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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 24, 1900, Image 1

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V OL - LX-.-N°- 19JG2.
PROSPECTS OP THE TREATY.
COMMENT IN LONDON ON THE CANAL
CONVENTION.
AMENDMENTS PREFERRED TO ITS REJEC
TION OUTRIGHT— COST OF UNDER
GROUND TRANSIT.
'"iCnio-rlirfct: 1900: By Th* N>w-T«rk Tribune. 1
[BT CABLE TO TUT: TRIBrVK]
London. Dec. 24. C a. m.— The announcement
tnade In dispatches from "Washington that the
amended Canal Treaty will he sent to London
represses the ardor of the press in discussing
the new questions raised by the Senators". There
are bo cues from the Foreign Office, both
Ix>r<? Lansdowne and Lord Cranborne being in
accessible so far as London leader writers are
concerned, and the under officials not being al
lowed to say anything about diplomatic affairs.
The controversy will not be kept up by the
press at an unseasonable time when the Minis
ters are taking a holiday and nobody knows
what view they take of the vague and academic
quality of the Davis amendment or the precise
effects of the Interpolated clause superseding
the Clayton-Rulwer Treaty or of other changes
in the convention. Two inferences are safely
drawn by men in touch -with the diplomatic
Circle One is that the British Government is
better pleased with the amendment of the treaty
than It would have been with the rejection of
the convention outright, and the consequent re
version to the Ciayton-Bulwer Treaty. It can
now have the final privilege of examining the
amendments and of either revising or rejecting
them, and is left in a more dignified position
than It would have occupied if the treaty had
been thrown out altogether at Washington. The
other Inference is that the retention of the Suez
rules in the convention will enable the Ameri
can Ambassador here to confer with the For
eign Office, and possibly to effect some read
justment or compromise. The prospect of suc
cess may not be hopeful, but it is not outside
the range of possibilities. Public opinion here
has been confused by the contradictory lines
taken by the American correspondents of the
London press, and whatever conclusion is
reached by the Foreign Office will be accepted
without dissent. x
Lord Kitchener's latest dispatches should help
to allay the fears of people in this country who
have been alarmed by the incursion of the small
Boer commandoes Into Cape Colony. The Brit
ish commander-in-chief does not, it is true, re
port that they have been defeated or driven
back, but he confidently declares it the opinion
cf ids officers on the spot that the movement
has been checked, that the raiders are being
surrounded, and that the Dutch farmers do not
appear to be Ending them any material as
sistance. The western commando has occupied
Brltetown, thirty miles west of De Aar. and
blown up a bridge south of that important rail
nay Junction, but the raiders who invaded the
colony from the east seem to have been quite
unsasosesfui. After occupying and subsequently
evacuating Venterstad, they made a dash for
Steymburg, which is a vital point on the
railway; but. finding the strategic points ade
lUMteiy guarded, they took refuge on the Zout
ps—hfrg range, southwest of Stormbexg Junc
tirn-
The news of the defeat of Beyer and Delarey
by French and Clements south of the Magalies
berg Is confirmed. Lord Kitchener does not send
many details, but the fact that the Boers fled
toward Potehefstroom and -were being pursued
Is sufficient to show that if Delarey's defeat of
Clements on the 13th lnst. has not been wiped
out it has to a certain extent been atoned for.
The engineers make a curious calculation that
the utdergTound electric railways in London are
costing four or five times as much a mile for
construction as the^ame system in Paris. This
is partly because the Paris lines are at a shal
lower depth, and the tubes are not lined with
Iron.. But municipal Socialism has a great ad
vantage over private companies in raising cap
ita! at a low rate of interest. L N. F.
CANNOT AGREE TO THE TREATY.
THE TIMES" SAYS ENGLAND WILL FALL.
BACK ON' THE CLATTON-BUL
WER CONVENTION.
London. Dec. 24.— "The Times." In an editorial
on President McKinley*B decision to submit the
Hay-Pauncefote Canal Treaty to Great Britain,
reproaches him with "shifting a dangerous re
sponsibility" on the British Government, and
stye:
The President must bear the responsibility for
any friction that may ensue. The amended
trf-ary ig a bargain to which we cannot agree.
¦Bi to which no reasonable American who takes
the trouble to reflect upon our side of the ques
an expect us to ag;
When Senator Lodge announced that Ameri
cans fxpect Europe to "'keep out" of America,
he forgets that England is a great North Ameri
cai. p..w<-r. and meana to remain such a Power.
If the Hay-Paunoefote Treaty is not adopted
in a form aooeptable to us. we shall stand quiet
ly upon our indubitable rights under the Clay
ton-Bulwer Treaty, rights which cannot be af
fected by any action the American Senate may
choose to take.
TURKEY'S PAYMENT DELAYED.
GERMANY PROTESTS AGAINST THE SETTLE
MENT WITH AMERICA.
Constantinople. Dec. 23.— The expected Im
perial ira<le authorizing the siKnature of the
contract for the construction of a cruiser for
•oman Navy by the Cramp Shipbuilding
Company, together with the initial deposit of
••", has not yet been Issued.
. turn that the Gfrman Embassy has pro
te The Porte against the payment to the
Cramps \mtmm the amount owing to Herr Krupp
for r aval guns haa been paid.
THE CZAR'S STAY IV LIT A MA.
WILL NOT RETCBX TO ST. PETERSBURG UNTIL.
THE MIDDLE OF JANUARY.
It Petersburg. Dec. 23.— The correspondent of
The Associated Press was informed by one of
the Ministers of State this afternoon that Em
peror Nicholas and the Ministers of Finance,
War and Foreign Affairs do not expect to leave
Uvadia, where the Czar is convalescing, before
Urn middle of January*.
GENOESE STRIKE AT AX BSD.
Genoa, Dee. 23.— strike that was caused by
th« closing by the Prefect of Police of the Bureau
of Labor Unions came to an end to-day, on the
announcement that the Government had consented
to a reconstruction 'if the bureau..
ALMOST WITHIN THE SHADOW
of the treat hotels stands the Grand Central Sta
tion a* the New York Central, v.'hen going west
you ea-ve tim» and travel at 2 c«nn a mile on that
Un«.— Advt.
JAV.Ni.fc EXPECTORANT— cures all Cold*—
uy:.i. -. — jbj — Advt.
MEN PROMINENT IN THE TRIBUNE'S CANVASS FOR THE MAYORALTY NOMINATION.
I. A. HOPPER.
BOER RAIDERS CHECKED.
KITCHENER REPORTS ON SOUTH AFRI
CAN OPERATIONS.
MOVEMENTS OF THK TWO BODIES OF IN
VADERS—FRENCH AND CI.KIvi-
EMS FIGHTING.
London, Dec. 23.— The War Office has receive!
the following dispatch from Lord Kitchener,
dated Pretoria, December 22:
So far as it is possible for me to form an
opinion from the reports of officers on the spot,
I think the Boer movement Into Cape Colony
has been checked. Of the two forces that en
tered the colony the eastern is still north of the
Zoutpansberg Range, while the one that en
tered west appears to have been turned in the
direction of Britstown and Prieska. Our troops
are getting around both bodies, and a special
column is also being organized, which will be
dispatched immediately when I know where its
services are most wanted.
The Boers have not received much assistance
In Cape Colony, so far as my information goes.
We have armed some of the colonists, who are
assisting our forces. Railway and telegraph
communication has been much interrupted by
the very bad weather.
De Wet is in the neighborhood of Senekal.
General Frencn, in conjunction with General
Clements, attacked a force under Beyers south
of the Magaliesberg. The Boers broke a^vay in
a southwesterly direction toward Potehefstroom,
and were followed by General Gordon with a
column of French's force.
Yesterday evening about five o'clock Clem
ents'a force was engaged south of Olipnant's
Nek. but I do not yet know the result.
A later dispatch from Lord Kitchener, dated
Pretoria, December 22. says:
The western column of Boers occupied Brits
town and cut the railway south of De Aar Junc
tion. The enemy is being followed up.
General French has been in contact for two
days -with the commandoes of Beyers and De
larey south of the Magaliesberg. He is pur
suing them. The enemy have lost considerably,
and Commandant Kreuse and others have been
captured.
General Colvile engaged two separate com
mandoes on December 21 near Vlakfonteiri. with
slight losses, the enemy retiring.
London, Dec. 24.— Lord Kitchener's dispatches.
breathing a confidence hardly justified by their
contents, are almost the only available news
from the seat of hostilities in South Africa, but
telegrams from Cape Town depict the situation
in anything but roseate views.
Without believing the assertion of the Trans
vaal agency in Brussels that six thousand Boers
have invaded Cape Colony, it is quite evident
that the invasion was a serious and well planned
affair. In connection with this a correspondent
sends an extremely interesting letter, dated
Bethulie. December 1, describing General De
Wet and his doings. He says:
De Wet has never been taken seriously enough.
It is of little use to pursue him, as he fights a
rear guard action and gains twenty miles while
he is being fought. He is a born military genius,
whose wonderful powers have kept up this phe
nomenal resistance.
Once he falls, the whole thing could be crushed
In a fortnight. He has every single commando
under his supervision. All his patrols and
columns march and countermarch on his order.
The forces under his command have been re
duced by his strength of will to a properly or
ganized army, moving at his word. The sooner
the British rid themselves of the idea that De
Wet's forces are a mere rabble, wandering aim
lessly, the sooner they will grasp the need of the
determined effort which is necessary to capture
him.
The Cape Colony Cabinet had an important
Bitting yesterday (Sunday). It appears that the
Boers have destroyed a railway bridge ninety
feet long about twelve miles south of De Aar
and that no Cape malls have arrived at Bloem
fontein for three days.
Further anxiety has beer, caused in Cape Town
by the discovery- that during the last two months
public bodies in out of the way places have
requisitioned supplies of dynamite. The Colo
nial Government is now endeavoring to recover
possession of these explosives, and is removing
all stores of arms and ammunition from bus
pected depots.
Other advices from Cape Town represent the
Dutch element in Cape Colony as greatly elated
over the southward progress of the Boers and
as boasting that the whole district of Victoria
West will Join the raiders. It is suspected In
Cape Town that the force travelling from Zout
pan's Drift is not a body of Boers, but one of
colonials, hastening to join the invaders.
The Pietermaritzburg correspondent of "The
Daily Mail" says:
The Boer* are active between Johannesburg
and Pretoria, exchanging shots with the British
outposts, and It is reported that parties of Boers
are hovering around Johannesburg.
OTTER'S CANADIANS HOME AC, A IN.
Halifax. N. P.. Dsc. 2.T- Th.' steamer Lake
Champlain, having on board Colonel Otter and
SfiO Canadian troops returning from South Af
rica arrived this morning from Liverpool and
disembark-d bete. The order to land at St
John X. 8., had been cancelled by the Militia
Department. The time saved by the change will
enable the Western men to get home for (hrist
mas. They started this afternoon on a special
train for Montreal and Toronto.
THE KAISER HONORS YON BUELOW.
Berlin. Dec. 23.--This a.ftf-rnoon Emperor Will
lam visited the Imperial Chancellor, Count yon
Billow and personally conferred upon him the
insignia of the Order of the Black Easl*.
COUNT ZEPPELIN AIRSHIP.
Berlin, Deo. 23. — Count Zeppelin, the aeronaut,
will finn address the German Colonial Society
upon the prospects of utilizing his airship.
1/ OTHER STOPPED THE MARRIAGE.
Suequehanna. Perm., Dec. — At Hawleytnn last
night, while David D. Owen and Miss Nancy D.
Vaughan were being united in marriage by a local
Justice of the peace, and when the ceremony wad
Just half completed, the young woman's mother
Jumped between the couple and forbade further
proceedings. The marriage was then declared oft*.
For gentle quiet, peaceful easy sleep try Dalian- I
tine's India Pale Ale. or, better yet. BaU»->Unt: - J
¦ ia Surton Ale-— AUvt. .'.=,.;
NEW-YOEK. MONDAY, DECEMBER 24. 1900. -TEN PAGES.-* T^Sr.Yrw
W. B. SIXTSOTf.
P. N OOT>TSA-R».
PEACE WORK AT PEKING.
JOINT MEETING OF NEGOTIATORS EX
PECTED TO-DAY.
DEMANDS OF THE POWERS TO BE PRE
SENTED TO CHINA'S ENVOYS— AN
ANSWER PROBABLY ON
THURSDAY.
Peking, Dec. 23.— Li Hung Chang, answering
an inquiry irom the foreign envoys regarding his
health, said he believed he would be able to at
tend the meeting to-morrow in order to accept
with Prince Ching the preliminary joint note.
The note will be presented by the Spanish Min
ister, Sefior B. J. de Cologan. doyen of the Dlplp
matlc Corps, with a few words expressive of a
hope of as prompt a reply as possible to a note
which has been carefully prepared with every
desire to continue the dynasty and not to be
hard toward the nation, and of a further hope
that the Chinese plenipotentiaries will urge
upon Emperor Kwang Su the necessity of im
mediate compliance.
An answer is expected about Thursday.
CHINA WILL ACCEPT TERMS.
London. Dec. 24.— Dr. Morrison, telegraphing
to "The Times" from Peking on Saturday, says
that official Chinese declare that China will ac
cept all the conditions of the joint note without
"losing her face."
MINISTER WTT AND PEKING NOTE.
HE REGARDS DEMANDS AS HARSH AND
SEVERE.
Washington, Dec. 23. Diplomatic circles dis
cussed with interest to-day the provisions of the
Joint agreement which has been signed by the
representatives of the Powers at Peking for pres
entation to the Chinese plenipotentiaries. The
hope is generally expressed that the latter will
act. promp^y In the <-cmstdcr»H^i O f the .ote
and thus pave the way for speedy negotiations
for the settlement of the peace terms.
To Mr. Wu. the Chinese Minister, the demands
made by the Powers are a keen disappointment,
and are not such, in his opinion, as should have
animated the governments which have the
ultimate best interests of the Chinese Empire
at heart. He regards them as harsh and severe, j
but expresses the hope that they will be dis- j
cussed by both sides in an amicable and con
ciliatory spirit, and that the Powers eventually
will ameliorate many objectionable features.
Mr. Wu expects that, while LI Hung Chang
and Prince Ching are fully qualified to act in
the matter, yet the terms of the note will be
sent by telegraph to the Court at its present
abode, which is connected with Peking by tele
graph. .
ARREST Iff CUDAET CASE.
"DARK MAN" FOUND, BUT SHOWS CON
CLUSIVELY THAT HE HAD NOTHING
TO DO WITH KIDNAPPING.
Omaha. Neb., Dec. 23.— The mysterious "dark
man" in the Cudahy kidnapping case was ar
rested this afternoon \>y the police, from the
description given by Miss Maud Munshaw, who
lives near the house in which "EJdy" Cudahy
was held for ransom by his abductors. His
name is "E<i" Johnson, and he Is a laborer in
the Cudahy packing plant, living at Twenty
sixth and Walnut sts. He admitted having gone
out to the Grover-st. house three times for the
purpose of renting the building, which he found
already let to the "light man" and his accom
plices.
Johnson was easily able to prove to the
satisfaction of the police and Mr. Cudahy. who
was called in, that he had nothing to do with
the case, and was allowed to return to his wife
and family. Chief of Police Donahue is well
pleased with the progress his men are making,
saying that the arrest of Johnson narrows the
case down by eliminating one of the extraneous
features and centring the chief interest about
the "light man" who rented the house from
.Mrs. Schneiderwind. In the mean time the city
is being diligently scoured for any sign of the
other men described by persons living in the
vicinity of the house.
There is still a dark complexioned man in
the case, but he is larger "".nan Johnson and
younger. Otherwise he is much like Johnson,
having a black mustache and dark hair, slight
ly mixed with gray. If the police have any idea
who this man is they will not admit it. So far
as they know he was seen by only one person,
and that is Eddie Cudahy himself. The other
bandit was the light complexioned man. with
the brown hair and long, light mustache, slight
of build, and whose age is said to be somewhere
between thirty and thirty-five years.
This Individual is described by three persons
besides the kidnapped boy, namely. B. K. Mun
shaw, James Schneiderwind and Frank Glynn.
He is the man who called at the Schneiderwind
home to engage the cottage at Thirty-sixth
ami Grover its., who called up the Cudahy
mansion from Glynn's livery stable to give no
tice of the letter's being in the front yard. The
police are satisfied thai they know this man,
and if he is the person they think he. Is he will
probably be In custody within the next ten
days. If guilty he cannot remain at large long,
thry say. . . ".
E. A. Cudahy, sr., still entertains the theory
that if "Pat" Crowe was not one of the men
who kidnapped his son. he will lose no time in
advising him of this fact. Mr. Cudahy has be
friended Crowe many times in the past. "Why,"
paid the packer, " 'Pat' Crowe knows perfectly
well that if he had come to me a week ago and
asked me for ?25 he would have got it. He has
often expressed a sense of gratitude for what I
have done for him, and I can hardly believe he
would turn against me in this way."
IV INSANE COUNT MIBBIXQ.
Stockholm, Dec. 23— The disappearance of Ll«mi
|( nan . - Count BnolUkjr. Military Attache of the
iish and Norwegian Legation in Berlin, ia
attributed to mental derangement.
TO WASHINGTON IN FIVE HOUHS.
From New York, Royal Blue S-hour trains, leavs
foot of Liberty Bt. 11.30 A. M.. 1.00 P. M . and the
"Royal Limited"— no excess fare— at 3:40 P. M.
Other fast solid trains at S.fA 10.00 A If., 1.30. 6.00.
i South K-rry 5
miouick - »t uiuiiiji uiiu eafa uu Mtrvice j
C. B. FATRCHILX*. J. D. CB.IMMINS.
(Copyright. Rockwood, 1897.)
DISTRUST HILL AS LEADER.
LITTLE SUPPORT FOR HIM IN AN ANTI
fLE SUPPORT FOR HIM IX ANTI
TAMMANY MOVEMENT HERE.
Ex-Senator Hill, ex-Senator Murphy. James
K. McGuire, chairman of the Democratic State
Executive Committee: Frank Campbell, chair
man of the j Democratic State : Committee:
Elliot Danforth and a number of other
prominent Democrats were at the Hoffman
House yesterday. They all came to town to
attend the thirty-fifth anniversary celebration
at the Manhattan Club. They stayed over Sun
day, and naturally gravitated together and
talked politics. Some people were inclined to
place stress upon the fact that ex-Senator Mur
phy, talked long and confidentially with Mr. Hill.
The truth is— as politicians realize it— Mr. Mur
phy is no longer a factor in the party in the
State. He cannot control his own organization
in Renssalaer County. He is looked upon as
a figurehead put forth by Richard Croker as
State leader to cover Croker's own sinister de
signs.
John B. Stanchfield was also in the group. It
is said that he has received a faithful promise
of a renominatlon in 1902 from Richard Croker.
and he seems to be trying to keep to the fore.
Augustus Van Wyck was also flitting around
with a benign smile on his face. On the whole.
it seemed to be a field day for the insurgents
and regulars, the important and the unimportant
figures in the State organization.
Many people wondered what Mr. Hill was do
ing here, but the fact is plain to nearly every
politician. Mr. Hill is working night and day
to bring: about a condition of affairs by which he
can attend the next Democratic National Con
vention as a candidate for President with his
own State delegation back of him, and. to quote
a Tammany leader, he is having his "own
troubles." Hill is largely responsible for the
• present and prospective scheme of an anti-
Tammany organization in this county. He
knows that Croker is the great obstacle in his
--path for* ptk.~**>.al piiS^prment.. • H-* has gath
ered around him such revolters from the Tam
many organization as John C Sheehan. Henry
D. Purroy. Bird S. Coler, William F. Sheehan
and others, and is trying to get support for an
organization which is to be built up. He has
received little encouragement. Some honest,
stalwart and earnest Democrats who want to
see Croker overthrown in this city have said
I bluntly that they did not want Hill as a leader
in the movement. They see clearly the selfish
motives which are actuating Mr. Hill. Some
| have gone so far as to say bluntly that if Hill
i and Sheehan were able to build up a cohesive
j and powerful machine to fight Tammany, as soon
as Tammany saw the menace and was ready to
make terms Hill and John C. Sheehan would
sell out wholesale. One prominent Democrat
said yesterday:
"Hill and Sheehan are both rank quitters.
Sheehan once had Croker down, and had him ab
solutely beaten, and he let him up. Sheehan's
protest yesterday morning was most laughable
to those who know the facts. Why, Sheehan hag
the heart of a kitten, and Croker knows it. When
j Sheehan won his fight in the IXth District, and
retained the leadership after Croker tried to
depose him, what did he do? As soon as the re
turns were in, and he saw that he had won, he
| went into the Hoffman House and called up
: Croker on the telephone and said: 'Mr. Croker.
you know I have never said anything about
i you.' Croker laughed over this many times.
; John C. Sheehan's brother. William F. Sheehan.
! was the maddest man in the county when he
; heard of the abject attitude taken by his brother
I when he had won his fight. Sheehan is a fine
! man to lead an anti-Tammany fight, isn't he?
"Then take Hill. He is no better. Why, if
< Croker would promise Hill the delegates from
this State in 1004. Hill would get down and
! blacken his shoes. He has been pushed out into
: the open two or three times to fight Croker, and
he has always quit. All Hill is after now is
j delegates. That is what his visit to town at
j this time is for. Hill wants to build up an anti-
I Tammany organization to use as a club. When
i it became strong enough he would employ it as a
¦ means to make terms for himself. There is not
| an honest Democrat that would foster or help a
i movement engineered for this purpose by Hill."
! There was much talk about the Manhattan
j Club celebration of Saturday night in political
I circles yesterday. It was regarded as a great
i success. The politicians, however. ,v-re not
) inclined to look upon it as significant. While
! Hill was greeted cordially, prominent Democrats
' say that the very men who greeted Hill most
kindly distrust him as a leader, and would have
i nothing to do with a movement he headed to
put down Croker. There seems to be no likeli
: hood that the club as an organization will take
I any part in the Mayoralty campaign next year,
but many of the individual members will be
j aligned against Tammany by working with the
Committee of Fifteen or some other organiza
tion. It is said, however, that any organization
, Mr. Hill tries to engineer will fall.
¦ There has been a great deal of talk to the
effect that William C. Whitney would soon re
enter politics and help to reorganize the party.
To this was added the report that Grover Cleve
land would come out and try to take a com
, manding place in the National councils of the
party and once more become Its acknowledged
National head. It may he said authoritatively
i that Mr. Whltnev will take no active part in
i politics, for a while yet. anyhow. Just what Mr.
! Cleveland will do Is unknown yet. He has
spoken freely of late, and there are Indications
j that he may become active once more, but those
j closest to him in this city say that they have
' received no intimation from him that he wants
to be supported in any movement for a reorgani
zation of the party. The better element of Dem
ocrats and the men who want to see the party
reorganized talk in a conservative way. They
My it Is too early yet, and that a year or two
years or three years may change the whole
t complexion of things, so it is just as well to wait
i and do nothing rash.
' BROKEX SHAFT LAYS UP THE PURITAN.
Fall River. Mas?.. Dec. 23.— The Fall River liner
i Puritan arrived here this afternoon with a broken
1 shaft. The break was discovered yesterday In New-
I York, hut as It was not a bad one it was decided that
I she should make her regular trip to this city. After
the passengers and freight had been discharged she
i proceeded to Newport, where repairs will be made.
and it is unlikely that she will resume her place
. upon the line before next spring. The Piiscilli*
will take her place.
It yr>u ar • troubled with insomnia see if Ballan
. tine's India Pale Ale doesn't bring refreshing sleep.
•— juivt.
I* B. CRANE.
ERNKST HJLRVrER.
CRAZED MAN SHOOTS TWO.
THOUGHT PERSONS IN STREET WERE
FELLOW EMPLOYES WHO HAD
ASSAULTED HTM.
Nathan Roth, nine years old. who lives at No.
ICyfi Berry-st., Brooklyn, was shot and probably
mortally wounded last night by John Galletus. a
boilermaker, who lives at No. 113 North Fifth
st.. Brooklyn. James Kelly, twenty-seven years
old. of No. 179 Bedford-aye.. was also shot by
Galletus, but his wound is not serious. The man
who did the shooting was crazed with fear be
cause he had been assaulted by fellow workmen.
Young Roth was removed to the Eastern Dis
trict Hospital The bullet entered the boy's
head under the rlgrht eye, driving the eyeball
from its socket. Kelly was shot in the chest.
Except for his thick clothing and some cards he
had in his pocket, the bullet would probably
have proved fatal in his case.
Galletus fired a third shot at another passing
pedestrian, who saw the revolver and ducked his
head. The bullet went wild. Galletus then ran
upstairs to his apartments, on the third floor.
Patrolman Owens followed him.
"Give me that revolver!" shouted the police
man. Galletus went to the mantel and handed
the weapon to the policeman He was then ar
rested.
Galletus is twenty-eight years old, a Lithu
anian, and is employed in a shop in Greenpoint.
He has a wife and two rhildron. He has always
been looked upon as sober and Industrious.
Lately he has had trouble with fellow employes,
and a week ago he was struck on the eye. On
Friday a man cut a finger off his left hand.
Galletus told his wife he was afraid the men
would kill him. She advised him to tell his em
plo/ers but he said he was afraid to complain.
While Galletus was sitting in the kitchen of his
home last night a party of men passed the
house, shouting.
1 They're after me! they're after me!-" GalTe
tus yelled and grabbed the revolver. Mrs. Gal
letus tried to restrain her husband, but he
pushed her aside and went down the steps three
ax a time When he reached the stoop he shout
ed, TIT kill them now!" The boy Roth and
Kelly were passing, and the crazed man blazed
away.
Galletus was locked up in the Bedford-aye.
station. He could give no coherent story of the
shooting, except that he had been afraid he was
about to be killed by some of his fellow em
ployes, who disliked him because he is a for
eigner. He is believed to be suffering from
temporary insanity.
THE PENNSYLVANIA BFYSi LA\D.
REPORT THAT LINE TO PHILADELPHIA IS
TO BE SHORTENED AT TRENTON.
Trenton. Dec 23.— The Pennsylvania Railroad
Company, through a local real estate- firm, haa
purchased about thirty properties in the south
ern part of Trenton, and is negotiating for about
thirty more. These properties are adjacent to
the railroad tracks where they cross the Dela
ware River to Morrisville.
None of the railroad officials here will discuss
the object of the purchases, but all the proper
ties are within a line that would be followed by
straightening the company's tracks, and it Is
unofficially said that the company's purpose is
to straighten its tracks in South Trenton and
build a new bridge across the Delaware River.
This would take out an "S" curve and reduce
the distance between New-York and Philadel
phia about a quarter of a mile. It would also
do away with the present necessity of fast
trains slowing up on the curve.
XFTKYORKER'S SUMMER HOME BURNED.
EARI/T MORNING FIRK AT BET>LE HAVEN. CONN,
DOES $20,000 PAMAGE
Greenwich. Conn.. Dec. 23 (Special).— The summer
home of a W. Brown, of New-York, at Belle
Haven was burned at 5 o'clock this morning. The
dense fo? whi^h prevailed at the time hid the
flames from the near neighbors. The alarm was
hrouKht to the village by a messenger in an auto
mobile. The loss is 520.000.
Mr. Brown Is a dealer in real estate, and lives
with his family at No. 40 West Seventy-nrst-st
He started for Greenwich immediately after receiv
ing a telegram In relation to the fire. His wife and
daughter regretted exceedingly the destruction of
their beautiful country home. Mrs. Brown saia
that nobody was living; in the house at the time of
the fire as It was undergoing extensive alterations.
The family thought that the fire was caused by
smouldering embers probably left In the house by
the workmen. , ..
The coachman lived on the property, and the
barn carriage house and contents, containing a
number of valuable horses and carriages, were
saved. The bouse was insured.
DEPUTY ATTORNEY GENERAL RESIGNB.
FRANK N. PARSONS OrVES CP OFTICB TO AT.
TENP TO PRIVATE AFFAtRS.
Albany, Dec. 23 (Special).— Frank M. Parsons, of
Weedsport. Deputy Attorney-General, has resigned
that place from a desire to attend to some private
business affairs The office of First Deputy Is also
vacant. John H. Coyne, who held the place, died
last spring, and for several months the duties of
the office were executed by his brother, Edward B.
Coyne, the County Judge of Livingston County
Judge Coyne a week ago found it to be impossible
to continue his work, as his duties in Livingston
County required his entire attention, and he there
fore returned to Geneseo. Attorney-General Davles
now has two Important vacancies to fill in his
office.
BLIZZARD IN NORTHWEST.
St. Paul. Minn., Dec. S3.— This portion of the North- i
west Is experiencing the first blizzard of the pres
ent winter. The last week was extremely mild
and pleasant. Early to-day, however, the wind
eMfted to the northwest and changed the rain to
snow In St. Paul the snowfall has been light, but
the fierce wind blew It in blinding sheets and made
things exceedingly disagreeable. The storm la gen
eral throughout the State.
Omaha. Neb.. Dec. ».— Considerable snow fell all
over Nebraska last night. The temperature Is not so
low but a sharp wind and a fine snow heralds the
approach of winter weather. Several minor acci
dents have resulted from th« storm, but only one
of them was fatal.
ABREAST OF THE INVENTIVE WORLD
No detail tor the safety and convenience of travel
ler* is overlooked in Pennsylvania Railroad trains.—
Advt.
PRUT, THREE CENTS.
GARDINER WONT FIGHT.
WILL ACCEPT THE INEVI
TABLE IN HIS REMOVAL.
THE PRESENT STAFF WILL SERVE INTO.
REQIESTED TO RESKIX-MR. PHIL
BIN OUTLINES HIS PLANS.
Asa BJrd Gardiner made yesterday what is
probably his first rational decision sine« he be
came District Attorney of New-York County.
Thiy was to accept the Inevitable as «rracefully
as possible and vacate the office* of the District
Attorney without any contest. When the news
that Governor Roosevelt bad ousted him from
the District Attoroeyship of the County of Mew-
York first reached Mr. Gardiner, on Saturday
night, he apparently had a more or less clearer
defined intention of resisting: the order in some
way or other. To that end he called a nnullna
«»f his staff for yesterday morning at the Demo
cratic Club.
After a consultation lasting some tiree the
meeting broke up to seek legal advice from
the best constitutional lawyers who could ft*
found on Sunday. The staff again met their de
posed chief at the same place in the afternoon.
and reported that the vast preponderance of
legal opinion conceded the point that Gardiner
had no appeal from the Governor's derision and
therefore must submit. With much reluctance
Mr. Gardiner came to the same conclusion, aad
EUGENE A. PHILBIN.
The new District Attorney of New- York County.
Assistant District Attorney John F. Mclntyre
was appointed to make the announcement to th*
waiting reporters.
When Mr. Mclntyre did so. he was asked what
foundation there was for the report that Gar
diner's staff would walk out in a body with him.
Mr. Mclntyre replied that while this action had
been advocated toy some. It had been so vlgor-
¦ x ously opposed by others, including himself, that
It had fallen through.
M'INTYRE'S STATEMENT FOR GARDINER.
So great was Mr. Gardiner's rag^ against re
porters that, by his express request, none were
allowed ro enter the doors of the Democratic
Club while he was there yesterday The To-
Hell-with-Reform champion holds those who
published his remarkable utterances responsi
ble to a far greater degree for his removal than
the Wtd judgment which led him to utter them.
It was impossible to get an interview with him.
Speaking as the representative of Mr. Gardiner
and the staff. Mr. Mclntyre said:
Mr. Gardiner has been advised that he hulno
appeal from the Governor's decision. He has.
therefore, decided to submit to it. and will make
' the entry of the new District Attorney upon his
duties as easy as possible. The new occupant
i of this important office will find a large number
I of important and intricate cases confronting
him. and that is one reason why I opposed the
; suggestion that we should all resign and go out
JOHX PROCTOR CLARKE.
Whom Governor Roosevelt has appointed to the
Supreme Court to succeed the late.
Justice Beelcmaa.
in a body. My resignation is ready (or Mr.
Phllbin the moment he calls for it. but I shall
not resign until he is quite ready to nil my place.
I take this attitude because I consider that I
owe a duty to the citizens of New -York aa well
an to the retiring District Attorney, and my
duty to the citizens is to see that the important
> work of the District Attorney's office is not
\ hampered or embarrassed any more than the)
i Governor's action makes necessary. It takes
about two years to educate a staff of assistant
District Attorneys up to the technical work of
the office so that all may move smoothly, aad
that education is gained at the expense of the
taxpayers. Therefore we owe it to the citizens
to keep the machinery moving until such time
as the new District Attorney is ready to name
our successors.
Of course, all of us feel that Colonel Gardiner
has met with great injustice, and as individuals
we protest against th*» Governor* action. Our
sympathies are with Colonel Gardiner. an<J w«
would stand by him to the last ditch had ha not
decided to enter into no legal contest over the
matter. He will spend to-morrow in getting
j TRAVELLERS BY TRADE
1 Know the merits of the Pennsylvania Railroad.—
Aviv I.

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