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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 23, 1900, Image 3

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MURDER IN WASHINGTON
WAR DEPARTMENT AUDITOR
SHOT DEAD IN BIS OFFICE.
THE ASSASSIN. A CLERK WHO HAD BEEN
REDUCED IN RANK. ATTEMPTS
TO COMMIT SUICIDE.
Washington. Dec. 22.— Frank H. Morris, of
Ohio. Auditor for the War Department, was
phot and instantly killed about 2:10 clock this
afternoon by Samuel Mac Donald. also of Ohio.
recently a disbursing clerk of the Treasury in
th» former's office at the Winder Building, in
seventeenth-st. Ma<*Donald afterward shot him
self and slashed his throat with a penknife.
Morris was alone with Ma-cDonald when the
ihooting occurred. In trying to escape MacDon
tld assaulted the watchman. Thomas Cusick.
with the butt of his revolver. He was arrested
hil*> leaving the building. Before being taken
into custody, however, he shot himself in the
breast, and made an ugly gash in his throat
Trith a small penknife. When the officers ar
rested him he exclaimed:
"I did it! I know I'm done for!"
THE ASSASSIN LIKELY TO RECOVER
MaeDonald was removed to the Emergency
Hospital, where the doctors have been busily en
caged in trying to save his life. He was bleed
leg profusely from the gashes he had made
across hi* throat, but it was found on examina
tion that the Jugular vein had not been pierced
and that the wound was not likely to be fatal.
The wound in the breast proved to be more-seri
ous. The bullet entered the left breast below
the heart and lodged in the back between the
rM An operation was performed and the bul
let was removed. The doctors were hopeful that
the man would pull through, unless blood poi
soniag or other unfavorable symptoms devel
oped
While Mac Donald wat in the hands of the sur
geons a police officer sat near him and kept him
under constant surveillance. Technically he la
under arrest and in the custody of the police,
but while the fight for his life is going on there
will be no further restraint. Owing: to the crit
ical nature of his wounds, the doctors have not
permitted him to be seen for the purpose of civ
ing a statement.
A witness of the latter part of the encounter
between Morris and Mac Donald said that on
hearing the shots he ran into the Auditor's of
fice, which he had Just left. On entering the
room he saw the men struggling in each other**
arms. MarPonald holding his revolver close to
Morris-s breast. Mac Donald. after firing again.
attempted to get out of the room, but encoun
tered a cumber of clerks and employes whom
the sound of the firing; had brought to the doors.
snd then turned and fired again. This is be
lieved to have been the fatal shot. Employes
who know Mac Donald 6ald he had a grievance
against Morris, who. he asserted, was responsi
ble for having his pay reduced. Others said that
they could not attribute his deed to anything
but a diseased brain from overindulgence in
liquor.
THE VICTIM'S CAREER.
Frank H. Morris was a native of Cleveland.
Ohio. He was formerly engaged in business
there, and had for a long: time been recognized
as a prominent Republican politician. He was
fortXJUBe .years old, and leaves a widow and
two sons. He entered the Government service at
the beginning of the present Administration as
Auditor lor the Navy Department. In the first
two years he cade an exceptionally good record
Tor efficiency, bringing the delayed work up to
<Sa.te and putting the office in better shape than
ever before. A year or more ago Morris was
ms£e .Auditor £or the War Department, chang
ing places with Auditor Brown. In this new
place he maintained his record as an executive
officer and soon had the work, which was much
behinq,^uj».to date. He was well regarded by
the Treasury officials, but was not popular with
cr, m of the* subordinates in his office, who com
plained that he was unnecessarily harsh in his
treatment of them and often exacted more
than they could do. It is said that in order to
keep the work up to date, he would require
them to work overtime and lose a part of their
annual vacation. The Treasury officials do not
agree with these statements, and say that he re
quired from each clerk a good day's work, and
¦a more.
RECORD OF THE MURDERER.
Mac Donald is a brother of William H. MacDon
aM. the well-known barytone singer of the Bos
torians, who Is said to have educated him for
the operatic stage. He is unmarried, fifty-eight
years of age, and tall and fine looking. He en
tered the Government service soon after the
Civil War In 1569 he was removed from his
place as chief of division in the office of the
Commissioner of Customs In 1690 he was re
appointed a clerk in the office of the Auditor for
the War Department. In 1597 he was made dis
bursing officer in that office, in addition to his
other duties, receiving in all $2,000 a year. In
February of this year his accounts were found
11.000 short, and upon being required to make
an explanation he said that on one occasion he
had forgotten to close his safe on leaving his
office, and that it had been robbed of $1,000. He
produced evidence which tended to exonerate
him from the charge of taking the money, and
as he Immediately made good the amount, noth
br "her was done except to reduce his salary
to" $1,400 and transfer him to the office of the
Auditor for the Postoffice Department, where he
was employed at the time of the tragedy. It is
caid that Mac Donald has been a hard drinker at
times and that many of his misfortunes can be
traced to this source. He has many friends,
however, who regard him as a man of excellent
qualities.
TO ABOLISH MISSOURI RIVER COMMISSION
Wsshlrgtor.. Dec. 22— The Fiver and Harbor bill.
¦a it will be reported from the House Committee
*r>on after the reconvening of Congress on Janury 3.
will carry a provision abolishing the Missouri River
Commission. The provision already has been
egreed upon, and only waits the formulation of
the bill to find a place in it. The decision to dis
continue the Commission Is said to have been
«nar.JniouE on the part of the committee, and It is
the result of statements made by members of the
House whose districts touch the Missouri on either
«*4e. They generally expressed the opinion that
the navigation of the stream is so limited as to
T<-nttT the Commission useless. The opinion was
that as the improvements of the river consist al
most entirely of the protection of the banks, this
work could be done as well if left directly to the
fiecretarr of War as if again placed In the hands
ft th* Conanisfion, and the committee accepted
this vlc-w. The Commission was created in 1&4.
*T!d at present consists of Lieutenant-Colonel Amos
Etlckney. of the Engineer Corps, president; Major
Thomas H. Handbury. of the Engineer Corps;
£ejor W. L. Marshall. Engineer Corps; Charles O.
Broadhead and C L Cbaffee.
}) "Standard of Highest Merit"
> Pianos."
We call attention to our large assortment
of GRAND and UPRIGHT PIANOS, cased
in rare and choice woods.
Several special Designs for the Holiday
Season. -~ ;¦¦;.;¦
PRICES REASONABLE
OPEN EVENINGS :^
From December 15th
to 24th indnsive.
FISCHER PIANO WAREBOOMS
¦•'"'33 Union Square West,
between j.;,), and iTih St».. Hew VorU.
ARMY INCREASE URGED.
SECRETARY ROOT POINTS OUT THE
NECESSITY FOR IMMEDIATE
LEGISLATION
Washington. Dec. 22.— At the last meeting of
the Senate Committee on Military Affairs, the
proceedings of which were made public to-day.
Secretary Root made a strong representation of
the necessity for immediai 1 legislation for the
relief of the Army. He declared that if Con
gress did not at once increase the Army in
substantial accordance with the recommenda
tions of the War Department the United States
would be obliged to abandon a large part of the
Philippine Islands where civil government is
established. If the present garrisons \ver<» with
drawn from certain parts of the islands the
municipal officers, mortly Filipinos, will be left
defenceless, with every pro&pect of being de
prived of their lives and property, and at the
same time the United States will b« disgraced,
the Secretary said, for having proved faithless
to its solemn obligations. H? argued that it was
necessary to pass the Department bill as a
whole, in order properly to adjust the militsry
organizations to the new conditions.
"We do not. any of us." he said, "expect that
for any considerable period an army of 100.000
will be maintained. ?nd for an army of 60.000
men the provisions (made by the committee) are
sufficient."
With reference to the staff details the Secre
tary said he was convinced that the control
of the permanent staff of the departments in
Washington is atTcvil that ought to be remedied,
an**, that it :s highly important for the Army
that there should be interchangeable service be
tween the line and the staff. In answer to an
inquiry the Secretary said that it was of minor
importance whether there was a corps or regi
mental formation of the artillery branch, and
that, while he favored the former, he really
cared little about the matter, which he regarded
as purely technical. Hp said he had put the
corps formation provision into the bill because
it had been generally represented to him as a
wise provision.
Secretary Hoot devoted considerable atten
l?on to *he Army canteen, urging that it was a
great mean? of maintaining the morality, health
ard discipline of the troops. He pointed out
that the post exchange is a club where the men
get together to read, talk and smoke, playing
checkers and other games, and drinking under
such natural restraints as the place afforded.
Prohibition of the cantee-j, the Secretary said,
would interfere with enlistments, as the men
would not enlist If they knew ihey were to be
confined in a reform school. He considered the
agitation against the canteen as a misguided
one. holding that to abolish it would drive the
soldiers out of the post exchanges, where they
were subject to salutary restraints, into the
demoralizing and vicious surroundings outside
of the Army posts. It would result in more
drinking and more deception among those who
drank. The Secretary also pointed out that the
proposed enactment would convey an entirely
erroneous and prejudicial view to the public as
to what had been the course of the Army in
regulating the sale of liquor.
MR. HOPPER GETS THE COXTRACT.
TO CONSTRUCT THE FOUNDATION FOR THE
NEW CUSTOM HOUSE.
Washington. Dec. 22 (Special).— There was
some comment to-day when it was known that
a valuable Government contract had been
awarded to a Tammany politician. The compe
tition was for the work of preparing the founda
tion for the new New-York Custom House. The
lowest bid by $1,000 was that of Isaac A. Hopper
& Son, of Xew-York City, and was for $369,610.
The work is to be completed in eight months,
and the Messrs. Hopper are subject to a penalty
of $420 a day for every day over that time which
they may use in executing the contract. The
senior member of the firm to which this con
tract has been awarded is a district leader of
Tammany Hall.
When George R- Bidwell, Collector of the Port,
wa« told about the award to Isaac A. Hopper *
Bon, he said: "That settles It, of course. I did what
I could to get the contract for Mr. Wills."
"Does this give Mr. Hopper an advantage as a
bidder for the superstructure?" Mr. Bidwell was
asked.
"Unquestionably,"' said he. "I should judge he
would be able to bid something like $15,000 under
any one else. The contractor who bids under Mr.
Hopper now will not make any money out of the
Job. '
TREATY AT STATE DEPARTMEXT.
AMENDMENTS TO BE FORWARDED AT
ONCE TO LONDON*
Washington. Dec. 22. — The Hay-Pauncefote
Canal Treaty, with the Senate amendments, was
received at the State Department shortly after
noon to-day. It was transmitted from the Sen
ate through the White House. With the treaty
was a simple statement signed, not by the Presi
dent pro tern of the Senate, but by Mr. Bennett,
the secretary, reciting the action taken by the
Senate.
The State Department will forward the amend
ments to the Erit.sh Government, and they will
be on their way to London by the steamer
which leaves Xew-York next Tuesday. This
action is rather more rapid than is usual in
treaty makinsr. Once it is taken, there will be
nothing more for the State Department to do
until the British Government has passed on the
amendments, provided a "reasonable time" is so
occupied
MR. LOUD AGAINST THE CANAL.
Washington, Dec. 22 (Special).—Representa
tive Loud, chairman cf the House Committee
on Postoffices and Postroads, is, unlike, some
of the other California members of Congress,
opposed to the building of the Nicaragua Canal.
He puts his contention on the ground that Cali
fornia is the natural point for the commerce de
veloped by the United States in the Orient to be
if there should be no canaL On the other hand,
the digging of the canal and the opening up of
a new mode of transit for the rich produce of
the East will dray.- a large proportion of this
traffic. He says that there is no compensation
to his people in any reduction of freight on
California fruits by the new route. Mr. Loud is
earnest in his opposition, as he- usually is when
his judgment condemns a measure.
A RUSSIAN VIEW OF THE TREATY.
St. Petersburg. D^c. 22.-The "Novostl." discuss
ing the Nicaragua Canal, says:
England is evidently incapable of opposing the
United States, the fact being that America is rising
proportionately as Kngland Is losing prestige.
ZI'PBEME COURT COXFEREXCE.
NO INTIMATION AS TO ACTION ON INSULAR
TEST CASES.
Washington. Dec. 22. -The United States Su
preme Court was in conference to-day, as usual
on Saturdays, but no Intimation was given as to
whether the Philippine and Porto Rican cases,
were even taken up informally. The general
opinion among attorneys is that the Court will
make no effort to reach a conclusion on the
cases already heard until after the hearing of
the cases dealing with the same general ques
tions which is set for January 7.
TO CREATE A CLIFF DWELLERS' PARK.
Washington, Dec. 22 (Special).— Following up his
work of recent years for the preservation of the nat
ural wonders of the Mill unsettled areas of the great
West. Representative John F. Lacey, of lowa,
chairman of the House Committee on Public Lands,
has introduced a bill for the creation of a Cliff
Dwellers' National Park. This measure sets aside
as a Federal reservation a tract of land in New-
Mexico In which are found the ruins of the pre
historic caves or cliff dwellings used by an early
indigenous race. The Government is to reserve and
protect these ruins and to open the. area which
contains them to etudentu and sightseers under nec
essary restrictions. Excavations are to be allowed
under the supervision- of the Interior Department
If the work is done in the Interest of a scientific
or educational ¦ institution. ...... ¦:•'•".'
XEW-YOEK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUIvDAY. DECEMBER 23. 1900.
JOINT NOTE SIGNED.
BEADY FOR PRESENTATION
TO CHINA'S ENVOYS. .
THE INDISPOSITION OF LI HUNG
CHANG THE ONLY CAUSE FOR
FURTHER DELAY.
Peking, Dec. 22.— The last obstacle having been
removed, 'the joint note was signed to-day by all
the foreign Ministers, including the Envoy from
the Netherlands, who arrived oniy recently. The
note will be delivered to LI Hung Chang and
Prince Ching. the Chinese plenipotentiaries, as
soon ns th? former shall havr sufficiently recov
ered from his indisposition.
The Chinese close to Li Hung. Chang still pre
fer to believe. d<?spit° the signing of the note,
which they did not believe would take place, that
the principal negctiatiops must be carried on in
Europe or America: .They r<>s»nt the British
modification of the note,, for, as they say, som«
Power or Powers might not be satisfied until the
indemnity had been paid in full, which would
mean the occupation of Peking for an indefinite
time, as it cannot be expected that China can
raise what would be required— possibly 1,000.
• •00,000 taels— all at once. As a matter of fact, it
will take several years.
Li Hung Chang's condition is reported to-day
to be so much improved that he was abl<» to be
out of bed for a short time. '
The cavalry and infantry detachments which
have been investigating the reported troubles
near Ho-Si-Wu have returned, and report that
there is nothing to oause alarm. All the trouble,
they say. is on the other side of the river, which
the allies are not protecting. It was discovered
that a party of Catholic Christians had started
on an expedition, but its whereabouts is not
known.
THE POWERS TO CHINA.
TEXT OF THE JOINT NOTE MADE PUBLIC
BY THE STATE DEPARTMENT.
Washington, Dec. 22.— The State Department
to-day made public the text of the joint note of
the Powers to China. The official statement
follows:
The following English version Is understood to be
In substantial equivalence with the French text of
the note to be addressed to the Government of
China, as agreed upon by the representatives of the
co-operating Powers at Peking on December 4, 1900,
and subsequently amended before signature:
During the months of May. June, July and
August of the current year 1 serious disturbances
broke out in the northern provinces of China, in
which atrocious crimes unparalleled in history
and outrages against the law of nations, against
the laws of humanity and against civilization
were committed under particularly odious cir
cumstances. The principal of these crimes were
the following:
First — On June 20 His Excellency Baron yon
Ketteler, while on his way to the Tsung-li-
Yamen, 1n the performance of his official func
tions, was murdered by soldiers of the regular
army, acting under orders of their chiefs.
Second — On the same day the foreign lega
tions were attacked and besieged. The attacks
continued without intermission until August 14,
on which date the arrival of the foreign forces
put an end to them. These attacks were made
by the regular troops, who joined the Boxers,
and who obeyed the orders of the Court emanat
ing from the Imperial palace— At the same time
the Chinese Government officially declared, by
its representatives abroad, that it guaranteed
the security of the legations.
Third — On June 11 Mr. Sujyama, Chancellor of
the Legation of Japan, while in the discharge of
an official mission, was killed by regulars at the
gates of the city. In Peking and in several
provinces foreigners were murdered, tortured or
attacked by the Boxers and tht» regular troops,
and such as ecaped death pwed their salvation
colely to their own determined resistance. Their
establishments were looted and destroyed.
Fourth — Foreign cemeteries, at Peking es
pecially, were desecrated, the-graves opened and
the remains scattered abroad. ;~; ~
These occurrences necessarily led the foreign
Powers to dispatch their troops to China to the
end of protecting the lives of their representa
tives and nationals and restoring order. During
their march to Peking the allied forces met with
resistance from the Chinese army and had to
overcome it by force.
Inasmuch as China has recognized her re
sponsibility, expressed regret and evinced a de
sire to see an end put to the situation created
by the aforesaid disturbances, the Powers have
determined to accede to her request upon the
irrevocable conditions enumerated below, which
they deem indispensable to expiate the crimes
committed and to prevent their recurrence.
I.
A. The dispatch to Berlin of an extraordinary
mission headed by an Imperial prince, in order
to express the regrets of His Majesty the Em
peror of China and of the Chinese Government
for the assassination of His Excellency the late
Baron yon Ketteler. Minister of Germany.
B. The erection on the spot of the assassination
of a commemorative monument befitting the
rank of the deceased, bearing an inscription in
the Latin, German and Chinese languages, ex
pressing the regrets of the Emperor of China
for the murder.
II
A. The severest punishment for the persons
designated in the Imperial decree of September
25, IfJOO, and for those whom the representatives
of the Powers shall subsequently designate.
B. The suspension for five years of all official
examinations in all ihe cities where foreigners
have been massacred or have been subjected to
cruel treatment.
HI
Honorable reparation to be made by the Chi
nese Government to the Japanese Government
for the murder of Mr. Sujyama.
IV.
An expiatory monument to be erected by the
Imperial Chinese Government in every foreign
or international oemetery which has been dese
crated or in Tvni<-h the Krav«s have heon de
stroyed.
V.
The maintenance, under conditions *o be de
termined by the Powers, of the interdiction
against the importation of arms as well as of
materials employed exclusively for th* manu
facture of arms and ammunition.
, VI
Equitable indemnities for the Governments,
societies, companies and individuals, as well as
for Chinese who during the late occurrences
have suffered in person or in property in con
sequence of their being in the service of for
eigners. China to adopt financial measures ac
ef>piah\e to the Powers for the purpose of guar
anteeing the payment of the said indemnities
and the interest and amortization of the loans.
VII
The right for each Power t" maintain a per
manent guard for its legatio*, and to put the
diplomatic quarter in a defensible condition, the
Chinese having no right to res'de in that quarter.
VIII
The destruction of the forts which might ob
struct free communication between Peking and
the sea.
IX.
The right to the military occupation of cer
tain points, to be determined by an understand
ing among the Powers, in order to maintain
open communication between the capital and
the sea.
X.
The Chinese Government to cause to be pub
lished during two years in all the sub-prefect
ures an Imperial decree —
A. Embodying a perpetual prohibition under
pemJty of death of membership In any anti
foreign society.
B Enumerating the punishments that shal'
have been Inflicted on the guilty, together with
the suspension of all official examinations in
the cities where foreigners have been murdered
or have been subjected to cruel treatment: and
C. Furthermore, an Imperial decree to be
Issued and published throughout the Empire or
dering that the Governors-General (Viceroys),
Governors, and all provincial or local officials,
shall be hold responsible for the maintenance of
order within their respective Jurisdiction, and
that in the event of renewed anti-foreign dis
turbances or any other infraction of treaty oc
curring, and which shall not forthwith be sup
pressed and the guilty persons punished, they.
the said officials, shall be Immediately removed
and forever di^qualifiM from hoMin? UQI office
or honors.
XI.
The Chinese Government to undertake to ne
gotiate amendments to the trpa'ie? of com
merce and navigation considered useful by the
foreign Powers, and upon oth*r matters pertain
ing to their commercial relations, with the ob
ject of facilitating them.
KIT.
The Chinese Government to determine in what
manner to reform the Department of Wi
Affairs and to modify the Court ceremonials
concerning the reception of foreign representa
tives, in the manner to be Indicated by the
Powers.
Until the Chinese Government has complied
with the above conditions to the satisfaction
of the Powers,- the undersigned can hold out no
expectation that the occupation of Peking and
the provinces of Chl-Li by the general forces
can be Wrought to a conclusion.
•'. ,".¦ i MORE - FIGHTING IN CHINA. 71
IMPERIAL TROOPS SUFFER DEFEAT AT THE
.' .": * • HANDS OF THE ALLIES. 4 .'!
Berlin. Dec. 22.— The following dispatch from
Field Marshal "Count yon Waldersee, dated Pe
king. •• Friday, December 21. has ' been received
here: " • ~- ¦>.*•• - ¦ , '
A column dispatched from Pao-Ting-Fu, com
manded- by Major Haine'. engaged a force of
Ohir.osy regulars on December 15 at Yung-Tsing-
Sien, ninety kilometres northeast of Pao-Ting-
Fu: Our losses were one officer and two non
commissioned officers ' wounded/ The Chinese
losses^ were, considerable. . . . < •
A column was sent on December 19 from Tien-
Tsin. commanded by Colonel Gruber. to Tv-
Tien-Hsien.- one' hundred kilometres northeast
of Tien-Tsin - - * ¦: : ¦ . ¦
ANOTHER CARGO OF CHINESE LOOT.
FORWARDED TO MARSEILLES BY GEN
ERAL FRYE. IT WILL PROB
ABLY BE RETURNED.
¦Marseilles. Dec. 22.— The French steamer Co
lombo, from China, has arrived here, bringing
another instalment of loot forwarded by General
Frye. The loqt was held by orders of the Gov
ernment. Must of the objects will he returned.
BELIEVES THE NOTE HAS BEEN SIGNED.
London, Dec. 22.— 1t now appears that the
British Foreign Office has not received direct
notification from Peking that the joint note has
been signed. But. in view of the fact that It had
received assurances from the Ambassadors in
London to the effect that all the Ministers had
signed, the Foreign Office accepted as correct
the alleged semi-official dispatches from Berlin
and Paris announcing the signature. The For
eign Office still declares it has every reason to
believe the signing Is an accomplished fact, ard
that ,the telegrams to the contrary are possibly
anterior thereto.
RAIDED BY REBELS FROM THE HILLS.
Canton. Dec. 22.— The rebels in the Wai-Chon
District descend from the hills. and pillage the
lowlands. ¦ The soldiery are • unable ¦ to prevent
their raids.
TIMELY TOPICS IN BERLIN.
Berlin, December 22.
STERNBERG'S SENTENCE.— PubIic attention
was occupied wholly this week with crimes in high
places. The sentence Imposed on Sternberg, the
millionaire banker, of two and a half years' ' Im
prisonment and five years' deprivation of civil
rights, for crimes against morality, satisfies the
public conscience and is regarded as well merited
retribution. Sternberg rapidly acquired a fortune,
estimated at 15. 000,000 marks, by shady methods, and
maintained social relations with hlfh officials and
military men for years, while disguising his most
loathsome crimes in the lowest Berlin life. He was
related by marriage to high officials^ and was a
free giver for charitable purposes. It was said in
his defence before the Court .that he had made a
will leaving to the Prussian Government the bulk
of his fortune to establish an institution for insur
ing laborers against loss of work. . The Sternberg
case is working widespread ruin among otljgrs. The
death of Yon Meerscheidt Htillessen. the suspended
Chief of the Criminal Department, announced at
the same hour as Sternberg's sentence, had a
peculiarly tragical effect. The public instantly as
sumed that he had committed suicide, but the phy
sicians certify that he died from apoplexsv Yon
Me«rsche!dt Hiillessen established a rappfation by
introducing the Bertillon anthropornetric system in
Germany. The case of Sternberg will continue long
to occupy the public mind. It is expected Sternberg
will appeal a*ain to a higher court. Furthermore,
numerous prosecutions of persons connected with
the Sternberg case are pending. A number of wit
nesses will be tried for perjury and three lawyers
are under investigation for unprofessional conduct
or collusion to circumvent justice. The public de
mand for reform of the Criminal Police, which did
not yield fruit in 1897 in connection with the Yon
Tausoh case, has now grown imperative. It is
authentically reported that the authorities are pre
paring a measure for reform.
The Ministerial "Berliner Correspondez" prints
the projected plan of reform of the criminal police
advancer! by Ba«-on yon Rheinbaben. Prussian
Minister of the Interior. According to this plan all
officers of the Secret Service shall be examined re
parding the manner of their life, their debts and
their association?, and these examinations will be
repeated at stated periods. A special assistant will
be appointed to keep a watch over the morals of
the officers A general advance in salaries will be
made.
The "Berliner Tageblatf ' says that Sternoers
will be tried a second time for similar offences
throuerh other intermediaries, one of jrhom has al
ready'been arrested
THE MORTGAGE BANKERS CASE.-The other
great case this week, the arrest of mortgage bank
ers, attracts an immense amount of attention. The
press is pointing out the resemblance to the Stern
berg affair, since wealthy bankers, moving in the
highest society, have carried on fraudulent practices
for years. The chief offender. Sander., made pre
tence to the greatest piety. He had a private chapel
in a luxurious villa at Potsdam. His home was the
centre of the highest military and. aristocratic so
ciety He was Potsdam's wealthiest citizen, paying
50,000 marks yearly in taxes. It has' been shown
that Sanden's business practices were most ques
tionable He would compel borrowers at the bank
to buy one of his lots at a fancy price. The losses
will fall heavily on small investors. The fall in
the shares obligation of the two banks already
represents about 175.000.000 marks. It is considered
certain that the arrested directors will get long
tprms of imprisonment for falsifying the balance
S .A committee of hoHers of obligations of the
C-undschuld Bank bas published the results of its
examination, rhowing that the capital of the bank
has been entirely lost, but that sixty millions or
the ninety-eight millions of obligations are secured
by mortgage?.
MORE TARIFF DISCUSSION— The tariff ques
tion wns most actively dlscufsed this week. The
announcement of the Conservative leader. Hcrr yon
Klinckowstroem, that the Chancellor, Count yon
Bulow, is willing to compromise witn the Agra
rtar.s. makes a deep impression. Signs multiply,
however that the commercial classes are growing
more united against the Agrarian demands. Count
yon Bulow is spending the week visiting the South
German courts, explaining Germany's foreign pol
icy He has made everywhere the most favorable
Impression, and has been entertained and decorated
with orders.
RESTRICTING COAL PRODUCTION— The coal
syndicate's action in restricting the production 10
per cent, while German industries are suffering
from the high price 3of coal, excites much sharp
discussion, and will give animus to the forthcoming
Reichstap debate on the resolution providing for
Government control of the trusts.
NON-ATTENDANCE AT REICHSTAG. - The
press is again engaged in a periodical discussion of
the non-attendance in the Reichstag. Among the
remedies proposed the "Post' suggests circulating
a list daily for the signatures of attendants and
its publication in the official "Reichjanzeiger
monthly. It is reported that the Government is at
last convinced of the necessity of paying members
and is preparing a bill accordingly.
TOO MANY PHYSICIANS— Emperor William's
decree lengthening medical study, as a remedy for
th<« overproduction of physicians, meets with the
approval of the profession. In connection there
with official statistics published this week show
the overcrowding of the medical profession in the
large cities. Berlin has one physician to every
798 of the population. Breslau one to every us,
Halle on* to ev*ry 735 and Koenlgsberg one to
every 681.
A BACH MUSIC FESTIVAL.— The first German
Bach Music Festival is to be held in Berlin on
March 2!. In connection therewith there will be
an exhibition of manuscripts, pictures and instru
ments, for which the Berlin Town Council will lend
the public rooms of the City Hall.
PROFESSOR SLABY'S EXPERTMKNTS.-Pro
fessor Slaby. of the Technische Hochschule, lect
ured'to-nfrht tn the presence of Emperor WHltnm
H Christmas Dinner
witbout
perrief
iQuet
upon his system of multiplex wireless telegraphy,
and made experiments • showing • the reception of
messages from Charlottenburg. two miles west, and
Schoenweide. eight mile* east of Berlin, simulta
neously. These messages were caught on the
same lightning rod. Professor Slaby stated that the
same receiving wire would serve for an indefinite
number of messages coming simultaneously, while
excluding all electric currents that were not
wanted. ' ¦ •
The Emperor listened Intently, and commented
smilingly signifying his approval to General yon
Podbielski. Imperial Postmaster. After the lecture
His Majesty engaged . Professor Slaby In earnest
conversation for a half hour
"BELLE OF NEW-YORK" IN GERMAN.— "The
Belle of New-York" was given at the Central The
atre this evening In German.
DISORDERLY STRIKERS FIRED O.V.
DISPERSED BY THE POLICE OF ANTWERP
WITH REVOLVERS AND SABRES.
Antwerp. Dec. 22.— The striking dockmen be
came more defiant to-day, and their attitude re
sulted ir several conflicts with the police, one
of which was serious. During the morning
groups of strikers interfered with the men who
were coming from the provinces to take their
places, and in several instances the new men
were maltreated.
This afternoon when an attempt was made to
resume operations at the Ockerill Wharf, 2,000
strikers attempted to prevent the resumption.
The strikers were dispersed by the police with
drawn sabres, and, under police protection work
was begun by the foreign hands. Later the
strikers menaced men who were working upon
the steamer Maz, and threatened them with
death. The workmen were put to flight.
The most serious outbreak of tbe.day occurred
at the Ockerill Wharf, where the strikers re
assembled and were charged by the police with
drawn, sabres. The officers used their revolvers
also, and it Is stated that thirty men were
wounded, ten of them seriously. Many arrests
were made.
The strikers tried to pre- ent the loading of
three steamers at the Old Basinfl and were en
gaged by the police. Some were wounded, and
the rioters were dispersed upon the arrival of
police reinforcements.
To-night the docks are quiet. It is said that
the agitators have decided not to make any
manifestation to-morrow, desiring to respect the*
entrance into the city of Frince and Princess
Albert of Belgium. The Burgomaster has taken
strong police precautions to prevent an out
break.
STRIKE SITUATION AT GENOA SERIOUS.
Rome, Dec. 22.— The strike at Genoa begins to look
grave. The strikers have declined the propositions
made to them and have decided to continue the
strike. Troops have been sent to Genoa. Vessels
are unable to leave that port, and it is feared the
electricians and gasmen will join in the mox-ement.
leaving the city in darkness.
MUNOZ RIVERA ACQUITTED.
E\P OK A TRIAL. GROWING OUT OF A RIOT INT
SAM JUAN.
I
San Juan, Porto Rico, Dec. 22.— Seiior Munoz
Rivera and eight other leading Federals, after a
five days* trial by the local court, were to-day
acquitted of the charge of resisting public au
thority. The charges were the outcome of the
riots which occurred on the night of September
14 last, when Seiior Rivera's house was mobbed
and five hundred shots were fired.
Eighty-three witnesses were examined. The
public was intensely Interested, and the court
room was continually jammed. The trial was
concluded last evening, and the decision was
rendered to-day. Seftor Rivera received hun
dreds of congratulatory messages by telegraph.
MR. MEIKLEJQHX'S CANTASS FOR SENATOR
Washington, Dec. 22— George D. Meiklejohn, As
sistant Secretary of War. left Washington to-day
for Lincoln. Neb. He has received leave of absence
for thirty days, and will at once begin a formM
canvass from suitable headquarters at Lincoln for
the Nebraska Senatorship, to succeed Senator
Thurston.
SEVERAL MURDERS IN SOUTH CAROLINA.
Columbia, S. C, Dec. 22 (Special). —
murders with unusual features were reported to
day. A party of young men went from St. George's
to Pregnall's last night to attend a dance. The
young men seem to have been rowdy, and on their
way' to the station they were fired on. and Agnew
Fellder. aged eighteen, and a member of a prom
inent family, was instantly killed.
An unknown person assassinated S. P. Carter, a
Falrfleld County farmer, as he opened his door last
night in response to a summons. •
In Coleton County James Barnwell was found
murdered, his neck had been broken In what seems
to have been a hand to band struggle.
In York County a negro boy deliberately shot off
the head of Edward Trade-well, and then, weeping,
begged bystanders to cut his throat. He did not
explain his reasons for the murder.
KILLED AFTER SHE HAD BOUGHT GIFTS.
Brunswick. N. J.. Dec 22 (Special).— Bessie
Gllland. twenty-three years old. was instantly killed
to-night while attempting to pass 'in front of a
trolley car. near South River. She was not known
in this city, where she had been buying Christmas
presents ; : ,M" ,;.
A STOKE DOCK AT LEAGUE ISLAND.
Washington. • Dec ' 22.— Rear -Admiral Endlcott.
Chief of the- Bureau of Yards and Docks, has re
ceived the report of the special board, headed by
Commander George. A. Converse, which was ap
j pointed to look into certain disagreements between
the contractors and the Navy Department concern-
Ing the construction of the League . Island dock.
The dock was to bo built originally of Umber, but.
later It was decided to construct a stone dock In
stead. The contractors claimed that more money
was needed for this reconstruction than the De
partment was willing to allow. The Board In its
rrport recommends an Increase of $350,000 for the
building of the stone concrete dock, this still being
within the limit of coat. allowed in the appropria
tion. The Board also recommends that the dock
shall retain Us original size. Admiral Endlcott
has reviewed, the report. -but will take no action
on It for several days, during which time the con
tractors will have an opportunity to express their
views on th« findings of > the Board. >. An order
is lite a Son*
without a tune
for Sale Everywhere.
Pettier *jcuc of the carious fawrite ofntage
has twn sold in England at higher prices thai
any other brand
Dv UiPier & Co., 22 barren St., n. V.
1
Diamonds,
Gems,
I Jewelry,!
I In Artistic and Exclusive 1
' Designs. 1
1 Moderate Prices and Reliable I
1 / Goods. ; ;i|
1 Bar tens & Rice Co.,
\ 328 Fifth Avenue, •
\ Near Waldorf- Astoria. ¦¦ •.
\ OPEN EVENINGS. '
just issued by the Navy Department provide* that
hereafter the League Island yard shall be officially
designated as the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
DAXISH DAIRY METHODS. \
AMERICAN" BUTTER MAKERS HAVE A FOR
MIDABLE COMPETITOR.
Washington. Dec. 22 (Special*.— Major Henry E.
Alvord. the chief of the Dairy Division of the D<»
partmer.t of Agriculture, has Just returned t->
Washington from an eight months' trip In Eiuw-
Major Alvord handled the exhibits of the Bureau
of Animal Industry at the Paris Exposition, which
included American butter, cheese and meata. The**
products carried off high honors, the Bureau reoerr
ing four grand prizes. For the last two month*
Major Alvord has been travelling throughout th«
principal dairying sections of Europe. He bas mad*
a special study of the English butter market. For
two years the Department, through the Dairy Divi
sion, has been trying to invade this market with
prime American butter, and the results hare been
fairly satisfactory. I Tfia. principal competitor is
Denmark, and Major Alvord's trip through that
country shows that the dairymen of the United
States have to compete with a most perfect ay « tern
of organization and co-operation, combined with
Government assistance to a marked dejiee. 'lUe
Danish Government practically regulates the qual
ity of the product exported.
Butter is made mostly In large creameries, acd
the Government has a system of inspection of
creamery products so impartial and rigid that the
result is an almost uniformly good exportation. The
butter is not better than the best American cream
ery, but it is uniform. The method of inspection
ts_s.omewhat as follows:
Toe Government Board selects, sample tuba from
the different creameries to be tested, without node*
to the creameries. These samples are criticised
carefully by commercial judges paid by the Gov
ernment. Reports are made up, and If adv^r?* 1
Government expert is immediately sent to the popr
creameries to get at the bottom of the trouble and
render any assistance possible, with the. Govern
ment at his back. All the Danish butter is ex
ported with the exception of a small percentage
reserved for the wealthier class. The Danish people
themselves at oleomargarine. All Europe, Major
Alvord says, eats oleo, and eats It knowingly, and
prefers it at the prices asked— lo cents a pound,
against 30 or 35 for butter.
The Danish Government has nn operation what is
known as a sy.-tem of cow control. The dairymen
contribute a certain amount and the Government
makes a like expenditure in supplying experts to
co-operate in feeding and caring for animals and
advising the farmers of the weak points m tbetr
herds. "Natural conditions in the United States axe,
however, more advantageous, and it Is bsUavvi
that under proper management this country can
successfully compete with Denmark m supplying
the millions of pounds of butter annually imports!
by Great Britain.
FIGHT FOR KANSAS SEXATORSHIP.-
M A LOW HOLDING THE BAIU.?:C2 OS" TOWER—
' . .*¦-, ' --¦-¦ . -
CHAXCES OF BAKER AJTO BURTON.
Washington. Dec. 22 (Special).- the time- •»»
! proaches for the meeting of the Kansas Legislators)
the co 'test over the United States SenatorsMp
. from that State assumes a more interesting aspect.
I It is evident that neither Senator Laden Baker nor
j J. R. Burton has been able to obtain a clear ma
f jority of the Republican members-elect, arid tt Is
doubtful whether either of them will be able *to
accomplish this by the time the Legislature meets.
Indeed, it seems probable that before the holding
of the Republican caucus, Immediately preceding
the meeting of the Legislature ; In joint ballot on
January 22. other men will announce their candi
dacies, thus adding additional complications to the.
situation. A- ,"t»
M. A. Low. the general solicitor of the Rock Isl
and Railroad, continues undoubtedly to hold th«
balance of power. He could throw the. Senatorahtp
to either Burton or Baker. But Mr. Low is await
' ing developments. It is intimated that Mr. Low
' has a candidate, who will be brought to the front
at the proper time, provided there is a reasonable
certainty that his candidate can win by drawing
from the friends of the leading opposing aspirants.
Baker and Burton.
Senator Baker has forged to the front perceptibly
in the last two weeks, and it Is evident that against
Burton, he has the best of the tight, though he un
doubtedly still lacks several votes of a majority of
¦ the Republican members of the Legislature. ¦ Bur
' ton Is following, a close second. This Is evidently
1 what Mr. Low desires. If the Baker and 'Burton
forces can be about equally divided and Mr. Low
.' can control the balance of power he will be in a
I position to- force one or the other of the candidate*
' to come to the support of the man of his choice. -.
Before his departure for Kansas last night Sen
ator Baker expressed confidence of bis re-election,
provided the situation was not farther complicated
by the entrance Into the race of other candidate*.
! He Is anxious that the fight shall be a square con
; test between himself and Mr. Burton, feeling but*
i that be can beat bis old antagonist.
MASSACHUSETTS CLUB CELEBRATES.
Boston. Dee ?*.— The Massachusetts Club eHe»
brated Forefathers Day this afternoon by a ban
quet at Young's Hotel. Robert O. Fuller, of Cam
brige. vice-president of the club, presided, tn th*
absence of the president. ex-Governor Clafltn. The)
guests of t*>e club were Major-General O. O. How
ard. U. S. A . retired, who spoke on "The Soldier
as a CMtaa," and President Hooker T. Washing
ton, of Tuskegee Institute. Alabama, who made aa
address on "The Event of . the Nineteenth Cen
tury '"
• ' IT'S BAD TO READ TOO FAST.
as you may overlook tha little advertisement* la
th« narrow- colunr.*. '. vß3n»aiSßMßl*l| 'HT'IV
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