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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 25, 1900, Image 1

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V*"LX..-.N°- 19.763.
LATEST LONDON COMMENT.
CABINET MINISTERS FORSAKE OFFICES
FOR CHRISTMAS AT HOME.
DR. JAMESON OFF FOR SOUTH AFRICA—
RICHArtD CROKER QU.IET AT HIS
COUNTRY HOME.
[rv->r-vriirht. 1800: By The New- York Tribune]
[BT CABLE TO THE TRIBrVE.]
London. Dec. 25, 6 a. m. — The English Christ-
Biss comes this year with holly and mistletoe,
but witn no rue. The work in South Africa is
unfinished, but there is no sense of humiliation
in the unexpected reverses and no bewilderment
over the holding up of the British army a-t the
three points of attack and the failure to ac
complish the relief of the starving garrisons.
The n"ws from the theatre of war is meagre,
and what there is points to a gradual breaking
down of resources in the Boer resistance. It is
mainly a problem of remounts and relays of
horses The infantry cannot bring the war to
a clos* by sitting tight on the railways and in
the chief towns. The Boer guerillas must be
hunted down, and this can be done only by sup
plying the mounted force with droves of horses
for riding hard and fast over the veldt. The
War Office has never been able to comprehend
the necessity for purchasing horses on an un
precedented scale for operation in South Africa.
No Intelligence was received from Kitch
ener yesterday, and private advices indicate that
railway and telegraphic communication between
Cape Town and the north has been suspended,
partly by the operations of the Boer raiders and
partly by the heavy rains, and this fact may ac
count for the silence of the wires. Considerable
anxiety as to the situation in Cape Colony is still
Bald to prevail in military circles in Cape Town,
but here there is the fullest confidence in the
ability of Lord Kitchener, who is now on the
¦pot. to crush the marauding commandoes. The
Boers are not in sufficient strength to seriously
Interfere with the British lines of communica
tion and any damage that they may have done
to railway and telegraph lines will no doubt be
quickly repaired.
The Express" looks upon Vicker's Son 4-
Maxim'e arrangement with the Cramp Ship
Building Company as a tremendous stroke of
British enterprise. Cramp will, it declares, be
only the ostensible head of the Cramp company,
which will be virtually & British concern, and
will buiM American warships for the benefit of
British shareholders. This newspaper in another
column at the same time appeals to Englishmen
to wake up to s?ve the threatened industries of
the country. "The Times'* this morning, dealing
with the same subject, concludes that there Is
urgent need for a thorough national system of
technical and commercial education.
The public offices at Whitehall have been left
under the charge of janitors and night clerks.
and th? Cabinet Ministers are entertaining
family parties in their country' houses. How
large will be the Cabinet Council at Hatfleld is
unetrtsin; probably It will not exceed three
members, as the two Right Hon. Balfours have
other engagements. Lansdowne Is at Bowood
with a iarge company. The Duke of Devonshire
to «t Chateworth. with a big shooting party.
P" *'?chael Hicks-Beach is at Coin Stalriwyns, In
Glwmtllltli . and Chamberlain is at High
bury, as he v/a« five years ago when his
holiday recreation was interrupted by tidings
of the Jameson raid, and he was brought back
to London in hot haste by a special train. The
soldier of fortune who then menaced hie peace
of mind IB now reading French novels on the
Bay of Biscay, in the first reaches of his voyage
to Cupe Town. Dr. Jameson has slipped out of
London quietly, and has taken passage for South
Alrica without observation. His health has im
proved under the rigor of medical treatment
here, and he has succeeded in eluding inter
viewers and gossips during his protracted stay.
The American Ambassador will have a family
party to-day at Carlton House Terrace, his
wife and daughter having returned from the
Continent in improved health. Secretary Henry-
White will entertain his colleague, Ridgely Car
ter, and other guests at Wilton. The Naval At
tache has recovered from a long illness, but is
unable to go out of town for Christmas.
Richard Croker is not a diplomatic personage
and his holiday recreations can only be sur
mip-d. I learn that he is recruiting his health
anil talking about horses at his country home.
Mi is not concerned over the onslaught made
by Governor Roosevelt upon his friends in the
District Attorney's office.
** Hall Came sends me from the Continent the
following tribute to Stephen Phillips's "Herod."
which has been the chief feature of the London
theatrical season:
The real motive is the strife of ambition with
love. Ambition conquers first, (hen love brings
in it? reckoning. The last act is very moving.
Mv only criticism would be that the v.-ork is
too short, and the' emotion p.ives the effect of
being written in shorthand. It would have been
still more impressive if it had been two acts
. longer, but the theme and treatment have great
ness This poet belongs to the first flight. He
possesses imagination and passion. I rejoice to
know him and to find him in a oay of so much
likeliness. I. N. F.
TON BCELOW WON EMPERORS APPROVAL.
ORDER OF THE BLACK EAGLE REWARD FOR
WORK IN REICHSTAG.
Berlin. Dec. 24.— Emperor William's bestowal upon
Count yon Billow. Imperial Chancellor, of the high
est decoration, the Order of the Black Eagle, is In
terpreted to signify Imperial approval of his recent
utterances In the Reichstag, particularly of his
successful management of the China debate, as
»*•!! as the Kruger Incident, a* against the Pan-
German agitation.
It Is understood that His Majesty regards the
Chancellor's present tour in South Germany as a
mat success in cementing the adherence of other
German cabinets to the Emperor's foreign policy.
NEW PROBLEM FOR CHAMBERLAIN.
"EWFOI-NDI.AKD PABINET AWAITS HIS ACTION'
ON TREATT FHORR.
Bt. John**. N. F.. Dec. 24.— The Colonial Cabinet
has decided to await action by the Imperial Gov
ernment before determining upon a policy with re
spect to the renewal of the Treaty Shore modus
Vivendi when it expires next Monday. The initia
tive will He with Joseph Chamberlain. Imperial
Secretary of State for the Colonies, who must either
•ake another treaty with France or call upon the
**J*By to renew the modus vlvendi.
•could the latter course be adopted by Mr. Cham
¦2J*i n ' the colony's opportunity will come: for, by
""In* to renew. Mr. Bond will force Mr. Chain
"•naln into an Impossible position or be able to
•"Sat* ample concessions.
AUSTRALIA'S FEDERAL VINIHTRT.
iMaij, N. S. W., Dec. 24.— Sir William John
L *ae. premier of New South Wales, who was re
..^fitly requested by the Earl, of Hopetoun, Gov
ernor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.
i?. f ? ri ? the First Federal Ministry, has declined
*£• t**k. He has advised Lord Hopetoun to suro
s°* Edmund Barton, who was leader of the
Pl—* Convention during it« sessions In Alelaide.
¦>an« y and Melbourne in 18*7 and !«*•
EMBARGO OX EXHIBIT.
UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT CARS
TIED UP BY A FRENCH RAILROAD.
FORMAL PROTEST MADE BY AMBASSADOR
PORTER. AND SUITS FOR DAMAGES
WILL BE PROMPTLY ENTERED.
Paris. Dec. 24.— Thirty cars, forming part of
the United States Government exhibit at the
recent Paris Exposition, were suddenly laid un
der embargo to-day at Havre, the railroad com
pany declining to surrender them pending pay
ment of a claim of 5,710 francs. This extraor
dinary action, seriously delaying the departure
of the United States auxiliary cruiser Prairie
from Havre for New-York with the Government
exhibits, was made the subject of a formal pro
tect to the French Government by United States
Ambassador Forter.
The company bnses its claim on demurrage
charges on freight in the cars when the goods
were brought to the Exposition for installation.
Some time ago the claim was submitted, and
Major Brackett, secretary c,f the American
Commission, investigated it and concluded that
it had no foundation, as some of the cars
charged against the American Government never
contained official exhibits, while the others were
cars utilized by private exhibitors, and not,
therefore, chargeable to the United States.
Major Brackett thereupon endeavored to secure
a settlement, but without avail. The matter
dragged along through the summer, the secre
tary of th« American Commission repeatedly
expressins his willingness to settle any just
claim against the United States. The company
left the case In an unsatisfactory condition, and
finally embargoed the cars.
When Major Brackett was informed by the
United States agent at Havre, he wired him
instructions to pay to the company 500 francs
in the presence of the legal authorities, and at
the same time to enter a claim against the
company for 10.000 francs as damages for ob
struction and delay. Major Brackett said to
day:
Last summer the company submitted a bill of
32,782 francs for freight charges against the
commission and pressed for payment. Pending
an explanation of certain items. I paid 2.~>.»mh)
francs on account, at the same time asking
for details. When these were furnished I dis
covered that th^ Commission had been charged
with 4.19.°. francs which should have been
charged to the Compagnie Gfnfrale Transat
lantique. while 4,110 francs should have been
charged to private exhibitors. The company is
therefore obliged to make a. rebate.
To-morrow being a holiday, there will be no
loading of ihe Prairie. The cars will be re
leased by the payment of the 500 francs.
Should Wednesday not bring a satlsfactory
eolution. Major Brackett will probably pay the
rest of the claim under protest, in order not to
delay further the sailing of the Prairie. At the
same time he will enter an additional claim for
damages.
Some trouble also arose with Philip Lazles. the
contractor who built the National pavilion. He
•wrote to the American Commission or Decem
ber lrt, saying that the last letter from Commis
sioner-General Peck was not satisfactory, and
asking when the building would be turned over
to him for demolition. Two days later he noti
fied to the Commission that he inUnded to take
possession and begin destruction immediately.
He. in ram. vaF irrTormed thr«« tb* buildins
would be placed under his control on December
20. and at a formal meeting it was notified to him
that the Commission would remove certain fur
nishings not supplied by him, a proposition to
which his representative did not object. Saturday
night, while the American custodian of the
building, assisted by two workmen, was remov
ing material belonging to the United States, a
force of police arrived, and arr°st°d all three, on
the ground that they were taking goods which
did not belong to them. It ts said that M.
Lazies brought about the arrests. Major Brack
ett secured their release to-da\. M. Lazies
served him with a legal notice that he would
not accept the pavilion in its present shape, and
would demand damages for delay.
The Frenchman will now be held to the strict
terms of the contract, which included demoli
tion, and a counter claim will be entered of a
forfeit of 2<>o francs dally from March 1.", the
date when the contract called for completion, to
June 23, together with a claim o? 2.<»00 francs
for defective construction, as the roof leaked
and certain furnishings were ruined. More than
this, there will be a special claim o* 2,<X>O francs
if it can be provr-d that M. Lazies brought about
the arrests, making a total of 2fi,fiO(> francs.
FILIPiyOH WORK FOR PEACE.
FEDERAL PARTY IPPT'ES ADDRESS ANT>
CABLES GOOD WILL TO PRESIDENT
M'KIXLEY.
Manila, Dec. 24.— Tho Ff-df-ral party has de
cided upon a new organization and to-day pub
lished in tht- Spanish ami Filipino eveninpr
papers an address to the Filipinos which says:
The number of Filipinos who are convinced
that the time for peace has come increases
daily. The object of the Federal party is the
reunion of all Filipinos who truly wish for peace
and who are disposed to work for it. It appeals
to those who will attempt to attain for thf-
Philippines the greatest number of liberties un
der the application of the American Constitu
tion. We call ourselvei the Federal party be
cause under American sovereignty thf right
eous aspirations of the Philippines will be to
form a part of th» American federation as
States of the Union.
The Executive Committee has cabled Presi
dent McKinley announcing that the organiza
tion has been perfected and tendering an ex
preesion of good wilt Copies of the address
have been sent into the provinces. The new
paragraph in the platform declaring for Amer
ican recognition of the legality of some acts
done by the authorities of the insurgent govern
ment is in conformity with precedents estab
lished during the reconstruction period follow
ing the Civil War in the United States.
FIGHTING ON THE ISLAND OF LEYTE.
FILIPINO LEADERS ON THE EAST COAST
DRIVEN TO THE MOUNTAINS.
Manila. Dec. 24— Aivices from the Island of
Leyte show that there is still considerable turmoil
on the West Coast, but that the East Coast is
quiet, the leaders having retired to thf mountains.
Lieutenant Frank E. Lynch and three men of the
44th Volunteer Infantry wen- wounded near Ilon
gas. on th,e west coast. Two m-n of Company L,
43d Volunteer Infantry were killed, and three of
Companies L and K. together with Lieutenant
Louis H. Leaf, were wounded December 13, near
San Miguel northwestern Leyte. Xo decided re
sults have yet been secured by the 2.000 T"nlffrd
States troops distributed among the coast towns
of Samar.
POIFCARFW TI7YS YOUNG BRUT.
GENERAL WILL MARRY THE PAIT.HTER OF THE
marqvess nr nn.voNriK
London. Dec. 2.V— General Reginald Pole-
Carew, who has returned from South Africa,
will marry Lady Beatrice Frances Elizabeth,
elder daughter of the Marquess of Ormonc'e.
He is fifty-one years of age and she under
twenty-five.
DEERFOOT FARM SAUSAGES
With increasing kiiowledge of the danger to
health through carelessly prepared food, consumers
crow more fastidious in their selection. "Deerfoot"
me&ns purity, daintiness and cleanliness.— Advt.
NEW- YORK. TUESDAY. DECEMBER 25, 1900.-TEX P AGES.-* u f.V.£w
POPE CLOSES HOLY DOOR.
EIGHTY THOUSAND PERSONS WITNESS
MAGNIFICENT SPECTACLE.
HIS HOLINESS SHOWS NO SIGN OF FATIGUE
AFTER THE CEREMONY. WHICH
T, A STEP TWO HOURS.
Rome. De- 24.— The Pope to-day performed
the ceremony of closing the Holy Door of St.
Peter's Cathedral with the gorgeous ceremonial
usual to great functions of this kind. It was
a magnificent spectacle. There was a great
gathering of the Prince? of the Church, who
participated in the ceremony, which was wit
nessed by enormous crowds. Just one year ago
the Pope solemnly inaugurated the Holy Tear
by performing the impressive ceremony of open
ing the Holy Door of St. Peter's Cathedral at 11
o'clock in the morning.
To-day His Holiness descended to St. Peter's
Cathedral at 11 a. m.. and the ceremonies lasted
until 1 p. m. The Pope then returned to his
apartments, apparently not fatigued. He In
toned thf- Te Peum in a resonani voice, and
throughout gave evidence of r.oinp in excellent
health and spirits. He used the artistic golden
trowel subscribed for by the Catholics of the
world in mortaring the »hree gilded bricks
which he placed, as a first layer, on the
threshold of St. Peter's door. The whole Pontifi
cal Court participated in the ceremonies. It is
estimated that eighty thousand persons in all
were spectators of the ceremony.
The spectacle inside the vast Basilica was
superb. The pillars of the central nave were
draped with gold embroidered scarlet cloth, and
the porch under which the function took place
was transformed Into a magnificently decorated
hall. On the left of the Holy Door was erected
the Pontifical Throne, covered with red and
gold. On the right hand of the doer stood trib
ui for royal personages, prinrfts. Knights of
Malta, prelates, representatives of the Roman
nobility nnd other distinguished persons In-
Fide the church every inch of space was occu
pied by the throng, vhioh gathered early in
the morning. A strong detachment of troops,
stationed in the square in front of the Cathedral,
controlled the incoming crowds, who literally
raced te secure the best places.
The Pope was borne to St. Peter's in the
Sacred Chair, and was preceded by clergy with
lighted candles, bishops, archbishops and car
dinals, and escorted by the Pontifical Noble
Guards. On h'.s arrival at the portal he alighted
and entered the church through the Holy Door.
As he appeared on the threshold. th<=- solemn and
silvry tones of the trumpet echoed through
the edifice The Chapter of th» Vatican met
him and presented tc him holy water which he
sprinkled upon the concrrtgation. Applause be
ing forbidden, a religious silence was observed
which heightened the grandeur and Impressive
nf-ss of the moment.
Borne now on the Sedla Gestatoria to the
High Altar, he stepped to the ground and knelt
before the most precious relics of the Catholic
Church, which were displayed on the altar.
Then the procession reformed and proceeded to
the rhape! of the Sacrament, wht-re the Pontiff
again knelt for some time, while the choir of
the Sistine Chapel chanted peilms. The Pope
was then borne to the Holy Door, where he
alighted from the S^dla Gestatoria, and waited
um.il the er»tir« prwssion lisd passed <v
through the door, he leaving the church last and
walking to the throne, where he seated himself.
A number of sacred songs were sung by the
Papal Choir, after which Pope Leo rose and
blessed all the material employed in closing th«
door. Then he descended from the throne, knelt
before the door and laid with the golden trowel
a layer of cement, on which he placed three gilt
bricks bearing commemorative inscriptions Be
side the bricks he p'.a-ed a casket containing
gold, silver and bronze medals bearing the head
of Leo and inscriptions recording the opening
and closing of the Holy Door.
The Pope having reascended the throne. Car
dinal Bishop Seraflno Vannutelli. Great Peni
tentiary, and four other Cardinals, performed
a similar ceremony of laying cement and three
bricks, after which the masons employed by the
Vatican closed the doorway with a canvas
screen, painted to represent marble with a cross
in the. centre. The candles borne by the clergy
were extinguished, the Te Deum was sung and
the Pontiff, having given solemn benediction,
was immediately carried back to his apart
ments.
BATB HER BLOOD 18 ROYAL.
NEW-YORK WOMAN LOCKED UP FOR DIS
TURBANCE AT OSBORNE HOUSE.
London. Dec. 24.— Elizabeth Alma Blake, well
dressed, good looking and about thirty years
old, giving her address as No. 339 West For
tieth-st., New-York City, has been arrested here
and committed to St. George's Workhouse,
charged with insanity. She will be tried on
Thursday.
The woman appeared at Osborne House, Isle
of Wight, on Friday, and claimed to be a daugh
ter of Princess Beatrice (Princess Henry of
Battenberg). She made a disturbance and then
disappeared from the Isle of Wight. She was
found and arrested here to-day.
A Tribune reporter called at No. 339 West For
tieth-st. last night. The only person at that ad
dress who knew about the woman who had been
arrested was Mrs. Sarah Cassidy. She said the
weman had come to her as a seamstress early in
September, having been sent by an Intelligence
office She was eccentric, considering herself re
lated to people of wealth and prominence.
One of her delusions was that she was a daugh
ter of the Princess Beatrice. She declared, also,
that she was a survivor of the Galveston flood.
About the end of November she was hurt in a
street car accident She settled with the company
for a small amount of money and sailed for Eng
land on December 12.
JAMAICANS ATTACK AMERICAN FOREMEN.
SERIOUS TROUBLE IN ECUADOR OVER THK
BUILDING OF A RAILROAD.
Kingston. Jamaica. Dec. 24.-Letters Just received
here from Ecuador report increasing trouble be
tween the American foremen and the Jamaican
laborers who are constructing the railroad in that
country under the contract obtained by the James
p McDonald Company, of New-York. As a result
of the disturbances several Jamaicans have been
L jnrtnnf of the American foremen had to clear
shot, and one refuge elsewhere. The laborers were
arming and serious trouble »as expected.
James P McDonald could not be seen last night
.' hl _ home at No. 1 West 81xty-nlnth-st. He had
feft h the cTty for the holidays.
LORD WILLIAM BERESFORD'ft CONDITION.
London. Dec. 24.- Lord William Leslio de la Poer
Beresford is ill He is suffering from peritonitis.
This morning his condition Is reported as slightly
imnroved. In consequence of Lord Beresfords Hi
ndis the Christmas festivities at Deepden-?, Ms Feat
at Dorking, have been abandoned
PERAZA BETOLTS fV VENEZUELA.
Curacoa, Dutch Guiana. Dec 24.— Celestino Pe
raza. formerly the Secretary-General of President
Castro of Venezuela, has revolted against the
Venezuelan Government, near Lesema. In the
Guarico District. A force of 2.500 Venezuelan troops,
under General Arlstides Fandeo, has been sent
against Peraaa.
ONE KILLED, MANY HURT.
TROLLEY CAR CRASHES INTO ANOTHER
AT BROADWAY FERRY. BROOKLYN.
As a result of a collision between two trolley
cars in Brooklyn last evening one woman was
instantly killed, two women were probably fa
tally injured, while several other persons re
ceived slight cuts and bruises. The dead woman
was not identified. The accident occurred at the
Broadway ferry.
Some of those injured" were:
AI.L.EX.. Benjamin, motorman. of No. 2f>« vVyrkoiT-ave.
Brookls'n. cut on the head.
BREX.VAN". Christopher, conductor, of No. 174 Throop
ave., Brooklyn, slightly Injured
TOrXEMANX. Mrs. Emily, forty years old. of No. 334
S.vjth Firpt-M., Brooklyn, internal injuries.
WAP. REX, Mrs. Elizabeth, fifty-seven years oM. of No. 10
Ten Eyrk-st.. Brorklyn. three ribs fractured and
probably internal inuries.
The dead woman was mangled almost beyond
identification. She was about thirty-five years
Old, had dark complexion and gray eyes, was
about five feet five inches in height, and wore
black stockings, a black waist, black skirt, black
gloves, black sack coat and black hat. Nothing
was found about her to lead to identification.
Car No. 1.37S of the Metropolitan-aye. line, in
charge of John Fagan, motorman, of No. 3."2
Monroe-st., Manhattan, reached the terminus at
Broadway at 6:20 o'clock, just as traffic was at
its height. The car due next was Newtown car
No. 1,557, on the Grand-st line. Benjamin Allen,
motorman of No 2.V> Wyckoff-ave.. was in
chirs<\ The car reached the terminus to the
north of the other car at fi:2.r The conductor.
Christopher Miller, pulled down the trolley pole
ani swung it around.
Although Allen, the motorman. insists that he
cut off the power and put on the brake prop
erly, it is said that evidently this was not done.
He had aisr failed to reverse the switchboard.
When the • polo again reached the wire the
Orand-st car shot ahead at a terrific rate of
sp^pri Tt crashed into the Metropolltan-av«.
car The cars were telescoped. They Jumped
the tracks and ran across the wide roadway
striking several wagons and imperilling the
live* of hundreds of people who were disem
barking from ferryboats. Many were knocked
down and trampled on in the mad rush to get
out of th<= way.
The woman who .vas killed was just stepping
on the curbstone near where the Metropolltan
ave. car was at thf terminus. She was knocked
down and crushed to death under rhe motor
box. The two women who wer<» severely in
jured were about to board the car when they
were thrown down and jammM between the
two cars.
Christopher Brennan. the conductor of the
Metropolitan-aye. car. was on the platform
when the crash ram«. He sav*d his life by
jumping He was struck on »he neck by a
plerp of flying timber, but not seriously hurt.
The half dozen people in th.^ Metropolitan-aye.
car were badly shaken up and some were
slightly cut by flying glass. Allen was cut on
the head.
Captain Short hurried with the Bedford-aye.
rM ; Pr vf.3 to the scene. Eastern District, St.
Catharine's and Willlamaburg hospital ambu
lances came The police had difficulty In keep-
Ing th* crowd r>ack The two injured women
were tak^n to the Eastern District Hospital.
In order to get at the body of the dead woman
th* car had to be jacked up. Both motormen
... . r .. arrested. Allen cried bitterly. He had
been employed on ih<> line only a week. Traffic
was delayed for some time, until the wrecking
crew removed the cars, which were badly
wrecked.
SUTI'ATIOX IX CAPE COLOXY.
•THE DAILY MAIL" SAYS INVADERS ARE
AIDED BY THE 'APE DUTCH.
London. Dec. 2. r ..-"We learn. 1 ' says "The
Dally Mail." "that the reports of the serious
situation in Cape Colony are fully confirmed.
The invading Boers are receiving much assist
ance from the Cape Dutch. Railway communi
cation between Cape Town and the north is
almost entirely severed, partly by Boer opera
tions and partly by rains.
NO PEACE FOR KRUEGER NOW.
REPORT FROM THE HAGUE THAT HE RE
JECTS ALL SUGGESTIONS OF
OVERTURES.
London. Dec. 25.— "Since the Nooltgedacht af
fair." says the correspondent of "The Daily
Mail" at The Hague. "Mr. Kriiger has become
htiff necked.
"He now scornfully rejects all private sugges
tions in the nature of peace overtures."
LORD KITCHENER AT DE AAR.
Cape Town, Dec. 24.— Lord Kitchener has ar
rived at De Aar, Cape Colony, and is taking
rm-asures to '-rush the Boer Invasion.
CANADIANS FOR THE TRANSVAAL.
VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED IN BADEN-POW
ELLS MOUNTED POLICE.
Ottawa, Ont.. Dec. 24.— The Colonial Office is
anxious to get as many Canadians as possible to
Join Baden-Powell's Transvaal mounted police. If
1,000 Canadians volunteer for this service it is the
Intention of the Imperial Government to offer ten
captaincies and fifteen lieutenancies in the force
to qualified officers of the Canadian miii^i- The
pay for men is five shillings a day from the date
of landing in Cape Town, with free transportation
from Canada to South Africa.
Winnipeg Man., Dec. 24.— Elaborate preparations
are being made to give a public welcome to tne
soldiers who will return from South Africa this
week The train will be met by Premier Roblin,
Lieutenant-Governor Colonel McMillan and mem
bers of the local government, members of the City
Council School and Park Boards, the military
bodies Including the Royal Canadian Dragoons,
the 90th Battalion, the Winnipeg Dragoons, the
13th Field Battery and the Veterans' Association.
At the Holy Trinity Church the Primate of Can
ad Archbishop Mncroy, will conduct short thanks
giving services for the safe return of the men. In
the evening a banquet and ball will be given the re
turned soldiers.
WANT KRI'EGER IN GRAND RAPIDS.
Grand Rapids. Mich.. Dec. 24-The Common
Council of this city unanimously adopted a resolu
tion to-night extending to Mr. Kruger an official
welcome and the freedom of the city. In accord
ance with this action the City Clerk sent the fol
lowing cable dispatch:
Grand Rapids, Mich.
President Kruger, The Hague: We extend greet
ings and most urgently request you to visit our
city and meet more than thirty thousand of your
count rymen. COMMON COUNCIL.
GRAND DUKE OF BAXE-WEJMAM ILL.
Weimar. Dec. 24.— Some anxiety is felt regarding
the health of the aged Grand Duke of Saxe-
Weimar. He is suffering from influenza. A bulle
tin issued by his physicians cays his condition is
satisfactory, that he slept well, in spite of repeated
spasms of coughing, and that his temperature
is 99.7.
Charles Alexander, the reigning Grand Duke of
Saxe- Weimar, was born on June 24. 1818. He is the
son of Grand Duke Charles Frederick and of Grand
Duchess Maria Paulowna, daughter of the late
Czar Paul I of Russia. He succeeded his father
on July 8. 1853. and married on October 8. 1842.
Sophie, daughter of the late King William II of
the Netherlands. She died in 1897. The heir ap
parent to the throne is Prince William Ernest,
grandson of the reigning Duke, who was born on
June 10. 1876.
Pschorr Brau Bock, the Beer that was aw.xrjed
Grand Prix (highest award) at Paris, now on
draught.— (Advt.
ODELL WILL KEEP QUIGG OUT
GOVERNOR-ELECT OPPOSED TO HIS RE
TURN TO THE COUNTY COMMIT
TEE PRESIDENCY.
Governor-elect Odells dislike of ex-Congress
man Lemuel E. Quigg is the principal reason
why he will not succeed General F. V. Greene j
as president of the Republican County Commit- j
tee. A number of Quigg's ill advised friends on I
Sunday started a rather sickly boom for him
for the presidency. All went well with it till
yesterday, when it became known that Mr. Odell
strongly disapproved of the suggestion that
Quigg was the most available man. Last night
Quigs's name wa.s mentioned only in whispers
by his admire -s, and then not in connection
with the County Committee presidency. One of
Governor-elect Odell's friends, in referring to
the matter, said: '
What's the use of putting the Republican or- ;
ganization in this county in the attitude of
looking for trouble when there is no necessity
for it? Quigg is down and out. and is mixed
up with a Havana contract of large dimensions.
Half a dozen of the most powerful leaders up
the State are against him. and Gruber, of the
XXlst Assembly District, in this city, stands
ready to declare war on him the minute he is
pat back at the head of the County Committee.
When Quigg left the County Committee presi
dency last summer there was a deficit in the
treasury amounting, according to reports, to
nearly £10.000. One of the first things that
State" Chairman Odell and General Greene did
was to clear up this deficiency. It was not at all ,
a pleasant task, as no one likes to "pay for i
dead horses," especially when there are so many
of them. Now the County Committee is out of j
debt, the district leaders are working together
with unusual harmony and all that is necessary !
is to elect a president of the General Greene |
type. Quigg is not of that type. If it was good .
judgment to have an independent Republican j
for president last fall, it is ten times more impor- I
tant to have that kind of a man now. as the j
election in New- York is likely to be carried by a i
slim margin. If we are to get the successful
margin and elect the anti-Tammany ticket, it
will be because good judgment has been used :
all along the line.
• Besides the municipal officers, we shall elect !
two or three Justices of the Supreme Court and \
county tickets in New -York and Kings. The |
justiceships are almost as important as the i
Mayoralty. Every one knows what Quigg did [
three years ago. He has done nothing to re
habilitate himself in the minds of independent
voters. When it comes to a problem of practi- !
cal politics, the result aimed at is to defeat
Tammany Hall next year. Quigg as the head
of the Republican County Committee next fall j
would stand for exactly the thing h» stood for i
three years ago — the success of Tammany.
Mr. Quigg was an early caller on Senator Platt .
at hi<? office in Broadway yesterday, but it was i
learned last night that he was not there to see
Bfr. Platt about the county presidency. An
entirely different matter was illßf lisnsil.
Whf>n Mr. Platt was asked about the chair
manship last night he laid:
The selection of a president for the Cminty
Committee wili not be mad" till W«dne«»day
night. We may not find a man for the place
even by that time. A number of men are being
considered, but I will not mention names.
When asked about the appointment of John
Prnctor Clarke and Eugene A. Philbin. Senator
Platt said that both were good appointments
and met the expectations of the party.
Some of Mr. Plan's intimate friends declare
that Mr. Philbin's appointment was an unpleas
ant surprise to him, and that he was likely to
remember it wh^n some particular friend of
Governor Roosevelt wanted something. Mr.
Platt was not consulted at all concerning Mr.
Philhin. and not until the "news came from
Albany did he know the name of the new
District Attorney.
PLANS FOR ECONOMY.
GOVERNOR-ELFCT ODET.L SAID TO FAVOR
ABOLISHMENT OF SEVEKAL
COMMISSIONS.
Albany. Dec M (SpecialV— lt was rumored to-day
in the capital that Governor-elect Odell favors as
one means of reducing "the State's expenses the
consolidation of various commissions and the re
duction of the number of salaried commissioners
attached to some.
Thus it was said that the Prison Commission
mi^ht be abolished and its duties conferred upon
the five State officers— the Secretary of State.
the Controller, the^ State Treasurer, the At
torr.ey-General and the State Engineer. The
constitution declares that there must be a Prison
Commission, but says nothing about Its members.
and the State officers, it is held, could perform all
the work of the present Commission. None of the
members of the present Prison Commission receive
a salary, but they have travelling expenses, and
necessarily they have a small staff of employes.
It is probable that Mr. Odell feels that the or
ganization of new commissions has brought about
the appointment of various costly batches of sec
retaries, clerks and stenographers, and that there
fore the abolition of some of the commissions would
reduce the State's expenses.
There is also a feeling on the part of some lead
ing Republicans that the Forest. Fish and Game
Commission should be abolished and its duties put
in charpe, of one Commissioner. The present
Forest, Fish and Game Commission la a costly
body, each man in it receiving a salary. Then there
are a good many employes.
It was hinted to-day that Mr. Odell might favor
a reorganization of the State Commission in
Lunacy, but this rumor may have arisen because
there is a vacancy in the Commission, caused by
the removal of Dr. Peter M. Wise. The terms of
office of the other two Commissioners. William
Church Osborn and William L. Parkhurst, will not
expire the coming year. A Republican politician
said a few days ago: "From an organization point
of view the organization has never received its
rights from the State Commission. " That simply
means that in his opinion the organization has
not received the political patronage it desired from
the State Commission in Lunacy, whose members
have charge of the expenditure of $5,000.G<X). the
largest amount expended by any one department ot
tne State government.
TODAY TO BE COLDER.
RECORDS SHOW THAT WARMTH OF THE
LAST FEW DAYS 19 NOT ABNORMAL
FOR CHRISTMAS.
A great deal is being said about the peculiarly
mild weather now prevailing, but a glance at the
weather charts for previous Christmas times j
shows that in reality the present conditions are '
not abnormal.
Yesterday was not so warm as many people
thought, tne highest temperature in the morning
being 51 degrees, while last year, on the same
date the highest temperature was 53 degrees.
The record for December 24 is 54 degrees, which
was made on that date in 1886.
The noteworthy feature about the weather con
ditions this year Is that they are the same as '
those which prevailed last year.
The forecast for to-day is fair and colder. Freez
ing weather is p rophesied for to-night, with fresh
to brisk westerly winds.
This city has not had a snowfall on Christmas i
Day since 1892, when there was a fall of three- i
tenths of an inch. The day was cold, the tem
perature being below freezing. Last year on De- '
cember 24 there was a flurry of snow in the fore
noon, which lasted six minutes. There have been i
some very cold Christmas days. In 1596 the tem
perature fell as low as 12 degrees and in 1897 it
fell to 13.
COUNTESS OF ANTRIM COMING BERE.
London. Dec. 24.— The White Star Line steamer
Cymric, bound from Liverpool for New- York, will
have among her passengers the Countess of An
trim and her son. Viscount Dunluce.
FASTER THAN EVER TO CALIFORNIA.
Every day in the year the Overland Limited leaves
Chicago 6:30 p. m., via the shortest route. Chicago
and Northwestern, Union and Southern Pacific Rail
ways, and arrives San Francisco 6:45 p. m., third
day. Double drawing room sleeping cars, buffet,
library car (with Barber) and dining cars. Full in
formation at Northwestern Line office. 461 B'way
A ...I
rRICE THREE CENTS.
MR. PHILRIN SWORN IN.
THE UNCEREMONIOUS PASSING OF UAH
DINER.
NEW DISTRICT ATTORNEY INTENDS TO
TAKE UP THE DUTIES OF HIS
OFFICE TO-MORBOW.
New-York has a new District Attorney. !!»•
gene A. Philbin was sworn in by Justice Morgan
J. O'Brien at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and
the following notice of dismissal was served
upon Asa Bird Gardiner just after the close of
his last day in office, which ended officially at 4
o'clock:
State of New- York. Executive Chamber.
In the matter of the charges preferred against
Asa Bird Gardiner, the District Attorney ofwt
County of New- York. Order of removal from
office. •
Charges of malfeasance, misfeasance and mlaosn*
duct in office having betn preferred against Asa mm
Gardiner. District Attorney of the County of New-
York, by John Henry Hammond, of said county, and
a copy of such charges having been served upon
him and an opportunity given him to make a da
fence thereto, and he having filed his answer de
nying said charges, and he having thereafter been
heard before me at the Executive Chamber In the
city of Albany, In person and by counsel, and tn»
witnesses produced by him having been duly ex
amined: now, therefore, it appearing to my satis
faction that the usefulness of the said Asa Bird
Gardiner In the office of District Attorney of the
County of New-York is at an end, it Is heresy
ordered that the said Asa Bird Gardiner be aad
hereby is removed from the office of District At
torney of the County of New-York.
Given under my hand and the privy seal of the
State at the Capitol, in the city of Albany, thts
23d day of December, in the year of our fcord.
nineteen hundred.
THEODORE ROOSEVKLT.
By the Governor: T. NEWCOMB. Appointment
Clerk.
Mr. Gardiner appeared at his office early ta
the day, and with the assistance of his son be
gan the work of packing up his private papers.
He declined to talk to reporters except to cay
that he would probably issue a formal statement
in a few days, which would be given to all the
newspapers at the same time. Being pressed
for some indication of what this statement would
contain, Mr. Gardiner shook his head, and made
the unexpected remark that he had come to the
conclusion that he had already talked too much,
anyway. He remained in his office nearly all
day. except when he went out for luncheon,
awaiting the arrival of the formal notice of his
removal, which was not served upon him until
after 4 o'clock, because the order appointing his
successor did not arrive from Albany until 4:15
o'clock, and It was considered undesirable to
leave New- York without a District Attorney
even for a moment, for fear of invalidating any
legal proceedings which might be under way In
the Interval The order was served by Luden
Knapp. special messenger of the Governor.
GARDINER'S FAREWELL.
Mr. Gardiner did not call his staff together lor
any formal le aw taking, but they visited him ta
his private mom individually or by twos and
threes and made their farewells. It was said
that Mr. Gardiner revealed to his staff unmis
takable signs of grief and chagrin at his re
moval, but when he finally left his private room
j about 4 o'clock and faced a group of reporters
whn had gathered In the corridor he gave no
evidence of dejection. Assuming a cheery tone
and forcing a smile, he exclaimed in a high voice
and waving his hand jauntily: "Well, goodby.
gentlemen. I have nothing to say to you. I¦»
now to enjoy my Christmas dinner at Garden
City." and so saying he stepped into the ele
vator alone and vanished. No one accompanied
him. The staff remained behind to greet the
new District Attorney, if he should arrrre.
Thus unceremoniously there passed from oftVe
the only District Attorney of New York County
who was ever removed for malfeasance, and.
strangely enough, no other incumbent of that
office ever made such ambitious claims for its
dignity. Its Importance and what he loved to
call its high constitutional prerogatives."
Mr. Philbin received the formal notice of his
appointment in hia office, at No. 11l Broadway,
from the hands of John A. Waldron. Deputy
i Appointment Clerk, attached to the Executive
Chamber at Albany, who had started with It
from Albany at 11:35 a. m.. but did rot reach
Mr. Philbin's office until 4:15 p. m. Mr. Wal
dron did not leave Albany until Mr. Philbin's
resignation as State Charities Commissioner had
been received by the Governor. As soon as he
received the notice from Mr. Waldron Mr. Phil
bin telephoned to the District Attorney's oAee.
The First Assistant District Attorney, John W.
Mclntyre, answered and told Mr. Philbin that
Mr. Gardi-.ier had left the. office a few minutes
before. Mr. Philbin then asked Mr. Mclntyre
to assume charge of the office and the staff as
Acting District Attorney until Mr. Philbin
should appear at the office, which he intended
to do at 9:30 o'clock on Wednesday moroing.
Mr. Mclntyre said he would do so, and informed
Mr. Philbin that Mr. Gardiner before going
away had said that he would revisit the Crim
inal Courts Building on Wednesday morning as
' a private citizen to introduce Mr. Philbin to the
staff and also to the judges in the various crim
inal courts, who would assemble to greet him.
MR. PHILBIN TAKES THE OATH.
Mr. Philbin then hastened uptown to the Ap
pellate Division of the Supreme Court, m Mad
ison Square, where Justice Morgan J. O'Brien
awaited him. Justice O'Brien's chambers are
on the second floor of the courthouse. At the
time the new District Attorney was sworn in
there were just seven persons present. After
exchanging greetings with Justice O'Brien Mr.
Philbin filled out the blank oath of office for
District Attorney of the County of New- York
and handed it to the Justice. Both then arose
and stood with right hands uplifted, while the
Justice repeated the oath to support the Con
stitution of the United States and the Constitu
tion of the State, and faithfully to discharge the
duties of the office of District Attorney. "I so
swear," said Mr. Philbin. and when he had
signed his name the ceremony was complete.
As Mr. Philbin was leaving the courthouse a
! copy of an alleged intervtew with him printed
i in an evening paper was shown to him. It pur
ported to have been "dictated" by him. He said
that he had talked to a reporter on some of the
subjects covered, but. while some of the phrases
printed were "very pretty." he had not uttered
them, and most of the remarks attributed! to
him were contrary to tm sentiments. He denied
particularly having said that his advent as Dis
trict Attorney would be "strenuous " and that
he feared it would bring him much unpop
: ularity.
I hope I have too much dignity to talk hi
that way," he said. He added that he had not
in any way criticised Mr. Gardiner, and had not
made any comment on the rapuiity with which
excise cases had been disposed of and the
j accused men releassd. "The reporter said that."
was Mr Philbin's explanation "He tnki me
' about it, not I him. It is true that I know only
i two of the present assistants in the crfice. but I
did not intimate that there would be extensive
changes. It is true, also, that i shall try to
conduct my office on the same general lines as
characterized the administration of Mr. Roose
i velt in the Police Board and of Colonel Waring
i in the Department of Street Cleaning, but I
I would net taU in such a boastful way."
STATEMENT OF SUNDAY STANDS
Mr. Philbin added that the statement which
! he made on Sunday regarding his plans for the
, administration of his new office, and which was
published in • The Tribune yesterday, covered
about all he wanted to ray. Being particularly
WHERE FLOWS THE HUDSON RIVER
There runs the New York Central; through the asoat
delightful region of America, far*. 2 cant* a nu.e.
A.1.1

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