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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 22, 1900, Image 1

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LONDON NEWS AND VIEWS.
FATE OF THE AMENDED CANAL TREATY
UNCERTAIN.
APATHKTI.- FEELING OVER BOKR INVA
SION OF CAPE COLONY-HOLIDAY
INCIDENTS.
flSryritfit; 1900: By The New York Tribunal
[BY CABLE TO THE TRIRrNK.]
London. Dec. 22. <? a. m.— The action of the
Foreign Office in relation to the Hay-Pauncefote
Treaty cannot be forecast with any degree of con
fidence. Lord Salisbury is at Hat field listening to
the story of Mafeking from the lips of Lord Ed
ward Cecil and Lord Lansdowne Is at Bowood
entertaining a large Christmas party. They are
the only men who can speak with authority on
the subject, and they are not likely to break
silence until the treaty in its amended form is
brought before them officially. The members of
the American Embassy are naturally non-com
mittal at the present stage of the proceedings,
and there are no officials in the British diplo
matic service who are at liberty to say anything
about the probable attitude of the Government.
There will be no disclosure of official views until
tne President decides whether or not he will
send the amended treaty to England through
the Embassy. There is a good deal of country
house diplomacy in England. Ambassadors and
Cabinet Ministers are constantly meeting one
another and talking over matters of State at
country houses, which are the real diplomatic
centres at this time of the year. It was in a
country house that the preliminaries to the Hay
paancefote Treaty were informally arranged.
end it Is not Impossible that there may be sim
ilar conferences during the holidays over the
amended treaty. All predictions respecting the
results of further negotiations between the two
governments are premature. The comments of
leader writers of the press are temperate, and
no pressure of public opinion will be brought to
. bear upon the Foreign Office against the ac
ceptance of the amendments. The views of the
Fentte in passing the amendments have been
Ptated with lucidity by the New-York corre-
Fpondent of "The Standard." who has done much
to clear up the situation and enable Englishmen
to form a Just opinion of the merits of the case.
The Boer invasion of Cape Colony has been
taken so philosophically by Lord Kitchener that,
little attention is paid to it by military men
here. Those who comment upon it describe it as
a natural expedient for raiders who are in need
of horses, food and clothing, and hope to find
supplies across the Orange River. They lay
stress upon the fact that the Boers no longer
are in possession of a single important town in
the Transvaal or Orange River Colony, and that
their bands of fighting men, not being under
the necessity of defending any district, and be
ing free to range at will on the open veldt, can
be kept together only by being adequately sup
plied with food, and consequently have been
headed southward.
Meantime Kitchener is again silent as to his
operations. If General French should have suc
cftfiefl in routing Delarey on Wednesday, as is
FU«e»tec by P*euter, it is difficult to understand
why the Commander-in-Chief should not have
reported the fact. The authorities at the Cape,
frightened by the Boer commandoes south of the
\orasge River, have promptly proclaimed martial
law in twelve districts of Cap* Colony, 1 where the
Dutch element preponderates. There is little
doubt that the invaders are meeting with tap
port, but the situation so far as it is possible
for the public to understand it is not an alarm
ing one.
Steamships going out to-day for New-York on
th* fv? of Christmas will have only a few pas-
BHBSSEB. Miss Maclntyre is the most conspicu
ous passenger by the American Liner. Phe will
join Grau's opera company in America, but ex
pset* to sing in a long sene? of concerts before
ims to England.
The Whitefrlars Club had a large Christmas
dinner at the Trocadero restaurant last night,
with Richard Whiteing as the chairman and
many well known literary men and women as
guests. i. N. F.
PHILLIPPTXE COMMISSION ACTS.
ALL LAWS TO BE IN ENGLISH— HIGHWAY
APPROPRIATION.
Manila, Dec. 21.— Philippine Commission
has passed bills prescribing that English text
•hall be used in the construction of all laws
enacted; authorizing the Provost Marshal to
establish police and health regulations, with
limited punishments for their violation; appro
priating $73,000 for the immediate construction
of a highway from Pozorrubio, Province of
Pangasinan. to Baguio, in Benguet Province.
¦long the line surveyed for a Government rail
road.
An order of General Otis, former Military
Governor, has again been promulgated, to the
effect that members of the volunteer force im
prisoned for military offences may be released
and sent home in the discretion of the colonels
of their respective regiments provided they have
not been dishonorably discharged.
All military and civil duties have been ordered
suspended for Christmas Day and New Year's
Day. with the exception of necessary- guard and
Held duties.
General Mac Arthur announces that he will
hold a formal reception on New Year's Day.
THE KENTUCKY IN THE SUEZ CANAL.
Port Said. Dec. 21.— The United States war
chip Kentucky entered the canal this morning,
fine will stop at Suez over Christmas, and will
proceed on December 20 for Colombo and Ma
nila.
RECRUITS TO START FOR MANILA.
About three hundred recruits are to leave Fort
Slocam to-day for Manila. They will go overland
'"' Kan Francisco on a special train. Several of
ficer* • ho have been detached and have received
order* to join regiments in the Philippines will go
* ; 'b the recruits.
HtRT f\ RUNAWAY AUTOMOBILE.
MAN and WOMAN BUMPED into STONE
WALL AND LAMP POST.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Neimann, of No 1,2.77
*"ulton-ave.. in The Bronx, got Into an automo
bile cab at Sixtieth and Eighth-aye. last
light and ordered the runner, George Bluett,
twenty-seven years old, of No. 306 East Sixty
einth-st.. to take them home. Bluett says he
<"ould not manage the machine as he rolled up
toward the wall across the avenue at One-hun
<Srea-and-Bixty-Beventh-et., and it banged into
"Mi wall. Mrs. Neimann screamed, and in her
excitement broke the window pane and cut her
•*'»• Mr. Neimann's arms and hands and his
head t-^-r*- also rut. Hluett got control of the
mn-'hir*- for a time, but it ran into the lamp
&o«t, and the excitement was renewed, attract
ing the attention of J> r Lipschutz, living on the
corner. Finding a man and woman bleeding he
Jfressfed their injuries, which were not serious.
Tne wrecked automobile, belonging to the New
£°™ Electric Cab Company, of Sixtieth-st. and
*M«nth-av«-., was taken hark to the storage
•»°«** by two horses.
DEERFOOT FARM SAUSAGES
tor *£ '* nn * thln £ more tppetizing and delightful
St— ktmm. try a two pound package.
7HB SOUTH AFRICAN WAR,
MARTIAL LAW IN CAPE DISTRICTS.
INCIDENTS OF THE REVIVED ACTIVITY IN
SOUTH AFRICA.
Cape Town. Dec. 21.— Martial law will be pro
claimed in Worcester, Wellington and Stellen
hosch.
Heavy rains are general, and several railway
washouts delay the movements of troops.
General Brabant, commander of the newly
raised Colonial Division, has been ordered to the
front, and will start to-morrow.
At Thorndale General French has routed 2,500
Boers with four guns and a pompom. Thorn
dale is sixteen miles northwest of KrUgersdorp.
The fight took place December 19. The British
had fourteen wounded, and the Boers fled in dis
order, with about fifty killed.
The B.ers who invaded Cape Colony had in
most cases pack horses in addition to those they
rede. All were in the pink of condition. They
commandeered all possible clothing and stores
at Venterstad.
General Baden-Powell will start for the Trans
vaal to-morrow.
The Boers derailed a train at Barberton, kill
ing an inspector and others.
London, Dec. 22.— A dispatch from De Aar.
Cape Colony, says that the yeomanry have
driven the Boers out of Houtkraal, the enemy
retiring westward.
'¦We understand that private reliable advices
have been received in London." says 'The Daily
Mail." "to the effect that virtually all the dis
tricts of Cape Colony in the vicinity of the Or
ange River are in more or less open revolt, and
that there is likely to be sharp fighting on a
rather large scale, before the invasion is
crushed. The tactics of the Boers in rallying aa
many as possible of the Dutch in the back coun
try to their cause are proving successful."
From its Cape Town correspondent "The Daily
Mail" has received the following:
The second invading force was designed to oc
cupy Britstown; but, being checked by the De
Aar troops, it has disappeared into the Ceader
tM rg Mountains.
An enormous concentration of troops is being
made upon the belt country occupied by the in
vaders, hut it is not likely that the Boers will
offer battle In large numbers. There Is a re
newed demand for the wholesale proclamation
of martial law.
Johannesburg, Dec. 21. — The Boers attacked
Zuurfontein on December IS, hut were beaten
off.
REINFORCEMENTS FOR KITCHENER.
BRITISH GOVERNMENT CALLS AGAIN FOR
HELP FROM COLONIES.
London, Dec. 22. — The War Office made the
following announcement last evening:
In view of the general position in South Africa
the following reinforcements of mounted troops
have been arranged. Eight hundred will start
nc-xt week. Two cavalry regiments have been
ordered to leave as soon as the transports are
ready.
The colonial police will be increased to ten
thousand. Detachments will leave as fast as
they are formed. Further drafts of cavalry
will be dispatched at once. Australia and New-
Zealand have been invited to send further con
tingents.
Three thousand extra horses, beyond the usual
monthly supply, have been contracted for.
The Secretary of State for War, Mr. Brodrick,
announces that, in view of the prolongation of
the war in South Africa, members of the Im
perial Yeomanry will be paid five shillings, in
stead qf one shilling and twopence, a day. To
militiamen are promised priority of return over
regulars.
As the outcome of statements made during the
recent session of Parliament, and since reiterat
ed, to the effect that some of the colonial troops
have refused to fight again, the War Office late
last evening lssue-d the following explanation
from Lord Kitchener:
A number of men belonging to two of the South
African corps refused to march on one occasion,
owing to some mistake to carry out their dis
charge at the expiration of their term of service.
Lord Roberts, on the ground that they had a
grievance, overlooked the matter, simply repri
manding them. The men of both corps have
since done good work in the field, and it is ab
solutely unfounded to 6ay that there was a mu
tJny, or that guns or any other force were used
against them. It is considered cruel to publish
an incident which all concerned regret.
HOW DB WET BROKE THROUGH.
STORY OP THK BOERS' ESCAPE FROM EN
CIRCLING BRITISH COLUMNS.
Bk'f-mfontcin, Dec 20.— The details of General
De Wet's escape from the encircling British
columns furnish one of the boldest incidents of
the war. Wh< D Haasbroek's command joined
Dp Wet on Decen ber 12, some fifteen miles east
of Thaba Kchu, General Knox was only about
an hour distant, and the Boer situation appeared
desperate. But De Wet was equal to the oc
casion. Dispatching Haasbroek westward, to
make a feint at Victoria Nek, De "Wet prepared
to break through the British columns at Spring
haau Nek Pass, about four miles of broad, Hat,
unbroken ground. At the entrance were two
fortified posts, while artillery was posted on a
lii!l eastward, watching the Boers. Suddenly a
magnificent spectacle was presented. The whole
Boer army of L',r««M» men started at a gallop, in
open order, through the nek. President Steyn
and I'iet Four;, led the charge, and De Wet
brought up the rear. The British guns and rifles
boomed and rattled incessantly. The Boers first
tried the eastward route, but encountering artil
lery they diverged and galloped to the front of
the hill to the westward, where the fire of only
a single post was effective.
The whole manoeuvre was a piece of mag
nifloent daring, and its success was complete, in
spite of the loss of a 15-pourider and twenty-five
prisoners.
The British force detached after Haasbroek
came in contact with his commando at nightfall.
The burghers were scattered, and the Welsh
Yeomanry galloped among the retreating Boers,
usiiiK their revolvers and the butt ends of their
rifles with great effect.
An incident of the fight was the gallop of a
British ammunition wagon right through the
scattered Boers, the gunners using their re
volvers freely.
NARROW MARGIN FOR GOVERNMENT.
ATTEMPT TO BRING DP ARBITRATION IN
GERMANY FAILS.
Darmstadt, Dec 2L— By the President casting
Ha vote, the Second Chamber to-day defeated
a motion to instruct the Hessian representatives
in the Bondesrath to propose the assembling of
the Foreign Affairs Committee with the object
Of initiating a proposal for arbitration between
Great Britain and the Transvaal. Twenty-two
votes we -e < as! each way. All th* Anti-Semites
and Social Democrats favored the motion. The
representatives of the Government left the
Houm before the debate on the motion.
MAKING LAWS FOR POBTO RICO.
THE JURY SYSTEM FOR THE ISLAND— AN
EXHIBIT AT BUFFALO.
.-an Juan de Porto Rico. Dec. 21.— A bill in
troducing the Jury system in Porto Rico has
passed both houses.
Frederick L. Cornwall, a member of the House
of Delegates, has introduced a House bill pro
viding for an appropriation of $30,000 for an
insular exhibit at Buffalo, provided th« people
raise $20,000 additional.
The House has passed a bill fixing the salaries
of the live native Councillors at $4,000. Thin is
considered excessive, as it exceed* the salary of
some of the department heads. It is not likely
to pass the Council
COMMANDS PUBLIC CONFIDENCE
Tl,* Pennsylvania Railroad, because It otter 9 unaur
na.=s-ed service between New York and the Middle
uvsr.— Adi'L ... „
NEW- YORK, SATURDAY.-. DECEMBER 22. 1900.-SIXTEEN . AGES.-* T*3eSSSU.
MJLBURY'S PLEA ANNOYS.
FAMINE COMMITTEE'S STATIONERY
USED WITHOUT AUTHORITY,
FORMER ASSISTANT SECRETARY SENDS
OUT LETTERS ASKING FOR MONEY
TO AID IN VAGUELY DEFINED
EDUCATIONAL WORK.
Members of the Committee of One Hundred
on India Famine Relief have been much annoyed
the last few days by letters sent out by Arthur
W. Milbury, assistant secretary of the commit
tee, which contain an appeal for subscriptions to
help some vague educational work. The com
mittee finished its work about two months ago,
yet these letters have been sent out on the com
mittee's stationery, bearing a full list of the
names of the members of the committee, and
apparently having the committee's sanction. In
addition to this the letters have been sent from
the committee's former office, at No. 73 Bible
House.
William E. Dodge, chairman of the committee,
said yesterday that he was at a loss to know
why this had been done. He has been receiving
inquiries from people who were asked to sub
scribe and wished to know whether the commit
tee had anything to do with the object of the
subscription. To all these inquiries Mr. Dodge
has replied that the committee had nothing
whatever to do with the affair and that he did
not understand why Mr. Milbury had used the
committee's stationery. He said that the com
mittee had relinquished its office in the Bible
House and that if Mr. Milbury was using it he
had rented it himself.
"I do not know why Mr. Milbury has used the
committee's stationery." said Mr. Dodge. "It
may have been stupidity on his part, and then
apain it may not."
THE UNAUTHORIZED LETTER.
The following- is a copy of the unauthorized
letter:
For several years 1 have been very earnestly
engaged in public school work, the chief object
being the preservation of the American public
school system in its original Integrity and the
securing to public school graduates a thorough
grounding in the fundaments of education. In
other words, my efforts and those of my asso
ciates have been in the line of endeavoring to
hold the public schools to thorough training in
the essentials of education, as against the ten
dency of the last few years to treat reading,
writiner, arithmetic, spelling, grammar, simple
history, etc., with a considerable degree of con
tempt, and so favor a widely extended curricu
lum to the serious detriment of the essentials:
so that boys and girls are graduated from the
grammar and even from the high schools with
a superficial smattering of knowledge along a
great variety of lines, but without thorough
training in any. and totally unfitted for the
practical duties of life.
We believe in giving the children as broad an
education as possible. But we insist that the
foundation be laid soundly.
My associates and myself have spent several
.thousand dollars in this work, and have never
asked for a penny outside of our own small
circle. Our v.ork is now at a critical point. We
need $1,000 instantly, and I write to you in the
hope that you will be willing to contribute ?2r>.
Checks may be drawn to my order.
Hoping that you may be able to respond to
my appeal, I am. with cordial holiday greetings,
very sincerely. ARTHUR W. MILBURY.
The amounts asked for In these letters varied.
In some it was $10, in others it was $50. The
"work" in which Mr. Milbury In engaged is al
ways put vaguely. Who hit* tpsociates are Is
also left to the imagination.
MILBURY'S MOVEMEVTB MYSTERIOUS.
The office In the Bible House was dark yester
day. No one had been there yesterday, so far
as could be learned. The janitor of the building
paid that Mr. Milbury was never in his office, but
that he called for his mail on Saturdays. The
J -nitor said that Mr. Milbury had gone to Phila
delphia on the first of the month, but he did not
know just what part of Philadelphia.
It was afterward learned that Mr. Milbury's
address when he was last heard from was "The
International General Company, Real Estate
Trust Company Building, Broad and Chestnut
sts., Philadelphia." It could not be discovered
what Mr. Milbury is doing in Philadelphia.
What mail he does not call for at the Bible
House on Saturdays, it is supposed, he has for
warded to him.
Mr. Milbury was secretary of the Industrial
Christian Alliance, at No. 170 Bleecker-st., for
seven or eight years. At the office of the alli
an< •• it was said last night that Mr. Milbury
was one of the founders of the organization. He
had resigned his office as secretary in July, ISfM*,
in order to enter the employ of the Ecumenical
Conference. After he had finished his -work for
the Conference he became the assistant secre
tary of the Committee of One Hundred on India
Famine Relief.
RECEPTION TO GOVERNOR-ELEQT ODELL
HEWBURG CITY CLUB, <">F WHICH UK IB A
CHASTER MEMBER, IS THK HOST.
Newburg. N. V., Dec. 21.— The Newburg City
Club to-night gave a reception to Governor-elect
Odell, who is a charter member of the irganiza
tion. The guests were received by Clayton E.
Sweet, president of the club, who presented them
to Mr. Odell. The clubhouse was adorned with
flowers and an Hungarian orchestra provided
music.
Among the guests were State officers, several
of the New-York State delegation in Congress
and other prominent public officials. President
McKinley and members of his Cabinet sent re-
Krets. The President wrote that only the press
of public duties prevented him from attending
the gathering.
TO PARADE AT ODELL INAUGURATION.
Albany. Dec. 21 (Special).— Another military or
ganization has been added to the list of those
which will parade here on New Year's Day, when
Mr. Ortell will take the oath of office as Governor
of the State. This organization is the Albany
Burgesses' Corps, a citizens' military company.
ACTOR FAINTB O\ THE STAGE.
EDWIN ABDEN OVERCOME AT THE KNICKER
BOCKER WHILES PLAYING IN 'I,'AIOUOH.*'
The performance of 'L'AJgrlon" at the Knick
erbocker Theatre last night was interrupted by
the fainting of Edwin Arden. who plays the part
of Prince Metternich. It was just before the
mirror scene, which forms the climax of the sec
ond act, that the actor suddenly fell forward in
a faint. The curtain was lowered, and a doctor
who waa in the audience went on the stage to
attend to the sick. man. In about fifteen min
utes th« understudy for the part, Clayton Legge,
was ready to go on. and the play was resumed
where it had been interrupted. The understudy
continued to play the part through the next
act, *vnd by that time Mr. Arden was able to re
sume his part, which he acted through the rest
of the play.
.s.LVT.I FE STRIKE AT AS BSD,
Houston. Tex., Dec. 21.— The telegraphers*
strike on the Gulf. Colorado and Santa Fe Hall
way was called off to-night.
TO WASHINGTON IN FIVE HOURS.
From New York, Royal Blue 5-hour trains, leave
foot of Liberty it. 11.30 A. M., 1.00 P. M.. and the
'•Royal Limited"— excess fare— at 3:40 I 1I 1 M.
Other fast solid trains at 8.00. 10.00 A. M.. 1.30. 5.01.
7.00 •». M. and 12.15 night. Leave South Kerry 5
minutes eariic-r Best dining and caf6 cur bi-rvlct
la ma world.— AjVL. . . - .-.'.¦-*;*', t>- : i, ¦
GARDINKI! MAY SEEK WRIT
RUICOB OF INJUNCTION TO KKS CHAIN
GOVERNOR'S ACTION ON CHARGES.
[BT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUWS.J
Albany, Dec. 21.— District Attorney Gardiner
of New-York was expected to reach here this
evening and take quarters at the Hotel Ten
Eyck, in preparation for his appearance before
Governor Roosevelt to-morrow, but at midnight
he had not arrived. There were rumors that he
was contemplating injunction proceedings
against the Governor to stop the trial to-mor
row. The Governor, it was stated at a late hour,
had not heard of any such proceedings, nor were
any known to Attorney-General Davies. It is
the official opinion here that the courts cannot
Issue an injunction asalnst the Governor, and
would not do so if the District Attorney should
request it.
Colonel Gardiner can look forward to another
unpleasant day with Governor Roosevelt to
morrow in thr . :xecutlve Chamber, although the
reports are false that the Governor has thus far
ffiven any intimation as to his probable decision
in dealing with the charges made against the
District Attorney because of his alleged neglect
to attempt to punish those guilty of violations
of the election laws of New-York. Neither in
public nor private conversation has the Gov
ernor said he would remove the District At
torney.
The District Attorney will have a fair trial,
and if he makes what seems to the Governor a
conclusive reply to the charges against him he
will be acquitted, but the Governor is resolved
that the District Attorney shall complete what
he has to say to-morrow, and not postpone to
some more convenient season his explanation of
his acts as District Attorney. The Governor said
to-day that he was resolved to finish his hearing
of District Attorney Gardiner's reply to-morrow,
even if he had to sit up till midnight to do so.
He has informed District Attorney Gardiner that
there can be no postponement of the hearing,
that the complaint will not he referred to a
commissioner for examination.
It is rumored here that if District Attorney
Gardiner is removed John Proctor Clarke will
probably be appointed as his successor.
An effort was made last night to see District
Attorney Gardiner and several of his assistants,
but it was unsuccessful.
THINK GARDINER MUST GO.
POLITICIANS BELIEVE HIS REKJN IN
CEXTRE-ST. IS NEARLY OVER.
Although District Attorney Asa Bird Gardiner
and some of his assistants have said they believe
Ms answer to the charges of Deputy Attorney-
General John Henry Hammond is complete, and
that Governor Roosevelt will not venture to re
move an official elected by the people on such
charges, politicians of both political camps in
the city yesterday said they thought the end of
Mr. Gardiner's reign in the Criminal Courts
Building would terminate soon after Christmas.
Mr. Hammond has been in Albany two days,
conferring with Attorney-General Davies. It is
known that the Governor had the charges in his
possession two days before he sent his order to
the District Attorney to appear at Albany to
day and make his defence. The politicians
think they see in the Governor's action an indi
cation that he believes Mr. Gardiner should be
removed summarily if the charges are proved.
District Attorney Gardiner and several of his
assistants will go to Albany this morning and
appear before the Governor at the hearing which
is set down for 11:30 a. m. It is expected that
Mr. Hammond will have an opportunity to pre
sent evidence in support of the charges at the
hearing, and that then the District Attorney
will have a chance to uphold the statements
made in his answer, filed with the Governor on
Thursday. Persons familiar with the case said
yesterday that they thought the Governor would
not take lojik to give a decision.
Members of the City Club who took a deep
interest In the charges which were heard before
Commissioner Ansley Wilcojr have declared that
the charges against District Attorney Gardiner
were proved, and that the dismissal of Mr.
Gardiner from office should have followed. They
hrive said, however, that the extreme desire of
Mr. Wilcox to appear disinterested made him In
cline to favor Mr. Gardiner in every way possi
ble. He was so determined to be upright. It has
been said, that he actually leaned backward. It
has been said, too, that Mr. Gardiner's supposed
serious illness led Mr. Wilcox to sympathize with
him. Mr. Gardiner's sudden restoration to vig
orous health as soon as the Governor dismissed
the City Club's charges caused some of the City
Club men to c'eclare that Mr. Wilcox had been
badly fooled. They have said that the Governor
probably will not allow Mr. Gardiner to escape
a second tine, If the charges presented by Mr.
Hammond are proved at the hearing to-day.
BRITISH ISLES STORM SWEPT.
MANY DISASTERS TO SHIPPING AROUND
THE COASTS.
Ixjndon. Dec. 21.— The storm appears to have
reached Its height during the night, and while the
Kale is still severe and the «as very heavy it Is
hoped thnt the worst is over. Stories of wrecks
and damage are coming from all directions, but
happily tru- fatalities are few.
The gale has done great damage generally in the
North of England and Scotland. A Glasgow cor
respondent says:
Not since the storm which destroyed the Tay
Bridge has such a gale raged in Scotland. Hiirh
walls have been wrecked in Glasgow. At Coat
bridge, ten miles east of Glasgow, several people
have been killed, while at numerous other places
roofs and chimneys have been destroyed and per
sons injured. Some of the buildings of the Uni
versity of Aberdeen have been seriously damaged.
and everywhere telegraph wires, telephones and
railway lines are interrupted.
The latest news from the White Star Line
¦tnamriT Cufic, which was in need of assistance
yesterday off the Skerries while on her way from
Queenstown to Liverpool in town, is that she <s
still riding heavily at anchor a mile southwest of
the Skerries.
The Cuflc reports very rough weather from Tues
day. December 4. until Sunday. December 9, when
the accident to her propeller occurred. She was In
great danger until the Kansas City took her in
tow and brought her to Queensto^p. After leaving
Queenstown the slorm increased In violence, and
the tugs were unable to make much headway. As
she approached the Skerries the tow ropes parted.
The captain dlsplay-d great presence of mind. and.
fortunately, the anchors held. Tugs hovered around,
unable to assist. The distre.-s signals, however, met
with h prompt response, but the work of rescue
was most dangerous, as great seas broke over the
steam lifeboat. The crew were landed In a very
exhausted condition
According to the latest information it is hoped
that the Cufic may be towed to Liverpool as soon
as the weather moderates.
The Britlslt ship Clan Macfarlane (from Toco-
Ci!a. October 20. for the Channel) drifted on a sand
ank north of Southport. A lifeboat went out to
her and found she had been abandoned. Her sails
were blown tc shreds and she will probably be
i. iota' wreck.
Skibhereen reports the British steamer Allsa
wald -m the rocks off Sherkin Island. She will be
a tiitii 1 wreck. Her crew of twenty-four men is
report- ¦¦ to have readied the shore.
The i .trtugiif-se bark Alvaro, Captain Coelho,
from I'nllad'-lphia. November 28, for Lisbon, was
abandoned in a sinking condition in latitude 39,
longitude *i degrees. The British steamer Ays
gurth Captain Smith, from Galveston via Norfolk,
December 4, for Antwerp, pasxed Isle of Wight
to-day ami signalled «she had the crew safely on
board.
There have been numerous minor wrecks. The
pn-» lasted all night, and blew almost with hur
ricane force at times. Telegraph lines are down In
all directions, communication with Scotland Is cut
oft. the Mersey ferryboats have suspended service
ami Channel pansares have been the most tem
peMtuouv In years
CALIFORNIA EXCURSION'S
in thmigh tourist cars every day in the year. Two
fast trains from Chicago via Chicago and North
wptuern. Union and Southern Pacific Railways.
H»>st of everything. Tickets and full information at
Northwestern Line Offlce. *51 Broadway.— Advt.
SX-GOV. WOLCOTT DEAD. CHIEF DHVERY OVERRULED
KAMA* m skttss DUmHOI MOD SON MLAn;HL , N SENT BACK T0 BROOKLYN
v VI, TIM OF TYPHOID. BY THE BOARD.
THRICE KLJECTKD KXECUTIVE OK THE BAY
STATE-DECLINED THE POST OF
AMBASSADOR TO ITALY
Boston, Dec. 21 (Special).— Former Governor
Roger Wok-ott died at his home, in Common
wealth-aye., this afternoon at .'{:-M> o'clock. The
end came very peacefully ami easily. The Gov
ernor returned from an extended European tour
early in November, and was at that time in ex
cellent health. Within two weeks, however, he
was seized with typhoid fever. Up to Wednes
day he was not considered in great danger, and
even to-day the physicians said that men in
worse condition than Governor Wolcott re
covered.
The following tribute to the distinguished ex-
Governor was Riven by Governor \V. Murray-
Crane to-night:
In the death of ex-Governor Wolcott Massa
chusetts has suffered a great loss. As Governor
and Lieutenant-Governor he served the Com
monwealth with ability, fidelity and distinction.
His standard of life was high. As a public offi
cial he won and retained to a remarkable de
gree the confidence and affection of the people.
In every relation he was true, manly ami op
riffht. It seems doubly sad that a life so valu
able should be cut off in the maturity of its
powers, for Governor Wolcott had every reason
to look forward to many years of useful and
honorable achievements. His death is mourned
sincerely and his family has ;he deepest sympa
thy of the people of the Commonwealth in their
bereavement. As for my relations with Gov
ernor Wolcott. he was always most kind, help
ful and true, and to me his death is a great
personal Errief.
Roger Wolcott was born in Boston, July IS.
1847, the son of J. Huntington and Cornelia
Frothingham-Wolcott. He is a descendant of
th<- Roger Wolcott who was second in command
in the expedition of Sir William Pepperell
against Cape Breton in 174.". which resulted in
the capture of Louisburg. Another ancestor
was Oliver Wolcott, one of the sisners of the
Declaration of Independence. Both of these
Wolcotts were Governors of Connecticut. One
of his ancestors, on his mother's side, was active
and prominent during the Revolutionary period
as a member of the Charlestown Committee of
Safety, and another took part in the "Beaton.
Tea Party "
Roger Wolcott was educated in Boston private
schools and at Harvard University, from which
he was graduated In the class of '70. In col
lege he ranked high, and was the choice of his
classmates for orator. He was graduated from
Harvard Law School in 1874. and was admitted
to the Suffolk bar In the same year. He prac
tised but little, however, his time having been
largely occupied by his duties as trustee of
various estates and in the management of finan
cial matters.
Ex-Governor Wolcott's public career began in
1577. as a member of the Boston Common Coun
cil, In which he served three years. Then he
was elected to the lower house of the Legis
lature, where he served from ISS2 to 18S4. tak
ing a position among the leaders and winnins
distinction as a hard and trustworthy worker.
He was elected Lieutenant-Governor in IBM>
ISO 4 and ISOn, and upon the death of Governor
Greenhalge became Acting Governor in IS9*S.
la the fall of IWKJ he was elected Governor, and
In WSfl and 1808 he was re-elected.
Mr. Wolcott was always a Republican, but in
the campaign of ISS4 he opposed his party"s
candidate for the Presidency, and voted for
Grover Clt eland. He belonged to a aumber of
reform organizations, among others the Boston
Citizens' Association and the Civil Service Re
form Association. He was a trustee of the
Massachusetts General Hospital, an over
seer of Harvard University and a member of
many social clubs
Shortly after the resignation of General Will
iam F. Draper as Ambassador to Italy, in lflflO,
President BfcKlnley tendered the post to Mr.
Wolcott. The offer was declined on account of
the pressure of private business affairs.
On September 2. 1574. Mr. Wolcott was mar
ried to Miss Edith Prescott, granddaughter of
William H. Prescott, the historian, and great
granddaughter of Colonel William Prescott. who
commanded the Provincials at the Battle of
Bunker Hill. They have four sons and one
daughter now living.
COLLEGK STUDENTS (LASH.
POLICE PREVENT TROUBLE BETWEEN
RIVAL SOCIETIES AFTER A DE
BATE IN THE GARDEN.
A clash took place last night between the
freshmen and sophomores of- the College of the
City of New-York. The police of the West
Thirtieth-st. station, in command of Captain
Thomas, however, prevented serious trouble.
The occurrence was a result of the annual de
bate in- the Concert Hall of Madison Square
Garden between the Clionian and Phrenocosmian
Literary societies.
The debate had proceeded about half nay
when the sophomo-es who occupied the gallery
with the freshmen made an effort to steal the
latter's banner. Then was a clash, and the au
dience, which was large and contained many
women, was almost panic stricken.
A messenger went to the West Thirtieth st
station, and Captain Thomas, with a roundsman
and a detail of ten patrolmen, was soon at the
Garden. They entered the gallery, and soon
had driven the students into the street. In the
mean time the freshmen rud regained their ban
ner after a hard fight. The members of both
classes assembled on the Twenty-sixth-st. si.le
of the Garden and made several efforts to get at
each other, but the police prevented further
trouble.
The student 3 remained in the neighborhood
until after midnight, when it was announced
that the judges had awarded the debate to the
Clionian Literary Society. The members and
friends of the victorious organization to the
number of lfiO assembled in Madison-aye. and
marched through Madison Square to Broadway,
and then uptown, singing college songs and
cheering. The losing society and its followers
marched up Fifth-aye.
At midnight it was feared that more trouble
might occur, and Roundsman Corey was sent to
the Garden with a number of additional police.
but their services were not needed, although
after the debate had been finished the students
made every effort to clash in Madison-aye.
The question debated was. "Resolved. That a
partition of the Chinese Empire such as the
Powers would agree to would neneflt the <"hi
nese."
The Clionian Society debated the affirmative
side, and the Phrenocosmian Society the nega
tive.
The judges were Colonel Alexander P.
Ketchum. Justice David Leventritt and John
Whalen, Corporation Counsel.
BALTIMORE XATIOSAL RAXK FAILS.
Baltimore. Dec. 21.— The Baltimore Clearing
House, at a meeting this evening, declined to ex
tend further credit to the American National
Bank, of Baltimore. Upon their action anil the
report of an official of the Controller's depart
ment, who conferred with the Clearing House of
ficials. Controller Da.wes to-night appointed J.
Frank Aldrlch temporary receiver. This Is the
first failure of a National bank in Baltimore.
For some time past there has been a shrinkage
In deposits and the losses have been large. it Is
not thought, however, that depositors will lose
much. In the last report to the Controller, on
October 25. the reaurces were given «*: l*oan.» and
discounts. JG97.S3U; overdrafts. 027430; United
States bonds and premiums, $106,000; due from
banks. $75,418 CO. Liabilities— stock, sur
plus and undivided profits. C39.<CS7S: due to banks.
$233,711:3: deposits. $333,209 SS; circulating notes.
nooouO. The American Is one of the youngest of
the National banks of Baltimore.
A WORD TO THE W |
I» sufficient when speaking of the merits of the
Pennsylvania Limited.— Advt.
Beyond question, the best Cough remedy is
JAYNfS'S EXPECTORANT — Advt.
VlllCK THRKi: CENTS.
CORPORATION COUNSEL HOLDS THAT THE,
CHIEF CANNOT LEGALLY TRANS
FER A DEPUTY CHIEF.
There- was official condemnation yesterday of
the action of Chief of Police Devery in trans
ferring Deputy Chief P. H. McLaughlin away
from the Headquarters in Brooklyn. Corpora
tion Counsel Whalen delivered an opinion to the
effect that the Chief of Police could not transfer
a deputy chief without the consent of the Police
Board. The Board met and unanimously passed
a resolution directing the Acting Chief of Police
to order Deputy Chief MeLaughlin back to duty
In Brooklyn. Devery emerged from his tempo
rary retirement from public gaze long enough to
make a hurried visit to Police Headquarters.
but he refused to talk about the transfers, de
clared that he still was on vacation and went
away from Headquarters before the Board
passed its resolution.
Tammany politicians said they were still **!•
the dark" ac to the future of Devery- They
could not give opinions as to the effect of the
proceedings of yesterday on Devery's case. Sons
of the politicians believe that Devery will have
to go. but others declare that he cannot be
turned out of the Department so long as a
single Commissioner and the Mayor sustain him.
The opinion of Corporation Counsel Whalen.
replying to inquiries by President York of the
Police Board as to the power of the Chief of
Police to transfer a deputy chief who had been
assigned by the Board, quoted the provisions of
the charter and then declared:
The Chief of Police has no authority to assign
a deputy chief in the case specified in Section
320. and if he has not the power to assign di
rectly he has not the power to make an assign
ment Indirectly by means of a transfer.
I must answer your second question, there
fore, by saying that, in my opinion, in the case
where by resolution of the Police Board a dep
uty chief has been assigned to duty in Police
Headquarters in the Borough of Brooklyn, the
Chief of Police has not the power to transfer a
deputy chief so assigned without the authority
and direction of the? Police Board.
DEVERY AT HEADQUARTERS.
Some time before the opinion of the Corpora
tion Counsel was sent to Police Headquarters
Chief Devery jumped out of his cab in Mol
berry-st. and ran into his office. He did not
have his uniform on, and he was puffing a black
cigar. To newspaper men he said he was not on
duty "Just dropped in. that's all," he said, and
when the reporters wanted something more he
declared: "Won't say no more."
Police Captain Herlihy. whose trial was to
have proceeded yesterday, but was postponed,
went in to have a talk with De\ -
President York was informed of the Chief
arrival by reporters.
"Are you going down to see the Chief T' he was.
asked.
President York laughed heartily, and when he
had regained his composure said: "Well, that's
pretty good! No, I don't think I'll go down."
The Police Board had a secret meeting lasting
for half an hour, and then passed a resolution
presented by Mr. York, The . resolution recited
the facts of the recent transfers of Deputy Chiefs
McLaughMn ?»r.d Clayton, and ended with the
following:
Resolved. That the Acting Chief of Police he
and he is hereby directed to forthwith order and
direct Deputy Chief P. H. McLaughlin to report
for duty at once to the Borough of Brooklyn as
Deputy Chief of Police in charge, and Deputy
Chief of Police E. P. Clayton to report for duty
at once to the Borough of Queens as Deputy
Chief in charge, as such assignments were re
spectively naJe by resolution of the Police
Board adopted March 9 and July 2«. 1900.
President York, Commissioner Sexton and
Commissioner Hess were recorded as voting"
"aye." Commissioner Abell was recorded as
fellows:
In obedience to the opinion of the Corporation
Counsel as the law officer of the city, whether I
have a different opinion or not. "aye."
Devery left Police Headquarters before the
action of the Police Board was announced.
SHEVLIN PLACATED. M'LAUGHLIN XOT.
"We are convinced that Tammany Hall had
nothing to do with the recent transfers. The
return of Deputy Chief McLaughlin to Brooklyn
has proved that to our mind. Devery seems to
have acted on his own responsibility, and things
have now been straightened out. The Brooklyn
organization is satisfied, so far."
Thus spoke James Shevlin, one of the Will
oughby-st. leaders, last night after he had
learned of the action of the Police Board.
Shevlin seemed to be delighted that all danger
of a break with Tammany Hall had passed
away. He seems to be perfectly 'willing to be
placated simply by the return of McLaughlin
to Brooklyn.
Hugh McLaughlin. the veteran boss, has got
through talking. He was evidently aware of the
action which was to be taken by the Police
Board, as he expressed no surprise when told
that Deputy Chief McLaughlin had been re
turned to Brooklyn.
'•What have you got to say about it?" he was
asked.
"Well, what is there to say now?*
"He certainly looks happy." said a friend
standing near by.
"Well, the reporter ought to know that, any
way," replied Mr. McLaughlin.
Mr. McLaughlin is. of course, pleased with his
victory, but It is not thought mat he feels so
sure that Tammany had nothing to do with,
Devery's transfers. He has never had any love
for Tammany, and never will. He intends to see
that Devery is removed. It Is believed that
Shevlin.- knowing that Devery is a favorite of
Croker. would be willing to "call things square"
now that Deputy Chief McLaughlin has bees,
returned But the other Brooklyn leaders want
Devery's head, and will not be perfectly satis
fied until they get it.
HKRLIHY 7ff/U MAY BE SLOW.
LAWYER SEEKS TO PROVIDE FOR FRE
QUENT ADJOURNMENTS BE
FOREHAND.
The trial of Captain Herllhy. formerly of the
Twelfth Precinct, who has been charged by the
Police Board with inefficiency, violations of the
rules of the Department and conduct unbecoming
an officer. In Insulting the Rev. Robert L. Paddock,
of the Pro-Cathedral, was formally: begun in the
trial room at Police Headquarters yesterday after
noon. Ex-Judge W. M. K. Olcott was counsel for
the Police Board in the prosecution of the charges
and Louis J. Grant defended Herlihy.
There was a conference between Mr. Olcott and
the Commissioners In President York's office which
lasted until 1:30 o'clock. At last they entered the>
Board room and President York asked:
"Is Captain Herlihy here?"
•Yes." the Captain responded.
"Do you acknowledge the proper serving of th«
charges, and have you read them?" asked Presi
dent York of the Captain.
•I do." replied the Captain.
"Then how do you plead?"
"Not guilty." was the reply of the defendant
He was interrupted by Mr. Grant, who said:
"He pleads not guilty through counsel."
Mr. Grant asked for an adjournment, and Fxida) -
WHY SO MANY TRAVEL THIS WAT.
"Because we like beautiful scenery. prosperous
cities and growing towns, and when the train stops
we have arrived somewhere. That Is why wo travel
by the New York Central." -iCommer -mu Tray
eler.-Advt. . . ***

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