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The evening world. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, November 23, 1912, Final Edition, Image 1

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20 TO 0, HARVARD SWAMPS YALE
ATHF.H-l naettlrd lo-nl.hl and Snadar, seller.
Wraths: las (tied te-algdh mm 4 Sasdari tl
" Circulation Books Open to All.
M Circulation Books Open to AIL
PRICE ONE CENT.
Oserrlslil. 1012. hr The rrea Fa
Co. Th. Maw York World)
NEW YORK, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1912.
10 PAGES
PRICE ONE CENT.
r IN AmJ
I EDITION.
1 EDITION. I
1 : : r r i
fJIMINS M HYnE'S NAME MINISTER ADMITS MURMURS PRAYER,
PROMISED CITY
GET LOANS
Amount of Money From Chamber
lain Increased After Their Ad
vances to Carnegie Trust, Heads
of Institutions Say.
That William J. Cummins of the Carnegie Trust Company secured
lotus from several banks by playing on his friendship for former City
Chamberlain Charles H. Hyde, and that immediately .after the loans
were made to the then failing Carnegie Trust Company city deposits
were made In ihe banks making the loans, was the testimony brought
out to-day at the trial of Hyde, charged wiih bribery, before Justice Goff
In the Extraordinary Term of the Supreme Court.
Richard W. Jon. former Ylt PrSSs
dent of the National tteserve Bank. 1
clered that Cummlna and hla asaoclatee
ihe !
of the Carnegie Trust applied to
National K serve Hank for a loan of
1180.000
"If you will make thla loan to tin,"
Oummlna told Jones. "I will 'Influence'
my friend Hyde to deposit 1300,000 of
tha funds of the city In your bank."
The loan was made, Jones swore, and
the city deposits wera made In the Na
tional Heaonr Sank.
Thla testimony was corroborated by
WlUlatn Hallowey of the Hungarlan
atasrtrsn Bank, to whom a similar
proposition was mad. Both declarod
thoy had not talked with My da and that
they cot no promises from him.
Heads of other Institution.-, also
tastlfled to cettinc city deposits after
leans to Cummins.
bout the courtroom to-day tha opinion
was very generally expressed that the
case will never reach the Jury. At
torneys who have studied the motion
made by John II. tilan-hAeUi, of the
defense, to dismiss the Indictment
against Hyde on the grounds that it Is
Insufficient
anu mat u uoes not cnarge i
mm wun n.iviug rc elved material
benefit from the loan, expressed the
bellof that as I0OII as tiie People's case
is closed, Justice OolT will take the case
from the haflda Of the Jury an I order
the acyulttul of the former chamber
lain. Although members of the Dlstrict
Attoincy's taff publicly declare the be
lief that they will aecure a conviction,
tt la said to be their private opinion
that the testimony of Robin, on which
tliey hail built uj their case, wai
Practically discounted by the cross-examination.
atobln was compelled to admit
that h personally owe 1 the Oar
aerie Irust Company (030,000 at
tha time the loan waa "foroed" by
yds, and that tha affaire of tha
Oarnegta Trust, the Northern
Bank and half a aoore of other
atobln corporations wore ao oloaely
laterlaced that the failure of tha
Carnegie Trust would hav j brought
disaster to tha whole -Xoblu fiuaa
can! fabric
The Ui m. witness to-day was licit, y J
Walsh, l-etuiy i Hty I'liamberlaln. wno
yesterday pro I need an Immense pack
ace of checks and bocks WhlOh Assistant
District-Attorney John K-rklar.d Clarke
who would rather have been in .New
Haven for the football game-proceeded
to read Into the record.
In the direct examination Mr. Walsh I
outlined the method of depuattlni he I
city's money and of selejtlng city de-
positories. His most significant state-1
rrjant yesterday rautiaa to wnai cnam
merlaln Hide said when he learned that
only $iro,W of the city's funds was be
ing carried In the Northern Hank.
"la there any reason," aaked Hide,
"orby we cannot carry I17S.O00 there?"
Robin, on direct examlnaUon, had
sworn Hyde had promised to Increase
city deposit in the Northern Hank If
ihe Northern Dunk would make tha
1110,000 loan to the Carnegie Trust Com
rany. Mr. 'Walsh was under redirect exam
latlon by Mr. Clarke when court opened
.,-dajr.
He was called upon to Identify more
iious tables of figures, showing the
posits of the city In tha Northern
ink and the Carnegie Truat. He pro
ucea the bond by which tha dir. dors
f tha Carneg.u 'rust Company agreed
Indemnify thu city If there shou'.l
x any loss of lha Sl.ooo.ro the city had
Ml deposit In the Cornegie Company.
y. Before Mr. Hyde went to Europe, In
1510, did he give you any order rela
tion to deposits of city funds In tha
t'araogte Company? A. He did nut.
TELLS ABOUT WITHDRAWALS
AT THE CITY'8 COST.
MP. Walsh said that when the af
fairs of the Carnegie Trust became
shaky it vols decided to withdraw city
fund at the rate of $50,000 a week.
This decision waa reached at a meet-
(Continue a on Second Face.)
DEPOSITS TO
FROM BANKS
FOOTBALL CROWD
IN A FIRE PANIC
BEFOH GAME
f,ooo Stampede and Women
Faint in Crowded Res
taurant at New Haven.
'Fmra
eisff
rn ageaadasl
The Evening
World l
YALE FIELD, New Haven
N'ov. 3.
A SeriOUS accident came near marring
the football celebration here to-dsy. An
heir W. tin,., tnr th. v- v,..
Harvard and Vale all the restaurant In
New Haven were inched to the doors
with hungry visitors. Outside In the
streets long lima stood waiting for a
chance at the tables or lunch I ounters
In Child's restaurant wore between 700
and l.ooo persons. Every sent was taken
ami hundreds waiting.
The owns In the rear of the restaur
ant became overheated and set fire to
tne celling above. Smoke pouring from
windows upstairs caused a Are alarm
to be turned In. At the same time the
patrons In the restaurant saw the burst
or names from the woodwork of
ceiling.
the
Women shrieked and fainted ano
there was a rueh for the doors. The
manageis of the restaurant shouted
that there waN no danger, and with tne
aid of the waitresses, who were aniai
Ingly tool through It all, hustled the
pau.c-strlcken people through the door
ways. The cashiers, to avoid delay,
refused to accept payment of check.
Those who had fainted wera carried to
the open air and revived. There were
I no serious injuries.
I The low. through unpaid cheoka and
tile cloning of the restaurant will
amount to about f!i,000. It la said
ASTOR BABY. 2 MONTHS OLD
' ' '
IS SUED BY HIS TWO AUNTS
Papers Are Personally Served on
lilt. ml in Fifth Avenue Mansion,
Mother States in Petition.
R. O. Wlllgus, as counsel for Mrs
Madeline Force Aslor, appeared before
! Justice Hlackmar in the Supreme Court
In Brooklyn to-day to ask for the ap
: polntment of former Justice H. A. Oil-
derslecvu as guardian ad litem for her
son, John Jacob Astor, who Is now two
I months UI, in the matter of a ault
brought against him as one of the own
ers of thu undivided estate of Col. John
Jacob Aslor by his aunts, Mrs. Orme
I Wilson and Mrs. (Jeorgu O. Haig. The;
petition was granted.
In the paimrs Mrs. Alitor recites that
the papers "wore personally served upon
the defendant. John Jacob Astor, at the
peUtloner's residence. No. M0 Fifth
avenue."
The suit of Mrs. Wilson anil Mr?,
i llalg. s.sters of Col. Astor, Is, according
' lo the petition, an action for the par
tition of certain Astor real estate In
Kings County. The co-defendants, With
j the baby. John Jacob, ore Mi ". Made-
j lelne Poro Astor, Mrs. Ava Willing:
Actor CoL Aslor's first wife -William
Vincent Astor. now tne head of ihe fam
ily, his cider, Alice .Muilel Astor, und
the executors of the John Jacob 'Astor
estate, James Roosevilt Itooaev. It,
Douglas Robinson and Nicholas lilddle.
FOX RACING SIC PAQE t.
WtUUMBtlfflUN
AND HISSHOW GIRL
Rev. Mr. Crowen Confirms Re
port of Marriage Denied by
Bridegroom's Father.
DAD SURELY IS MAD.
Belmont Pere Gives Red-Hot
"Interview" After Reading
Accounts of "Romance."
About tha same time to-day that Aug
ust Belmont waa raging and refusing to
admit that his eon Raymond had taken
unto hunaelf a ahow girl bride namely,
Ethel Helen Lindner, or, for atage pur
poses, Ethel Lorraine the Rev. Edward
P. Crowen, retired Baptlat clergyman,
stated peevishly but emphatically : "Tea.
I married them. I married them on the
afternoon of Nor. 21 at tny home, No. it
Boyd avenue, Jersey City. Now, ple&se
Co away and don't bother ma any
more."
The Roy. Mr. Crowen confirmed the
resort of the marriage In tha Jersey
City Hall, where he Is employed as a
clerk. A fallow employee said young
Belmont and hla comely inamorata
called at the City Hall several times,
after they had obtained their license to
wad an Nov. 14, and at last approached
Mr. Crowen and arranged with him to
perform the ceremony.
Mr. Belmont granted a sort of short
circuit interview to-day while seated In
the body of hia limousine, upon return
ing to Ills home after an early tour of
various newsstands, where he purchased
every dally print that Is disseminated in
Ureater Now York.
MR. BELMONT IN RED HOT
"INTERVIEW."
Mr. Belmont waa so absorbed In his
newspapers that he did not eeem to
realise his car had stopped In front of
his home, at No. 4 Hast Thirty-fourth
street, where Mrs. Belmont was waiting
for him to oome In to breakfast. An
Evening World reporter brought the
financier back to earth with the query:
"Mr. Belmont, have you anything to
aayT"
The millionaire started and his fea
tures tangled In a scowl.
"About what7" he snorted. "About
this stuff In the papers?"
"Yes," said the reporter. "Why not
make a positive statement and clear the
atmoaphe e of mystery? You have been
Informed that your son'a marriage la a
matter of record."
"I will make no statement." raced
Mr. Belmont. "I have nothing to say. 1
am not colng to be bothered. I have an
Important ongagement. ( am going io
the Harvard-Yale football came and am
In a hurry."
"But you are reported In the news
papers us having denied the fact of the
marriage," urged the Interviewer,
"I don't give a damn," stormed Mr.
Belmont, "what you print or what any
of them print! I have made no state
ment to anybody and don't Intend to.
Uood morning."
Mr. Belmont flung open the door of
Ids limousine and plunged up the et"rs
of his mansion.
The bride and bridegroom early to
day evacuated the apartment In the
Oosford. No. 230 West Fifty-fifth street,
where Miss Lorraine had lived for some
months. The couple were there late last
night and bridegroom Raymond was
doing a lot of telephoning, making vain
efforts to get his papa on the wire and
plead for a paternal blessing. Emis
saries and ambassadors reported in
effectual efforts to establish a family
entente.
A happier romance, which has been
brought to lurbt as the Helmont-I.lnd-ner
marriage Is confirmed, ts the union
of Thomas S. Hurries. Raymond Bob
mont's chum, and Miss Helen A. Ma
li ruder an intimate friend of Mrs. Ray
mond Belmont, who was known on the
staice as ' Hlllle" i Maggett. They were
marrlec In California and are now on
their honeymoon. Young Barnos Is a
Yale graduate, very rich and the mem
ber of many exclusive clubs.
HELEN TAFT SWINGS OPEN
GIANT GATUM LOCK GATE
IN PANAMA CANAL TEST
PresiJent's Daughter Starts the
Electrical Machinery in
hirst Trial.
COUOKi Panama, Nov. 311. One of the
giant gut .t of lio Qctun se'li In the
Panama 'an..l WU tested for the first
tltnu yesterday, when .Miss Helen Tsft
put the sleotrtocl mcohlnsry In operation
and swung the gate open.
She visile, 1 the CMC! In company with
Secretary of War Stlmson and his party.
A ball la to be given In their honor
tavnlcht
FLINGS HERSELF 10
DEATH IN SUBWAY
Woman's Suicide Under Train
Draws Huge Crowd to
Brooklyn Station.
CARRIED A BANK BOOK.
Engraver's Wife Had Recently
Failed to End Her Life
With Gas.
Mrs. Emma Rurkerstuhl, the wife of
Emlle Ruckerstuhl, an engraver of No.
803 Herkimer street, Brooklyn, com
mitted suicide a ftw minutes after noon
to-day by throwing herself under a sub
way express train In the Brooklyn Bor
ough Hall station. Mis. Ruckerstuhl
had been In poor health and attempted
to kill herself by Inhaling gas on Nov. 1.
She left home to-day saying he wanted
to transact some business at the Brook
lyn Savings Bank. A book of that In
stitution, found In shopping bag of the
suicide, established her Identity.
Mrs. Rurkeratuhl's act of self destruc
tion was w itnessed by scon s of passen
Cera waiting on the platform to take
tha nazt train for Manhattan. The
screams of women attracted such a
crowd that It became necessary to close
tha atatlon entrances becauae of the de
lay attendant upon the removal of Mrs
Ruckarstuhl's body from under the
wheels. The Brooklyn division of the
subway was operated under difficulties
during the early afternoon.
The woman entered the station at
noon and walked to the extreme east
end of the platform. She was slender,
weighing only about 1G0 pounds, was
dressed In black, wore black cotton
gloves and a black hat and carried a
small black leather bun. Her dark hair
was tinged with gray.
Standing at the edge of the platform
the woman claaped her handa In an atti
tude of prayer. Frank McKeown of No.
1141 Smith atreet, and Joaeph A. Beyers,
a lawyer of No. 168 Montague street,
turned to look at her. They felt danger
In the situation, but it was too late fjr
them to do anything.
A Bronx express train of ten cars. In
control of Motor Engineer John Uowes,
entered the station. The woman waited
until the forward car was six feet away.
Then, with her hands atlll elapsed and
with her lips moving, she allowed her
self to fall. Inert, across the rails.
Bowes had shut off the electrl' power
and had made the preliminary applica
tion of the alr-hrakes. When he saw
the woman fall to the truck he pushed
the air lever over to the emergency stop
and brought hlfl train to a standstill.
Two cars had passed over the woman
and her body was wedged under the
trucks of the third car.
Policeman William Lott, who waa on
the platform waiting for the train, sum
moned the station employees and ordered
them to keep the orowd away from the
east end of the platform. Then he tele
phoned for policemen and seat In an
ambulance call. While Lott waa ao oc
cupied Bowes, the train conductor; T. J.
Lane and the guards went to work to
remove the body.
This took twenty minutes. In the
meantime an Immense crowd had gath
ered In the street and surged about the
stairways leading to the station. Tha
ambulance surgeon, on examination of
the body, said that death had been al
most Instantaneous and directed that
the remains of Ihe suicide be taken to
the Morgue.
in the woman's black bag waa found
a purse containing S2.U4 and the bank
book. The book ahowed that at one
time there had been to the credit of
Emma, In trust for Emlle RnokorctUhit
the sum of I3W. Steady anil uniformly
small withdrawals had dragged tha bal
ance down to .
DYNAMITE BOMB FOUND
IN OFFICE OF LAWYER
FOR LOS ANGELES ROAD.
LOS ANGELES. Cal., Nov. 23 . A
dynamite bomb, with a clock attach
ment, was found In the office of J. W.
McKlnley, atomey for the PCOlAo Elec
tric llallroad to-day.
An unidentified mun was arrcHted In
the building shortly afterward. He re
fuses to talk.
A. F. L RE-ELECTS G0MPERS.
HOi 'HESTER, N. Y., Nov. If OcmiHl
(JomiH'rs was this kf temOOfl again re.
elcted President of the American I'Vd.
elation of Iabnn
The convention hitd previously, by a
vote of 1S to 67, rejected a propoaltion
to aloot offlcara by rafereadum vote.
HARVARD OUTPLAYS YALE;
BRICKLEY HERO OF GAME
Harvard Star, Hero Against Yale,
Scored 13 Points in To-Day's Game
$--
Try to Halt Landing of Troops
Under Fire of Ottoman
Warship, but Meet Reverse
CONSTANTINOPLE, Nov. 23.
Turkish troops landed at the port of
Sllivrt on, the Sea of Marmora under
the fire of the Turkish war vessels
last night, according to a news agency
despatch from Constantinople. The
right wing of the Bulgarian army
In front of the ChataIJa linos Is thus
threatened. The Bulgarian troop
made desperate attempt to drive
back the Turks, hut after an hour's
ftafhtlng the Bulgarians were forced
to retire.
SOFIA, Bulgaria. Nov. a-The be
sieged garrison of Adrlanople attempted
a general aortie yesterday afternoon,
according to despatches received here.
The Turkish troops, however, wera
fought back into the fortress after S
battle which lasted throughout the af
ternoon. They lost heavily.
Thla la the first sortie of the kind by
the whole garrison, and It Is sppposed
by the besiegers that It was undertaken
with the vlow of reprovlsloninn the
town, the population of widen Is suffer
ng from scarcity of food.
EUROPEAN SITUATION CAUSES
ANXIETY.
LOSDOH. Mot. S3 A news agency
deapatoh from Vlenaa aaya a censor
ship has baas estabUahed on all tele
graphic and telephoalo ooinmualoatlona
from Austrta-Mangary to foreign ooua
trlea since early to-day.
Reports stll continue, to come from
Vienna of tha mobilization of Austrian
and Russian troop and to thane li
audud one from Prague whl h says nve
Uerinan army corps have called up their
reservists. These rumors accord badly
with Premier Asquith's statement la it
night as to the prevailing barman)
among tie European Powers. Official
denials quickly follow each story of ihe
ailing up of reservists by the Various
armies, but the denials fait to dlHidpate
the general anxiety as to the situation.
UDAflSST, Nov. 33. The Ana
trian Daanbe flotilla, conalatiag of
two monitors, two torpedo boats and
four gaaboata, atarted for Belgrade
this aftsrnooa- It waa not stated
tha they wars oa a hostile mission,
bat the dsrelopmeat waa considered
aalreuasy omlaous. Bmsloyaea of
mW bbbbbV-
aL ' , 'Jj' l A
mmW mmW aaatsl all
I tPgi. afri
I 1 .as jSsCsbV asaC
Am ajCxeBBBBBBBBBBS
Csxew .Sal bbW.
-aafl CsnaW
" aafl CteaW'
BRICKLEY-
BULGARIANS BEATEN BACK
BY TURKS IN HOT TIGHT
ON CHATAUA TORT LINE
as
.. ... ...
. . . ..
m
the street railroad system also re
oslTsd orders to report to thalr re
serve regiment commanders to-morrow.
The flotilla's departure created
a tremendous sensatloa.
The Albanian chieftains declared their
country's Independence to-day. It was
learned here throush Montenegrin
sources.
Tha declaration of Albatila'a Indo
pendence brings the Austro-Hnrvlan
controversy Immediately to a head. It
Is through Albania that Servla must
got Its Adrian.- "window' If It la to
have one at all. A nominally lnde
; Bend SWI Albania will he under Austrian
oontrol. Austria and Italy together will
choose Its ruler. He will be virtually
In Austria's employ, though the wishes
of the Italians, who are thumsslvea In
terested In wnat happens un the east
side of thu Adriatic, will tie given due
consideration.
THINK PROCLAMATION IN
SPIRED BY AUSTRIA.
Austria has been waiting anxiously
for the In sped defies proclamation, it
ns considered hora that the declara
tion was probably Inspired from
Vlanna. Austria, Italy and Uermany
are expectod to recognize It at once.
Servla will have to make up Its mind
immedlHtely what course to adopt. IVic
prediction was made by high author
ities that the m at few hours will sho v.
In view of the latest development,
whether there , to bu peace or war bs
t e. ii the powers.
VIBNNAi Nov. M The newspapers
here have been strictly forbidden by the
aUtboritlSI to publish any reports of
military measures In the Austin-Hungarian
Bmptra, The despatch of tele,
grams kaImk auoh information has aU i
been prohibited.
FOOTBALL RESULTS
KlT.nl
23
7
West Point
bjIsVMMi
Annapolis.
N. V. I
DirkinHon.
Sniarth'orv
Lufuvette
: Lehigh
1st Qtr. Id Q: -. M Qtr
0 10 li
0 0 0
13 7 6
0 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0 0
0 0 3
I'IMMt OaNAli ItlUKS.
Tl iu, r.ftertaliuii sag t.i Issl luforiaalMO rt
ai.i. UHUl si mi, Wnltl.li TRa m,
HI'MKAI , t--ad. fulltser iW.,rl,i HaUdlng.
M Oil I'uk Boo. N. V 1'Iuh ItMiuuui tWX).
tdn.
Crimson Star Alone Scores Thirteen
Points of Twenty Making Touch
down and Two Goals
From Field.
FELTON'S SPIRAL PUNTS
PUZZLES TO ELI BACKS.
Bulldog Makes a Desperate Finish,
but the Referee's Whistle Ends
Hope 35,000 See the Game.
The Score by Quarters
M Ptrlod 3d Period 3d Period 4th Period 1 nil Score
Yale - ... 0 0 0 0 0
Harvard - - 10 0 10 0 20
HOW THE TEAMS LINED UP.
Yale. Position. Harvard.
Avery LL FettOA
Talbott LT Stortr
Cooney L.G Pennook
Ketchem ...Centre Parmenttr
Pendleton R.Q Trumbull
Warren R.T HHohoook
Bomeisler R.E O'Brien
Wheeler Q.B Gardner
Philbin L H.B Mardwlok
Spaulding R. H.B v Briokley
Flynn F.B Wendell
Officials W. S. Lanoford, Trinity, Referee; Dave Futz.
Brown, Umpire; W. N. Morice, Penn., Head Linesman.
BY ROBERT F.DGREN.
ntranUl ta Th. CmaUs WotM.)
YAI.K FIELD, NEW HAVEN, Nor. 33. -Harvard won the) champions!
from Yale this afternoon by a score of 10 to 0. That aoore tolls the) story
of nvprythlng exempt Yeta's desperate rally near the end of the last Uliusrtsr.
Harvard outplayed Yale from the start. Much of the credit for the victory
belong to Felton. It was his lon spiral kicks) that the Tare barks fooad
11 Impossible to hold. YaJe'a fumbling gars Harvard a goodly proportion
of her twenty points. It was BrlcMey's toe that earned the res.
Itrlrkley, of ooursa, was tha spsctaau
lar Mar of the cams. He mads one
touchdown and kicked two field goals,
totalling 11 points. Of course, lha de
f as) ted Yale team had Its heroes as well.
Ilomelalnr playod through Ihe lattar
part of the gam. with a helpless Isft
arm anil two broken bones in hla right
ha ml
Wheeler's fumbling waa the mnat
OOStly place of poor play nn Yale'a
aide, lie made aeven fumhlea, one of
which gave Htorer a rhanca lo make
llsrvartt'a firat touchdown.
'litis victory will clve Harvard a
prcstlgi. that should make her the
strongest of all Eastern football rol
lgs next year. Her defeat of the
Tlgera. followed by the eaay way In
which she cruahml Yale to-day, will
put an end for ever to Harvard's lack
of confidence In her team.
No flnar day aver dawned for a Yals
llarvanl gridiron battle. Over Yale
Fluid tha aky was of a deep auminar
blue. For the wpectatira It waa Ideal.
The warmth of spring waa in tha
clear, dry air On the stands facing
the wrsl the sun fell with July heat.
The spi ctatora, aa they came In, dis
carded OTOeooeti and fura and aettled
down to a,- one fall football game In
romrort It was hardly as good foot
bajl SrtCther for the playera, Incased
n "ivy mo la ekias. leather headgear
and woollen Jerseys and stockings. Old
timers amused themselves figuring Just
how much weisjiit the teams would
lose. I'Mve i-'cin I - a man was a con
Mcrvatlvc estimate In weather us warm
as this.
About I o'clock tvi huga eray stands
Kan slum In : patches of color here and
tliere. The beauty and chivalry uf
Massachusetts massed slowly on
the
i n
west, flutterinx ponRQtlg of crimson
the rail Yab's SI OS prea
;k. . real
gfOWtltg bed of violets.
All tul I their un.- ;;..' eh. -i ring en-
lliiislastK o'i hand 'hen the 'aine hc.in
Iters end I hare through the stands rose
little puffs of Dig &1 sinoac almost
straight up.
On I) ii., tops of the stands were
.-wept by a gentle breexe from gg
ii.o i in. ist. There was to lie slight Hind,
un advantage for klthSf team unless the
vv 1 tut greej st longer si no dOOiUlIng sun
dropped lowu.d the nortsoti.
BATTLE OF BRASS BANDS AS A
PRELIMINARY.
It was a 1 title over half an hour be-
ton came time when Harvard's
baad marched ha. sendtnsi Its
challenge across tha gridiron. When tt
had finished Yale'a band nesssfl
hurled back the acceptance.
There had bee no singing ymt ta fJse
amphitheatre. The rooters.
In through the entranos galea In
columns of black created with art meow
and blue, were waiting for ths rooters'
se. ti.wis to fill and the yetl Isadora to
start that organised uproar that al
ways marks a Tel. -Harvard f flirt haf)
came.
But at 1.40 o'clock a crash shoo the
stands, tbs last battle-try they wtM
ovsr hoar, for next year Tale's aaw
stadium will bs built. Out dashed tbt
Yale team, runnlnc down tha length
of the field and colng through fe
tlone with th. practice ball
kicked far against ths wind. AM Tate
ross with a veil across ths field, aest
Harvard listened. The Pirn SOS) bad
not yet corns doom to do battle,
Vale ran up and down. In their ttgat
blue Jereeya standing out clear aewaaast
the yelow turf, men looked Mast Qtanta
Yale rootera began to alng at laeti
"Maroh, march on down the field
Inc for Bil;
Ilrsak through the Crimson line
strength to defy:
We'H give a long cheer for Bp
men
We're here to win again.
Harvard's team may fight to thai easg,
iiul Yale will win."
And. as if tn snswei to the boas, a
squad of men big and burly in taetr
crime in coverings rushed suddenly
out from a gate at one side aad
charged across the gridiron, rial said
I routers russ with a roar that
to ech back from the
overhead.
GO, L KICKED BY PUMPtLLV
AND BRICKLtiV IN PRACTICI-
Yale'S heroes gathered at one OSsf eat
the field while I'umpelly kicked a
At the other end BrtckleJ kicked
Ike SSOOad ball leaving his toe sal
Drat sailed down to the goal I
There eras some punting. Tale
fumbled and fumbled and
students chuckled first, then
I But Flynn practised goet Ma!
eacb ball shot swiftly over the
of thu bar the Mlue began to
turn.
At Ove minutes to I she
(Continued on Sixth
rear la

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