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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 23, 1900, Image 28

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14
MUSICAL NOTES.
THE WEEKLY CALENDAR— SECOND WEEK
OP THE OPERA-RUSSELL, AND HIS
SONGS— NEWS NOTES. ANNOUNCE- •
MENTS AND PROGRAMMES.
Sunday— Metropolitan Opera House. 8:15 p. m.. pop
ular concert: Church of ih» Divine Paternity.
7:« p. m.. special service. "The Music of Eng
land." - i * . . . " '
Metropolitan .Opra House, 7:46 .p. m.,
-, German opera, "Die • WalkUre."
Tuesday— Day .V;'-. .
Wednesday— CarnPide Hall. 2 p. m.. performance
of Handel's "Messiah" by the Oratorio Society;
Metropolitan . Opera House, 8 p. m., Italian
opera. Puccini . "La Bob#rne." • ¦ 4 -:. * . :
Thursday— Hall. 8 p. m., performance of-
Handel's -Messiah" by ¦ the Oratorio Society:
Waldorf- Astoria, 'concert by the Musical Clubs
•of Cornell University. " ' • ".- • ;*, t.-.'^j"'
Friday— Metropolitan Opera House. 8 p. m.. Ger
> mm opera, Beethoven's "Pldelio."
Saturday— «Hall, 2:16 p. m., concert for
young people, under direction' of Frank Dam
roach; Metropolitan Opera House, 2p. — Ital
ian opera. "La Boh?me"; 8 p. m., French opera,.
"Romeo et Juliette." •
The operatic list for this week at the Metropol
itan Opera House Is as follows: Monday evening,
beginning at 7:45 ; o'clock. "Die. Walkure" In Ger
man: Wednesday evening, "La Boh*me." by Puc
cini. in Italian; Friday evening, "Fidelio" In Ger
man; Saturday afternoon. La Bohtaie"; Saturday
evening. "Romeo et Juliette" In French. The casts
are as follows:
"DIB WAUCI'ERE." -
Bl»rmun<l Mr. Van Dyck
HumJlnx Mr. Blass
Wotaa . Mr Bertram
Flepllnde .........Mme. Gadskl
Flick* Mine. Schumann-Heink
Orhilde .......:......;..Ww. Van Cameron
Ortllnde •..;......:;. Mian Bau«>rm»ister
Wtltraute -• -Mine. Schumann-Heink
Sch*ertlrtt# -•-... Ml" Rwnl
Heimwieg* „ „, M lts Marylll
Me* Tune Miss Marylll
Orlmserde • V/. Ml*" Olltzka
Rosf-trelne Miss Bridewell
BrUnohiiae ...ill»» Milks. Ternlna
Conductor. Walter Damrosch.
"LA BOHEME."
•...—I Mme. Melba.
SS u «i-na .' " HIM Fritil fieheff
Hodolf? Mr. Sal«a.
Ma-cello Mr - Campanari
fcKrt V...;...... Mr. Glllbert
f fl ] ; ir< . ; Mr. Journet
AlclniToro. . } _ Mr. Dufrlche
S™'ra"oV .' Mr. Maslero
Pan "* n conduct"^." Mr. MancineMl.
•KIDELJO."
—„,»„„ Miss Milka Temtna
Mareell''n#' V.V. :::.: Mlsb Fritrl Schen*
R^" r " •;;:;;;;;:;..; Mr. buss
Va£u?no Mr. Hubbenet
Her Minirtcr-.-.-.V.V.V.'.V. Mr Muhimann
Flore»tan •• .....Mr. Dippel
Conductor. Walter r>amrosch.
V .— The "Leonora" Overture N->. 3 will be played
between Acts I and 11.
¦"ROMEO ET JULIETTE"
T,;ii«tt» Mi»s Suzanne Adams
tephu-' ' V.'.V. Ml.* Carrie Bridewell
Gertrude Mis. Bauermelster
pv, r « Laurent ¦......: '••• M. Flangon
?H,ulet .":.......:.....¦...;..... --Mr- Glllbert
Tvhait Mr. Jacaues Bar*
MemitVo" . Mr Sixes
1* Due de ' Verone".::::. Mr. Dufriche
Greeorlo - Mr wIVw 1V alli
ncnvogllo Mr Masiero
8E5T.!...'.. Mr. Ma
Conductor. Mr. Flon.
Henry Russell is dead, at the age of nearly eighty- |
eight years. To the younger generation this an
nouncement will mean little, for it no longer sings
"A Life on the Ocean Wave." "Woodman, Spare
That Tree." "The Old Arm Chair." "Cheer. Boys,
Cheer!" and "The Ivy Green"; but the elder gen
eration did sing these songs throughout the length
and breadth of America, and its more venerable
elements did so under the Inspiration of the com
poser himself, who spent one of the most pros
perous periods of his life in this country sixty years
ago. Russell was born at Sheerness on Christmas
Eve. 1812. He studied mut'.c at Bologna, and was
the friend of Rossini. Bellini. Donizetti and Balfe.
For a while he was chorus master at Her Majes
ty's Theatre, but in 1833 came to America, and re
mained till 1841. He retired from his public life
as composer and singer long ago. and. it is said,
made a fortune as a note broker in London.
The words of "A Life on the Ocean Wave" were
written by Epes Sargent, who died in Boston In
1880. He told the story of its composition to Helen
Kendrick Johnson, who printed it as follows in her
book. "Oir Familiar Songs and Their Authors":
"A Life en the Ocean Wave" was written for
Henry Russell. The subject of the song was sug
gested to me as I was walking one breety, *un
ftrlrht morning in spring on the Bittery, in New-
York, and looking out upon the ships and the
small craft un<".er full sail. Having completed my
song and walk together. I went to the office of
"The Mirror,"' wrote out the words, and showed
them to my quod friend. Georg« P. Morris. After
reading the piere he said: "My dear boy, this is
not a sonp: it will nf-ver do for music; but it is a
very nice Uttl.< lyric, so let me take it and publish
it In 'The Mirror.' " I consented, and concluded
that M"rrl? was- right. Some days after the pub
lication of the piecp I met Russell. "Where is
that song**" asked he. "I tried my hand at one
and failed." raid I "How do you know that?"
"Morris tell* me it won't answer." "And Is Morris
Infallible? Hand me the piece, young man. and
let us go into Hewitt's back room here, at the
corner of Park Place and Broadway, and see what
w» can make out of your lines "
We passed through the trusic store. Russell
reated himself at the piano, read over the lines
attentively, murmured an air or two to himself,
then ran his flnpers over the keys, then stopped as
If nonplussed. Suddenly a bright idea seemed to
dawn upon him. a melody had all at once floated
into hie brain, and he heEsn to hum it. and to
sway himself to itp movement. Then, striking the
keys tentativ.lv ;i few tim«F. he at last confidently
launched int.) the aJr since known as "A Life on
the Ocean Wave." 'I've got it!" he exclaimed. It
was all the work of a few minutes. I pronounced
the melody a ¦¦rcit— . and it proved so. The copy
right of the song became very valuable, though
I never got anything from it myself. It at once
became a favorite, and soon the bands were play
ing it In the streets A year or two after its pub
lication. I received from England copies of five or
six different edition? that had been Issued there
by competing publishers.
George P. Morris, who pronounced against the
value of "A Life on the Ocean Wave" for song
purposes, was the associate of Nathaniel P. Willis
In conducting those journal*, beloved of our
mothers and grandmothers— "The Mirror." "The
New Mirror" and "Home Journal." "He wrote
several songs for Russell, the most famous of
•which Is (or was) "Woodman. Spare ; That Tree!"
He has left us an account of how that song came
to be written, in the stately and sentimental style
of a period that seems much further removed from
to-day than it really is:
Riding out of town a few days since, in company
¦with a friend who was once the expectant heir of
the largest estate in America, but ' over whose
worldly property a blight has recently come, he
Invited me to turn down a little, romantic wood
land pass, not far from Bloomlngdale. "Your ob
ject?" Inquired I. "Merely to look once more at
the old tree planted by my grandfather, near a
cottage that was once my father's." . "The place
Is yours, then?" Raid I. "No. my mother sold
it" — and I observed a slight quiver of the lip at
the recollection. "Dear mother!" resumed my com
panion. "We passed many, many happy days in
that old cottage, but It is nothing to me now.
Father, mother, sisters, cottage., all are gone!"
After a moment's pause he added: "Don't think
me foolish. I don't know how it is I never ride
out but I turn down this lane to look at the old
tree. I have a thousand recollections about It. and
I always greet it as a familiar and well remem
bered friend. In th« bygone summer time it was a
friend, indeed: Its leaves are. all off now. so you
won't «* it to advantage, for it is a glorious old
fellow in summer, but I like it full as. well in the
winter time." These words were scarcely uttered
when my companion cried out, "There it is!" Near
the tree stood en old man. with his coat off,
sharpening an axe. He was the occupant of the
cottage. "What do you intend doing?" asked my
friend in great anxiety. "What is that to you,?"
was the blunt reply. "You are not going to cut
that tree down, surely." "Yes. I am. though." said
the woodman. "What for?" inquired my com
panion, almost choked with emotion. "What for?
Why. because 1 think proper to do so. What for?
I like that! Well. I'll tell you what for. This tree
makes my dwelling unhealthy— it stands too near
the house. It renders us liable to fever and ague "
"Who told you that?" "Dr. S." "Have you any
other reason for wishing to cut it down?" "Yes
I am getting eld. the woods are a great way off.
and this tree is of some value to me to burn " He
was soon convinced, however, that the story about
the fever and ague was a mere fiction, for there
had never been a case of that disease in the neigh
borhood, and was then asked what the tree was
worth for firewood. "Why. when its's down, about
HO. "Suppose I make you a present of. that
amount, will you let it stand?" "Yes." "You are
sure of that?" "Positive." "Then give me a bond
to that *fTect.' I drew it up. It was witnessed by
his daughter, the money was paid, and we left the
£!, wlth an assurance from th young girl, who
!»£i*?K "? «ot"nK * nd beautiful as a young Hebe.
that the tree should stand as long as she lived
A pendant to tin* story came from the composer.
who. recounting some of his experiences, says:
m££? t tlJ} m ?~* a ?. X the noble ballad of "Woodman.
XSEf^&f 1 U l?' * l ?°ulo»ne. an old gentleman
among the audience who was f really moved by the
Skf^l*!^™ ""* seau5 eaut £ °' the »«>rds rroyL y and
¦aw such excitement In any concert room!
Touching an American incident which had an ln
•t*rizg effect upon his carter, Russell haa also left
a record. At Rochesterhe heard Henry Clay make
a speech. The orator made a deep Impression upon
him. "I do not think I shall be talking extrava
gantly," he says, "If I declare that the orator
Clay was the direct cause of my taking to the com
position of descriptive songs. I asked myself: 'If
Henry Clay can create such an ; Impression , by his
distinct enunciation of every word, why should It
not be possible for me to make music the vehicle
of grand thoughts and noble sentiments— to speak
to the wo^ld through the power of poetry and
song?' The Sdea gained upon me. I became more
and more fascinated with the thought not only
of trying my fortune as a vocalist, but also of
composing my own songs." His first attempt was
a setting of Mackay's poem, "Wind of the winter
night, whence comest thou?" and from that day
onward song composing became the supreme object
of his life.
In Its obituary notice of Russell "The Dally
News," of London, says:
Russell himself has left on record the prices he
received for hit* various songs. They averaged 10s.
each. For "The Ship on Fire." however, he re
ceived a guinea; "The Maniac." £1; "The Gambler's
Wife," £1; "The Ivy Green," 10s.; "There's a Good
Time Coming. Boys." £2: "Cheer, Boys. Cheer," £3:
"The Slave Ship." £1; "Man the Lifeboat," £1. and
"Woodman, Spare that Tree," Bs. There was no
FRAULEIN FRTTZI SCHEFF.
Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Company.
"royalty ' system in those days; but Russell man
aged to amass a competence by singing his songs,
his entertainments being- for a long time most
lucrative Most of his songs were sentimental,
and some were of a domestic character. "The Old
Arm Chair," for example, was set to a poem spe
cially written for him by Eliza Cook, whom Russell
knew very well indeed, and of whom he had many
agreeable anecdotes. "The Ivy Green" was, of
course, to Dickens's words, and was sung — or pre
tended to be sung— by that eminent novelist al. his
iarewell reading at St. James's Hall, in 1870. Rus
sell was a personal friend of Dickens, and the dead
composer's mind was also fully stored with recol
lections of other acquaintances, such as Lady
Blessington, Disraeli and Macaulay (whom as a
youth he met at Gore House), Samuel Kogers, Bul
wer Lytton. Thackeray, Landsec • and Mark
Lemon, besides Fenimore Cooper, Judge Halibur
ton, Daniel Webster, John Brahani and President
Harrison, whom he met in America. Toward the
end of his public career his entertainment was
elaborated, and in 'The Far West" it was fur
nished by Mackay with some sort of consistent
plot, and with scenery by Mills. In 1889 the com
pliment was paid him of an Admiralty order to the
Royal Marines directing them to use "A Life on the
Ocean Wave" as one of theh- regimental marches.
The friends of Miss Sara Anderson reed not be
surprised if they hear before long that she has
entered upon an operatic career. She has been
studying in Berlin, and will soon go to Bayreuth
to prepare to take part in the festival perform
ances next summer.
The Sunday night concerts at popular prices,
which have long been a feature of the regular
season at the M-?tropolita.i Orera House, will have
their beginning to-night, when Signor Mancinelli
will conduct the orchestra and there will be a per
formance of Rossini's "Stabat Mater," preceded by
a miscellaneous concert. The solos In the "Stabat
Mater" will be sung by Mmes. Nordlca and Schu
FRAU ERNESTINE BCHUMANN-HEINK.
As Fricka in "Die Walkure."
(Copyright by Alme Dupont.)
mann-Heink. and MM. Cremoninl and Plane.on.
Following Is the programme of the first part of the
concert :
Overture. "William Tell" Roesini
Air, "Ah, rr.on nUV Meyerbeer
Miss Carrie Bridewell.
Air from "Tannhauser" Warner
Mr. Gllibert. r
"Spirtto Gentll" Donizetti
Mr. Cremonini.
Aria and recitative from "La Relne de Saba"... Gounod
Miss Susan Strong.
•Inno Sa/rro " . Bunl-Pecda
Mr. Campanaii.
Overture. "tMnorah" Meyerb*#i-
Orchestra and cborut.
The sale of seats for the two song recitals of Mr
and Mre. Goerg Henschel, on January 8 and 10^
will open on Monday morning at Sehuberth's music
store. No. 23 Union Square. These recitals will
"positively be the only appearance of Mr and Mrs
Henschel in this city this season." says their agent
On January 7 the annual concert for the benefit
of the Worklngmen's School and District Nursing
Department will take place in Carnegie Hall under
the direction of Mr. Henry Wolfsohn. A mlsc^la
neous programme will be given by Mr and Mr«
Georg Henschel. Ernst yon Dohrfanvl »n?i p „
Kreißler. The Bchoo! is under the «pi ci,,l t?oter»lon
of the Society for Ethical Culture protection
The Manuscript Music Society, of Philadelphia
offers a prize of $100 for an instrumental compost
tion. not larger than a Quintet nor smaller than a
trio. Each conwoslUea must be inscribed with a
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUTE. SUNDAY^DECEMBEK 23. 1900.
non, d« plume, or motto. The name of the com
poser must not appear or. the composition. But an
accompanying envelope must contain the true name
and address nf the composer, and must be inscribed
on the outside with the norn de plume or motto.
Thf work submitted must be absolutely new. not
having been published nor publicly performed. The
judges will bo three musicians of National reputt-.
not resident in Philadelphia. The successful com
position will be performed ;it the first con
cert of the society after the declaration of the
prize. All rights in tne HMeSMCW composition art'
to remain the property of the composer. All com
positions must by April L 1901, be in th» hands
of the secretary, Mr. Philip H. Goepp, No. 1,024
Chestnut-st.
H. M. Hlrschberg r.nnounces a song recital by-
David Blepham at Mendelssohn Hall on Tuesday
afternoon. January 15. Mr. Blspham will be assist
ed by Hermann Hans Wetzler at the piano.
The Oratorio Society will give Its annual per
formances of Handel's "Messiah" at Carnegie Hall
next Wednesday afternoon and Thursday even-
Ing. The solos will be in the hands of Mme. Lillian
Blauvelt. Mrs. Morris Black, H. Evans Williams
and David Bispham.
On New Tear's Eve at Carnegie Hall a grand
popular concert will be given at which Mme. Sem
brich will sing for the last lime in New-York pre
vious to the beginning of the opera tour, and it
will also serve to mark the American debut of
several members of the opera company which will
support her. Together with Mme. Sembrich on the
programme. Signor Lara, Slgnor Bensaude. Signor
Rossi and Signor Dado will appear, and a full
orchestra under the conductorshlp of Signor
Bevignani will assist. Signor Lara is the leading
tenor of the company, Signor Bensuade the bary
tone, Signor Dado the bass and Signor Rossi the
bass buffo. Signor Bensaude 1b remembered as
having been the leading barytone of the Damrosch
Opera Company two seasons ago, while Signor
Dado has not been heard in America except with
the last company that Colonel Mapleson brought
to this country during their very short season.
Signor Lara and Signor Rossi are entirely new to
the country. Signor Lara sang with Mme. Sem
brich In Berlin and achieved great success. Signor
Rossi is regarded as the leading Italian bass buffo
of the day. A most interesting programme has
been prepared.
Alma Powell, an American singer, who made a
successful appearance as the Queen in "Lea
Huguenots" at the Stadt Theatre in Breslau four
weeks ago, and afterward sang at the Dresden
Opera House, has been engaged for five years at
the Royal Opera House, Berlin, commencing next
September.
Following Is the programme for the Symphony
Concert for Young People at Carnegie Hall next
Saturday afternoon: The German Christmas song,
"Holy Night," will be sung by Mr. Leland Lang
ley and a chorus of three hundred. Mrs. De Moss
will eing the recitative. "There Were Shepherds "
from Handel's "Messiah."'
M *£. h of The Kings, from "Chrl.tu.".... T ,„«.
S2SS H^hV'^
.<<>> Pastoral Symphony .
H SS33S»*»lr Handel
Hallelujah Chorus, from "The Messiah." "
Ing of this week In the I ", a ? i y * Yea "
ballroom. The programme iTS'Si^." 1 * Hotel
•Alma Mater." "The Chimes ¦
"SeaegwnWan Patrol".. * Carm. Cornell
"Th. Mennaad and tJe hh * C ln n nba?!l ba ?!« b
"Th. Ameer" Th. Gles Club. " *¦«
"My Mother's Sonr^^fH".?^' **"*"'
'The Feller £&?s£*£)& 8 * '*+ * Jv^ 1 ?
"Campus Reverie" The G1 " aub/ ••-** r>or.
"Th. Dixie Kid" Th « «"J« aub. "V ' °- A - Colem «
**-. "Bonheur rj^''™""**-' -~-' G <™
'"" "f he hie,; ciub: *: ¦¦ ' ¦* ' Oarm - Corae »
FOREIGN NOTEB.-Johanne 8 Mien.en, violinist
fornerly of this city, recently B ave a conce In
Berlin, at which he played a concerto by hl .
brother. Puul Mlersch, and brought furward he
latter's orchestral rhapsody' on Indian themes......
Siegfried • Wagner ' is ~ said 'to have " completed * his
second opera, of which he is also the librettist. It
Is called "Herzo* Wlldfang." and performances are
projected at Munich/and Laipsic before th« close of
this season Richard " . Wagners 'other -"Sieg
fried," the lyric drama, was performed in Madrid
in Spanish on November 14 for the first time.: Nat
urally enough the Madrid -public found little In It
to admire". . . . . .Camille' Saint>Saens_ Is said to he at
work on an opera entitled" '"If a Barbares.* 1 for
which SardoV wrote the book./.*..Th e." fact that all
traces of Mozart's remains " Were lost within a few
weeks' after his burial • is well known." Now
it seems there is danger lest even the spot In: the
Cemetery of St. M.irx. in Vienna.. wh,ere the great
musician found pauper burial, he forgotten. It was
marked by a # simple tablet stone, which has been
stolen. A new finger pok;ha3'been'erected to direct
visitors to the locality. .... .Anton Rubinstein's only
son has gone Incurably insane, and is now the In
mate or a hospital in Parls^He is thirty-flve years
old. and" was for some.* time musical" critic of a
Russian newspaper. , . r j. '„ ¦* •; \rf'*'MV. X'"
THE'} OPERA" "ZAZ'A." « i-
THE LATEST WORK BY LEONCAVALLO
PROVES A DISAPPOINTMENT IN MILAN',
WHERK FIRST PRODUCED.
The expectation raised by the popularity of "I
Pagllaccl" and "La Boheme" has met with partial
disappointment. It had been confidently held that
the success of Berton and Simon's play afforded
good ground for believing that a still greater suc
cess awaited the opera drawn from it, and no one
doubted that Leoncavallo was the man to com
pose the music best suited to such a theme. Be
ing a poet as well jis a composer, he had written
the libretto of his dpara, thus supplying additional
proof that the subject had taken hold of his
fancy. Add to this that the artists engaged by
Slgnor Sonzogno, the lmpressarlo. were first rate,
that the orchestra was directed by Signor Tosca
ninl, that no expense had been spared, and one
may well wonder that, under such favorable
auspices, the result should have proved compara
tively unsatisfactory. The impression conveyed
by the music was that the composer's soul was
not in it, and this being so It naturally failed to
stir the audience.
Unlike the protagonists of other dramatic works
converted into operas and spiritualized by the con
version, "Zaza" loses her original attraction and
appears unreal. It Is wrong to affirm, as some
critics have done, that the choice of the subject
was a mistake. Had Leoncavallo done as much
for "Zaza" as a composer as he had done for her
as a poet, the subject would have proved Inter
esting enough, but, unfortunately, he failed to
bring Into prominent relief the startling psycho
logical moments of his eccentric heroine, and al
lowed the same to melt into a level of uniformity
which unavoidably proved fatal. True, the or
chestra displayed a richness of instrumentation
quite In keeping with the development of the action
on the stage, but it painfully lacked continuity,
being fitful and abounding with fleeting melodies
which appeared to chase one another with disas
trous haste, and certainly was not improved by an
oversonorous accompaniment.
The first act, somewhat too leng, is a lively ka
leidoscope, in which an excessive number of actors
appear and disappear with bewildering rapidity.
Dufresne's song, although admirably sung by Sig
nor Garbin. was coldly listened to, and later on the
"Song of the Kiss" fell flat. As the curtain
dropped the composer was, under protest, called
out five times.
The second act was hardly more successful than
the first. The tenor, after singing "Zaza. Zaza,
non tl attristare," was deservedly applauded, and
so was the barytone, Signor Sanmarco, after the
duet between Cascart and Zaza. He is unquestion
ably an artist of great dramatic power, and in
possession of a magnificent voice. The composer
was called out three time, and Signor Toscaninl,
the conductor, also received tribute.
The prelude to the third act. with a distant
chorus of washerwomen of the Seine. Is distinctly
good, and was appreciated accordingly. This suc
cess was followed by a burst of genuine enthusiasm
over Dufresne's romance, beautifully sung and en
cored. The scene between Zaza (Slgnora Storetrlo)
and the child Toto. In which the former sings and
the latter merely recites, is one on the originality
of which Leoncavallo built great hopes; but, alas,
it missed Its effect, and was only saved from com
plete failure by Zaza's pathetic soliloquy, while
the child played Cherubini's "Aye Maria" on the
piano to a slight and fUful accompaniment by the
orchestra.
The last act is decidedly the best. The air by
Sanmarco. "Zaza plccola zlngara," was encored,
and elicited enthusiastic applause. The scene be
tween th-e two lovers Is full of life, and was inter
preted in a masteriy manner by Signora Storetrio
and by Signor Garbln. When the curtain was
finally dropped Leoncavallo was called out four
times.
At the second performance the house was less
crowded than on the first, but the audience ap
peared better pleased with the opera.
WO CONTEST 7.V MINNESOTA.
St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 21.— A meeting of the Execu
tive Committee of the State Central Democratic
Committee was held here last night and after a
full discussion of all the points. It was decided
to drop the matter of a contest for the Governor
ship. Ever since the November election developed
such a close race for office between Governor Llnd
and his Republican opponent. S. R. Vansant, there
has been a pronounced sentiment among Demo
crats throughout the State that a recount should
be demanded. The Governor himself has opposed
•any action looking to a contest for the office, and
it was in deference to his wishes that the com
mittee decided to let the matter drop.
JERSEY CITY MAY HAVE TO WAIT.
Jersey City Is not likely to secure an appropria
tion for a new postoffiee building during the present
term of Congress. Senators Sewell and Kean and
Congressman McDermott have informed Joseph A.
Dear and Samuel C. Mount, of the Jersey City
Board of Trade, that it is very doubtful if Senator
Sewell's bill passes.
LOSES SITUATION, KILLS HIMSELF.
Paul Kushman, sixty years old, committed suicide
yesterday at his home. No. 171 Bay View-aye.. Jer.
sey City, by swallowing carbolic acid. He died two
hours after he was discovered suffering tortures
from the poison. Kushman was a bookkeeper, and
a few days ago was Informed by his employer in
New- York that as the expenses had to be cut down
his services would not be required after the first of
the year. Kushman brooded over this and deter
mined to kill himself. He is survived by a widow.
STI'IUO XOTFS.
The organist of Roseville Presbyterian Church,
Newark. N. J.. thanks to the liberality of the pas
tor, the Rev. Dr. Haley, his authority to engage
a different group of soloists for each Sunday.
Some of the prominent singers of the city have
sung with Mr. Rlesberg. who, aa secretary-treas
urer of the New-York State Music Teachers' Asso
ciation for the last three years, has become widely
known in the profession. He was formerly or
ganist-director at Rutgers Presbvterlan Church.
P. W. RIF.SBERC.
Organist Roseville Presbyterian Church, Kfwark
His musical education, begun in Norwich. N. V.,
was continued for four years in Europe.
A musical and tea was Klven at Mme. Helena
Malgiile's studio recently, when ten of her advanced
pupils sang. Among the number were Olive Celestle
Moore. Marie Thornton and Elisabeth Carrlll Hinds.
Francis Stuart, of San Francisco, .has taken a
stndlo In Carneaie Hall. Mr Stuart was a pupil
of the elder LampeUi, of Italy. v
WEBER
PIANOS
"Amonß all the instruments of the renownM
makers, hero and abroad. I to-day prefer the
w-i.-r because of its sympathetic tone-quality."
EMMA CALVF
"Th<» Weber has glvon me the greatest satis
faction." JOHANNA GADSKI.
¦ Tho quality and tone are exceedingly sympa
thetic." MILKA TERNINA.
"It is a beautiful instrument."
EDOUARD DE RESZKE
"Perfect for accompanying the voice."
KRN-V VAN DYCK.
"Your pianos surpass all in excellence, both as
to sonority and richness of tone."
T. SALJGNAC.
Examine onr l»e>nullfnl Holiday Stock and
obtain oar prior* and terms.
Fifth Avenue, Cor. 16th Street, New York.
* 605 Fulton Street, Brooklyn. .
1 I.XERAL CASE TO GO TO CHASCERY.
EXECUTOR KNOWER THINKS BILL OF UNDER
TAKER NECKER TOO HIGH.
Charles Knower. of West Hoboken. proposes to
contest In the Court of Chancery the payment of
the funeral expenses of Mrs. Christine Knabe, who
died about one month ago and left a will providing
for her burial. She made all the arrangements for
the funeral a long time before her death and the
bill amounted to $657. Among the items which the
woman provided for were a Grecian casket, which
she ordered from Undertaker Necker. of Union Hill,
and which was to cost $500. and a solid mahogany
box to cost $80. A bill was made out, and Mrs.
Knabe signed an agreement authorising the under
taker to take charge of the funeral and rurnish the
articles she had agreed upon. She also provided
that he be paid by the executor, Mr. Knower,
within thirty days.
Mr. Knower asserts that the charges are too high
and declares that the casket could be purchased
for $250. He also charges that the undertaker ccn-
Jured the woman to sign the extravagant contract.
The case will come up within a few days.
musical.
The announcements of the various music
halls for the coming week will be found In
the amusement columns of to-day's Tribune.
M. L PINKHAM
MUSICAL BUR3AU.
87-88 Decker Bids*, 33 Union Sq.. >ew York.
Exclusive Management of the Following Eminent Artists
for the Season of 1900-1901.
DE En.NEST
SOUZA HUTCHESON
(Marquis Francisco De Sorrza. Composer-Pianist Recently
Coutlnho) famous For- from Berlin,
tuguese Baritone.
MLLE. ELSA MiUWW
HUEGGER VAN HOOSE
_ _• . „ _ . ! Tenor, first season In Amer-
The Celebrated Swiss lea Bjnce recent Euro _
' Cellist. pean successes. AND
CARLOS AXD MME. MARTI>CS
SOBRTXO SIEVIKIXG
Piano and Song Recitals. The Great Dutch Pianist.
CHARLES L. YOUNG,
MANAGER.
Distinguished Artists and Concert Tours.
Suite 819-820 Townsend Building. New York.
Broadway and 25th St. Tel. 62 Madison Square.
the o.\ly "LESCHETIZKY" school
OS"
PIANO I'LAVIM. I* AMERICA.
Named after Prof. Leschetizkjr. of Vienna, by his special
permission.
Mme. de WIENZKOWSKA,
Founder and Directress.
STUDIO, CARNEGIE HALL.
Address all Communications to 147 W. 82d-«t.
MR. FRANCIS STUART,
Teacher >f Singing. ' '
FIRST SEASON IN NEW YORK. TEN TEARS IN
SAN FRANCISCO. PUPIL. OK LAMPERTI, THE ELDER
BEING IX FCLX. POSSESSION OF MY METHOD OP
SINGINO, HE HAS THE ABILITY TO FORM GREtAT
ARTISTS.— FRANCESCO UAMPERTI.
Reception Hours Mondays and Thursdays. 2 to 3.
STUDIO. 882 CARNEGIE HALL.
Mme. Louise Hdlcombe,
ARTISTE. - 7 <
VOCAL STUDIO, 16 WEST 22D STREET.
WALTER E. FISCHER,
MUSICAL ACCOMPANIST.
Instruction for Piano. Vocal Culture. Harmony. Composi
tion. Vienna Conservatory Method.
70S LEXINGTON AYE., NEAR oai> ST.
S. C. BENNETT, "r™ 0 " 114 "*
Scientific voice production, purity of tone a specialty.
Pupils trained for church choir and opera.
DE VAUX-ROYER. Violin Soloist. Indorsed by
VSAYF Concerts, Violin Instruction.
10/WLj. Address Hotel Girard. 44th St.. near B'way.
Arthur d. WOODRUFF sag .srara*
MME. HENRIETTA BEEBE, voc £ l S£g l 3_. t .
PIANO SIGHT REAPING cffg^gj
VVM H. BARBER, teacher of piano.
TTiTI. 11. DAI\DLI\, STEINWAY HALL.
riADAME EUGENIE PAPPENMEIM,
the celebrated ptitn& donna.
Vocal instruction. The Strathmore. Broadway, cot. B2d St
GERARD-THlEßS^^^o^v,.
MISSCROUUS. a^-gga,^
CARL C. MULLER, teaS^^Ti^o^ 8 " 10^
1281_LEXINUTON AVK * '
CARL BERNHARD"^^^^^
SAMUEL P. WARREN^^J^gj^
AMY ROME, Sgff^gsffS"g«
FANNIE HARTZ,^^^^;^
HOBART SiVIOCK.
_45Ues( 32d St
S. G. PRATT, oT&^ a g^gg
THE CURTIS SCHOOL ~~ ~
OF VOICE CULTURE
701 CARNEGIE HALL. 7th Aye & Mtn St
A NEW METHOD which makes th" culture of .x
SPEAKING voice help the SINGING VOICE I>«™.
from 12 cents to «3. *IC • ke»*oni
Miss EMILIE C. CURTIS. Director.
VIOLIN artistically taught. Tour residence M*rh-*i
Deßerlot. Kr«ut»r. Rod*. Vlcvxtempl Solo ErSl™
ble. JACOB CHADWICK. 2 Chambers St." En»»m-
HANS KRONOLD. VIOLONCELLIST
69 E. S7TH STREET. NEW- YORK? '
PHILO'S CONSERVATORY OP MV%IF '
Violin. Piano. Singlrg Instruction. l.S6l*sth A vi
WINTER TERM
THE WINTER TERM OF THE
Clavier Company Piano School
BEGINS THURSDAY, JANUARY ; ,90,
ENROLMENT \MI EXAMINATION niv
JANUARY 2. «»l
EVENING CLASSES IF DESIRED.
THE ONLY WAT PUPILS CAN GET THE VX'i r
1 KNEFITS OF THE SUPERIOR ADVANTAUEa x<&
!...'« TUITION RATES WHICH THIS SCHOOL OR- k4^£
IN TECHNICAL AND MUSICAL TIIAIMNo IS TO ?v 3
ROLL AT THE PROPER TIME AND ENTER CLAS^J
AT THE lIEGINNINO OF A TERM **"****" t-UASbES
FURTHER INFORMATION GIVEN on plication
IN- PERSON OR BY LETTER. * * "CATION
THE CLAVIER COMPANY SCHOOL
W WEST 15TU ST.. NEW TORK. '
£be Shopper |
for pianos is often called v
upon to decide between a
slightly used piano of the
best make offered at a re-!^
' duced price and a new '
piano of inferior grade of \
equal cost. An examination
of the
Jflaspn&lJHmlin
PIANOS I
which have been rented one -'
season, and which we now
.. . offer at greatly reduced
prices will convince you
that they offer better value
at the price than any of the
new medium-priced pianos.
Warerooms, 3 and 5 West 18th Sc
Near Fifth Avenue
Ulnsical.
THE WOLFSOHN MUSICAL BUREAU
131 EAST 17TH ST., N. Y.
HIGH CLASS ARTISTS ONLY.
The most reliable Vlusical Agency In America.
L M. RUBEN,
ASTOR COURT BUILDING,
I (KstablUned 1976.)
! CELEBRATED vi MUSICAL ARTISTS.
; CONCERTS, MUSKAJIS AND SCISIES OF HIGH ORDER.
I AMERICAN SCHOOLOFOPER.^
¦ Berkeley Lyceum Theatre-. 23 West 44th — '¦
York.
WM. O. STEWART. Gent Director.
Complete Instructions In Opera Repertoire.
New classes now forming.
. Circulars MM on application.
The Organ School
<Copr right. »
ALEXANDER GUILMAXT. Pr*«. WILXJAU C. CARL i
Director. Inter Term. Jan. Sth. Address 34 W. 12:4 st
MISS EMMA HOWSON.
METHOD, jtudio: 9* Fifth A. - T :«days and Fr:
GIACOMO MINKOWSKY,
VOCAL SPECIALIST.
Indorsed oy De Reszkes. Xordica. Grau.
805. SO6 CARNEGIE H.VLL.
Marguerite Hall
MEZZO-CONTRALTO.
1.428 B-WAY. or care of HENRY WOLFSOHCf.
Velva Yon Derenburg,
SOPRAXO. °
CONCERTS. s ? I f^?^. F M^CAIg. ORATORIO.
SIGNOR SPIGAROLI, '
VOCAL LESSO.\«j— Stndlo, 503 CAK.\EGIE Ft CLi i
Applicants Receive*' Tuesday and Friday MoraiasiT*^
Dr. MEDINA-FERRER
SCHOOL FOR VOCAL fILTVBE. V
Studio: Xo». SO « 32 West 15tl> Street.
LOUIS V. SAAR,
PI A>O ASD COMPOSITION. 12« EAST S3D ST
RECEPTION HOCSS 1-3 DAILY. '
Mme. Helene Maiqille
VOCAL STUDIO.
1214-15 CARNEGIE HALL.
THEODOR BJORKSTEN,
INSTRUCTION IN SINGING.
96 CAPXEGIE HALL,
ANGELO DE PROSIT
PIANIST ASD ACCOMPANIST FOB IR.TISTS.
15« FIFTH AVENUE. — ••^•o»
mildenbergT
PIANIST SO.X. COACHING.
STUDIO. i.StO. CARNEGIE HALL.
LUDWIG BREITNER, '
Piano Studio. Concert Work. 311 Madison Avit
Lillie d'Angelo Bergh
SAMUEL EPPINGER, '
MUSICAL DIRECTOR AND ACCOMPAVIST
Available for Concert*. Muslcalea ana Artists' Repertoira
l"*ractlce.
STUDIO, 71S LEXINGTON AYE.. NEAR 38TH t»T.
THE EPPIXGER CONSERVATORY OF MISIO
Haa removed to 713 Lexington Aw«.. near 58th
WALTER E. FISHER.
MUSICAL A'.\X>MPAX!.*r
Instruction for Piano. Vocal Culture. Harmony ' niun^
tion. Vienna Conservatory m«?th<y! ' *~— ~
70S LEXINGTON AYE.. NEAR 62D ST.
E. PRBSSON Mru,ER
VOICE CULTURE.
METHOD OF SBRIGLJA AND SHAKESPEARE.
Metropolitan College of Music
212 West 39th St.
MME. TORPADIE BJORKSTEN,
VOCAL INSTRUCTION.
Carnegie Hail. Room 839.
The DETHIER ORGAN SCHOOL
. . . PIANO AND THEORY . .
GASTOX M. DETHIER. 1* WEST 16TH ST.
Organist ot St. Francis Xav:er-» Church.
M. LOUISE MUNDELL, J^erOfTheVdc*
' Studio, 400 sth A»t.
KATHRIX HILKE, *-««,:-¦
* 44 Seventh A**
ANTOHIA SAWYER
CARL G. SCHMIDT
IFiWIF SLATER Soprano. Vocal Instruction
JLl\i\lL OLA 1 Lit, stmMo. 132 West 40th g^-j.
E. H. BOWMAN, TlAiiO^^° If^^1 f^^
CARLOS N. SANCHEZ * jj^g^«°g«>
CLEMENT B. BILL Or * in * Muti gggy^ aua*.
ULLHItIiI n aatt» S els- Church. \ „, End-«r.
GWILYM MILES, ~
IDA W. HUBBELL,. jS £w . I4th3t
V. E. COLEMAN. £^ff m u £. -,?*£ u g,»tg
MME. O€DEN CRANE \ffi
JENNIE SLATER. f»p»«» vo«i tut-Mta-.
JU "" L ounlu> » Studio. 152 West 43tH St.
F. W. RIESBERgT "
Instruction. Piano. Organ. H*rmo-v
ACCOMPANIST
Specialty. Harmony- lasaon*. moderate ili i —
&U STH-AVE.. COR. 36TH-ST. CCarS "'
AX KNITEL-TREUMANX. ' .
BARITONE.
Vole* Culture— Art oX Slaalas.
C~m*gt» Hall. Room 837.
PAUL LISTKMWN. Vlollabt.
FHVXZ USTEMANN. 'Cellist!
SOLOISTS AND TEACHERS: GRADUATES LUMIO
CONSERVATORY & ROIAL niOH SCHOOL. B_R_IN
STUDIO. US BAST SUTJI ST.
BROOKLYN.
CHARLES STUART PHILLIPS. I
VOCAL INSTRUCTOR PRATT INSTITUTE
STUDIO. a * CLINTON AYE.. BKOOKLM.
MD C Cl ft3AMT vocal xxsTßUcnat
mnO. C. J. U'lMn I, Pouch Mansion. BrooiJjr^
Mrs W r* B£AfifSl?¥ e :uJUi - Pouch Oallery. Braok'gr^
M IS. n . L. 0 1 AM 3 L l l I'tAXQ I\i i- ::'jci*_-»

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