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The evening world. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, February 27, 1913, Final Edition-Extra, Image 1

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TRACK OWNERS DECIDE TO REVIVE RACING
,
HALF THE POLICE HONEST, SA YS CROPSEY
WKAIIIKH-K.li
EXTRA
PRICE ONE CENT.
FIRS
T
RACE MEETING
SLATED FOR AQUEDUCT
TRACK ABOU
Associations Agree to Revive Sport
Under Brand-New Betting Con
ditions New Commission
to Be Appointed.
r Horse racing will be revived in New York State. The first local meeting
will be held at Aqueduct about June 1. The Jockey Club, in conjunction
with several racing associations, has decided to open under modified con
ditions. The Jockey Club has sanctioned spring meets at Virginia and
Maryland and the new dates cannot conflict with them, hence the late
local start.
It U ths plan of ths ' Jockey Club rind
the Raring Associations to oo-operate
to wlvs the sport a new birth. The aUrr
will toe tnada at only one or two track!
Bad the raclnit authorities have no fear
f legal Intervention.
The Evening World's Information was
MeM rag this afternoon from an au
thoritative source.
The Paul Schane test rase sufficiently
clarified the betting atmosphere and 1f
further test case Is needed there will
be at least one raoe track official who
WtH be willing to submit to an arrest if
need be to show that the Directors' I.la
Mttty clause In ths Hurt-Ann. iw law Is
egal.
It Is believed that the new Racing
Commission Oov. Suiter will shortly
appoint will be favorable to the re
sumption of racing. The State Hoard.
It Is understand, will consist of will
lam E. Lewis, Charles Kohler and Mon
tague Oerans.
JURY FOREMAN'S MISTAKE
PUTS COURT IN A QUANDARY.
He Returned the Wrong Verdict
in Brooklyn Case and Now
Officials Are Puzzled.
Here's a funny thing that happened !
In Brooklyn. Yeaterduy the trial of .Tim
Oenaro was concluded In Judttc Tlcr
nan's Court. The man wa charged
-with having burglarized the house of
Mrs. Anna Kelly last August, taking
Kids amounting to I
clothing and other
ITS. Peter Olbt.ns of No. 125 Sterling
place was fort-man of the Jury, and
when asked by the clerk of the court If
the Jury had agreed on a verdict he
said they had. Hurglary In the third
degree he said was the verdict. Friday
was fixed us the day for the sentence.
To-day Foreman Sterling went to
Judge Tleman and said he had deliv
ered the wrong verdict; that It should
have been pe.lt larceny. The Judge
was embarrassed. He didn't know
what to do. Edward J. Rellly, Oen
aro'a attorney, straightened out the
matter by saying his client would
plead guilty to petit larceny. Now the
question arm. "Did the Jury have tho
right to c.iange ihe crime with which
the man was charged?"
BRIDE 105 YEARS OLD DIES
FIVE DAYS AFTER MARRIAGE.
Mrs. MirCfllini l-eon Had Won
Fight in Court Against Relative!
Who Opposed Union.
leOS ANiKl.KS, t'al.. Kc'.. J, .-Alar-oolllna
Leon, gald W be 105 years old,
after she had shown strength of ml:, I
sud body sufficient to win hr w and
attain the consent of the courts to mat
rv the man who for fifty years had
teen her sweetheart, Is dead at he
home to-day after being a bride fir
only five day.
Relatives opposed her marriage to
fUasanlma i.em, eighty-two yean
old. She fought them In tho courts,
obtained the dismissal of her Bloat a
gusnlian and established her oomi'
tsncy to do as she DBOOBBi hut shortly
after her marriage she DOllBPSStf.
World Hinl.ll '.i Isrkleh llaihs.
alwaie tsyeu. ahttti with nrttxu numi. $1.
Barber end Msnlrurt l..r.,, -.In- Id 4: 'rnduica
at risk hew. east hamaUs Bridge.-.. ai.
teoirleM. 1IM3. hi
Cs. I The Now
T
AGAINST SWEENEY
Grand Jury Adds to Accusa
tions After Hearing New
Testimony.
Eleven Indictment, each rhnrglriR
a specific grafting offense, were
fou.id to-day by the Grand Jury
against Capt. Dennis Sweeney of the
Police Department, recently demoted
from an Inspectorship and under sus
pension. These indictments supersede
the Indictment charging bribery
found a week ago and attacked on
,h-e ground that It was defective.
The first Indictment charging Sweeney
with taking money from George A. 81pp.
a Harlem disorderly hotel proprietor,
specified April 3, 1911, as the date of the
transaction. Hollow Department records
how Sweeney " "' Um '
In Cweenpoint and did not go to Harlem
and the Sixth District until June of
that year.
To-day's eleven Indictments cover a
period from July 1911 to May. 1912, In
clusive, end ana based on payments of
protection money alleged to have been
made by George A. Slpp, Thomas J.
Dorian and Ieroy Wllklns, who keeps a
negro resort at No. C-'U Fifth avenue.
Sweeney Is accused, of taking $100
from Slpp on July 3, Aug. 5, Sept. 1,
Oct. 4. Nov. 4 and Dec. 4), 1911, and
100 from Dorian on Jan. 5, lilt, and to
have agreed, In return, to allow the
notorious hotel at No. 2037 Iexlngton
avenue to do business without rwilloe In
terference, lie Is accused of luklng li.O
on Fob :t. March 4, April 4 and May 4.
Llll from Wllkins for allowing Wllkinu
to violate the law.
apparently the first Indictment la to
be droppod. Notlfll atlon of the finding
of el. veil bribery lndl tuients was sent
to Hwreiwy'a counsel, who was asked
to produce his client before J untie (Joff
for arraignment.
The Grand Jury took up the entire
morning session in finding the Haeene,'
indictments and reconvened at 3 o'clock
this afternoon, it was reportsd that .'m
afternoon lasolon would be devoted to
Iwanng evidence against other police
offl cl.iis who have been detailed to duly
In llariem within the past five years.
The Hrsl witnesses Of the afterno in
were John J. McGrsth, who has two i
loons in Harlem, and his manager
Henry White.
Capt. Thomas W. Walsh, who a is so
111 a a days a;:o that the Gn.nd Jury
had to go to his home In Harlem to
he.ir his evidence, speared at tho Crim
inal Courts Building to-. lav and testi
fied In the Grand Jury room. He was
brought downtown an, I tak. n bark
home by Assistant D.st rlct-Attorney
Groehl and a corps of detectives.
Besides Walsh U Urand Jury heard
JUNE
1 1 INDICTMENTS
ON NEW CHARGES
Circulation Books Open to All."
Thr Prr.. PaklUklM
lork World.
NEW
HEAD OF MATTE A WAN
WHO RESIGNS AFTER
THAW BRIBE CHARGE.
FERRYBOAT LOST
IN THE FOG THAT
Starts to Cross North River
and Finally Enters Slip at
Pier 8, East River.
The. Pennsylvania Railroad Company's
ferryboat Pittsburgh left the Jersey
City slip, crowded with passengers, at
8.15 o'clock to-day bound for Dcshrosscs
street. Two hours later the ferrylajat.
hopelessly lost, tied up at Pttf No. I of
Bast River,
This was but an Incident of one of the
heavieat fogs that old weather sharps
could remcmlier as ever having vis
ited these parts. It was so bad It even
threw the subway train schedule out of
gear. Motormen, who have to slow up
their trains when they get out u.f the
tube at Dyckm.in street on the Broad
way branch and beyond Third avenue In
the lironx, could not read the block
signals.
The experience of the lost Pittsburgh
was something entirely new In the his
tory of bay navigation, old river skip
pers said. The Pittsburgh had no soon
er left her slip than the captain at the
wheel lost his bearings completely. He
turned down Instead of shooting straight
arrows the river and up to Destiroises
slip.
The tooting of some upcoming craft
caused him to swerve again. Suddenly
Liberty statue poked Its arm out of
the fog right under the Pittsburgh's
nose and the helpless ferrytwat mode
a quick turn to avoid going plied up on
Iledlue's Island. Thereafter it was as
badly lost on Kast River as a five year
old child without its mother la Central
Park.
Finally when the captain saw an
empty slip he ran In.
"What slip is this?" ha bellowed to
somebody standing with heavy mist
hlnttlng out his fmtures.
"Pier I Kast lliver." came the answer,
and the captain sent s boy down for
his smelling salts.
The ships Ihat pissed In throuirh '.to
night anchored off the Status of
Liberty, until the fog lifted. Among
them were the steamer Ant n, with
passengers fror the Canal xone; the
Ceirlc and Kugenli from Naples, and
the Red Italia from Nip'f.
Manv belated suburbanites had to
make the usual "worst tog we ever
had" excuses vhen thiy arrl'od at
t leir offices.
George A Slpp ai.d Thomas J. Dorian,
who testified to payments made to Pa
trolman F.ugene Fox for "protection!"
Ashley Sh.a, th.: gambler who pleaded
guilty yesterday; Patrolman Fog, who
hps also peladed guitly and turned
State's evidence, and Tom l.loyd and
Hilly Neuman.
The trial of I'ollcem in . Haflgan,
ch.1rg.1l with bribery. Ill bi moved be
fore Justice S.-abury n.-xt Monday whon
that Jurist succeeds Goff In the Crim
inal Term of the Supreme Court.
The interval will lie used by the Dlt-tr'ct-Attorney
to Investigate charges
s, a nst other iMptetOrl associate! with
Kwseney.
fmwm Ti
TIES UP SHIPPING
YORK, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27,
RUSSELL RESIGNS
OFFICE AS HEAD
OFMATTEAWAN
Gov. Sulzer Gets Notice After
He Had Decided to De
mand His Suspension.
IS ACCEPTED BY SCOTT.
Action Follows Charges and
Counter Charges in the'
Thaw Bribery Scandal.
AL.BANT. Peb. 17. Dr. John W. Rue
sell resigned to-day as Superintendent
of the Matteawan State Hospital for the
Criminal Insane. His resignation was
accepted by Joseph F. Scott, Superin
tendent of State Prisons, who ordered
Dr. Roy L Leak. First Assllstant
Physician at the listltutlon, to take
charge temporarily.
Russell who had accused Lawyer John
N. Anhut of offering him $20,000 to aid
In releasing Harry Tha.w from Mat tea
nan, was yesterday in turn practically
accused by Anhut, with soliciting
bribe from him. .
Gov. Suiter, after a conference with
his committer of Inquiry and Attorney
General Carmody, had .decided to de
mand Dr. Russell's suspension, but thi
Superintendent's resignation nnd been
accepted tiefore the demand had been
placed before Col, Scott.
Dr. Russell's resignation Is the result
of Inquiry Into recent efforts to bring
about the release of Har.y K. Thaw
from Matteawan.
THAW'S AGENT, HOFFMAN, CAN
NOT BE FOUND.
Subpoena servers sent out by Gov.
Sulser's committee of Inquiry reported
to-day that they hail been urwible to lo
cate H. A. Hoffman, whose testimony
Is wanted in the Investigation which
the committee is making Into ths Thaw
bribery charge.
Hoffman, according to Lawyer An
hut, acting for Thaw, paid Anhut 125,
0011 us a contingent retainer" to bring
about Thaw's release from ths Mattea
wan State Hospital. Thaw declined
yestei.lay to give his version of the
affair when the committee visited him
at Matteawan, but tho committee hoped
to put Thaw's side of the case on rec
ord t .rough Hoffman's testimony.
Alfred Henry Lewis, who visited
Thaw al Matteawan recently, has notl
fled the committee that he will be In
Albany to-morrow, when It Is hoped
to conclude the Investigation which
was inaugurated by charges that Will
iam F. Clark, former secretary of the
committee, had used Gov. Sulsere
name without authority in efforts to
free Thaw.
"I am waiting for a report from the
committee," sul.l the Governor to-day,
"so that I aii lake necessary action In
the Thaw case."
The committee Is expected to make
a preliminary report to tile Governor
some time to-ilay.
REFUSAL OF THAW PLAN TO
AID RELEASE.
Thaw's refusal to answer the ques
tions of Guv Sulser's oouimltlre of In
quiry unless he could testify In Albany
"very plainly manifested his purpose
of using this examination before (he
committee as a means to further his ef
forts to be liberated," according to a
formal statement by the committee 0
day.
The committee also announced that
"It would be highly Improper fur It to
do anything In this connection will' h
might furiileh any basis for Interfering;
with the due administration of Justl
In Thaw's case."
' Therefore." the statement concludes,
"tiie committee has determined not to
make any (fort to produce Thaw at
Alhaiiv an effort which In uny oven.
Is beset wl'h legal difficulties."
The Governor hits decided to send
to Distrl" It-Attorney Whitman of New
York for such action as he may deem
proper the testimony concerning the
charges an I counter-charges if gllefsd
bribery. IB an effort to sen the re
lease of Thaw from Matteawan
JERSEY MAN DROPS DEAD.
KHenbelh Hnslneas tfan Dies gd
delll) at I'm I m lleiieli.
PALM HK.VH. Fla, Fab, IT. Just
aa he had dressed f ir breakfast, F
Itsndolph, a prominent business man
of Bllaabethi N, J., droped dead In ins
rnoni at a lOeal hotel to , lay. Death
was due to heart failure.
FOR RACING, SEE PAGE 15.
GIRL RISKS $80,000
IL
TO HELP FATHER TO
FIGHTECKERT WILL
Millionaire's Granddaughter
Hazards Her Legacy by
Taking the Stand.
BESTS LAWYER IN TILT.
Her Sallies at Attorney Amuse
Court in Contest for a
Fortune.
There was something o the flavor of
gambling In Miss Johanna Kckert tak
lug the witness etand to-day In her
father's suit to break the will of her
grandfather, Oen. Thomas T. Kckert
former President of the Western Union
Telegraph Company. As the will
stands, little Miss Kckert, who is nine
teen and uncommonly attractive, re
celves 150,000 and a country estate val
tied at tao.oun. 8he Is a witness, how
ever, for the plaintiff In the action and
if the will Is broken her shsre would
be problematical.
Miss Kckert had no sooner been sworn
than De Um.-ey Nlcoll, attorney for her
uncle, Thomas T. Kckert Jr., who, under
ths Will. Inherits the bulk of the II. K"
O0O fortune, made a strenuous attempt
to disqualify her as a witness. He con
tended she was a "party to the event"
and that unquestionably her father had
promised a reward, In the event of her
father gaining a larger share of the
estate. The lawyer failed to prove this,
however, and Justice Greenbaum per
mitted the examination -if the witness
to continue.
"What Is the earliest recollection
you have of your grandfather and his
second wife," begun Attorney Palmer,
counsel fur the contastaiit
BE8TS LAWYER IN TILTS OVER
QUESTIONS.
"I recall visiting them wnen I was
three years old," replied Miss K. kert,
who maintained the greatest compo
sure on ha stand, aave on a few occa
alona when she took umbrage over cer
tain questions asked her. Then the
lawyer usually came off second best.
The lawyer wanted tu know how fre
quently she visited her grandpsrents, but
the Court Interposed, with the remark
that the girl could not be expected to
recall all of the things oocurrlng when
she was a small child.
"She has assured me that she has a
very definite memory," ssid Mr Palmer.
"And a bachelor Is the very best author
ity for the assertion that children differ
on memory for events, according to my
observation."
"Yes, and an old maid can alwaya
raise children the best," said the Jus
tice, with a smile.
Miss Eckrrt said she visited her grand
father and grandmother frequently, but
could not recall the dates She ssid
Gen. Eckert always called her "Little
Wueen" and that most of the time she
pent In his home he held her In his lap.
The witness testified she saw Gen
Kckert five days before his death, but
only after she had been kept waiting
outside his room for two hou's by her
uncle.
"When I entered," she said, "I kissed
him and then he twice slgnliled with his
lips for me to kiss him again, which I
did."
PASSAGE AT ARMS WITH ATTOR
NEY AMUSES COURT.
There was a lively tilt belweou Ml
Kckert and her father's lawyer when
the attorney put this question:
"When you went to your grand
father's house what would he do?"
The girl said she didn't know what was
meant, and the lawyer mapped he oould
ml make It plainer. Whereupon the Jus
tice observed that the question was not
very clear. It finally developed that
what the lawyer wanted to r.rlng out
was whether the General kissed the
child.
Why, cer'a nly," said Ml PVkert.
Miss Kckert cored again when the
lawyer ask el If she oni 1 " her gran .
father holdlnr a newspaper.
"In whai manner was lie holding it .'"
e-k.il Mr. Palmer.
"Both ftandj olenehed lilhtly on it
ami dlreetly In front ol him," shot back
the witness with a curious smile.
"!ld you see a picture In that Paper?"
Yes, s.r. upside down."
I'iUXA C'ilUI. t Hl UKI.
Tl'Stt r, . .e ,1. si.i fultml Inf irtastlis .It
M.I. I. INK-. II'- "III. I IIIAVKI.
HtltCAIi. An.ls r,, 'i-r iu.,rini Hni..liug. .VI
U-
Ads,
rats aw.
rCfrciiati'oM iJooAs Opci to
1913.
22 PAGES
GIRL WHO RISKS HER
LEGACY BY TESTIFYING
IN ECKERT WILL CASE.
tCKE-rer
PASTOR RUSSELL'S
WIFE TELLS OF BIG
E!
Says Cemetery Hnterprise
Stock Paid "Holding Com
pany" 90 Per Cent.
Mrs. Maria Prnnels nussell, ths
estranged wife of l'at.r HusseD, sh'sr
w hlskiTcd portrait appear! Of! tdlllH.fl.rds
nnd In BaWVpapefl all OVef ths world
iin.-e a week ut fie fieiin or n:s awrinons.
was u witnees attalnst her husliand at
a lienrtnir before, the Ta rommlasiun
at th- City Hall t..-dav. PaetAf Itnssell
has claimed exemption from taxation
of his many pni.il, atlon and huslness
enterprises, Ineludina his atriiey for the
sale of afM) a buahel "miracle wlwa-t,"
on the around that all his activities are
phllanthropl.' and relialoiis.
Mrs. Kussrll, who Obtained a sepa
ration from her husiian.l on in- around
that he treated her cruelly, and of
whose relations with himself I'astor
Kussell mails unplsasunt statements In
his publications, said that when Pas
tor HiiHsell started t'.s Zlon Watch
tower Hoclety In nttshurit. she was
entirely In hie confidence as his prin
cipal aide. Hh said that he sol.) mem
bership In the society at 110 ra h. and
that at the laat election In I'lttsburf.
of wht'h ehs had knowledge. 60.000
members Ip votes were cast. Indicating
taht the socltey had taken in I 'OO.OOO.
I'astor llusn II, so his wife testified,
also had William Van Ambers, secretary
and treasurer of must of th concerns
under ths RUaeill manaf tment buy land
rear lit t elm raTM for a cemetery at a cost
of many thousand! of dollara The stock
...' the cemetery was sold to the pious
Tin: emetery company was m-rKel Int..
n. United Hta.es Investment t'ompany.
a hoi&iiuj so rpo ration for Huieell, undr
n e. intra el which stlpu'ited that only
ten per rent of the prollfs of the ceme
tery should aTo to the 00 mob ry corjiora
tion stockholders and that ninety per
sent should tin to the United fiuifes in
vestment Corporation.
rie retary Van Ambers', a tall, melan
choly mall, said thai he was aide to live
In a line house on Colombia ll.lshta,
i iooklyn, only i.ecause bis parent sup
ported him. Ills salary us secr.-i.iry and
treasurer of the Russell oonosrna. he
said, as only HI a month Ha could
S work at a better Salary elsewhere,
he said. bUl staled alto I'asior RtUMSli
"because be loved th work."
C Q"
A ew Serial Ntorr nf .ore sail Traseitt
hv Arthur I n.l.i line of I lie lieet-kn.iwa
ureses! -lis, v erlters of tnrllllns silvealura.
1 nn manias In the Maaattiie sua MlesS
Beetles mi the aWaasas Weeks.
IslggHnr
TTl
BUSINESS PROFITS
All."
JEROME SAYS GRAFT
BY POLICE THRIVES
UNDER PRESENT LAW
McClellan Laughs at Gaynor's" 50";
Says Police Corruption Is Not a
Question of Arithmetic but
of a Discredited Force.
CORRUPTION ON FORCE
PRODUCED BY SYSTEM
Gaynor's Police Ideas Not Practical,
the Opinion of Former District
Attorney Philbin.
Former Mayor McClellan and Police Commbsioner Waldo gvrt to
the Wapier committee on remedial police legislation to-day their opinions
of the present police situation in New York, and their views wot ts
far apart as Ihe poles.
Former District-Attorney Jerome told the committee this afternoon
that so lonK as laws are kept on Ihe
;raft will continue.
JEWELLER HELD UP
IN STORE MAKES
DESPERATE FIGHT
Jansen Knocked on Head With
Iron Bar but Manages to
Shut Safe Door.
Two hold-up men entered the Jewelry
store of If Oamse Jansen. at the north
west oorner of Klahth avenue and Twenty-fourth
street, this afternoon, struck
him twice over the head with an Iron
bar and attomptod to etesl his stock
of diamonds and his money. Janeun put
up a stiff resistance and made so much I
noise tn.it the thieves were compelled
to Bee before they oould get hold of
any loot.
The fos; and rain mads business bsd
alona Elsjhth avsnue thle afternoon, and
Jansen was In his stors slone. He had
Just ssnt his daughter, who had been
actlna as his clerk, on an errand. Ths
holdup mn. who had apparently been
watching1 for the chance, entered the
tore a few moments after the depar
ture of Jenieti's daughter
The Jeweller, who had been In business
on Klahth avenue for many years, was
suspicious the second hs saw his visi
tors. His mental attitude must have
shown In his face, for they lost no tltns
In coming 10 business.
"Com across with the gems and
money." ordered one, "or we'll put you
ut of business."
Jansen rushed for his eafe to shut
the door. Ths thieves pursued him and
one drew sn Iron bur from under his
coat snd brought It down on Mr. Jen
sen's bead.
The blow staggered but did not dls-
alds the Jeweller. He slammed the
safe door and yelled. The thieves ran
out ami disappeared In Tw. nty-fourth
street toward Ninth avenue.
Mr. Jansen, with blood streaming from
a cut In his goal Pi ran tu the street fl
pursuit of tho th. ives, but collapsed OB
the sidewalk. There wasn't a policeman
In sight and by the time I'atrolm.i i
Plghsr of the West Seventeenth liTBBI
station ipeared the hold-up men had
(Continued oo Sscond Pads )
EDITION.
PRICE ONE CENT.
statute books mat will allow fnft,
Oil. McClellan declared bluntly that
the police system was rattan to tho oar
and that thoss not corrupt were afraid
to call their souls thslr own. while On
the other hand, Commissioner WaMo 4s
clared that the force was doing tfss
work well and that It was throueTB flb
work of the force that all the ressmt
r. v.iations came. Inspector Dwyar aisr.
wss a star witness, and he came ou.
bluntly with the statement thai th
public could not expect a cop to be) hoe
est when he was turned loose on a bee'
at aoo for the Oret year, and with Mb'
of that taken out for his equipment
"You give him a olub and a pistol aast
authority ami turn him out oo tho
street without the pries of a sand s"
on him," hs declared. "Then TOO as
pect him to resist temptation."
Mr McClellan was the Brat so sag.
the stand at ths hearing
QUESTION It NOT HOW MANY
POLICE ARE QRAFTER4. 1
"The question la." hs said, " 'la the
anything wrong with the Police Depart
mentT' If there Is anything wrong, then
what la UT Whether there are onl,
nfty men or tiva thousand on ths fore
who are oorrupt Is aside from ths ques
tion. "Ths police are discredited m ike
minds of the people of ths ety as the
result of recent revelatone and lndlot
in en is Unless ths people want to OS
the police become a very ghastly ann
grtsxly Jungle eomethlng should be don i
In my tune as Mayor I found ths Irs
tern In operation. I have only to rose.
to the case of the murder by Polloeme .
Dillon, ths Plstrlot-Attorner of ths.
time ssid that the Byatom had dor.
everything to block the course of Joe
lice.
"I would like very muoh to balls-
that there are only nfty corrupt poltc.
men. but If there are only fifty they are
very capable and active. The corp.
spirit of police system is s false spirit
and the morale la rotten. Those whs
are mu corrupt are afraid to call thatr
souls their own. end bow to the oor
rupt." REFERS TO SWEENEY AS A
"WRETCHED CREATURE."
He referred to Inspector Sweeney as
"a wrttohed oreature under Indlctn.eni
I for graft." and said that ha would not
have attended ths IJeutenant s associa
tion dinner whers Sweeney was a guest.
"President Taft." lis said, "was fooled.
The dinner was turned Into a ratlSca
Hon of Sweeney's acts."
Col. Mci'lellan declared that he heart
ily objected to putting the police Into
the hands of the State. He declared
that politics in the force would only
bo transferred from the City Hall tb
tin. L'apltol. He oojscted also to ths
Idea of electing s Police Commioalonar
by the votes of the people, as this
would bring the force into the elec
tions. He declared that the Mayor
should have the power of removal U
ho haa the power of appointment. This
power of removal should be restricted.
huwsvsr. hs said, aad thi

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