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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 29, 1893, Image 7

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I HONORING A DEAD POET.
THE LOVELL -MKMOKIAL IN WESTMIXSTEIl
| ARIU-Y UNVEILED.
CEREMONIES IN TUE CHAPTER IIOl'SE-Ai>
PRE-SEa UV DEAN BRADLEY, LESLIE
STKPUEN* AN") MR. BAYARD-MANY
WELL-KNOWN PEOPLE PRESENT.
London, Nov. 28.-The ceremonies attendant upon
the unveiling of the memorial to James Bussell
Lowell In the Chapter House of Westminster Abbey
began at noon to-day. The memorial consists cf
two stained-glass windows, one of which ls divided
by two mullions Into three parts, while at tho
bottom of the other ls a medallion portrait of the
Minister, author and poet. On the three rectlons
of the mullioned window are representations of
an angel bearing a shield, below the arms of the
t'nlted States; the landing of the Pilgrim Fathers
from the Mayflower, and the figure of St. Botolph.
Oa the other window are the figures of Slr l*aun
fal, an ang-1 bearing a shield below the arms of
the I'nited Kingdom, and I figure of St. Ambrose.
ss well ss a symbolic representation of the emanci?
pation of the slaves.
While Mr. Lowell whs American Minister to
Great Britain he greatly endeared himself to the
best classes of the English people, and shortly
after his death the project was started of erect?
ing a memorial to him. The funds ta ere quickly
raised among his English friends, and to-day's |
ceremonies marked the tlnal completion of the
work of love. Among those who subscribed to the
fund were the Duke of Westminster, the Duke of
Argyll. Lord Rosebery. l.ord Coleridge. Lord
Brassey. Ixird Playfair, Sir John Lubbock, Pro
fessor Bryce. Professor Tyndall, George Meredith.
Dr. Conan Doyle, Canon Farrar and Alma-Tadoma.
Among those present to-day wore Thomas F.
Bayard, the American Ambassador; Miss Balfour,
sister of A. J. Balfour: the Archbishop of Cantor
bury. Dean Bradley and Miss Bradley, 1-ord Cole?
ridge, the Lord Chief Justice; Arthur Wellesley
Peel, Speaker of the House of Commons; I.ord
Rosebery, the Foreign Minister; Canon Farrar,
Ixird Herschell, the I*ord High Chancellor; Walter
Be-ant. Joseph Chamberlain and Mrs. Chamber?
lain. Slr Henry James, Lord and Lady Reay. Lord
Aberdare, William Leek, the historian, and Lord
and LoAt Pembroke.
Dean Bradley presided. In his opening speech
be said:
"Wo have met In this venerable building to pay
a tribute to the memory of one whose high char?
acter and great gifts endeared him to an ever
widening circle till the day of his death. I will
leave others to speak of Mr. lowell as * writer
who helped others to appreciate great writers of
the same race." After saying tnat he regretted
the absence of Mr. Balfour, who was to have
spoken. Dean Bradley said that he regarded the
Chapter House as specially fitted for the memorial.
He did not know what the future of Great Britain
and America might be. but he hoped that In the
future their children, looking at the memorial,
would be reminded of the bonds uniting their com?
mon associations to the great memories of a ra^
speaking one tongue. He hoped these bonds would
prove a source of great strength to the two coun.
tries.
Leslie Stephen, as chairman of the Memorial Com?
mittee, begged Mr. Bayard's acceptance of the
memorial on behalf of the United States. He said
among other things:
MR. STEPBEN'S PRESENTATION SPEECH.
"I had the honor of Mr. Lowell's friendship for
many years. The reason we have met here to honor
Lowell is suggested to any one visiting the Poet's
Corner. The long line of Illustrious men whose
monuments are there, and who passed the torch of
literature from Chaucer to Tennyson, would doubt- |
less recognise Lowell as a congenial disciple.
Scarcely one of these followed letters with more
unflagging zeal. Gn him fell the spirit of tho groat
masters. He always spoke from his heart, and
hence nobly. He would not take a low rank among
the masters."
Mr. Stephen eulogized Mr. Lowell's works, and
referred to the Influence exerted by "The Blglow
Papers." He also referred to Mr. Lowell's love for
English literature and England generally, even
English weather. He extolled Lowell's powers of
speech, his sympathy and kindness, and said he
was proud to call him his friend all his life. The
committee had received manv offers from the
lulled States regarding ihe memorial, but lt had
been thought flt to decline them, because they
wished to show that Englishmen themselves knew
how to honor a great American in the spirit in
which Lowell spoke and wrote.
"We have erected this memorial," he added, "In
the hope that lt will be accepted as it is intended,
so that Americans can see that Englishmen aro
capable of respecting and admiring one of them as
heartily as If he were one of our own countrymen."
Mr. Bayard in accepting the memorial said:
kn ii.-j.vr.i/s Annans.
" I hold myself happy In that I have been per?
mitted to be In the Chapter House of Westminster
Abbey when, for the second time, the name of an
American ls Inscribed in this double sanctuary of
religion and renown?the bust of Longfellow, and
now the memorial of his brother poet, both from
our kindred beyond the sea. The forms of
these two gifted sons of America are clasped In the
bosom of the land of their birth; their ashes rest In |
peace at home, but the echoes of their fame have
been wafted across the Atlantic, and they fall In
clear and musical notes upon the loving ears of
the two countries whose people speak the same
tongue. Longfellow and Lowell, here In West?
minster Abbey In blended fellowship, are worthy
companions of that band who sung with Words?
worth, and who gave us nobler love and nobler
cares.
"1 am unable In the few words permitted me to
attempt a portraiture of Lowell. Happily, this lr.
needless, owing to the eloquent addreis of Mr.
Stephen, which ls especially grateful to myself and
my compatriots, and which will be received thus
by the country whose son ls its subject. It is a
Strong saying that ' blood ls thicker than water.'
" Every day proves how the ties of common
origin and* ancestry are stronger than written
treaties. The inborn sympathies of race Anally
silence International discord and Jealousy. It ls
pleasant to recall In this chamber that the man la
whose honor this unveiling takes place to-day stood
twelve years ago speaking words In honor and
affection of Dean Stanley, that pure, noble bein
whose memorial ls before us, seemingly the guard?
ian spirit of this venerable place. But eight vein**
since the voice of Lowell was again heard in those
precincts when the bust of Coleridge, the K|f- 0?
Americans, was unveiled. I am glad Indeed that
this mark of honor to my dear countryman was
erected so soon after his death. The reproach of
long delay, often Just, cannot be made here nor
can be applied the words of Johnson.
See the Nations' nl.nvly wise and meanly Just.
To burled merit raise the tardy bust.
" For here brotherhood In letters and kin Ind
spirits hasten to give burled merit a Just memorial.
I cannot forbear to wish, however futile lt may
be, that he should have been permitted to foresee
this honor. It was his purpose to bring the people
of Great Britain and the I'nited States to a better
knowledge of each other, to replace suspicion by
confidence, and Ignorant animosity by friendly ap?
preciation.
"He liked to call himself a man of letters. Truly
he was the master of the English tongue, and he
made his skill and knowledge the agency to Inter?
pret thc better feeling of both branches of the race
having common glories. In all American homes a
sense of grateful pride will be felt when thev learn
what the name and fame of their countryman, the
poet, scholar, statesman and patriot, have received
%s ? hands of Britons In this venerable temple of
Rational religion, honor and renown. 'Give my love
to England In general,' was the last message of
l_owetl to Thomas Hughes. In these memorials mny
J-L u l**d England's reply to Lowell and the Na?
la? m*__*l'-h.ul!y represented?"
Mr. Chamberlain moved the adoption of a vote
of thanks to Mr. Bayard. Iii said that Englishmen
claim common Interest, common pride, and almost
common ownership in great Americans, and this
was particularly ao in the case of Mr. Ixiwel!. The
vote of thanks was adopted unanimously, and Mr.
Bayard made a brief reply of thanks.
____**_? ____ *rJPwnonl?* many persons lingered in
the Chapter House to admire the memorlaL
GEN. DE CAMPOS SAILS FOR M KULLA.
OPERATIONS AGAINST TUE KII*FIAXS TO BE
PUSHED ACTIVELY UPON His ARIUVAL
MORE TROOPiS LEAVE SPAIN.
London. Nov. 2..-A dispatch to the United Press
from Melllla yesterday, by way of Malaga, states
that the news of the coming of General Martinez
de Campos to assume command of the Spanish
troops ha* produced the greatest enthusiasm among
the soldiers. The army rejoices that operations
against the Rlfflans will now not be further de?
layed.
General Macias yesterday morning sent a letter to
Muley Araaf Inviting him to take refuge In Melllla
unless he considers himself safe with the Rlfflans.
In the conversations between General Macias and
Muley Araaf the latter left the Impression that he
oould not control the tribesmen.
Madrid. Nov. ?.? The people of the provinces are
engrossed In the preparations of the Spanish Gov?
ernment literally to " carry the war Into Africa."
In all the places rrom which drafts of troops have
been made the preparations for their departure for
the seat of war are almost completed. Generals
Prtmoderlvera, Echague Asnar, two companies of
lancers snd a battalion of cavalry armed with
Manser rifles have left Madrid for Melllla. Three
battalions, of 750 men each, under command of
Generals Molina and Marcedo, have embarked
for the same place at Barcelona. To-morrow two
battalions will leave Cadia, and three battalions
under General Chinchilla will sall from Malaga.
General Martinez de Campos, who ls to have
command, of all the Hoanlsh ferces employed
?stainst the Rlfflans, attended service In the Malata
'athedral last evening. The bishop wno officiated
roached a patriotic an.l warlike sermon, and asked
rc Divine tile.*-.:it on the .Spanish army. General
e Campos subsequently atten'iod a banquet, at
i-hlch he said that the cair-palsm In Morocco
Tight be a rough one, but he had entire con.1
enoe in th.- Spanish troops. At midnight tao
Jenora! embarked on tho steamer Alfonso XII.
(Jeneral Macias, now commanding the Spanish
orces at .Melllla. telegraphed to-lay that all ls
ulet around that place. Work has been completed
n the trenches, and the outlasts have Lien sup
lied with provisions enough to last for weeks.
Muley Araaf, the Sultan's brother and envoy,
ontlnues his negotiations with tho Rlffians with
he object of getting them to withdraw and leave
he Spaniards In undisputed possession of the
'-lilia territory. The I'acha El Arsbl, on behalf
f the Rlfflans. has solicited a new interview with
Jeneral Macias.
? ?
ENGLAND NOT SECURE.
"HE GOVER.VMFAT'S POLICY CRITICISED BY
LOBS SAUSI5CRY.
mo op irnsuOT-O-HiBra the navt-inteu
RITV OF THE EMPIRE NOT VET WON-LORD
Dmnafn chosen* pansxnxni of
THE <'i)N.-,!.l'V..TIVE VNir.N.
London, Xov. 25?.? Tho Marquis of Salisbury de
Ivered an address before the National "Conserva
Ive Union in Cardiff this evening. Referring to
he coal strike, he auld he rejoiced over the set
lemcnt of the trouble, as the conflict was dlg
:ing a chasm between classes without whose
igrecment the prosperity of the nation was 1m
?osslble.
News from foreign countries, he continued, was
?uch as must make England reflect upon her po
ltion. duties and dangers. Two nations were
vithout governments, and another was bank
upt. It was a matter of the first importance for
england not to depend for her safety upon the
rood government and good will of other nations.
5he must be in such a condition that, whatever
mppened, she should always be able to depend
lpon her own fleet and her own* strong arms.
Cheers.) It ought not to bo imagined that Eng
and's position was absolutely secure. As a mat?
er of fact, her navy was far below the point in
iii.inj* absolute confidence.
In view of such facts, lt was with a feeling
if deep dismay that he saw the Government
?/astlng all its force on measures which no?
body heard of ten years ago, and the Im?
portance of which was only a fiction of the
mngUfation. The political situation was, he
lid not doubt, one of great complexity; but.
?cgarding the Farlsh Councils franchise, he
tad never heard of any movement of the rural
copulation showing that they desired it. The
>nly construction he coull plac cn the action
-f the Government was that they desired to
?btaln the opinion of the electors, not upon
Home Rule, but upon a half-dozen measures of
ilfferent kinds at the suine time.
In concluding the speaker said that the coun?
try was In as much danger in being surprised as
n being openly overcome. The cause of the In?
tegrity of the Empire had n>n yet boen w<>n. It
behooved them, therefore, to bo constantly on
the alert leejMSIadstone, seeking to fulfil his nu?
merous pledges, succeeded in wresting from
Parliament his trill.
Cardiff. Nov. 2K.? The meeting of thc National
t'onsorvativo Union ..pened here to-day. Slr
Henry Stafford Northcote, member of Parlia?
ment for Exeter, prodded. On motion of Slr
Elli* Ashmead Rartlett, member of Parliament
for the Ecclesall division of gbef-Md, Lord Dun?
raven was elected to the presidency for the ensu?
ing year.
ilesdutions were adopted thanking the House
Of Lords for rejecting the Home Rule bill, and
declaring that industrial disputes ought to be
settled by boards of arbitration. 9
IN Till: ROUSE OF COMMONS.
MR. (JEAPSTONE ON HEM El* VOl\ THE I'NIM
I'LOYED-TIIE MONTREAL AM) IllBEIN
ounuon.
London, Nov. 28.?In the House of Commons to?
day James Keir Hardie (Socialist), Member for the
S.iuth Division of West Ham, asked whether the
Oovernment would appoint a select commit loo cf
members of the House to consider the condition Of
tho unemployed throughout the country.
Mr. Gladstone In reply said that tho practice
established is. whore extra distress prevails In par?
ticular districts, for tho local authorities to deal
with the matter. Ho added that lt was decidedly
the opinion of the Oovernment that thjs course
ought to be continued.
In reply to a question on th" subject. Mr. Glad?
stone said that the Government still had no In?
formation regarding Um acquirement by Russia
of a port on Ihe Mediterranean.
Sydney Buxton. Parliamentary Secretary of the
Colonial Office, responding to questions, said that
tho House would bo glad to barn tho views of
the Earl of Aberdeen, Governor-General of Canada,
on the recent attempt to blow up the Nelson Mono*
ment In Montreal. The Govern.>r-Gi ni-rnl had tele?
graphed that tho affair was a freak on the part ..f
three excitable Lids. It had leen a subject of re?
gret and complete disapproval In the Trench ns
weil as tho English papen of Canada.
Edward I'.'.rsi.n (Cou sar vallie), Member for Dub?
lin University, risk'-d If th- Government bad uny
Information regarding dynamiters In Dublin.
Mr. Asquith, tho Home Secretary, said there had
undoubtedly been un attempt nm.le to cause a
dynamite explosion at the Aldborough Barracks.
It remained to be seen what, If any. connection
there was between t'lls affair snd tin- murd, r of
Patrick Reid. The Irish Government preferred to
say nothing in the mean time.
CABINET CONFFKENX KS IN BOMB.
TUE MINISTRY NOT LIKELY TO IJE IO-UUUI
ion SKTBSA& hays.
Uome, Nov. 28.-This evening Signor Zanaid. Ill
had ar. intcrvl. w with Mgaor Son.ilno, the lead- r
of the Centre, with rOfSTSSCS lo the formation of
a Cnblnet. Signor Sonnino asked that Sinn.ir For?
tis, the Kudlcai leader, bo excluded from the new
Ministry and that an lncreu.*e of tax.it*.n to the
amount of .0,01*1,000 lire be made an item of the
n**w Government's programme.
Signor Fortis this evening said: "1 shall remain
true to my expressed principles, if signor '/miuit
dolll wishes to obtain SCOOTd with the Right COB*
trs t'uoui'h signor SoBMrlno ?n arrangement i? not
possible. To succeed. Signor Zanardelli must en?
ures his parliamentary i-asis."
Signor /annrilelll conferred with a number of
Senators this evening. It ls believed that the n.-w
Cabinet will not be definitively formed for sev.-i.il
.'ays.
King Humbert had a long conference to-day villh
Signor Zanardelli. Tbe conference turned upon th.
reduction of the Army l.y two corps. Subsequently
the King had s conference with General Consorts.
ex-chief of staff.
SASSOON & CO. NOT IN DANGER.
London, Nov. M.?Humor., have been current for
some weeks affecting the well-known firm cf Sas?
soon & Co.. merchants. The latest Information on
tho subject ls to the effect that, as the linn weath?
ered the recent llr.ar.clul storms, it is now believed
to be safe.
The firm ls that of David Sassoon & Cn., pt Sn.
Vi Loadeuhhll-st.. E. C. The rumors also' applied
to E. 1). Sassoon & Co., of Nos. | and ll Pen*
church-ave., the business relations between th.? two
linns !>. lae Close. As S matter of fad, both houses
ure as stosdy ss a rock. Both ar.* supposed lo
huve lost through their India connections recently,
but their credit is entirely unshaken.
DFKR OF LEINSTER SAID TO BB DYING.
Dublin, Nov. -S. -The Duke of Leinster ls dan?
gerously 111 with typhoid fever. This evening he
was said to be dying.
TROl'I'LH IN THK SFANISH CAI1INKT.
Paris, Nov. 28.? A dispatch to the "Temps'" from
Madrid says that a n.-w difference has arisen in
the Spanish Cabinet. Henor Gamuzo, Minister of
Finance, and other Ministers oppose _*enor Mia et.
Foreign Minister, and Senor I'ulgcerver Minister
of the Interior, on asking tho Cortes to aoorov.*
the treaties of commerce modifying ihe protective
tariffs.
A GEOLOGIST'S OPINION OF THE EARTH
QL'AKl*.
Montreal, Nov. 28.?Slr William Dawson, thc ge?
ologist, says that yesterday's earthquake was no
doubt the result of a settlement or giving way In
the rocks along the Junction of the Laurentian
and Silurian formations. From whut he can ju.lt-e
the earthquake came from a croat ?t.-nth and
nearly vertically. The shock was pronounced and
was followed by a rumbling noise, which Indict.*-.
the depth at which the settlement took !,l?c ?
These shocks are not uncommon in Canada ami
are much more frequent and much mon severe In
autumn than at other seasons.
MKS. LANGTRY IN THE OOCRT-ROOM.
London, Nov. 28.?The Queen's Hrneh Division of
Her Majesty's High Court of Justice was filled
with a lari-e and expectant crowd to-day ppamr to
hear the evidence In a case growing out of . chock
for ?30.000 given by the late Abingdon Halrd. bettor
known as Squire Abingdon, to Mrs. Langtry.
Shorfy after Halrd had given the check to Mrs.
Langtry the two had a quarrel, and Halrd went
to Mr. Seaton, a well-Vnown racing man. and em
ployed him to get the ch'-ck or the mon-y back
promising to give bim one-third of the amount.
had been .stopped.
..-nrv junes, nwwnw. i"c
executors, asked for the withdrawal of the case.
The request was granted, and the chso will be set?
tled out of court. Mrs. Langtry was In the court?
room.
THE PBpiM1T-_fHlP- ****** M'i'uIX'}.
M. T.EYVAL I'.EI ISES TO PO HM A FltENCU MI.VIS
TRY-M. SPVLUUI MAY UNDERTAKE.
THE TASK.
Paris, Nov. 2H.-M. Reynal has declined the re?
quest of President Carnot to attempt to f..rm a
new Ministry. Ills refusal is the general topic of
conversation in political circles this evening. M.
Reynal leads the Moderate Opportunists, nnd lt ls
fairly certain that ho would command a good ma?
jority. Ilia reiusal, therefore, ls assumed to Indi?
cate that President Carnot Imposes OPOS those
whom he requests to undertake tts formation of a
Cabinet the condition that the policy of concentre
lion shall be maintained In order to conciliate IBS
Hadlcals; whereas M. Reynal and other possible
Premiers look upon it es imperative thal 'h.- Min?
istry shan be a boBMseneous ono.
It ls exp.-, i'd that President >'arnot will to-mor?
row call iip'.n M. Fallieres or M. Spullor t
take the formation
some metters that
M. Sculler to under*
.f a ('ahlnet. lt ls thought In
M. Bpuller is likely to ac.-pt
the task.
In the lobbies of the Chamber of Deputies this
afternoon th.-re was p strong feeling In favor of
tho recall of M. Con-tans. This, lt ls said by many.
would bs if"' b.-st course, hut President Carnot's
personal animosity against the ex-.MInister renders
his recall unlikely.
The Chamber sat for a half-hour to-day. and
debated the contested ile lions. It then adjourned
until Thursday.
OVER 100 ARRESTS MADE IM HAR''E.LONA.
Barcelona, Nov. ML?TIM Govern.>r of Marcellina
states that fifteen Anarchists, eleven of whom ar"
Spaniards, w ll be charced with complicity In the
recent dynamite outrace St the Lyceum Theatre
hore. Ono hundred and eighteen persons are de?
tained on suspicion of having been In some manner
concerned in th.* outrage, .t of bavins subse?
quently aided those who ex.eutd the ?cheUS bj*
which over thirty persons lost their lives.
FRAGMENTS Of NEWS FROM RUROPM.
London, Nov. M.?The new llrltish steamer Slr
.lohn Hawkins. 1.7.*. tons, foundered on November
-*>, on her first voyage fr..m Plymouth to Marian
opie. The crew were drown.-1
St. Petersburg. Nov. L'*:. -Tho recent annual con?
scription added SUM men to tho army, nf this
number 70.MI ar.- man-led. (inly one-fourth of tho
whole number of conscripts can road or write. The
Hebrew recruits equal on.* in sixteen of that impu?
tation.
Herlln. Nov. 2S? Tho debate on tho budget eras
resumed tO-day. Dr. Mlquel, Prussian Minister of
Finance, defended tho Government's financial
scheme.
landon. Nov. M.?Schell and FL.yd. the two
Americans arrested on the charge of having robbed
th.- Hunk or Minneapolis <.f MMM, won ii;,*.un
brought up in the Bow Street Extradition (Toort
to-day. They were again remanded until Satur?
day, to allow tts magistrate time to examine tho
extradition pap.rs.
Naples, Nov. M.?Afl inquiry concerning Socialists
in this city has resulted In tho discovery of a
society formed ..n a plan similar to that of the
Si. Iliaii "l-'ascl.' Many members nf the society
have been arr. stol.
Paris, Kov. ML?Oosnl bs Haussonvllle denies tho
story published this morning in the "London Times"
to th.* effect that th.- betrothal of Princess Helene
of orleans, daughter or tho Conn! ..f Parts, and tts
Czar, witch, may be expected nt any time.
London. N..y. _s john Morley. Chief leers tory
f..r Ireland, caught s fresh cold to-night, and wns
obliged t.. leave tts House ol Commons cai ly and
so io bod.
ROVXD ABOUT EUROPE.
M. BAIHAVT NOT TO WEAK THE M ?.**??-sw
tamii.i: still is nun. an BAWL
it ned ron ritt'i i.ty.
Freed from tho convict'.-- musk, lt, lialhiuit. who
now is the only one of the persons Incriminated
by tho Panama ''anal I'ompany scandals remain?
ing in prison, .-.ii ile ott t.. bavins boss liberated,
has I..-.-ri exempted by order of the Oovernment
fri.m the rule providing that every convict In tho
penitentiary ol Eta mp. t, ? n being taken au. ..f his
c.-ii .-ith.-r for ex.reis.- or labor, should hsve els
features, and in fact his whole bead, concealed by
ii mask aol hood, with a vow not only "f pre?
venting any communication or Intercourse between
tte prisoners, bul also of sni-KUHr'iiiiK tre.s.* who
hav>- complete*- tbeir sent. n< ??* from tha dangar
ol betng b-sehmatled lat.-r on by belne recognlseo
by thi.se Who hal s-r\> I SS their follow <a>.->vnts.
?aataader fUU le Dsager. Tbs city of lasts sear
continues pealestrtefces, sad ttsrs bes i..on a
general exodus <>f tts inhabitants stern thoi hoosms
aw.ir- that no |e.*i thar f" (BOSS <>f .Unarm'- IS
still submerged under tho wit'rs ..f thc herbor,
Accordtag lo tts opteloa of experts, ute nltro*
glycerine te the dynsmlte ls i...un-l to explode, sooner
or liter, by rea em "f lbs Infiltration ol the water.
Too much praise cannot bs accorded t. ti-..- divers
who Mre ii..iv, nt tte risk <.f their lives, engaged
in raisins tte explosive, srhlefe is betsg takes out
ta ?'*i and sunk._
Arctic Explorers Loot The whaler Aurora, which
h.i:< just arrlvd Bl Dundee, brines Information of
the loss Of BB Arctic .-xpl.-iWw I'-'i'V ihat startfl
fi..in Newfoundland cl-rht-.u sMBths sgo in a
small schooner named the Ripple, chartered st st.
John's. In Baton's Miv th.- wreck "f th- Ripple
wai discovered, and close hy calms containing
ttl body of ..ne ot the expl irers and several manu
scripts Tho party war COtSpOSSd if tw> Swedish
gentlemen arel three Newfoundlanders, who aro r<
ported to have been lost ?lr:l.- end.-..v..ring to
reuch the mainland in a small boat.
An Earl RBCd for Cruelty. -Tho Earl of Rottsa
who has but recently soccssded t>. th.- title s..
leag borne by his grandmother, has Just bOSB SOB*
vtcted bv a board of ssagtstrstss sad ssatenei i to
a 6ns for cruelty to s esl by setting hi.* terriers
at it. It ls ..niv fair to Sdd that thi* chief .>f tte
ancient Scotch l! .'is.- of leslie |g a\\\\ a scboolboy
nt Eton and only about sixteen year.-. ..f air . a
fact which tte English Radical pipers s.. m to
h.iv lost sigh I of wh.ti they made ii*.- ..r the te?
ddi RI to mSOUfSOtUlM capital uRitlnst tte House
of Lords.
OP. I Tl A EY.
OOLONRL N. n. ELDREDOB.
Adrian. Ml-P. NOV. M.?COlOBSl Nathaniel Bott
Eldredge died el his boan ta this elly inst sight
after au HlBSBS of more than a year. Colonel Eld?
redge was th.- scion of an English IT itali family
which settled in Connecticut before tbe Revolution
His father, a soldier of the War ..f IMI settled in
New-Vork stat.-, near Auburn, where the son was
i...rii on March H, MU. Nathaniel Rldredge was
successively school teacher, physician, lawyer sad
politician He came t-> Michigan In lin. in UPI he
wa* elected s member >.f the State Legislature, sad
in IK'.'. Probate Judge ol Lepeer County, ludgi
Eldredge fought ta Die <T>il War, aid Was ap
pointed colonel of th.- 7th Michigan Infantry foi
gallantry >>'i the battlefield. In I**'.' he resigned be?
cause of iii-b. nlth, .-md two years later removed
here, resuming tte practlci ..f law. In UM be wns
elected Maror, and in 1874 Sheriff. In UM he war*
elected ta Congress snd was i .--? i.-ct-.i in ism. -{-.
leiiv.-s seven sons and four daughters.
THM LEV. MARTIN J. RTOVMR
Amsterdam. X. Y. Nov. M (Sp. -el iii. -Tho Kev.
Marlin .1. Stover dl.-d lu.*t night, aged eighty -Six
years. For moro than sixty years h.- was a mem?
ber Of tho Hartwich Lutheran Synod, and f.r nf ty
nine years was actively engaf(*d ir, th" ministry.
Ile had ulled pulpits rn this State, Pennsylvsnls and
(>hio. He leaves ;? widow snd thr.-.- sons Martin l.
Stover, a Justice of tho Supreme Court; iii Charles
Stover nnd OeorgS EL Stover, ull of ih|H ,?!? ? .
BATIOATIOB BLOCBBB IS THE erie CARAL
Canajoharlo, N. Y? Nov. H.?The flBBSlhOBl
Itl.hard H. White, with a cargo of corn, was sunk
by les ta tte Brls ("ansi this morning, shout B mlle
above Fultonville. She Ht. ai ross the e-n-il com?
pletely blocking navteatloa. lt is sail that there
ure forty-three lomled boats buck ol h.-r.
tRRASOR RRaTimS COSDITIOS I SCHASfiF.D.
Watertown. N. Y.. Nov. .I.- There wns no ma?
terial change In Senator Erwin's con.Ilth.n p.-.my,
Ho slept well, until 2 O'dOCtt I'll* -Sontag, bul v..is
restless during tho remainder of the night.
FATAL OVmmUBtOB BRTWBBB TBUIOBT TBAIXB
Erle, Fenn., Nov. 28.-A freight collision occurred
about midnight BOBT OOBBSBBt, ohio. on the Lak"
Shore road. Extra No. Wi had K?ni. on a slilo-trncK
to let a pas-.cn,-. r train pass an! had Started BCTOSS
the eastbound tr uk v.!,-a N, .;., -.,.? .. ttocP
eastbound. crashed into n. J(?.| (..,,?, ,. ;lnt,,,.;
and W. A. Kirk, fireman, of the westboundI train
were buried ben.atti their enirii,,. i,n,j klll.-.'l lohn
Bohllnger, engineer, and Winiam Melun fireman of
No. _n. could not Jump in time, gad went Into 'the
wreck. Bohllnger is Internally injured and Mehan
has both .".rms broken and ls Internally Injured.
Moth engines sad thirty cars were demolished Some
of the Hvo stock and a lance amount of morchatidlsr
were destroyed.
??? . _
.t xichioas MARR o\ fire
Iron Mountain. Mich.. Nov. 2-.-Tlmb-*rlnK BB UH
third level Of tho Dowah,c .\||t?, mmngftf ..-,. Vl ...
terdny afternoon, and the Ml m.;, trOtt WtOBA W
tho surface. Tho min I bar. boca hermetically
sealed. In an attempt to sn-otho- the til .Yrs The
Powablc is tho only mino working *!or?s ii ?
Hulst, of Milwaukee, ls president o' th .company.
I The min- "hlpreu nUW tons of ore this season.
THE NEW TARIFF BILL.
WHAT 1HI KKITBUCANS SAY.
SATISFACTORY TO FREE TRADERS.
?"rom Tho Philadelphia Inquirer.
Th" bill prepared by the Ways and Means Com
nittoe ..unlit to be satisfactory to the most radical
' roe Trader. True, there ls a semblance of pro
ectlon loft In some of the schedules, but the cut
ire heavy all along th? line, and there must be a
reneral unsettlement of business Interests until the
nllls and the manufacturing establishments can
lecommodate themselves to the changed condition
if affairs? that la if the change "hall come.
THE WORK OF RECIPROCITY UNDONE,
?"rom The New-Tork Recorder.
The abandonment of the reciprocity features ot
ho McKinley act strikes down a young and grow
ng trade in the Republics to the south of us?a
rads built up at groat expense and labor. If the
?'uropean manufacturers who held the monopoly
>f these Important markets had had a voice in
raming tho Wilson bill they could not have drawn
t moro favorably to their own interests than the
.Vays and Means Committee has done.
BEARER FREE TRADE THAN EVER BEFORE.
''rom Tho Pittsburg Commercial C.axotto.
Taken as a whole lt ls more radl'*al than wss
renerallv expected, nnd in some of its features lt
IpprOBChes nearer to fro* trade th.-n any preceding
arlff. In this respect it ls B surprise even to
.'em...rats. The free list ls of the most ample di
nenstous, and lt will puzzle many stanch Demo
?r.its to .Hs,-,,v.r wherein thc demand for a "tariff
or revenue only" has been compll>*d with In offer
in,' a bill which frees sn many articles and falls so
ar short of raising the re.-uired revenue,
IS IT "FOR REVENUE ONLY"?
'?'rom Tho Hartford Courant.
Th.* V\,i\s and Means Committee nnd Its con
rultteg experts bave gotos as far In the direction
<t flee trade iis thev dared; that ls plain enough.
IVill any of thom- will Professor Wilson himself?
lave th.- effrontery to pretend that In preparing
h.-li- bUI?Witt Its Illogical discriminations, its
?emnants of protection and Its remarkable free
1st-they have kept their eyes Steadily fixed upon
he revenue needs of the Government, and upon
hose needs alon"?
AN EXTREMELY RADICAL SCHEME.
'mm The Philadelphia Lodger.
Tho scheme aa it has emerged from tho commlt
e.--room ls an extromelv radical one, both with
'?'irani to the many additions lt mak-s to tho free
1st. generally, though BOl exclusively, of raw
natertals, rmi In respect to ibo large reductions
if th" duties on manufactured products. Tho m
stlons ef th.- additions of tho ono part and the
?eductions Of tl.thof part STS not always pro
lortlonsbiy maintained, although lt ls obvious that
itr.tiuous efforts lo maintain thorn have been made,
FAVORING- THE SOLID BOOTH. ?
rrom Tie- Pittsburg Dispatch.
Hoop iron ls scheduled at .10 per cont duty, which
rafflctently Illustrates th.- committee's idea of the
imouiit of latsir In that highly finished product.
But cotton ties, which are hoop Iron with some
?xtrn labor, sre not irlv.-n a higher ad valorem rate.
I*hey ar.* not given the same rate; they are not
?von given a reduced rate. The Solid South ls the
?Ole user of cotton ties; end while .0 per cent is
?ocognlze.j as the Just rate for the people who
is,- Mop Iron to pay, the section which furnishes
i solid electoral vote and a nearly solid Congres
ilotrril otic has got to have Its cotton ties free of
luty.
RBPUBUCAM I'I'.Ei'EDENTS FOLLOWED.
Prom Th- ii,,ston Ads sr tlssir.
Consistency i* not so gi eat a jewel as com?
oon s.-'is.', and th'* Democrats exhibited a degree
.f common c. nw- at OBCe gratifying and astonlsh
ng when th.-y decided t.. follow, In tho main. Ro*
antillean prec.lents In regard to sugar, tea -Mid
-.fr..-. By Insisting on tbs admission, duty free,
if sugar up to and Including No. 16 Dutch stand
in!, the framers of the McKinley bill hit th?
*?ii?-ar Trust hard. Thal SOOd example ls followed
ind extended by a reduction of one-half in the
liiiy on relined sugar. All right. The people will
i..i complain, and th.* legitimate business con?
nected with sugar refining tn this country will nat
-uffer. though mooopollstlc speculation and st... k
market manipulation may suffer, us they deserve
to.
HARD OUTLOOK FOR THE WOOLLEN TRADE.
From Tho Huston Journal.
Tho programme whl.h tho committee offers to
tbe ir. ir woollen interests of this country ls prac?
tically a succession nt tariffs, to follow .'rich other
it regular Intervals, each making a fresh cut and
requiting new adjustments. I'n lor tills arr.ing
m.-nt lt becomes necessary for .-.erv manufacturer
io calculate to a nicety exactly how much of lils
products he can bOp? to market before tho du:.- of
Du- lex' cut, which ls to bring In new conditions.
Substantial!) the same calculation must h.- made
i.y every wholesaler ani every retailer, and by
?very Importer or buyer >.r miler ?>f foreign goods.
WHAT REDUCED DI'TIES MEAN.
From Th- iti.a Herald.
Th.- reduction of datles ? sr ss ps ulong tho whoi<?
Industrial Un.-. Cotton manufa-tures. glass, t.?
i ... ... lr .n and steel goods, lumber, cutlery, etc..
ur. r.-lie ?I. ns th.- .-ommltloo says, "In th- Inter-st
of Increased reventi *_." American workmen should
mark this adiiilsu.il Duties are reduced In the
int. -.?*? of Increased reveouea That caa ..niv come
n--.ii through In.reas.-d Importatlona What we
im.x.rt -.*.-.? .I., n.-t make at boom, What is made
I : does not e>ii|il y \tnei'i-rm labor. No labor,
rn. ..vug.*, from whl.fi th- committee's conclusion
thal "xx iges pall natural labor are Irrelevant"' ts
reached _
WHAT lin: DEMOCRAT8 SAY.
A LAME AND IMI'i'TENT CONCLUSION.
From Th.- Philadelphia Roeofd.
ThS SUgar schedule of the Wa*.* and Means Cobs*
mlttee !* a nest lame aril Impotent conclusion.
In fear o' offending tte Sanar Trust OB "ii- band,
ar. i ri,- sugar planters on tho other, a most vate
ai.i- source .a Meal iweans hus boen totally
. toned. Will'- raw sugar has Peon left on the
free ll-'. ti:>* bounty of the M. Kinley tariff
t>. th>- Sugar Trust ir is be. n cn down t . a Quarter
.?r a cent a is.ur..I half of th>- M. Kini..v rate a
i\ (tl Ot a quarter "f a ceBI a pound on raw sugar.
uni.'..rm with the duty on the refined product,
as lt wolli have I.- -1. would have yielded a
lise-,! revenue .>; not lees thnn tl0>00~,000 a year;
but this would not have, served tho .Sugar Trust, ii
monopoly that appears to l?" In peculiar favor with
iii- Democratic politicians
TARIFF SMASHING CANNOT WIN.
From Th.* Troy Press.
<'. I r-igr I Iii IsraH and re. tariff-smashing
crusade ..tn win. The gr.-ut manufacturing dla
trtcts have too many Democratic representatives
lu bott bran -her. of COngTCSS lo . ii.il.I,- tia- urls
? ailed revenue reformers t-. Bins out th.* borne
protective features whose retention is demanded
by every patriotic American inter.--'
N'n "REVENt i. ONLY," No DEMOCRACY.
Prom Tli-' New-Vork Sun.
We hiv- read Professor wilson's tariff bin. it
may be called .. sound protectionist document from
one .-nd to th" Other. Th.-r.* ls no revenue onlv
In lt. .-.nd no Democracy. If .McKinley had mad
It he needn't be sshamed ol his work. H.* might
differ willi Its details, bur Its principle would warm
his bones! oil heart And lt i* th- work of so
called Democrats ar.d tariff reformers:
I'M I.TY, BUT WILL BK ACCEPTED.
From Tho Atlanta Constitution.
ll ls true tho bill dOOS not abandon the Idea of
Protection, but lt ls gratifying thut lt makes a
weeping reduction In th- Import duties levied un?
der the McKinley lav.. The bill ls much more a
revenue tariff measure then ritter the Mills bm
or thc Morrison Mil. However faulty lt may bs
aa ,-? measure nf complete relief, it win bo accepted
gin.Hy l.y th- people lu preference to tho existing
.-..amt.- i.y all odds the worst of the kind in the
whole course of tariff legislation.
IT fJOBS PAR, INDEED.
From Tho New-Vork World.
Th- I.Ill generally is eSCOHSBt II has been pre?
pared with great care and entlr.insclentiousneas.
li -foes v. ry 'ar, perhaps as far as il ls possible
ta |: . ir once, toward B complete fulniment of
Democratic pledges. When lt passes and becomes
,. law ? ri tm and bright ers wfll begin for
American commerce and manufactures.
NOT AN AMERICAN TARIFF.
From The Eoston I'ost.
f..il. lion on- sad wool on Ihe free list: an ad
valorem dutv of not more than M per cent on
r. le iran these were the only requests made upon
Congress by New-England Industry In connection
witb tte tariff. They were rejected by tho Repub?
lican Congress; they nre fully recognized In tho
new Democratic bill. This ts a New-England tariff.
AN HONEST ANO COURAOBOCI EFFORT.
Pn ra ThS lialtlmore Sun.
The Tariff bill mad.* public yesterday by Chair?
man Wilson, of the Ways and Moans Committee.
comports admirably with the promise of low taxes
mole to tts people in tho platform of the National
Democracy tn I*:".!, an.l responded to by tho elec?
tion of a Democratic President, House and Senate
to carry lt Into effect. It ls an honest uni cour?
ageous effort to relieve the masses from tho ex?
actions of m< nopolles, created and "protected" by
ta abuse of tte taxing power.
NOT Ql'ITE PREPARED TO RE.IOlCE.
From Th.- Rlcbaeoad Dispatch.
Not Wo it Virginia only, but Virginia. TSBBSSS e.
Alabama, and some sections of North Carolina
view erith disfavor thc proepeci of fr-? seal and
fr. e Iron ore. lt looks as though N w-E:nrl.iii<! I*
dominating this r***rtlcnlar feature of tte ti*riff, as
she has .lomln-itod so ms nv other... Wc could have
sild naught SKal-lSt n reduced duty BB ronl and
iron ..re but t" ws thom both sdml'tsd 'lutv rms
ls a little mor*-> than w ? ar.- pr.pan.I to rejoice at.
A TiN'I.Y (JREAT MEASCRE.
Ki. - Th- Host.,ri niobe.
The lost talent et tho command of the Treasury
D.-pHrtinoiit has been bi-oo-rht Into requisition in
preparing this great embodiment of tire principles
?.f t.irif reform, lt ls bv no means merely the bin
of or.e p_aa or -vin of one committee. It will
rank among the >no.-rt earnest thoughtful sod com?
prehensive plan- ev..r formulsted 1" the annals of
?sr!". lo.-!-latl'in
NOT THE LAW THAT WAS PROMISED.
From Tho Provtdeaee Journal
The Democrats hu ve brought forward*, and now pro?
pose t . try to p.i.,-?, not a revenue tariff, hut a protec?
tive tariff-- tariff ivhi-h differs from tho exist?
ing law. and from such l.w- as th" Republicans
have declared desirable only In Dercentai.es. lt u
not the law which the Democrate outlined In their
platform, but Just such a law as in that platform
they declared was fraudulent and unconstltuluna!;
it i_ not -he law which the people of the discon?
tented Wost meant to help bring about when they
put the Democrats in power last year, but Just
such a law as they Intended to rebuke and
reject the Republican party for having passed.
In plain words, the fundamental and carefully pre?
served principle of the Wilson bill ls not to raise
revenue from customs duties, but to sive certain
favored home Industries an artificial, protected
protlt.
HAZARDOUSLY RADICAL IN SPOTS.
From The Springfield Republican.
In the schedules for manufactures the committee
have been, tn spots, unnecessarily and hasardoualy
radical. The cuts on woollen goods are too heavy.
Our manufacturers can stand them, we think; they
said In 1S87 that 2_ per cent net protection was
enough. This bill gives them much more as a rule.
Hut lt should have left the ad valorem rates of
the McKinley law about as they are. The
specific rates of the existing law are nominally
compensatory for the wool tax. Keally they offer
some little net protection. It was enough then, for
a stnrt. In taking off the wool tax to remove only
the compensatory specific duties on woollen goods.
IT WILL PROVE POPULAR.
From The Boston Herald.
It will, of course, be hotly assailed, and one must
expect that some changes will be made In it while
lt ls running the gantlet of Congress. Hut if its
present lines can be fairly preserved on the main
points we are confident that it will prove a popu?
lar measure, and that with the larger scope af?
forded by it American trade will receive a greater
and far more wholesome development than would
be possible If the fetters of the McKinley tariff
were maintained.
THREE STRIKING FEATURES.
From The New-York llerald.
The most striking feature of the new Tariff hill
is the number of raw materials it transfers to the
free list. Ores, coal, lumber, wool and other tex?
tile fibres are thus treated, on the theory that as
these things are tho foundations of modern indus?
tries production will be stimulated by leaving them
untaxed. Another favorable characteristic of the
measure ls the adoption wherever practicable of
ad valorem Instead of tho specific duties which
have been made to cover such a multitude of sins.
A third commendable feature is the provision for
slew reductions in dellc.tte instances, as In the
bounty on sugar, the abolition of which will be
gradual, extending over a period of eight years,
nnd the sliding scale by which the rates In the
woollen schedule are to be reduced five points In
five years.
ANY ENTME8IASM DISAVOWED.
From The Louisville Courier-Journal.
It would not bo fair as among friends and broth?
ers If "The Courier-Journal" should affect an
enthusiasm lt has no reason to feel over this bill.
It had hoped for a bill embodying less of the pro?
tective and more of tho revenue theories of tariff
legislation. The mandate of the last National
Democratic Convention was sufficiently explicit.
Its ratification by the people was sufficiently em?
phatic.
An Opportune Friend will be found In Dr. D.
Jayne's Expectorant, when racked by a Severe
Cold, and the many Lung or Throat affections
which sometimes follow. This old remedy has met
the approval of two generations, and ls to-day as
popular, safe and effective as ever. .-.
Vt hen baby was sick, wo gav.* her f.-mtorla.
Wll. ri sh- was a Child. she . n-.| for OutOfiS.
Winn she Is-.aiiie Miss, she clung to Cast.-ria.
When sh.- had children, she gave them (.'astoria.
ma nm Ei).
DAViaOS-COBB-Os ftaterdar, Vevssjbsr IS, t(*03, at
Brest End A verm- (olio,Mite aurari. New-TorS liv
Sm Kev. Henry Evertses Cobb, a**i-t .1 br th ? Bev
John Knot Allen. I), ll, .soi hy Nitchie, da.allier of
Mrs. (Uii.-i EI.Mvoitli Cob! , to tlai lier S. DtvlaCB.
'ai??iI'.-h.vmili'o.v-oii jii-s-.v. Kovember -8th, l-?3
st SC. James** (iicmi, thi.* eily, iv Uta Rev, L. M.
\ an Bskbell ii, nf St, Thoma*'* r'liur-h. M .n.aioi.e. k,
V v., -Mia* <l l.v Um lt.-.. Coin.Hug B Smith, rector
nt Ul- farlsh, |y?.>n?.-, ihni.ht.-r ol R. Luther lian.I,, ii,
o-q., Ut Law.-.-ll.-.) Jaroh, all of this city.
l'Aiilll-.E-l'I.El MEIl-Nox rmi* r _Mh, hv tho P.v. H.
Heber Newton, u- ;>., Dr. .hurl* latte* Pattnt n
Mr*, .-ranees ''utrudt- Beecher, d-ugbter of th. Ute
xhv. BL -iio-.v.
ITotlccs of marriages must be indorsed with
fall name and address.
DIED.
Hl'NTIN'l'-Ptioobu L. Valentino, In Rno-lvn, ilth
inaiith. -Mh tay, ?tfe of William liuiitlns, in the 78tli
yew <>f her az*'
Relative* and fri.-ud* ure Invite, to attend tho funeral
services, si IO o'clock "friday Domini*, December l*..
st. in.- leeWeoce of in r tos>la4aw, ..annuli munt, io
Cullin.I.la llelfhta, 1'r.oklyn.
Interment private.
li A Wa T-i'ii Sunday, Novcmb-r _:.th, IMO., at the
i.-ni.?in.- of lur -a'l.liUrr. Mr.. XBoodore llaillanl.
Ami ./a..-, i ram' , .viona J., Villis uf tho lalo William
ll. Deasat
Kotlci of lum-ral hercafurr.
OREEN >'u\N..vcml>or J7th, ISBB, al 00 So. Elliott Place,
Brooklyn, <J%*\ird C. ..i.-en, ixitr .'.1 year*.
f-landa ste intMU-d lo attend mooral .crvlrea, from hu
lat.' roaftSeo. a, *V?*lii?-*l_y, * lt. m.
Interment at coavealeaee el th.- family.
iv lukin, tr. v.. patna pi>'_*o topj. ??
ll. um l.t.-<>n VeveS-bet Mtg, at tho ro*id.*nre of
Chain* Mallory, Hortelieeter, H. v., Uenells Mailor*
lliiM-.ll. ai...I 17 fore, <!a.iK"U-i of UM late E. li. and
(..rn. ila Hula .11. ,,t Hutt iii. tomi.
Nota-.- of fnn.'ral li. r. aft.ll.
I*, rfd H'| ?ait ani II u ll-.r.- |SSBS_ pl BBSS tOMf,
junks-du MaoAay, MeveS-bet _;th, .samuel 8- Jorc?,
in al* Path -re*-. ,
II. iitl\. umi f.ni.'l* ure Invited to attend hit funeral,
iroin ia* ut.- iu-ul.-ii..-, I'..; *.at.--ox>*., Ur oklyu, o.i
> ndoj. December 1*1, at I ?.. m.
lui. tn. ut at teavesleace af tuatty.
LEWIS Os M..:.do innriiin.'. Hovsabet _rth. et hi.* lato
r ? d- li" ' , -4 11 lUth-UA.-., I.coil,- U ?:*, J .. l.i bis Ul?t
y. tr.
K. lau*..'* and frk'n.l* are K**M|y ii. wi -I te atK'.id tm
fun. ml servlees ?t tko boneo ob W.dn?diy rn'rain;,
Xotombei SMB. si lu o', lock.
inters cnt prlvste.
Kindly ..inn llow-r-.
i.i.iii>. vi i-i--i.lv. Kevessbei tttt, ISBS, Uhsriss E., mm
of tim late I nari.'* unit l.ll.u .*. I...ni.
Kuli' ra. fill'.- ??ill '??' beld al the chapel of tho Eui
\.r itv Kia- Pfesbytertsn Chsreb, Wesnesdsy, (fovea.
l.r 8MB, ai 10 o".'lo-rk. Entiainrc to <rha|*.-l i.* on
loth-*!
t ompnny K. seventh ll.-.liiie'it. N. ii. S. B. Y., New
Ya.rs N'oMii.l.er 'JO, lt*1.'-. I'll"' Irainlier* nt lill- ii*m|*_Iiy
.1, le lilted t., ntl. nd lbs fun.im services of jiu- late
.nts.r. Charis* E. Lord, H IBs cospel ot the University
risc l*r.---l>> lorim. thur, n, on \\? lin-.lay. November _JUi,
at ly o'clock; eurai..-'' (o i Impel la on Tenth-*'..
Kl ..ENE 1. KlllKI.AMl, t apl-ln.
PIERKOS?Os Monda- ?fleraOOB, Nov.u.n.r .'Trh. lian.
nail A., "lie Ol JUl:>-ri i'h rroii, In tue UJUl year of
h. r av
I-, i.-.m. Wednesday, November 1Kb, ?t 2 i>. m., from tho
residence et ber soo, ttl. Herron, im unrrae-axc,
itr eelya,
KKQl A -Elijah Les, suddenly, of pMB-SSS-Bt oa Monday,
Kui'.'ral" |;ri*"-?*'", from lil* Isle KdMSBSe, No. 0.. Wet
i ,ii. *'.i.aii-*t., on -/teaeeday, at ur-o e. __?
.mi-, levers.
HACKETT-OS Moii.lav. BOtOOBOt SIW, M RjB, N. Y.,
I > i llnanl William, SOB of -ulan la. mid lin lalo Allaru
T e-uurell Hackett, h. i.m -Tin yest M t.i" m..'.
Kmnr il -.rM..-.* ul Oirl.it Cliur.-ii. H'C, on Woilin>.*dar.
.\..\.'iiil:i r -".uh, at IJ .io oil"-.-, on sirliut ol thc
II :i>_ irani tren .\e?-Voi-K.
sriiiiiA (rn sniidav. Heves-bei 1Kb, i?--t. ??*? f-au
lonni--. Csl., Aiinrrii; M. Merita, of .V'*-Yo._.
Sottce of iiin.-r.il boresllsi
.smith On Nov. .nth. Oe||rs-e Bstdsrls, bMib et
iteben WorUilnstoti smith, II. li., ot BBB-SB, t'oim.. lu
th.- Milli resi ..t lu r U.e. . .. - .
Relstlves iud rn.ni- sra Isvtted lo attentl th? fnn.-r.ii
?ervlcea ar the resldesee ol h.-r ??oii*in.lu?, iiolxrt i.
(teer Ko. H lt. m.-.:i-*t., Dreoklyfl. al 3:30 jt, in, wi
Krit.iv. Dec. 1*1. _ . ,
Intel".I at sh iron, Corin., at IS'.ll P- ".- on BSPSSSy.
SMITH ->n .Uomliv, No*.-inlier ITIk, .if-ei' a Uno-rliiR
un,-* AiiiiMi.n Smith, in tu- "Mn teat nt hi* a*.-.
KoUUvm and Ui.-nl*. are Invited lo attend th- fun.'Ml ?..-r
ii.-... ul tim residence of hi*, dsughter. Mr*. Uamlllort
li. Ki rr, N... -- w.-*t .vitii-t., os Wtietetnt, No\tmb r
?.Mi th at 10 ri' 0'i-lo.k a. tn.
Kiiniiv omit rtowi i*.
Intel mon t a". Nru-lla\'ii. Conn.
Kew-Usren imikt* pHese c..|.y.
WARRINER Hied NovenitM'i' HIS. at tin* ;.? Wont of
ber elster. Mi*. Hi*or_e Brown, l'itt-ll"ld. Ma*-*., Hirrlet,
Jarvl*.. ames of th.- late snlomuu Warriner.
Nee-Yeeft peseta plea*.' taft,
\VII.(i X-D:i Momiav, Noiriiilior- _7Ui. USB, of nea*
unui.. it hi* r-*d'Ui". _.)* W'-.liiiikeon-.i.-.. Ilroo-lyu,
N. V., r* .-pa.-a Wilcox, seed -Ixty-tano yeer..
|.-iineMl sorvl.c. ai the Clus-on Avenue l>.*.l*yterlin
Chu ah. ria**....ni., rorn.'i- M. in*oe-t.. lirookl.in. WSSBeS.
t. ni.
du. Novembrr -jit.i, at 2 u.
Iniiriiieiii irt Wcstsily. R. I.
V.vrK.s-,\t X.'ivark. X. .1.. ?n NovnrnN-r _lt'.i, IS.l.t.
Hesry ?/. Wit"*, in hi- "u'l year.
Kiiini il srrvict- at hi- home. N,.. .'i l'ar:< i'la.-,*. Seers k
im Wedaes-sy, November BWb, *t - rs_KB B, m.
iiuntiiu;t:in fl., i.i pspsn stake) copy.
Appeal
THK HOSPITAL SATUltDAf
AND
SUNDAY ASSOCIATION
OE
NKW-YOItK
HBO, H. HAKKK
JOHN H. iii OattiQ
RICHARD M. i.,.imiv
A. H. AOMKW, '
J.M'dll H. Si'HIKE
asollac o. WritskuocK
N.w-Yoik. November X im. Uxniuiv** Coiiimittoe.
Special Notices.
TUanksgtvlns- Appeal
UK TUE
I-IVE POINTS HOUSE OP INDUSTRY,
IU WOKTIl-ST.,
ror Kunda to enable tt te I'rovldo for lu Large family
of Uonieli-M Children.
itt no Collector ls employed our -ont.!bater, ere ssl
celled cn i* ..anally, aird tel. moibod la adopte*
so sa to cau.c Ute lonat, anuoyaaee.
THE MOST ->_-_'irrcTE
risaa of children lu tbs city ia under tte roof, and tl
ia. cued lot more Utan 'io.QOO Ululates ellice Ita orgaal_e
Uon.
IT IS A MOUE,
ind a family of about 400 sre living In tbe bondings,
.hey sre clothed. lcd and tauuht lu tee ordlnery acboet
inn.he- and aUo trained in beuacbolU work. typcactUne
md csriieiitering.
A CHARITY DAT SCHOOL,
'or any children la thc vicinity, ls maintained, sad all
-?ho aro loo poor te be supported st home csa nave toot
tat clothing here snd attend this school.
AN IN KI KM A HY,
arith s di. irepsary attached, ptovid.a medical cere tor Aha
tick of the In-tltution. and oilers medicine and medlcsl
ittendanoe te tho poor of the Five Pointe.
MOUE URGENT THAN EVER
in* thu calls for a*?l*taii>e, and the Iuatitutlon sprests
very i-arnostly for fund*, to enable lt te meet the emse>
tcui-y of the present herd tlu.es for tb. poor.
A I.A Uti I'H N I'M HEH THAN EVER
ire In tho InsrltuUon st thc present time, snd for their
-up.ort tho House ls pertly dependent upon voluntary
?ontrlbutlons.
ITS WORK FOR THE YEAR.
Mouin Bl\en. 431,010
i'ost ]ht meal.S 1-10 cte.
Avi-ni-e attendance in school. SOS
Whole number in school since orfanliatlon. .4,8*1
Ther*. are now over 400 children osch dsy st the
.inn.t-niI'I.'. The puhiii' sro st all times welcome IB
lilH and Inspect the house.
AT 1 O'CLOCK, THANKSGIVING DINNER
KOR HOUSE CHILDRES.
AT 2 O'CLOCK, THANKSGIVING_.. _1 . _ mMm
DINNER KOR OUTSIDE POOR.
An effecting sight. Como sad ace. Last year about 1.S0S
Diesis VttltD given.
INTERESTING SERVICES
will be held in thc chapel st 2 O'CLOCK. The chl__m
will sing, recite, perform csll-ithenlu exoreisea, eta.
Public cordially Invited.
The safest mode of remittance, ls bv check te the order
of nuoa N. camp, TresMSse, IH worth-st.
TRUSTEES:
Morris K. /SSOr. President;_
HUGH K. CAMI*, Treasorer. ?BO. t. BETTS, Serf.
GEORGE H. MORGAN, I CH A KEES LANIEB
DAVID 8. EGLESTON, OLIVER HARRIMAN,
WALTER ll. LEWIS. I HENRY E. HAWLEY.
WM. T. DA RN* A RD, Superintendent.
?
A.-Hy The Fifth Avenue Aacttoa Koona,
SSS Klftii-sve.
Wm. B. Norman, Auctioneer.
NOW ON l-XHIBITIO^N
From 0 A. M. te 0 sud S to 10 P. M-t '
A NOTA OLE SALE OP
ETCHINGS AND PAINTING8
IN OIL AND WATER COLOR,
The Property of
MK. H. DILLON RIPLEY,
and by order of TUE EXECUTOR ot tho late OeS-H
McLaughlin, Esq., of Cincinnati, Ohio.
Tho etchings, which are rare and of the finest state.
Include g-Ba*at-l br BnStBSejsat, Chauvel. Waltner,
Knstke, Il?l?", I*s ('ouuux. Rajou. Macbeth, Mi-ls-oniee,
Benser. Rare proof* bv il.-ml undi, Durvr. Edclliicli.
.sharp. Jaclin... Whistler. Meryon, Cou-du*, Koriuaf,
Klanieng, Itejon. Notably:
The Calais l'ler, hy Seymour Haden.
Ia lUxe, by Brurqu.morit, after Melssonler.
Ihe St. Hubert, by Albert Dnrer.
Tho ixiliitlnis and water-colors ore bc II. Boltoa
Jone*. II. P. Smith, Thos. Moron, T. Hovondca. Arthur
Qinrtier, winslow Homer, Kdwsrd Sar- A. T. Tal*.
Jules werBBS, R. Geekle, A. W. Kowalski, Cir! Hubner.
Jos. ('?>..nuns, E. Minder, C. Troyon Ct sketches). E. A.
Pbit-hart. A. Wyegsrdt, Mdswsr Kni-thi, J. Wolla
Ch-in-pner. De Pet nc. J. Ald-'n Weir, W. T. RI. h?*ds,
H. W. Ranger ond others.
THE SALES WILL BE AS FOLLOWS:
THE KTOHINQS AND WATERCOLORS,
Fr.day and Saturday Afternoon*,
December 1st and 2d, at '2 o'clock*
THE PAINTINGS,
Vrldaj* Evening, December 1st,
ii*, 8 o'clock.
Established 1878.
MRS. McKLRATU'S HOME-MADE PRESERVES
DHAN HIES. CANNED AND SPICED TAVOttB AND
pure nr.n currant jelly a specialty.
Ex cry thing put up in t-l-.s iud lc pt until fall, tat
pr:..*, refer.'... e?. fte., oddr-s* Mr*. SARAH 8. Me*
ELKATI1. 3U3 Dcsraxx-st.. Hrooklyn. N. Y.
The linrdner Pla* Needle Embrocation.
This is the l>(?a Liniment MM to thc pu bi lc for lth.-u
ni.tlsm iio.it. Lumbago, 1*<inf.il and Swollen Joints sui
Mus- ular Pains. Park ft Tilford, Asenta._
Koroite.
Will M. O'D. D.. who hit Man-hp-ove. London. July
IB m IB, writ.* *Me-j," Thaycr-st., or Highbury 1 Hwa
.nnicthlnir he xxiii he pleased to knox*-._
lt -vo.il.1 not be iiosalble _*._.__
"to roncelxc ri moro .l.-li_rh?rul pe-ctnii-' tean Crab Appia
niii*s"ins." -.iv.i Th? Next-York Ob-erxa-r____^
Postofflce Notice.
Forel-m mnlls for the week ending lire. 2 will close
(proiapily In all cases) at this office _s follows:
WEDN BSD A Y?At u m. m. tor Kurope, per s. s. (.er
manic, via Queenstown (letter* must he directed "per
? l.imanic'i: al 6 a. m. for Kurope i**r s. s. I'arls. via
Southampton; at 8 a. m. for Belgium direct, per a. e.
Rh. nun., via Antwerp (letters must ti. MeeMM per
RhynUad"); nt IO a. m. (supplementary ll a. m.I for
? Vntral America (except Costa Richi nnd _*>uth 1 acme
perts, per s. s. City of Kara, xi.-i CbiOB (letters for Oaute
mi'ls must be direct-d "per I'lty of Kara"); at 1 p. m.
far t'eliz... per *. *. H. A. Il-irtmaiiu (letter, mu-t
be dii.vt.-d "per H. A. Ilartnia.n"i: at 1 p. m.
for Cuba. p*r s. s. I'aratoka. via Havana; at 2 p. m. fJS
Li Plats .-..tintri.-s direct, per s. s. Kima; al '.'I i> m. tor
Tu-i-to Cort.'*!, jtar n. *. WtaAttOt, from New-Orleans.
THirSSDAY?Al 7 a. m. f?r .Santiago, per s. a. Mexice
(lelivra for Venezuela an.l Savanllla. etc.. must \m <ll
r-cted "per Mexico"!; at Hr.TO a. m. f<?* Italy and DrltUB
India per s. ?. Columbia, via Naples; at U a. m. for
Netherlands direct, per s. s. IH.tam, via Rotterdam (lat?
ter- must be directed "per Dldam"I.
Kill DAV?Al 8 a. m. for Brazil and I.a Plata ( ountrlee,
per s s Elebnltz. via I'ern_mi>u.-o, llahla. Rio Janelre
and Santos tlcltor* for Para and Cearm must be direct*-!
"per Llebnltz'); ut 1 p. m. is ipplemcntary 1:30 p. ru.)
far Nassau. M. P-. per ?. a. Antllla.
SATL'RUAY-At tl:'J*> *? ta. tor Germany, per a. a.
?"aale via llremen il?tteis for oiher pana of Kurops,
via Southampton and Bremen, must be directed "per
S.iale"); al <:3o a. m. .supplementary l*:30 a. m.) for
Kr.ir.;*.*. Switzerland. Italy. Spr'-in. Portufal, ?" -'-?'
and Dritlsh Ind la. per a. s. La tlretagne
at U:30 u. m. (supplementary ll rjii a. m.,
M( * s.. I'liibrin. via yuecnstuvn; at 10 u. m. for Si?
Kilts an.l Hemerara. par s. s. Tjomo; at IO a. m. for Nor?
way direct, per s. s. Trim_'. mia (letters must ba di?
rected "per ThliiKvalla"); at IO a. m. .supplem.--.tary
lo mi a. in i for I-'.rt urie Island and Jamaica, per c. a.
Ailsa (letter* for .acme! and ABX-Osjrss must be dir.-, ted
"l>?r Ailsa"); at ll a. ni. for r.inipeche. Chiapas. Tat-aa
co, nnd Yucatan, per s. a. Seneca 'letters for other
Mextean Btatea nn.i Cabs mu.u ba dteaoted "per sen*
ca'i; at ll a. m. for Ha.xtl. eumana and Cartipano,
p.-r *. *. Prlaa Willem ill. (lettera f..r <>iii*-r Venezuelan
Ports, Curacoa. Tilnl.'ad. llrltish and Dutch <'.alana must
he direeted "per Prlne mileni HI."): at ll a. ra. for
Helcium direct, per s. r. ll.'U.-i.liii'.l. via .\nis-,-rn (lettera
mual l*e directed "per Uelnenland"): ut ll tx. m. for
Netherlands direct, per s. s. Maa- lam. via l'.>tioid.un
(l.-tteia mu.*t U- dlreeted "par Ma*sdam"?; at ll a. m.
for Scotland direct, per a. s. Kuili.-s-.la. via I'liagox*
(letters must I* directed ?per Kumeasla"); at 1 p. m.
for Netherlands direct, per a. s. Zaanuam. via Amster?
dam (letters must bo direct.*,! "per Zaamlam"); at *S
p. m. for Hluetlelds, per s. s. J. Wilson from New
Orlcan*.
Malls for China and Japan, i?-r s. s. Peru (from Saa
I'lani-lsci, close h-re dally up to Dec. SJ nt fop p. m.
Mulls for Aii*trall.i, New-Zealand, Hawaiian. FIJI and
Samoan Islands, per *. :.. Alaim-nda (from San Kranclaco)
ates* here daily up lo lice. *l) at 0;*) p. m. (or on ar?
ru il it New-York of s. s. Etruria with British malla for
Australis, stella for Itswslten i-hmd*. per s. a. Aua
tralla Ur m San Eranclsro), .-lose here daily up to Dec.
?1. at 6*_B p. m. Malls for the Society Islands, per
ship Tropic Hird (from San Kmnrlsco), close hero .lally
me to Dee. *'-'". at PM p. m. Mails for China, Japan.
Hawaii and Australia, via Vsncoiiver (apaeiallf addressed
only) close ai this offlee daily at Mr.lo p. m. Malls for
Newfoundland, by rail te Halifax, and thence hy steamer,
.-|. s* at this orTlce dilly nt s:_<) p. ni. Malla for
Mluuelon. by ral! to Hosu.n. and thence hy steamer,
Cte** at this oSke dilly at *x:-0 p. m. Malls for Culm,
hy r..ll to Tampa. Kia., r.nd thone- by steamer (sallins
Monday*.. Thursdays ond Siturdays). eloae ut thia omc-i
dally at 2:?'? a. m. Malls for Mexico, ..verl-ind unless
specially ruldressivl fir dispatch by steamer, cloae at thia
olllce daily nt 3 ;i m.
CHARLES ST. DAYTON. Poatmaater.
1:30 a. m.). for
rtufal. Tu?<?y
ne, via ll?"W;
a.) for Kur?i\
adiqioas Notices.
CHCRCH OK THF. DIVINK I'ATERNITY, Sth-ave and
toth-si.. Rex. CHARLES H. EATON. D D. Paaior^
Sarvtoee on Thankwtvinsr Dav at lOrn-l. The 1'a.tor wffl
lll.NRY VARLEY. THE FA MOPS EVANGELIST
of'pondon, la conductlns Gospel meetlnes at the Goa~l
Tsberna. ?-. Si h-nx-e. an.l 44lh-.t.. nn XV* m. .da" Tl S?-!
day und . rlday afternoons at A, and cvenlnara at, ? S^SSSs
JAA?lBO* AVBMVB BAPTIST CRUMB, corner ol
*rS^: f"1*" 8 a. 2 AVI..Xr-w,e!_om; t
^erTh^.^^^^'^-^^^^^*^^
*^?^^^^*?i
_ THANKSCIVINC. HFRVli'N
CHURCH Ot TOE ilotx TRL-flTT
_ Mudlron-ave. and im._i '
T-UNKKIITIIKI hERVICE
?i^^AlTOJ2r^^ Si POAtAtaefRMWAm
h Or. BILTON MERYr_S_.J-t|l L0*"? ??^-J^e'Bief
Prastwterian Chur3_; 8M-TH. Puter ol Um Ceatsd

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