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The evening world. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, April 20, 1912, Latest Extra, Image 1

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TRACING FALSE REPORTS
TITANIC PASSENGERS WERE
WssA'
te-alckt mw mmmr.
LATEST
SENATORS
SAFE
PRICE ONI OENT.
PAY'S PLAN TO FLEE
WITH CREW ON CEDRIC
HURRIED SENATE PROBE
Government Wireless Caught His
Message to Hold Outgoing Liner,
and Investigators Came Here at
Once From Washington.
WHITE STAR LINE'S HEAD
VIRTUALLY ADMITS ORDER
"We Have Need of Ismay" Says Sen
ator Smith, "And He Will Re
main to Answer Questions.
t
Wireless messages from J. Bruce Ismay to General Manager Frank
lin of the White Star line asking
Ismay and the crew of the Titanic
Gorernment boat and sent tol Washington, were the direct cause cf the
prompt arrival in New York of the Senate investigating committee
which to-day resumed its inquiry into the disaster.
Senator Williarn Alden Smith of Michigan, Chairman of the com
mittee, said to-day :
"J. Bruce Ismay sent wireless messages to General
Manager Franklin in which he urged that the outward
bound Cedric be stopped to take himself and the crew of
the Titanic aboard and back to England. These mes
sages were picked up by the wireless on a Government
boat and Washington at once communicated with. That
is why the Senate committee was so prompt in arriving
in New York and why I was down on the pier when the
Carpathia put in.
"Not only was Ismay eager to return to England
on the Cedric, but he has been eager to get away on the
Lapland since his arrival in New York. We have need of
Ismay and he will remain here, for I have some more
questions to ask him. The crew will also be held for a
time, for many of them will be questioned."
ISMAY VIRTUALLY ADMITS IT.
Mr. Ismay virtually admitted sending the messages in question to
day. He was questioned about the matter before t tie seioion of the Sena
torial Investigating Committee.
"The facts speak for themselves," he told. "The only reason 1 am
anxious to get the survivors of the crew back to lingland as soon as
possible is because England is their home and they are anxious to get
home. It would be unwise to have them lualing around New York, it
is for their own interest that 1 am anxious to get them back to their
families."
Mr. Ismay was questioned about a report that he told a Mrs. Ryer
son, a passenger, on Sunday, when she spoke to him about the proximity
of Ice, that the Titanic would "go faster" to get past the ice. He made
this comment : "Absurd."
NEW FRENCH LINER SAILS
ON HER MAIDEN VOYAGE;
TAKES SOUTHERN COURSE.
La France With Many Notables
Aboard Will Avoid Ice Dangers
That Beset Titanic.
HAVRE. April 10. Is) France, the
new 27.000.ton Flench liner, sailed from
Havre at 1 o'clock ti ls afternoon on
her maiden voyage to New York. Hly?
esrrled a throng of notables, among
whom Robert Bacon, who recently re
signed as American Ambassador to
France, and Mrs. nacon were proml
r.'nt. The oltieln.! delegation to the
t.'hamplain festivities In the United
states, which comprises eminent men
of France, also sailed.
J. Dal Plal, the general manager of
the French line, who Is a pasaenger
on La France, said to-day that orders
had been given to the captain to take
the southern course and to adopt every
measure of prudent.
The disaster to the Titanic, szoept In
very few cases, hae not affected the
I ill I gll lift of La Franoe.
Oe. (Tk MlTlIt ffaUI.
that the Cedric be stopped to take
aboard, which were intercepted by a
150-FOOT HOLE TORN
IN HULL OF TITANIC,
DECLARES FIREMAN.
An accurate Idea of tlie damage dono i
to the Titanic by the actual Impact :
with ths Icdborg w,;s obtained to-day!
from William Short , lit at class tire-
man, of No. .. nrawlhvi.- . I'nrk, one of
the thr, , men wh'i tried to pull ('apt.
Smith unto a llferaft.
"Tho lallOra all are agreed.'' ie said,
"that the firm hole punched Into the
TlUinlc'a hull, on the starboard side,
was at a point almu: Ml feet from
her stem. The hlg ahlp tore along over
the leehefK, whwh opened her koel to
a point abuut GO feet aft the hiidge.
I should say the hole torn In the Tl
tanlc's hull was about 1 10 or 160 feet
In length.
"It didn't matter how many water
tight compartments the Titanic had,
she was torn open for euc . a long dis
tance that none of them could have
saved her. If the hole ha I stopped at
the bridge, I don't think the vessel
would have sunk."
Viewers 1 VML
hssst sradss ovij, eTin es seas. i
I jj OrculMtkm Book Open to All." I
WAD'S SEAMEN,
CLOSELY GUARDED
IN UP WS HOLD
White 3tar Officials Place
Watch to Keep Interviewers
Away From Survivors.
BOATS' CREWS REMAIN.
Many in Tears and Poorly
Garbed as They Are Herded
Aboard Tug to Depart.
Approximately 1 of the 306 members
of the Tltanlc's crew who survived
wore sent back to England to-day on
the Red Star liner Lapland, which
ailed from Pier No. d at 10 o'clock.
The sailors went as passenger In the
steerage. FVw of them wore uniforms.
the majority having been furnished
clvtllace.' clothing 'by the White Star
line officials.
Unusual efforts were made by the Red
Star Hne officials to prevent the Titan-
ic's survivors from talking. The
meat the men were landed from the
Carpathia, they were horded together
and carried to a tug, which transferred
them to .the Lapland, where they were
Quartered asrtt sals) time
The Red star 11ns, owned by the In
ternational Mercantile Marine, which
lao owns the White Star Hne. was evl
asrauy acting nuder orders to prevent
tne men from toeing Interviewed. Per
mission to enter the steerage was re
fused, the refusal being backed up by
stationing a force of men about the
gangway to permit only steerage ticket
noiiers to enter.
A large number of the Titanic' sail
ors. however, refuted to submit to the
practical Imprisonment and Insisted on
'coming ashore tills morning. Most of
them were founu In the waterfront sa
lens drinking beer. They were willing
to talk freely.
At 9.30 A. M. the Tltanlc's eallors were
mustered in the steerage of the Lin.
land and the roll called. About 1M an-
Wared present. As the men answered
meir names iney were told that sixteen
men, who had been in command of the
life hoi , had been ordered to remain
M Am-rica to appear before the Sena
torial investigating Committee.
As they came from the vessel's hold,
bringing with them their meagre be
longings, several of them wars In tears.
One. Who refused lo give his name,
brclte .iw;iy from the others and tried
to re- inter the Lapland.
"I don't wav.t to stay In America."
he wept. "I want to ge back to my
wiie.
He was led away from the ship weep
ing. Ills fellows said he was one of
tho Beroei of the wreck.
"TITANIC IN TOW
MESSAGE NEVER SENT
FROM THE OLYMPIC.
PLYMOUTH England. April JO.-Capt.
Iluddno'i of the Olympic to-day posi
tively and emphatically denied that Ihe
wireless message which the operator at
the Cape llace station says was plcki!
up by him, saying that the Virginian
was towins the Titanic, was sent from
his vessel.
"f never hud any information to that
effect." said Cupt. Haddock, "and th
intimation that It was sent by me to
the Cape I!. ice man 1s absolute Injustice.
I do not know from whom he could
have received that message."
"The story that I sent It." Caipf. Had
dock added, "is a flagrant Invention.
So toon ai I heard of the disaster from
the Carpathia I despatched the news by
wireless to New York. That was on
Monday afternoon.
Tho Olympic," the aptain continued, i
"first heard the Tltanlc's call for aid
about twenty minutes aftern the mls
he.p had OOCUrred, It canto through the '
tenner 'Celtic, and we never heard
direct from t'apu Smith. Five hundred
miles reparated the. Olympic and the Tl
tanU and, irttltgtng every pound of
steam. the Olympic pressed forward at
u pace never before steamed by tier
between it and iiiS Knots ail hour.
Hours later the Olympic hue, that
her race to the Titanic had been In
vain. The t'nrj.r. !i announced : ii.it I
she had the survivors aboard and t ill 1
the Titanic had disappeared. QIOOO)
settled over the Olympic and ali j
amusements ware cbandoned.
A committee formed under the chair
manship of Albert Wlgglti collected
$7,000 for the relief of the s ifferers. M
The wireless operators and passengers
on board the Olympic were oombarded
with requests fori stot ies of the dls- '
aster, but censorship was established
over the wireless service so as to shut
off the posslbfllty of groundless rumor
being circulated.
NEW YORK, SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 1912.
FIRE IN K'S
COAL HOLD RAGED
UNABATED5 DAYS
Stokers in Relays Unable, to
Halt Blaze, Ready to Give
Up Sunday.
TOLD TO KEEP SECRET.
Stoker Asserts Plan Was to
Call Fireboats Here to
Drown Out Flames.
The White tar Uner Tttaalc was oa
the day She sailed from
or officers ead eraw
knew It, few they had fought the Ire
for days.
This story, told for the first tfme to
day by the eurvlvora of the ore, who
were sent back to England on board the
Red Star liner Lapland, was only one of
the many thrilling tales of the first I
and last voyage of the Tltnnlc.
"The Titanic sailed from Bont.hemp
ton on Wednesday. April 10, at nosh.'
said J. TMIley. fireman on the TNaote,
who Uvea at No. :i Milton road.
Ington, London, North, and who
wtt m other members of tew -Titan'
crsw to-day on the Letpkuid.
"I was aeatgned to the Titanic from
the Oceanic, where I h)a1 served ae a
fireman. FVom ths day we sailed, the
Tltanec waa on fire and my sole duty,
together with eleven other men, had
been to fight that fire. We had made
no headway against It.
"Of course, sir." ha went on, "the
passenger knew nothing of the fire.
Do you think, sir. we'd have let them
know about It? No, r.
'The fire started In hunker No. fi.
There were hundreds of tons of coal
stored there. The coal on top of the
hunker was net, as all the con I sh.iuli
have been, but down at the bottom of
the bunker the coal had been permitted
1 ' ,ry-
SPOKE OF
EMPTYING
COAL
BUNKERS.
"The dry coal at the bottom of the
Pile took fire, elr, and am auldered for
days. The wet coal on top kept the
tlames fraro coming through, lut donn
In the bottom of the bunker, sir, the
ames wns a raiting.
"Two men from each w.iteti of stoker
was tolled off. sir, to fhrht that fire.
, The tkr. you
hours at a lime,
know, sir, work four
so twelve of us was
fighting flames from the day we pu": out
of Southampton until we hit the damned
ioeffierg.
"No, sir, we didn't get that fire out,
And among the stokers there was talk,
sir, that we'd have to empty the hlg
eoal bunkers after we'd put our passcn-
igers off In New York, and then '-all on
the Are-boats there to help us put out
! the fire.
"Hut we didn't need such help It
was tight under Hunker No. li thut Ihe
Vnberg tore Ihe biggest hole In the
'Titanic, and the flood of wa:er that
I earns throng. . sir, put out the (lit that
jour tons and tons of water hadn't been
able to get rid of.
"The stokers ner .beginning to ge
alarm d over It, hut the officers told III
(a keep our mouths shut they didn't
I Went to alarm the passentrers."
TITANIC S SEAMEN
GET NOTHING AND PAY
STOPPED WITH WRECK.
Ex-fpt for furnishing clothing to
those Aho were asleep at the time of
the uc .doit and did not reach land with
heir uniforms, the White Mir Hue has
done nothing for the nieuitberj' of the
crew win were plokod up fro.n i o f .
tan! 9, Up tu date, there iius lietn n
announoemeltl o: what provtalon eel II be
made for the men.
Under tho Bmrlish .nariti no laws, the
wages of t ie sailors, firemen and stew
ards stopped when tnelr vessel went
down. None of the men landMl here
wit i money, and they uii declared no.o
bad boon Mvoa to them.
Under the Knrlish Workmen Com.
pensatlon law, thl fa 1, the White star
(no will bo cOBUOllOd to take care of
th families and dopondooti of those
memuers of lin crew ahi iosf their
lives. The line, however, is not i am.
polled 10 do snytiilng fur the men orb)
were saved.
Tit KM' attic IS
CU all CoUtsiH, Ceulrsl. South Asurlrta se4
muds BuBshi: !. Trtttilon' I u sal
j one. aspM see psrcel ebsrk turn
"on.L. Of S"M mt'ljuei
iwonoi euiKiius w si Pa,
FALSE TITANIC REPORTS
NOT FROM THE CARPATHIA
Wireless Heroes of Disaster
Who Testified at Inquiry To-Day
5RIOC
HMS TO
ORDERED
Vessels of International Mercantile Marine Are
Now Being Equipped So That Every Passen
ger and Sailor May Have Chance for Life.
J. Bruce Ismay, Chairman of the Director, of the International Mer
cantile Marine, announced to-day that orders had been Issued to equip oil
vcsocls of the line:, embraced In that corporation with a sufficient number of
lifeboats to carry all pasHeiiKers and every member of the crew. The orders
go Into effect Immediately and Mr. Innny said the work of completing tho
equipment was already under way.
Tho linen affected by tho order aro the White Star, American, Ited Star,
Atlantic Transportation, Leyland and Dominion. The order was prompted
by the experience of the International Mercantile Murine In the foundering
of the Titanic.
"We have learned by bitter experience," mild Mr. Ismay, "although our
ships have all been equipped with rettped to life saving appuratua In full
compliance with (he Admiralty Laws."
NO WOMAN SHALL
DIE HERE BECAUSE
- DANIEL GUGGENHEIM
Heroic End of Millionaire
Miner Told by Steward Who
Carried Message to Wife.
That it. injamlg OuMOAholm, sr ho voni
Soam ith t ie THanlo, died us hravel)
as tho hest. win deiinllelv mude known
to- lay through a moioagf the yuung
II Mtsl HlUllglUlH sent his wle Jiy his
room steward on tie dOOIttOd ship. The j
ItOWggdi Johnson oy name, oil tolled
off to bgo or tiie iifetsts. Johnooa '
I AM A
COWARD
failed at tie Ht. Regis and delivered in
mtaitgi
"Tell toy wife, If t don't net away,
thai I ecnil 1 not leu.'e the ihlp until all
the women v.b sgfe, No WOgvM snail
ij to the bottom bttgtiao I as a DO Of
"d. Tell lor my lt thoughts will be
her."
There wrr the words Ihe steward
- i"ufh' ashore s QuggeDhelm's lust
Notgo, This laformatlofi wa- gtvgg
, t i,t Daniel Uuggaiinalm, eldest of ths
seven -iw all I others, world famous
as millionaire mining men.
Aooordlng to Johnson (iiiKXenheltn was
In hie stateroom iutt after the crash and
Johnson helped Dim dress, (insgenhelm
was calm, ae aa hts secietary, Ciugllo.
.... . ... -.y .
"CirctUMtioa Books Open to
12 PAGES
riftssevs .w
OsssssssssssVsKssssOssl sV 1
T CO'
SAVE ALL
BY
I Aftef dressing he went on deck nh
jtliigllo. Johnson Whs ordered to Ills pot
ut one of iliv llfobOata Me urged 'inn
gen helm to try to get Into a Iwrnt la
Whloh they were taking SOOBs men.
'It s not my plnee to tags I Imat yet,'
Mid the young nllUonalro. "There
I SSeftlS to he man's VrOTll to do et i. 'I
th!s e'llp If there are ho.it s for all th
women, I'll iry to Ket away."
I Tnen he ifave Johnson I tie miMsnue f,
Mis. Quggenrislm, shook hsnds with the
leward and Malkeil away with Uiijtllo.
TO ( LOT HE DESTITUTE
SURVIVORS FROM THE
TITANIC 8 STEER A GE.
Tiie New York Mectlon, OOttBoll nt
, JOWlOh "omen, a national orKanlsa-
I l Inn, with headiiuartel H at No. 44S fen
tral Parlt West, ar.nonmed t'.-duv that
it is proparag to funlgh oomplota oat-
I H's of new clolhlaa to all destitute
; Titan!.' steerage passenger.
This organisation nsuully i-onllnea lis
charities to Jewish women and girls
hit In toe case of the Titanic aur
t Ivors no distinction w ill lie made
The organlgatlon is also ready to semi
c'llearu inn to l-.tirojie for need sur-
l I VOI H
A acre or more nf merchant! have
cintri holed everythlnif hOOoaoafy to
the icsrlilnK of women ind ohlMrgfl
M.sm Hadle A inerie.in, national execn
liy, secretary Of the oouaoll and presi
dent of the New York Heetlon, Is In
i harae of the work of relief.
(blldrrn IMani :tlM,MMt Trees.
OHIfAOO, April ;n.: ami chtldron
planted more than .. tics m Ohl
eaco yesterday In nbwntin n of Ariiur
ia. in orier thai over) hool child
in the city might hafO tl opportunity
of plaining a Ire. '.. t ila I
oo,ouo iwoyoarold olm trses on suae at
ono cent eioh.
"WIIKHr. I..NII(K)U l-KIUMIEI) SOT."
Tbs Smm Vors licrsUl to-sioiru (Muudsrl sill
prist . nwets! elulon dc.Hcsl s tlw Tttauli
metk, whiiSi ess b :.,c i s, . rcml to.
sthsf with rnvuducUuu of Mr. W, A gisjti,'.
TTA,M I
NOW
MAY
ns.i amis rensute ajea
All."
(i
I Sent No Message That She Waa
in Tow," Wireless Operator Testi
fies Before the Senatorial .
Investigating Committe.
FOR THREE FULL DAYS.'
Surviving Operator of the Titanic
Says Word of Icebergs Was Re
ceived at 4 P. M. Sunday.
The mnuner in which the news
suppressed for twelve hours or more
ing messages that percolated on Monday to the press through (he Whit
Star Line oil ices were the. subjects of the investigation, resumed to-day at
lie Waldorf-Astoria by- the Investigating Committee of the United States
Senate, of which Senator Smith of Michigan is chairman. Herald Gotten,
the wireless operator on the Carpathia, and Harold S. Bride, second fcUu
coni operator on the Titanic, who went aboard the Carpathia with the
survivors, were questioned along those lines.
It was brought out by Cottam's
disaster was sent to the Baltic of the
Monday morning. Both Cuttam and Bride, the surviving assistant wire
less operator of the Titanic, positively denied that they had sent any mes
sage that could be construed as meaning that the Titanic was not sunk
and was being lowed to Halifax.
MESSAGES WENT TO WHITE STAR LINE.
Cottam aJmitted there had been communication between the Car
pathia an,! the White Star Line offices in New York during the period in
which the Carpathia was steaming from the scene of the disaster to this
port, but Senator Smith was unable to get from him the exact text of
any of these messages. The wireless men denied they played any part
whatsoever in keeping the dire news of the foundering of the Titanic
secret during the long, anxious hours of Monday.
Cottam declared that his first message from Jack Phillips, the IT
tanic Operator, read:
"Come at once. It is a C. D. Q.,old man."
Then Phillips sent the position of the Titanic. His last message, re
ceived by Cottam at tl.SS, read:
"Come as quickly at possible. She's taking water and
it's up to the boilers."
"I never heard from her after that," said Cottam. "Al
though several times I oalled the Titanic and sent Capt
Bostrom's reply to Phillips's last message, which read: 'Wt
are making your position speedily as possible. Have double
watch in the engine room. We are making 15 to 16 knots
an hour. Get your boats ready. We have ours ready I
never got that message to the Titanic."
The horrors of the disaster grew very real before the committee
when Harold S. Bride, the extra wireless operator of the Titanic, took the
Stand. Bride, a pale-faced, bluck-haired boy of eighteen, was carried
into the room. Both of his feet, frozen in the terribe hours between the
time he left the sinking Titanic and the time he reached the Carpathia,
were swathed in heavy bandages. His face was drawn with pain and hjs
Mg black eyes were red and -ainken.
bile Bride was testifying several newspaper photographers ex-
ploded flashlights. I lie report startled everyone in the room, and
1 Bride's shattered nerves almost gave way.
Yesterday's session lasted Irom forenoon until almost midnight. Its
hief feature was the tirst official statement of the catastrophe that of
Second Officer Charles Lightoller, the senior officer surviving of Hie
Titanic.
One of the things already brought out at the investigation is that at
eas'. 198 person died needlessly on the Titanic because in six lifeboats
that would have easily carried 39o persons only 192 persons were sent
away. These boats were all that went on one side of the ship.
COMMITTEE AFTER DETAILS.
The cnnimlitef iicmin to-duy to
s minus unglfs. At yostenluy's eblon
he rescued the Titanic survivors, uod Marconi, the wireless man, tOM ft
jo workings of the win-loss system at sea.
decoud Officer Ughtoller told a lung and clear story of the part 0
played In the wreck at last nlght'a session of tho oommlttoa. Haluwl a m
marhable pxnprlrncr In that he went down with tbs veoool. was tWMs)
sucked under uud Uleo blown to tho surface by explosion la tho talk at eta
PRIOR ONE 01NT.
of the sinking; of the Titanic
ami the source of the fab
testimony that definite news of the
White Star Line at 10.30 o'clock on
gu Into tbe details of tho disaster
J- Uruco Ismay told why ha
I
T
4
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