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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 04, 1896, Image 5

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VA^T CROWDS CHEER.
MASSED ABOUT BULLETINS
A SEA OF HUMAN FACES IN FROXT OF
< THE TRIBUNE BUILDING.
THE THRONG ESTIMATED AT 190,000.
psOGH TREMENDOUS ENTHUSIASM NEVER KNOWN
- MIGHTY OUTBURSTS OF PATRIOTISM AS
,11 ?5 GOOD NEWS IS FLASHED FROM THE
HOARDS?YELLING FRANTICALLY
LONG AFTER MIDNIGHT.
rhe demonstrations that attended the an?
nouncement of McKinley's overwhelming victory
in the city last night were simply volcanic. In
the number of the multitudes that gathered and
stood packed together for hour after hour in the
palpitating eagerness with which they strained
their eyes toward the various bulletin boards, in
the enthusiasm with which they received the em?
blazoned records of the triumphant fight for
National honor, last night's assembly exceeded
anything ever known In this city, and it is
doubtful if this country' bas ever seen its like be?
fore.
Never before has New-York been so anxious
to get every piece of news regarding the prog?
ress of the great National fight. Never before
have such crowds assembled at every point
where the news was to be had. Never before
have such shouts gene up at the sight of the re?
turns from pivotal States. There were no such
scenes even at General Grant's re-election as
last night in New-York. The close of the neck
and nwrh campaign that Hayes won did not
produce such enthusiasm. The election of Gar
field and Cleveland and Harrison saw no such
tremendous outbursts.
rjATHERED AT EVERY POINT.
At every point in the city where the returns
were displayed dense crowds assembled long be.
fore night fell, and midnight found them still ?
there, wearied from long standing and the ex?
citement under which they labored, almost
speechless from shouting, but still earnest a tul
eager ard determined. A the Circle, at Klghth
ave. and Fifty-ninth-st., at Herald square, at
Greeley Square, and at Madison Square reports
were announced by the stereoptlOon, and hu?
manity stood packed together for .hours to see
them. But it was in Newspaper Row and City
Hall Park that the most remarkable scenes oc?
curred. The crowd began to gather soon after
noon, and increased in numbers steadily. Every
newspaper in the row had Its special bulletin fa?
cilities, and when darkness came the crowds
pressed more closely and waited for the first
news. City Hall I'nrk was a mass of humanity.
The block extended away over to Broadway on
both sides of the City Hall, through Mail-st. and
well into Centre-st it overran tbe sidewalks until
they were obliterated. The sight from the vin
dov.'s of the Tribune Building was tremendous
There lay the sea of human faces upturned to
the walls of the building. It did not move. It
could not if it would, and would not if it could.
But when at times the lights Hashed out the
story of another gain for McKinley, the great sea
heaved mightily where it lay. an! the sound that
rose to the sky was like the sound of many
waters.
CHAPTKRS IN THE TALK OF VICTORY.
Almost every second the electric octopus
flas.ied along Its myriad arms Into view of the
thousands a new chapter in the tale of victory.
Hcur after hour the throng stood in Its ira? ?<s.
Hour after hour the mighty roar rose above the
dt" and floated skyward. From the windows,
far above, the multitude looked like a vast sea of
black, dotted with Innumerable points of white,
looking steadily up. Almost every second there
glimmered faintly the light of a match as some
one lit a cigar. The effe<t was that of in?
numerable will-o'-the-wisps darting swiftly
hither and thither over the throng.
Early in the evening, before any definite re?
turns came in. the crowd contented itself with
watching cartoons thrown on the screens by
the stereopticons. These ?ere varied w ?th pict?
ures of the Presidential candidate-; and well?
known public men. Both the candidate? bad
their supporters, and they mad* plenty of noise
for their favorites. Then the returns from
New-Y-.rk City began to be shown, and the
real enthusiasm began to make Itself known.
Before long It became evident that the City bad
gone for McKinley, and every fresh bulletin
was hailed with renewed acclaim. S on after?
ward the New-England States began to send
in their majorities for McKin'.ey. Oh? after the
other, Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut,
Rhode Island, Vermont and New-Hampshire
Joined the virtorlous procession. But this had
been SSpeCted, So the crowd held ilself in check
and waited for news from the pivotal States
In the Middle West. Early returns from Illi?
nois and Michigan were favorable, though in?
complete, but the multitude was dumfounded
when the telegraph brought the news of Mc?
Kinley's vote in the South. The news from
Kentucky and from Tennessee simply paralysed
the throng with delight, and then they began
to roar in earnest. Wave afler wave of shouts
swept up a* county after county in the South
reported for sound money.
When Bryan's own State and his own district
recorded their votes for his opponent, the en?
thusiasm o* the crowd lost nil bounds A? the
return;; from the South and from the pivotal
States regan to come In more rapidly and
'bowed In every instance McKinley gain-;,
especially in quarters that had been almost
universally conceded to Bryan, it was avalent
that there had been a Republican landslide.
THE FIILST TO TELL THE PJTORT.
The Tribune was the first paper to tell the
waiting thousands that McKinley's election
was assured, announcing at fc:4.1 that he was
sure of 200 electoral ?/otea, with 224 required
for a choice. The crowd was dazed for an In?
stant, not expecting assurance so soon. As
the waiting thousands realized that the result
of the great fight was no longer in the smallest
doubt, such a cheer went up a? had not yet
Isen. A free-silver band near by struck up In
ha vain attempt to drown the sound. It might
I well have competed with the roar of
-iagara. Over City Hall Park swept the sound,
iaken up by thousands who could not see tbe
bulletin and did not know what the shouting
was for, but who were swept off their feet by
the contagion of the roar. Soon afterward
other papers confirmed The Tribune's an?
nouncement that Rijan WSJ positively defeat?
ed, and the great shout was renewed. Il was
a mighty outburst of patriotism, such a? New
York never saw before, but which might have
been expected after that other patriotic demon?
stration of last Saturday.
Although there was no dqubt of McKinley's
election after 1? o'clock, the crowd did not di?
minish, but wuited for details of the fight in all
the States. It was not until long after midnight
that there was any appreciable diminution in the
site of the vast throng. It knew that sound
money was safe and that repudiation had been
repudiated, and that Bryan had been buried
under an avalanche of ballots, but It wanted to
know how the great battle had been fought, and
It waited until It knew and until there was no
more to be known. And all that time, up and
around the tops of the Uli buildings and away
up toward the stars, there rose such a roar and
?tien a din of human voices and the blast of horns
that the wonder grew how anybody could shout
?ay more.
A OOOD-NATURED OATHERINO.
With all Its enthusiasm the Immense record
breaking crowd was a most cheerful and g
natured assembly. It trod upen its own feet
elbowed itself in its own ribs without losini
Own temper in the least. I? was too inten
other things, and though there were many Bl
men in the number they took their defeat In i
part and no personal collisions were reported
Chief Conlin and Acting Inspector Brooks \
busy all evening looking after police arra
menta for the night. At s o'clock word wai
eelved that there were such crowds watching
bulletin boards in Park Bow that the p,
were unable to cope with them. Acting Inspe
Rrooks at once sent a sergeant and twenty
policemen who were in reserve at Headfjuarl
to give assistance.
The Tribune's bulletins not only conveyed
first infirm?t Ion of McKinley's election,
nearly all the nr>re Important announccnx
came first from the same source, and were
quentrjr copied (.n adjoining screens. From
roof of The Tribune Building the results vv
announced at the sanie time by means of
flre code published In yesterday's Tribune,
the daytime a nujaber of kites were ?own fi
the roof of the building. The kites were ma
factured especially for the use of The Triln
and In their construction the skill and exp
enee of William A. Eddy, ?if Hayonne. X.
were employed. In the afternoon nine of
kites were flown at one time and from one 1
When all were well In the air. a big Ameri>
flag was sent up the ||ne until it waved
above the tops of the loftiest buildings. The I
waa 15x^1 feet, and such a large apoetaSfl
the Stars and Stripes was never before lifted
far above the level of the earth.
Just at nightfall the wind failed, so that
kites hud to be taken in. This somewhat
paired the success of the signals by which "]
Tribune intended to flash the news of MoK
ley's election to a distance of at least thi
miles around the adjoining country. But
spite of this tad the signals were a nuce
They were lifted upon halliards strung on
roof of The Tribune Building;, and were vlst
and reeofcniz(>d for a long distance east I
west, telling the story of McKinley's tiiun
before it was elsewhere announced. The kl
will again be Mown from The Tribune Buildt
to-day. and the flag will once more wave fr
its unprecedentedly lofty altitude, tend this tl
It will be the sign of victory assured, and i
prospective.
A POWERFUL BEARCHLIOHT
During all yesterday evening a power
searchlight, placed on the roof of The Tribu
Building, flashed its powerful eye over the H
piercing the darkness with shafts of brillin
light and making places where It rested ns lip
as day.
The searchlight was one of the rr.oet pOWi
fui type ever built, and known as the "Bus
more Naval Projector." having been built
th? Kushniore Dynamo Works of Jersey Cll
Although not of the larges; sute mail.- at t
works, us power was estimated at 40,(sj0,fl
candles, and its design was similar to that
tin- (<rc.?t Rushmore projector at the Slegi
Cooper Building.
Until recently searchlights have been comp
cated and cosily, and used only in the Na*
The lenses were imported from Prance ai su
enormous cost that only the Government cou
afford to pay for them. Realizing the imp,
tance of low prices, s M Rushm ?!??. manag
of the works, investigated the matter, and. n
ter years of study and experiment, succeedi
in producing the special glass castings require
and perfected a machine for grinding the lenst
which brought the cost to s fraction of th
Involved in the old method. H" also perfect?
a lamp mechanism, which, while contain!)
fewer parts than the common Street lamp, w
feed the heavy carbons as they are coneumi
without the ?east variation, it win in tere
Americans to know that the Kushmore worl
have driven foreign competitors from ti
American niarkit. and are no? selling the
apparatus in Europe and all over the worl
This company gave S splendid exhibition la
night of their high-power, projectors from tl
roof of their seven-story factory opposite < "ot
landt-st.. In Jersey City. In extent at
grandeur this display 1? said to surpass air
thing ever attempted with flreworka. It Wi
visible from all parts of NeW-Tork and Brool
lyn.
6
OH! BUT THE WOE WlBTHICl
HOW THE NEWS STRUCK ST. JOHN*
HEADQUARTERS.
AT FIR37 "JIMMY' OUVXB TBTBTJ TO ?toy 1
THE BOra, BUT AT I.AST 'lAVF.
t'P IN DESPAIR
A few of the faithful- wild-eyed, but hopeful
gathered last evei ing la the Popo ratle headqu?.
t.r? at the Jjarthold! Hot/I. end listen.,] to tl
inspired utterance^ of "QokHMl Jimmy" '?live
who r.ad aloud tie- messages si tit oui over til
long-distance telephone A pall of deepest Mac
hung over the establishment from the recelpi i
the earMest of the messages of fate, but it <ii<:n
shake "c?ionei" oiiv.rs beautiful faith in Bryai
To nu inquiring free-silver man be eouehsafed th
Informa Wop about 7 o'clock that '11 look* 66 ihoug
New-Torn City had srenl ! M fur McKinley an
the Slate IkOW, but that (i"n't worry tie- "
"Von see, these first district! are heai from sr
the intelligent districts the quick figurera." aal
a stout man in a light overcoat 'The alow oi
trlcts win b? nil right." Thi? Insinuation ths
Bryan's strength eras in the strongholds of stu
pldlty met a sullen reception from the f;tlthfu?
and the itout man repented It several times, un
der the impression that his point wns nol under
stood.
Terrific majorities from Brooklyn. Long Islam
?r.d up tic State continued lo hll the ilred-looklni
little gathering, and the aepulchral silence wa
broken only by the hound "f the Sb'Klnley fire
works, home and i beere that Seated in from Mad
li-on Square.
"We won't get no favorable news till the ?noun
tain district? are heard from," said the undl
couraieed Oliver, and his sudltora leaned up .-?K.ilns
the wails for support, and v.aiied a feu favor
able indications from Indiana and a lirym tic
Jc.rity U> ? fei? wards In Troy caused a foible cheer
which faded away under the disheartening report:
from Chicago and Kentucky.
.Mr. St John appeared and addre?scd the rnultl
tude on ihe Inborn wickedness of the newspapers
displayed in claiming State? for McKinley beton
the polls were closed. Half a dosea reporta fr.irr
Bryan election districts in New-York senl dlreei t,
the headquai tara by faithful workers Un d i ne Popo
cratlc hearl for a moment, but the new? frmr
Michigan extinguished wen the fitful gleam ol
hope
"My ilionghts are all west of tic Mil lourl, sal.
the poetic Oliver. "Thi6 Is nothliiK but frota We'r.
get tine. Wall for the heer."
"Tola iM-.'t beer; it's I '--water you're giving u?
Jimmy," seid e despairing ?liver man, snd ?h
ghsetly laugh wenl round.
Then wns only one happy men in Ihe place ami
h'- bavins ? quarl of champagne In him, Inn
about with the nft-repeuted prediction that ' i:r> ?r
'11 win, hands down."
As the awful truth began tO dawn, even on thi
free-silver mind, thai overwhelming defesl *a
th'ir portion, the few remaining listeners t'
"Colonel" Oliver's announcements descended t<
the "I told you so" mood, find went forth le dark
ne;-- snd despair.
At 9:31 ovirck Mr. St. .lobe refused to give ui
{few-York. State to the Republicans, and insisted
that only one-sided statements bad been given ou'
"I asj certain." be said, "thai we will all be drint.
in': Prvan's health in our coffee to-morrow morn
In*. I inn ?ure that Bryan will carry lllini M.
ANIMATED SCBNBS AMONO CLUBMatN.
MaUtBBBa THBONO TUB BOOHJ AT Till* t'XION
LBAOUB ANI> itKl't iti.p-.vN ci/III HOVSBt
The Cnlon League Club house WS! the centre of 6
brilliant scene last night. The elaborate and ornate
decorations of Saturday remained on the K!fth-a>'e.
frort Of the Niiiding. A band offend, p.itiiotlc airs
In continuous profusion. There was a larg* crowd
i of the curious-minded In the avenue. ln?;de th*
clubhouse the room? were thronged with enthusiastic
members whi watched the bulletin board and psSBffl
the ,'ood tiding? along. Th? inlon LsegUo Club'e
headquarten have not presented a more animated
scene In the history of the present clubhouse. The
member? remained until a l-il?* hour.
Nearly across :he wsy the members of tit? !''?
publican Club filled the rooms of the headquarters,
while the Vim Kegnnent Hand made merry muM<'
from a siand erected In front of the bulldlnr A
large numlxi of the members belong al.-o to the union
League club, and the?* divided ihMr ?tte?it:,ai be?
tween ihe two places. Confidence ir? McKinleys
election took possession of the membeis of both
clubs earlv In the evening, and ?oon settled into a
?mailed conviction that honest and found money
and protection had won ih* day In g.orloii? man?
ner. The news from this city w*s particularly gratl
The Sound Money Democrats at the Manhattan
C.uh seemed ?ven mors {Spans than the honest
money advocate.? at the I'nion League and ?he Ko
publican clubs. The basement of the Stewart man
sion was crowded with Democrat? who are? |Ub
over the returns.
-a--?
./ 0 Y A T HE A DQI \\ RTL: US.
MANAGERS OF THE REPUBLICAN CAM?
PAIGN RECEIVING THE GOOD HEWS,
they WATCH THK RSJTTJRira EAUmtL* ASP SCND
IMPORTANT DETAILS TO CANTON-TKl.K
BRAMfl OF roNORATfbATION TO
MAJOR M KINl.KY
Trie besdqnsrtsr? of the Bxeentlv? committee
of the Rspabltesn National Committee WSJ in a
turmoil I'ist nicht. Kor two weeks the campaign
in the Bast had dragged along In a Useless man?
ner, but last nigh) tlM epatby vanish?.1. and the
white building ai Msdlson?ava aad Tweatr-thlnt?
st. was ablaze with light and restless with activity.
Early in the evening the essspalga asaasgeri ar?
rived, and later in the evening prominent Republt?
enns dropped In to hear the news, and went away
with smiling fsees or stayed to bear later returns.
The whole headquarters was in a fever of excite?
ment The headquarters was - connected with
?'hiratro, Canton and F'.itrrson by lonp-distnnee
telephone, and so the managers were in communi?
cation With both candidat?s. as well as the mana?
gers on the Western battle-ground.
Om of the first to arrive at hasdquaitsr? was
Oenersl William McKinley Osborne, secretary of
the Bxeeattve Oeninrittee. Veteran campwtgner
thai he i?. he was in a whirl of sitHen??nt. and
fairly hopped about ns the rettrtns b.rgag to .ome
In. As the little white sJlpa rolled in steadily
and each one brought more cheering tidings, he
became le?s restive, imd a smile of -.-rene content
ment overspread his f.-uc.
W.-UT1N'; Knit THK RETURNS
Mr, Manley, Mr. neott, Mr Clsyten, Mr. Bliss,
Colonel Bwordi and others gathered In Oeneral
Osborne's room early la the eventngSnd waited for
the returns, Every time s bulletin was posted
J"s'i,h H Manley, cigar In mouth, would critically
?urvey it and then r,-f. r to a little card he had in
his hand. After mature deliberation he said with a
chuckle: "I have been i political prophet for a
good many years, but I have never Ml nearer the
mark thin i have this trip ??
Among those wll > dropped In In the coure nf the
?venina, were Msyor stronc. c. c. Bhayne. com? p.
Huntington, Henry w. cannon, J. Pterpon* Mnr
gsn, Bamuel Psssenden, ?'aptain Jack Crawford,
Mural Hslstesd, lams? <; Blslne, J Edward Bint
mons, Qeerge Bliss, Andrew Carnegie, Charles
Btswsrt Smith. I? Ogden Mills, Oeneral T. H. Hub
bard, <;?-n. rsl Anson O. McCook, Richard T. Wilson.
Mrs. M. a. Hsnns, Bdwsrd Lautsrbacb, Mrs
Lauterbach, Frederick B. Olbbs, Mrs Frederick
D Grant, Clarence w. Meads, Whltelaw ft- M and
Oeaeral w. s. c. Wiley.
CONGRATULATIONS TO MAJOR MMM.KV
A? the niKh? wore on. and It became more and
more evident that McKlnley'i e'.( lion was sssured
by an overwhelming majority, the tel. ?rams of
congratulation befan t-. t?> Ilka anowflakes. Bv? t?>?
one of those who have been attending to the cam?
paign In the 1..1-' sent telegrams of congratulatloi
to Major McKlnlej early In the evening
Mr S.otts tel.Kram lead. "For eight ?? ira I
have waited for the pleasure o( congratulating you
upot your election as President of the united
Btatea. I now have that pleaaun "
Mr Beott'i telegram to Mr llobart ?a*
and was addressed lo Mrs Hobari Itr? -i "Tslce
.1 ? of our next Vice President Hij e?iuntrj ne*da
him."
The return? from the South w.t- mo? satisfac?
tory to all Mr Beott, who has been In cl n ? ?? i
work ?t. ihi Bout hern section, ha been d?Vtni
man's servi and to bin belongi much of th?
credit f r driving home lb? eredge ?hi > opens th
wa\ for the disintegration of the " olid South."
Mr Manie? a i- ?ereni and calm III the evening
M Ine goes Rcpubll an ???- M.'??? plurality." r?
bulletin Mr Manley pk-ked it u| ? . said dryly
"That la about whit l predicted Noa l v
sv.'e emnhatl a!h ibst I am no rainbow chaser
Mr Manie) ant Oeneral Claytoi started to tuore
on the returns early in the evenlns It pi ???
a adding ?cale, and a sei f telegram?
i'.,. results ? i? ? ? ? ' ??? ? intot '11 ?? ni I gavi
Major McKinley 3S1 electoral \..?.?-. then It Jui
lo -?>.*. then "?>, and tin.ills w is fluttering around
.. ??
W ien '? w i- Anall) assured beyond the slightest
doubt t!. ?? M Kin le) w.i - eh . :? d, and l
question was t;..- plurality, Hie tension was relieved
The member? <.f the Exscutlvi Committee I I ?
psrt ?ok of a lui I the re? ?
t '.\. milk: w Ul ; - :.t In figuring (?n I hi ti
and in the Interchange of mtsgrafulattona
e
TA M MAN" SICK.
A DtM?STgt) I ROWD IM ISO ?ROUND Till". WIO
WAM WHAT S1IBKMA*? ?ay?
The ?treel In fr.-r,t of Tammany Hal' ? i? packed
aril ?? , . i.v rne finis lha ? t?t- pareacy :? u a.?
? iiv for business last night Th? Ms Bpstalrar hall
lillsd up slowly, for t.n? breves were packed Into -be
public ro.m downstairs, ?vr? they might ?.<? h
the movem<-rit? of Joba C Bheehsn, * le sal it *
? ? task In the rear room, ?nd read ??
one suit ,ii i another, most y dli iraglng and
thought deeply and I >oke?l p?,??ing serious Ttiere
aras no enth ? I reel u I sn i
-uiifn aliene? pervaded th- perspiring throng In tbe
Mg w.ir.t.i. room
Ta- ticker i-1-?n Ir? wite,.-;a'.nm?nt ?hortlv befan
: ? k. and a y ai c man hem over it. soil ?lto n t
,i g the tape; bul no comfort could be
from th? refrain it *** ?>..! singing Thai refrs n
M Klnley," and w.th every repetition o( the
. , . nab!) groaned Ai Isti sa ? o'< la k
John C Bheehsn declared thai Bryaa would csrry
Se? Tor? BtaU by M.*n auijorltj \; I o'clock he
, , :? |o ki i i II Iba Bu le and th? city would i-oh
go f..r McKinley. AI IM o'clock Becretarj John
McGoldrk-b Sppearad on the staRe In the main hill.
and w.i- greeted ?irllti wIM cries He told the i ? n
bly the.- th? Rep?blicas SMnagers were repeating
th? tactic of ISM, and were holding bach lb? Seturna
from tbe Wei I If Mr McKinley was elected Prest
d'-nt .if the L'nlti I Btsies w? arouM bsve the ne?
now," he sh ?ted, sod Tammany thought II bt i ? I
mm Then he continued: "if Kins? County gives ?
majority foi Bryan, dc-n't be afraid ol the Btate."
H:s liaunetn irted IheaT level besl to >??? i ?orne ?rom
fon Mil of this Aeubtfal sutement. Tien he ssked
theli patlen t for retsvns fr ?tn Kew fork, snd h
tired. Mesawbtta, downstaus. tn^ ticket was sin?
itiK a Rspubllcan .?.'nK. nnd tne managers waited in
vain f'u some i h h r that would encourage the ero? i
II WSS an SlnSOSI bOBSlesS task, for th- boys In ihe
gall? y did n->! want any perennial Information
At ? o'cloek the Tanunsn* rasnageti bsd grsd
uslly srltbdrawn from the public rl< a The crowd
groaned si I o'clock, when the young man si tbe
ticker read oui with cold-blooded exactness.
"Chicago Ml election districts gtva McKlnk?!
107,000; Bryan, 7';<"""
"That settles II. said an individual at the re?
porter's elbow, ni n deeply disgusted lone. Then
tin- ticker m.m K?t facetious, and rattled off tti.?*
McKinley had I29.OO0 In I.IM dtotrtetS In New
York; "lirvan BOtbing."
The meeting upstairs broke up si s? o clock, a?^
the crowd ?truck the street the news was thrown
on th.- smsll canva? to the effect that thirty dli
tn~t? outside the city gave Bryan .'..r'rn and M< -
Klnley i im Then n wild chesi went up; tmt the
knowing ones smiled grimly and were nol at all
surprised when "Oood night ' appeared on the can
vas ai !i M o'clOi h
Mr Bheehsn had the u-companylng statement
ready lor ein ni mon al IM ? O? K
??Tne Den.racy of *h<- clt) and county of New
York n:.'d' i brave striii?^i? nciinst iremendoul
r>ddo, The result was unexpected We had hon.?d
lhat tho plain people ol the city would respond to
im call, and itana by their champion, William J
Bryan, However, the battle Inaugurated thl?. y< <<
win b?i contlnuexl until the money of ih* Const H u
i m la re-established Like the crusses for the
abolition of slavery, our ktshl will ko on until gold
and silver are reatored to the plsce provided for In
the ' 'onatltutlon "
To o Tribune reporter tust before i ? ? o'clock be
said. "We ronce.!.? Ih- Stat- anil Ihe clt>. DUI WS
will save, we itdnk, n halt-dosen Congresemen."
lie could nit give an> Bgurea si he aaM the re?
turns were not complete enough in warrant It At
10 e "loci: there were nol KQ p-jopl* In and around
T in many Hall
e
O. F. HALL DISAPPEARS.
CASH ASBET? OF THE gTOCKMANS OOMMISMOM
mMl'AS'Y Os* CHICADO, OP WRICR III'
IS ('('NKII'I.NTIAI. M \N ARE
/t.?o MIBBIKd ?
Cbitiagn Nov. 3 c>. v. Hall, confidential man for
the Stockman* Commission Company, dolii* htisi
ness '?t lbs ste kysrda, baa dltsppesrsd, and tn?
oflk is of lha eon- rn assert thai the emir-- asset?
of ihe company, amounting lo $:.'l.iioO In caidi ??nd
nei itlabM sccsHtksS, nre not to be found. Ksirs
WberesbentS nre not positively known, but It I? Intl
matJd that a widow, who hVSS In n Western dty,
may know som? thing about him.
It Is said that some time ?ro he became acquaint?
ed with :h" woman and became enamored of her.
Bhe was in Chtcsgo s few days uko, and it M 're?
lieved Hal! hsa !-ft town with h.-r. Hall's dfcwp
peanuKe, presumably with the funds of the con?
cern, has for'-?I the Btockmsni Commission Com?
tiaiy to ren?e business. It has sent word to the
banks and Its patrons, that It will nol resume
11 ill was for years the trusted man for the Camp?
bell Commission Company, and when that concern
failed he became confidential man for the Stock
mans Commission Company. J. II. Campbell, the
president of tbe insolvent concern, nftm twenty
three years of active businaas life at the ?dock?
yards, ih now foni-d to look for a position among
nlr- old as.*o<'|at?-?..
BROOKLYN ALMOST SOLID.
THE WHOLE CONGRESS DELEGATION RE
ELECTED.
A PU RA LIT Y FOR M KINLEY OK OYBB .11.000?
"OUR TIM" AND FRANK S. BLACK HAVE
ABOUT 20.000 VOTES TO THE OOuP
GAINS FOR THE ASSEMHEY.
Brooklyn's verdict upon Bryan and all candidates
who had the courage to have their name.? placed
upon the ticket tinder hi? name was so emphatic that
the Popocrats' most ardent supporters were forced
to admit early last evening that they were the worst
Whipped lot of men that have asked for the approval
of the city's voters for a number of years. F.arly
in the day the straws began to blow all In one dlreo
tlon. and a? evening approached the confidence of the
Republicans Increased luO per cent. After the re?
turns hid come In from a half-dozen elect.on dis?
tricts the whole story was told, and the Popocrats,
whose official spokesman was Chairman York of
their Campaign Committee, "threw up the ?pong"."
The Republicans, on the other hand, ?rere every?
where in evidence, and their Jubilation over the
results in Brooklyn, as well us in the State and
country at large, knew no bounds. As the evening
advanced the glad tidings poured in from North.
South. Kast'.ind W'.st. and every spot In the city
where crowds congregated to get the returns be?
came scene? of wild Jubilation.
The eatlmste? given out by Chairman Hrenner
of the Republican Campaign Committee wer,
shown by the city's returns to be exceedingly con?
servative. The city's total vote was:
McKinley . ?o* S4i>
Bryan . 76,040
Palmer . a Tin
Every one of the Sve congress districts returned
its Republican Representatives In the lid Dis?
trict the candidacy of William C. RedSeld, the
National Democrat, who expected to run away
vith the scalpe of Denla w. Hurley and .lohn w.
Clancy, ?.roved to he Ineffectual. Mr. Hurley won
bv n safe margin, although the exact figures could
not be obtained last night
Of the twenty-one Assembly districts the Repub?
licans carried sixteen. McKinley ran ahead of
all the State and local candidates, but the State
nominees received ample majorities. The vote for
Governor was:
black .pi2 ?.lo
Porter. 81,62?
Oriffln . I SSI
The four R.-pulil! an candidates for the Supreme
c.iurt received substanttsl majorities, in short, the
only Republican* who did not win were the Assembly
candidate* In the strongest D?mocratie districts.
Many bfterestlng 1, - OUI er* shown by the detailed
reports from the wards and election districts Mayor
Wurster*! district the Fifth of th* Nineteenth
Wir.i gave * Republican gain over last yesr of 12s.
T,ie Fourteenth District of the First Ward, Where
Hugh M'l.aughiin lives, showed a Republican gain
Of Ml There were doSCO* "f districts in which Mc?
Kinley h.?,i aeven or eight votes to Bryan'a one
While the Republican districts, almost wltboui -x
n. ihOWed substantial Increases, there was a
ponding failing off of D?mocratie strengt!? in
the Democratic ?:rong;iold?. The entire vote pulled
was phenomenally large, being SI least M per cent
of the registration.
The detailed ?ota for the Presidential Electors fol?
lows:
ltcgl>
1808 MSB traten
M'KlnWy.Uryan.Pal'r Palmer. King 1606,
J 646
162
2,3K,
1 aas
1 130
2 ?m
? ?.??,
3.600
I 2??
I ????
; -m
1 ?..-,
? ??'.
1 .11
1? .
-
? 361
1 62*
4 ??
?, am
a l m
6 Ml
t. ;??
a ana
?. II?
.i ' r.
: 71?
1 ?66
1 me
1 ?is
126
l.tIT
1 i.?a
1 ?rj
l.jiai
2 163
4'?.2
J sc.s
;t :, > '
S.SIM
4.'?'l
I '.'.'1
1 .?'1
8.(131
2 -vi'
tarn
? ?
1 -11
3 ->l
1 ?T'.i
? ,?
4 ???'
1 lua
?? ?13
. -?*.
.1 ?.72
1.401
3
160
If
1. wa
1.681
7-1
-? 372
2 ????:
1 '..?,'.?
!<ti
'.II
"Irts
ISI
las
118
I 12
I'd
?SB
184
n.*
1
1.618
1 ills
1.673
1.480
J .nil
1.42?
:t 327
:t 4T'i
::.t'4'V
1 610
2 '-".'s
3,314
'.'."'.'7
3.072
J 2S7
2 4 Ml
4 IIS
i.aua
; 136
t.024
4.-V.
1.766
4.013
3.112
t ha
T.8ia
S 4> 1-.
>> u|:.
s IM)
1 187
2 ?'???"'
3 613
1.mu
1766
4 MS 4 n-14 11
r, 56*
4 >;s
6.061
?.iHill
10,4(7?
:t s a
?42
2 1 ', ?
3 1.17
I B?1
I 1 * i
7".t
33i ??
4 671
.1 472
a IS4
. 1 ?;
3 7J17
I ISO
1.761
I IV"
3.*
13 171
12 !??'??>
I.8SB
5 VN
u 4'i:t
6 42?
12.626
3 rae
:: ' 61
'.' m
1 1'.c.
-. - 1,.?. ?u. 7?'M'.i 8 71(1 7 7 -.77 ?t ????? ;-r :i''.
McK ? rallty, SI 861.
The vot.. un th. St.,!.- ticket Is given here in de
IHM
?:;. k Porter (?nffln
1 *X<
Palmer. Km?
2 74-,
: 763
. .
3.671
2 77 1
-' 1?
1 ?77
2 *71
I Ht*
?.lia
1 . ii
I 366
? 163
8 len
.'. SOD
., :?..
1. 860
2 7.1;
:. 364
1 ???. ?
7 a.%3
1 i?l2
i?86
1 te-1
1 Ml
?
I ??*(
3 IM
4 122
j ??,..
3 .vu
4 618
1 '.rit?
.1 2S|
2 ?It
a i*-,
.? ? ?',
2 ??'?.
? ? ....
1 .14
1?S33
4 621
I 17
2 ::"-i
1 .,?.,
2 323
,
2 367
? ?>;?:
1.331
1 c?.'
Ml
348
233
1 is
141
113
103
1 H?
2.".
211
a?
? ;c.i
Ill
2 7'1
133
s.r.iw
1 a?
2?l
1.601
line
7-1
I 111
S.?76
.' 372
I ?..?'.
1 :ni
MS
2 .,<!
1 |s7
3..VIS
2.763
4.:. IH
I nil
i ?61
. 1 83
7'M
:::tn
,57T|
Regl*
1 ration
I aoo
4 ?SB
1 706
1 013
8 112
8.760
7 ?12
? 108
6.016
?. ISO
1 111?
! 218
1.673
1 INI
2 3'.I
4 ?J?
3 327
3 47"
3 1?4H
? rtlli
3 31 ?
8 (172
2 IM
4.113
1 ?'. A :i KM
3 43'l 7 M3
2.('21 '? T2
?c.'i n.uns
:? 271
4 am
lo "T?
3 472
? mal
2 123
3 l.%4
2 326
8.721
12. HT?
t sas
B 4M
6,42s
12 !'?''
3".i'r
T 186
?4 4!?' 107.316
1.261
1 II.VO
3061
T lall 102.430 M.65S
niaek'? plural?! '-'" ""'-'
The latest returns on the State vote Indicated B
gain of tiv" Assemblymen for the Republican
ii'ket. tbe tigur.s indicating the election of the
following:
1 ?I II. w
2 ?Jolw m K
.t ?moma? H
?Murr ill
12 llenrv
u ?n 1.
B. Arell (II.).
I ',r.
il<
I ir
Il.
,v I? Il ilt 1
?1 .1 ht? (' Kn.iii!' dt 1.
il E 11 M K ?!"? 'Il 1
7 u 11 Parsli ?!! dt 1
I, Jame? I--OII n ii (P ?
'l J'.hn .1 i'iiln (P I.
6, ?W I. Pi rk'l^ ,lt '
1 t. S. II?\II?h dt '
?It.- ?lert?,!.
Republicana l" l'emnerat?.
I^i?t venr R?puMlcan? 11.
M K.OII "Ver MWI CM! ?i
ilt 1
Pli
K ll?lK-I?
Mut iv lit ?
Ht. ?IWward f Itrennan (R 1.
17 ?Ib-nV* M.irshHll ill ).
1>. Oeorg? I S 'l'-r Ot ?
tli ('liarle? Nolan*. (It i
20 ?F. O Hughes (R )
^'l Henry PrVneh (D. * r )
l><-m^icrv?. IS Republl
I NEGRO SHOOTS HIS LANDLADY.
IHK VICTIM KXTKiTKI? TO DIE ATTACKED
uiiii.N urn HUIBAND IS AT THE POLLI
Harry Klllmore. a Colored porter, twenty-seven
years old, who lives at No 22i West I-'irty-scventh
?l , shot and dangerously wounded Mrs Mao Bagley,
?Is,? colored, in her apartaMata In th- basement of
No. 2IK West K" irty-seventh-st, .it noon yesterday
Th.- aroman, who was shot in the stomach, was taken
o Roosevelt Hospital. She may die.
Ragley, the ?"man's husband, keeps a small restau?
rant, rtltmor* b,,.irded with him and his wife until
?bout four w.cks 6g0, when Rsgisy beCSBM Jealous
cd tuld him to move. FUlmore did S,v He did not
visit the restaurant again ?mil! yesterday morning.
Bsgtey was then at the poll* as a Republican worker.
Mrs Bagley, When KUImor* entere.), told him that
iwr husband did nol want him in the place ami ad?
vised him t" K> away A dispute over some washing
which the man said he had left behind him follow d,
an l I'lllmoic drew a pistol anil ?hot th? woman in
the Btomecn
Killmon ran after the shooting, but was followed
by two policemen and ceptured after a stubborn re
?fstanc* When as n arraigned in TorkvUle Police
Court It i? probable that the chatge of murder will he
made against him, as late las' n!?rht bis victim was
not expected to live many hiurs.
SAYS HE IS HEIR TO $>,000,onf>.
If the story told by Ant into BsgUl, a drug (ib-rk em
pi ijred in MaspSth, Kong Island, l.e true, he will
(.ion be the posscusor of an estate in Florida valued
? t $;.iXiU.is?i. .Se?ul BSyS thai htl father was ?.direct
desesShteal of Father Antonio S.-gul, who settled In
Florida abOUl 1^'W. -ind 'Mcaaae the possessor of a
large rstate, whleh was inlierlted by hi? father. Segu?
taya that be Is now the only heir to l!. The e?tate
consist? of ao.iut MSB ecre* of valuable land. Regul
h.?s taken steps to recover possession of it.
*- ? ?
THE NEW SPASISH LOAN AUTHORIZED.
I London, Nov. 3 A dispatch from Madrid to the
1'nlted ISSOClStsd Tresses says that Queen Hegent
Christina has signed n decree authorizing th? con?
traction of a loan of *i0.000,000 peseta*, secured by
Treasury bonds, and has also authorized ihe pur?
chase of S.firt) kilogrammes of ?liver bullion in
London
Madrid, Nm. I ??resaler Caaeeas del cnstnio is
?uffertag from a catarrhal affection which con?
fines hin? te bis house, and Cabinet councils are
consequently suspended pending hi? recovery.
TUE RETURNS IN LONDON.
MR. MKINLEY HAS WON A SPLENDID VIC?
TORY, SAYS "THE STANDARD."
NEVER BEFORE HAS Sl/CH KEEN* INTEREST BEEN
DISPLAYED IN THE CITY OVER AN
AMERICAN ELECTION.
London, Nov. 3.?In Us Issue to-morrow "The
Standard," commenting upon the election re?
turns received from the I'nited States, will say
"Mr. McKinley has doubtless won a splendid
Victory. The mere silence of the Bryanites con?
firms the belief that they have sustained a crush
Iiik defeat. Even the Indefinite preliminary an?
nouncement of the result of the election will go
far to restore calm In commercial circles."
As an illustration of the great interest dis?
played here in the Presidential election In the
United States the fact may be cited that a large
number of Americans and others gathered
this evening at Efflngham House, Arundel-st.,
Strand, where are Situated the London ofHcea of
the I'nited Associated Presses, for the purpose
Of obtaining the earliest possible information re
gardlng the result. The bulletins sent from
New-York, giving the results as soon as they
were known there, were eagerly scanned and
commented upon according to the political faith
of their readers. Most of the guests of the
I'nited Associated Presses have announced their
intention to remain ail night if necessary to
learn definitely how the election has gone.
Never before has such keen interest been dls
I laved in this city over the result of an Ameri?
can election. Much praise has been bestowed
upon the very prompt, efficient and impartial
service furnished by the I'nited Associated
Presses
The Dally Chronicle" und the many pro?
vincial papers which are client? of the United
Associated Presses are displaying; in their
Office windows the bulletins which are received
at Kfflnghnin House by cable and immediately
fowarded tu them by telegraph.
Blaborate preparation;: have been made at
the various telegraph Officea in the city, the
Weal End and Piccadilly to announce the re?
sult Of the election.
-4>
THE RUSH TO AMERICA TO VOTE.
PICTURE! OF M'HINLKY AND HOBART IN LON?
DON-RETS TEN TO ONE OM THE
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE.
London, Nov. 3. Most of the Americans who
? were sojourning in London returned home on
board the steamships sailing within tbe but fort?
night, for th? purpose of voting. Those who were
unable to secure first-cabin accommodations con?
tented themselves with second-Cabin passage, and
some of them went In the steerage rather than
los- their votes.
Great Interest Is being taken In the election In
London, and the Stars and Stripes and pictures of
McKinley and Hobnrt abound in tbe American re?
sorts. There has been a good deal of betting on
the result of the election, some of the bets befolg at
odds as high as 10 to 1 on MeKlnley. The man?
agers of the steamship companies say that nearly
all of the Americans who returned home to vote
were goldltSS, It Is estimated that fBMjW in bets
has been placed on the result. Colonel Wilson, of
Chicago, made ? wager Of ?1,000 even to-day that
McKlnlei would be elected The bet was taken by
K. ?'. rulton. a Chicago Brysnlte. Besides the
ordinary ei-.tion bet? there has been considerable
freak betting, Oeneral Morgan, a Brooklyn silver
lie, mude a bet In which be engaged In the event
of Hr>'an's defeat lo have all of hts teeth drawn.
In the event of MeKlnley"s rief,mi hi.-- opponents.
four In number, agree to have the!.' beards and
mustachee shaved off. The parties to the bet are
under a penalty of J.'* m each In rSSS of failure to
fulfil the ternis of the wager, and article.? have
been signed and witnessed to that effect.
The West End hotel? have mad- special arrange.
menta to post election bulletins this evening, and
main of the club.? have made similar arrange
motiis Several prominent statesmen residing out
Of town will remain In London over night In order
to learn the result.
THK FRENCH PRC8B ON THK ELECTION.
?nntr:it,v. hays the '"TEMPS," "as BETWEEN
M K1M.K.V AM' BRYAN. THi: toUTTION I? MM
1'I.Y A STATTS QUO OR RKVOU'TION ??
Paris, Nov. 3.-The "Temps." in Its issue this
morning devotes a leading editorial to the Presi?
dential election in the rnlted States, In which It
says: "When the sun sets today the Great Re?
public will have decided one of the gravest con?
troversies that have agitated that country since
the foundation of the Government, and the
electors will have pronounced between two radi?
cally opposed tendencies?one continuing the nor?
mal development of the States, and the other Im?
pelling the country toward unknown hoflsoas
' Briefly, as between McKinley and Bryan, the
?Oluttoa Is ?Imply s status ano or revolution. It
Is the Irst time In America, nnd, perhaps, the first
time In the world, that a like contest has been
engaged In upon questions lying upon the founda?
tions of social order, with the Issue pending upon
s single throw of the dice."
The "Matin" eays! "European? expect nothing
from th? triumph of one candidat.? or the other
with Bryan are are exposed to the conaotjuencee
of free trade, and With McKinley we are con?
fronted with taiiiY restrictions."
The "Figaro" says: "The triumph of th? ?llve;
Ites will mean thai European holders of American
securities will receive for t h? ir coupons paper
baaed upon silver worth In money only M per cent
..f whal they should receive, and America will ex?
propriate from all of h?*r creditors one-half of
their holdings."
-e>
BETTINO ON THK LONDON 'CHANGE
London. N iv I.- The Stock Exchange was the
scene of unusual excitement to-day, more time
being devoted to betting on the result of the Presi?
dential election In the I'nited States than In the
conduct of legitimate business Throughout the
aeselOtl there was I steady placing of bets at 4 to 1
on MeKlnley. Some of the large rtnsnclsl and
bn iv rag- tirms will remain open all night to re?
ceive the results of the election, and many big
houses .ne in expectation thai there will be s mad
rush to engage In transactions at the opening of the
market to-morrow
-e
t SPANISH TOWN WIPED OUT.
lft'KLVA OVRKWHKLMKI) BT A TIDAL WAVE
THK BTEAMER CARTAOMNA BUNK?
MANT LIVE! LOST.
London, Nov. il.?A dispatch from Madrid to
"The Central News" says that the town of
Huelva. In the province of that name, has been
swept by a tidal wave from th- Atlantic Ocean.
No details are given, hut the report says It is
known that the loss of life has been terrible. The
steamer Cartagena fas overwhelmed by the
great wave, and most of th?- persons on board of
h-r were drowned.
Huelva Is .1 maritime town of Spain, capital of
the Province of Huelva, on an Inlet of the Atlantic,
forty-nine mile? west-northwest of Seville. It Is
the terminus of two railways, and has an export
trade by sea. The population of the town Is about
U,M*._
THEY DIED ALMOST TOGETHER.
SCOPES HEATH OE THE PROTESTANT BISHOP OF
? KII.LAI>iE FOLI-OWED BY THAT OF HIS WIPE.
London. Nov. 3. The Right BSV. Frederick Rich?
ards Wynne, Protestant Bishop of Klllaloe,
dropped dead tn the street In Dublin to-day. A
dispatch from Dublin to the Central News says
that Mrs. Wynne, the wife of the Bishop, was
found dead In her bed an hour after her husband's
death _
ANOTHER RIFE1W OUTRAGE.
MOORISH PIRATES CAPTURE A FRENCH VESSEL,
Hl'T ARE OBLIOED TO 'UVE HER UP OWINO
TO AN ATTACK nY SPANIARDS.
Washington. Nov. S.-Consul-Oeneral Burke, at
Tangier. Morocco, reports to the State Depart?
ment. Iii his dispatch of October 15. that another
act of piracy was committed by the Moors off the
Lillian coast, on October S A French sailing vea
sel was attacked by about 100 Rlflians In small
boats about twenty miles off Cape Rouen (Cape
Bsbasun). As soon as th? attack became known
on shore the Spanish Governor of Alhucemas and
some of the Spanlah colony at once set out, In the
little steamer Sevilla, to tender aid to the French
vessel. They arrived in time to capture three of
the pirates' boats, which were on the point of
pushing off for the shore with prisoners and plun?
der. The Spaniards boarded the French vessel,
which was In possession of the pirates, and, after
a severe struggle, succeeded In rescuing the rap
tain and a member of the crew.
The Spaniards are reported to have had one man
killed and four or five severely wounded. Some- of
the wounded have alnce been reported aa having
died . ,.
It Is also reported that some of the crew of tbe
French vessel have died from their wounds.
A French man-of-war arrived at Tangier on
October IS, and othera were expected on the 16th,
among them a BDSnlsh war vessel.
WHAT WILL FRANCE DOt
THE GOVERNMENT INTERPELLATED OJ?
THE ARMENIAN QUESTION.
GREAT EXCITEMENT 17* THE CHAM*? 0?
DEPUTIES?STRONG SPEECHES MADE BT M.
DENY?. COUNT DE MUN. AND THE MIN?
ISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.
Paris, Nov. 3.?In the Chamber of Deputies to?
day M. Denys, Deputy for Cochin China, Inter?
pellated the Government, demanding to know
what action France would take In defence of the
Armenians. Continuing his remarks, he asked
what the Powers had done since 1880 In de?
fence of a race whose sufferings were without a
parallel in history. M. Denys then recapitulated
the horrors of the mas ?acres In Asia Minor and
Constantinople, during the recital of which the
Chamber was ?reatly agitated.
Tbe Deputy for Cochin China declared that It
v as the duty of France to Interfere in the nam?
.,: humanity to prevent the occurrence of fur
? ? r massacres. In order to effect this, he said.
? would be necessary to make a clean sweep of
?is corner of Europe and to guarantee protec
: not only to Christians, but to Turks, as wslL
The whole of civilized Europe was Interested In
the purification of Turkey, and France had a
right to convoke h?r alli?e and all Europe to
undertake the task.
The remarks of M. Denys elicited great ap?
plause.
Count Albert de Mun then followed M. Denys
in a speech. In which he declared that sadder
even than the Armenian atrocities was the In?
ertia with which Europe tolerated such out
rapes.
Count de Mun, continuing;, said that, although
the responsibility of the Porte for the outrag?e
was denied. It had been proved that Turkish
officials had taken p.rt in the atrocities and had
directed and commanded the massacres which
took place in Constantinople on August 2H he
f .re the very eyen of the officers of the foreign
puardships and the passengers on board tho
French steamer Glrondel, yet the authors of the
massacres had not iVen punished. On the con?
trary, he declared, the officials who were the
fomenters of the outrages had been rewarded.
MM. Delafosse and Hubbard approved and em?
phasized the remarks of Count de Mun, and M.
Hanotaux, Minister of Foreign Affairs, followed.
M. Hanotaux said that the Armenian movement
would not have taken upon itself such an In?
tensity if contact with Europe had not imbued
certain Armenians with a desire for Indepen?
dence. The excesses of the Ottoman Government,
he said, had furnished legitimate r.otlves for
complaint, and ? hen the question assumed an
aspect of grave importance, England underetood
the danger of acting alone.
France does not forget the traditions of the
religious protectorate which she exercised In the
Orient, nor the bonds which unite her to the Ot?
toman Empire, but she must proportion her ef?
fort to the extent of all the taske devolving upon
her.
M. Jaur?s, the Socialist leader, replying to M.
Hanotaux. said that the Sultan had been fre?
quently admonished, but without result. The re
marks of M. Hanotaux. he said, left the whole
question open. He reproached the Forelsn Min?
ister for endeavoring to render the Armenlane
solely answerable for their troubles In the re?
sponsibility for which Europe and the Sultan
were Involved.
M. Devallo moved the order of the day approv?
ing the declarations of the Government, and the
action was adopted by the Chamber.
TRIE BILL AGAINST THE CASTLES.
VKRDICT OF THE GRAND JURY OF TTTB
i'LKRKKN'WEI.I, SESSIONS-A POWERFUL
DKFKNOK IN PREPARATION.
London. Nov. 3.-The Grand Jury of the Clerk
enwell Sessions, after consideration of the case
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Castle, of San Fran?
cisco, yesterday returned a true bill against
both prisoners on a charge of shoplifting.
Sir Frank Lockvvood. one of the counsel for
the defence, Inf.'imed a representative of the
United Associated Presses this morning that at
the meeting of the counsel held at the chambers
of Sir Edward Clark? yesterday the lawyers
arranged the details of a powerful defence.
Disea?* and de.ith often lurk In a continuously
neglected cold, when It might be speedl'.y eradicated
with a few doses of Dr. D Jayne's Expectorant.,?.
-?,
DIED.
mr.NARD? At Flushing. N. Y., on November fc_SS. ?hS
residence of her Muter, Mr?. George Newton. EllMnetn
Funeral ?enr?e** at the house on Wednesday, the 4th tnat.,
,i ? o'clock.
[ntennent at convenience of the family
BEI Lr At New Beelwliev N. Y . on Tuesday. Noverab**
V. '??or*?, tifant ?ot of George G and Blanche Bell.
Funeral private.
B'M^xRD- At Oedham. Man. on October SI. 1806. alary.
only daughter of the Ice William Bullard.
i-i .vviT.KY *m November I. INK). Samuel F. Cowdrey,
In th? 81th vear of hi? age.
Funeral from hi? '.?'? residence. New-Rochelle. N. T.. on
Wednerday aftenvon. November 4. at 3:45 o clock.
fani**? ?ill be In waitti.e on arrival of train leavlns
Grand Ceotrel Perot .it V66. via N*w--Havcn Railroad
EDWARDS?At N* M Eaat 10th-?t.. on Mondtr morn
(?ig November 2. Mary G. Edw?rd?. widow of A. H. P.
i-MvVard?. and daughter of th? late Nathaniel L. Ort*
Funeral will take place from her lat? residence at 1C
o'clock Wednesday morning. November 4
GRANT?At Moliegan. N. Y . on Sunday afternoon. Char
l.tte Louisa widow of Jam?a Grant, and daughter o?
Ihe late John H. William?, of thi? city.
Funeral service? at All Soul? ("hurch. M?dl?on-ev?. sa4
fiilth St., on Wednesday morning. November 4. at 11.SO
o'clock. . ,
It I? kindly reiuesfd that no flower? he sent.
HAMILTON--On November 8. 1S!>6, Richard Hamilton.
president of the Bowery Bank of New-York
Funeral service? at hi? late re?ldenc?. No. 566 Clinton
ave . Brooklyn. Wednesday evening, at 8 o clock.
HAW KINS-On Monday. November 2. Charle? Henry
llawkln?. In hi? ?15th year. __ _ .
Funeral ?ervlce? at hie late residence, Rochelle Pa?t
New Rochelle. N. T., on Wednesday ?venina St I
Fr?en,Is of the family are lnvlt-d to attend.
Interment ?t convenience of family.
MANIOE?On th? Sd inst., at Queene. Leo* IslesiB. De
forest, ?on of William De F. and th* lat? Joaephln* U
Manic*, la the 84th year of his *fe.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
MASON?On Monday, November 2. at hla r?*td?i?e*. No.
749 West End ave., of pneumonia. Alfred Henry l**
Funerat*?*rvlce?e a"' St. Mlcheel'e Church. 68th-*t. ?SkJ
Am?terdam-*ve., Wedneaday. November 4th. inetant, el
Friend? and m-mbe.-? of the Society of Chemical Industry
American Chemlc.il 8cclety. Colles? of Pharmacy and
St George'? Society are Invited ?o attend.
Montreal ?nd English r?P?r? plea?e copy.
MASON On Monday. November 2. Charlea il. Mason,
agad v- \ ear?.
Fuueril service? at th? residence of hla daughter, lira
A. K. P. ?'ooper. No 125 Flr?t Place. Brooklya.
Wednesday. November 4, at 2 p. m.
Interment private.
MIM.KR?At Albany. N. Y.. November t 1886. Ernest J.
Miller
Funer?! Thursday morning at 11 o'clock from hla resi?
dence, Albany.
PELOUBET?8udd?nly. at home. Bloomfleld, N. J? ?To
vember 2, Samuel Peloubet. in hi? Slat year.
Funeral from hi? ?at? re?ldence, No. 270 Belleville-?*?.,
on Thursday. 5th inst., on arrival of 1:80 p. m. train
on N. Y. a O. L R. R., foot Chamo*r?-et., New-York.
MDDLaW Suddenly, of heart failure. Monday ?venins. No?
vember 2. John RUdle.
Funeral ?ervlce? at hi? lat? residence. So. 218 W?*x 21?t_
?t.. on Wednesday evening. November 4. at S o'clock.
Interment at convenience of family.
Please omit flower?.
BII.KY?At Hartford Onn.. on October 80, 1886, 01
W. Rlley, in th? 57th year of hl? as?.
H. m'K--On November 8. Ellxa I*., beloved wife of
Matthlaa Rock, wed 87 yeara
Relative? and friend? are rc?p?ctfully Invited to attend the
funeral ?ervlce at her late reddenc?. No. 81 But STth
st.. on Thura.lay afternoon, at 1 o'clock.
tendon and Paris paper? pleaae copy.
Interment at Woodlawn.
Rl'REL??Suddenly, at Zurich, Switzerland. November a,
Mrs. August Rubel, beloved mother of Alexander Rebel.
8TORRS? November 1. 1*96. at the residence of her ?on
ln-law. Franela W. Hay ne?. 446 Or?ene-av*., Brooklya.
I.,,ra I.ee. widow of Roval Otia Storr?. of Dedhesa,
Mass . '.a her Nl?t year.
Funeral Wedneaday evening. November 4, at 8 o'clock.
Interment at Storr?. Conn.
WJOUOJT?At Cortland. N. T., October 30, Dorothy Adama
We??on. Infant daughter of David and Mary M. We??oa.
WOODLAWN CEMETERY.
Office No. 20 E. 23d st.
Woodlawn Station ?24th Ward) Harlem Railroad.
Special Katie*?.
?^AAAAe/tfVWwvwv.y\A^^A/vsAA^^A/v/\ArtAeyw?MSe?
ArtUW-lul Teeth.?HIGHEST AWARD ?t WerM'e
Fair, three medal? American Initltute. wer* granted Dr.
Deane, Dent let, 454 Lexington-ave., corner 45th-*t ls
presalon of m luth restored. Crown and bridge work.
> Face contoured.
The Mercantile klaraer,^ _ .
i A8TOR PLACE. Conum? 255.000 VotaSBM,
Branchen: 420 Fifth Av?. and 120 Broadsray.
Booka delivered to all parta of the city._
Ask for Mat-sa-kl-ta. _ -_
i th? n?w Japan?*? perfume of the Crow? Perfumery Oa of
London. Sold everywhere. Simply dellcloua!
I -a?,-1? ? i.
What am I Best Pitted Fort
Fowler * Wall? Co., Phrenologiat?. of 27 East tlat
| Street, near Broadway, will tell you.

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