the averaja - - . rBJ
clerical forco of a broker's office, and are 'iJfB
moro vigilant nnd watchful of the interests o nHJ
their employers. Vflfl
There are a number of offices down in tha 'VsSJ
street where they havo a custom of giving 'i&S
somo of thoir bookkeepers a bonus at the end. .
of tho year, but this is not a dividend, and ffi
does not imply that tho recipient has any '9
share in tho employer's business. It is oinv 5
ply a bonus and is called suoh, consisting
simply of u certain percentage of salary. ?'
Alter a clerk or bookkeeper has been u j
tho oulce fivo or six years under the dividend J-
system his shore of tho employees' profit v
grows to quite a substantial figure. For in- a
htanco, it frequently happens in the office of bj
which mention has already boon made that V
whoro a clerk receives as his regular salary 1
$1)00 or $1,000 a year ho will receive a sum in As
addition at New Year's timo. in the shape of J
dividends, which will swell tho amount up S$l
to over $2,000. Tho uncertainty as to how. ;3
much tho dividends will amount to always tS9
furnishes a considerable amount of excite. mm
ment among tho clerks and bookkeepers, and Ml
not infrequently a young man of extrftvagan. fmm
habits, who has boon banking too heavily on Aim!
his dividend, suffers a grievous; disappoint. MB
inont when ho opens his envelope and finds! jm1
that for soma reason or othor the profits bavaj l
failed to materialize. mJ
Soch Is Greataea. tiM
Boston Olrl-I see that you have taken, HUta. v
Kelly's picture ont of your album. .. 'wm
Ottei Bouton Olrl Tea. Ton see, the Bos jiM
Club la only nftb In the League race, and tharals tjH
Jake KUraln, who's gotaf-to whip Jem fissMh.) " tfm
l.xlo'flgottolavoapuoo, ! 'jm

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