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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 28, 1901, Image 1

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V 01"V 01 " LXI •¦ X o 1 11.04 R.
THE BRrDGE THAT DAiTMED THE FLOOD ABOVE BURKE, AND. BREAKI KG. DELUGED IT WITn A WAVE WRECKET> HOUSES AT XORTH FORK JUNCTION.
PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN FOR THE TRIBUNE IN THH ELKHORN VALLEY. WEST VIRGINIA. SHOWING DAMAGE DONE BY THE FLOOD OF LAST SUNDAY.
(These photographs hay.- ju^t arrived. More ri<'tur*>s made bj Th»» Tribune's ih<>t<>praphfr win be printed on Sunday. June 30.)
SEVENTH NATIOXALBANK FAILS
INSTITUTION, EMBARRASSED BY TOO HEAVY LOANS,
ORDERED CLOSED BY THE CONTROLLER.
POSTOFFK'E FrXDS IX IT WELL SECURED.
The Seventh Xational Bank closed its doors yesterday morning, a half hour
after the opening of business. The suspension was directed by the Controller
of the Currency, the directors having failed to give him required assurances
thai ¦ 1 lenry Marquand & Co.. aggregating $1,600,000, would he taken up
and the money therefor l>c paid into the bank by to-morrow night; and National
Bank Examiner Raynor took charge of the hank.
The Seventh National was debco'r yesterday morning at the Gearing House
to the amount of 1644,108, and on receiving notice from the directors that they
had decided temporarily to suspend payment, the committee instructed the man
ager to ehtninate [rom the clearings all transactions connected with the Seventh
National Bai .
All the oilier banks cleared without difficulty, and none are believed to be in
any trou
Late in the afternoon a statement was issued by the bank, in which the failure
was charged to the action of Henry Marquand iK: Co. in not taking up their loans
and to the acceptance by the Kimbali administration of collateral which was not
marketable, although probably of more or less intrinsic value.
The country correspondents of the bank withdrew their balances, thus
dosing the heavy debit balance of the bank yesterday at the Cleanup; House.
The institution had been made a depository for postofiice money order funds
through Perry S. Heath's connection with it. The Federal moneys, however, are
secured by government bonds.
CLOSIXG FOLLOWS CLEARING HOUSE DEMAND.
The Seventh National Hank, which on Tues
day found itself unable until almost the close
of sastoeas for the day to meet the debit bal
ance of 1983,000 against it at the Clearing
K<-;us<-, a half hour after the opening of business
yesterday morning suspended payment and
closed its doors, posting on the outer door this
notice:
I
I THIS HANK IS IX TIIE HANDS OF TUB •
• • :!.•¦!. l. Kit of CTOC CUBBKX X.
rotuuasr RAVXOR,
National Hank Bxamlner.
The suspension was due directly to Inability
to comply with the demand of the Controller
of the Currency that satisfactory assurances
should be given him that the Henry Marquand
* Co. loans, approximating f1.C00.000. would be*
5 taken Hp and < ash for them put into the bank
by Saturday night, and. secondarily, precipitated
by withdrawals of balances by country banks,
representing in the aggregate a very large sum,
the run from this source resulting in another
heavy debit balance against the bank at the
Clearing House yesterday.
CLEARING HOUSE STATEMENT.
The following statement regarding the sus
pension was issued from the Clearing House:
The Clearing House committee were in session
thin morning at U.'.Mt o'clock. The clearings
*'*-r* mad.- is usual at 10 o'clock, and after the
balance nad been struck it was ascertained that
the- Seventh National Bank wan debtor to the
extent of $U44.10S UT,.
Oslpms of the Seventh National Bank were
communicated with at once, and informed that
the committee must know Immediately If this
«a!anee would be furnished the Clearing House.
A reply came back that the board of the Sev-
POLAND! POLAND! POLAND!
A Tt* purest natural spring water In Ihe world.—
3 ** Branch and Atlantic City Saturday Specials
T» KEW JERBK CENTRAL will begin running
on Jun« 2Hh. Th* Atlantic City Special will leave
t' '— ¦ t- 1 : </) p. ji.. South r,r--.. 32:55 P. M.
k™A Branch Epeclal wilt Jravc Liberty ... 1:10
'• *.. South Ferry 12:65 P. M.-Advt.
THE PRISON OF KTrTSTOTNTS TOTTN. AT BPTLCTTEnTO-VTN.
enth National Bank was In session, and that in
a few moments they would arrive at some con
clusion as to what the bank would do. The
Clearing House committee kept the exchanges
back for thirty minutes, and just at that time
were informed that some of the officers of the
hank were coming to the Clearing House to com
municate with the committee.
The president of the bank, Mr. Thomas, and
Edwin Gould, accompanied by William Nelson
Cromwell, their counsel, came before the com
mittee and stated that, in view of the large debit
balance and otl'er circumstances connected with
the affairs of the bank, it had been deemed ad
visable by the board temporarily to suspend pay
ment.
After this announcement the Clearing House
committee instructed the manager to eliminate
from the clearings all transactions connected
with the Seventh National Bank.
The Seventh National Bank has been in ex
istence for many years, but was never prom
inent until two years ago, when a controlling-
Interest In it was purchased by a syndicate, the
leading members of which were Perry S. Heath,
at that time Assistant Postmaster-General, and
US brother. Fletcher S. Heath.
The first move of the new interests which at
tracted public attention was the taking over
of the money order business of the Postmaster
at New- York, which had long been controlled
by the Chase National Bank.
An active and successful effort was made by
the new Interests to secure as correspondents
banks In the interior, especially in the Middle
West, where the Heaths were well known and
influential, attention being especially directed, It
is said, to establishing connections with in
stitutions which were government depositories.
The transferring of the balances of these in
stitutions from other local banks to the Sev
enth National naturally incensed the banks
here which had had these accounts, and the
securing by the Seventh National of the Post-
• mi I iniiiil on third |>u»;r.
. POLAND! POLAND' POLAND!
The purest natural ti,r.r,g water in' the world.—
?dvt.
NEW-YOKK. FRIDAY. JUNE 28, 1901. -FOURTEEN PAGES.-* ,JS^\22;.u«.
A MAX! AC BITES X FUSES.
DEMENTED MEMKKR op SALVATION
ARMY BURIES HIS TEETH IN FOUR
MKN CHOKES HIS WIFE,
Jacob Vopelle, a patient in the insane pavilion
at rM!(»vue Hospital, has been seized with a
mania for biting nurses. Since lasi M>>n'l-iy
he has Inflicted Injuries ¦• four of the nurses
with his teeth, has violently assaulted a tifth.
and m.uJi a desperate effort to choke the life
out .>f his wife.
The maniacal patient i.« a member r,f the Sal
vation Army, thirty-four years old, of No. 18
Morri.--st. He is a man of powerful physique,
and was brought into th.- hospital last Friday
for examination into his mental condition. <>n
Monday afternoon Dr. Wlldman, one of the
examining physicians "of th" insane pavilion,
assisted by \v. J. Paul, a day nurse, and his
ml nurse, Jones, attempted to examine
Vogelie in the presence .>f the patient's wife.
The si^ht of her seemed to arouse Vogelie to a
fury, and he made a violent attack on Paul,
scratching him on the nock with his Hnper nails
and tiien injuring the nurse's neck with his
teeth, Vogelle'a teeth are uneven and Jagged,
and the Injuries which he Inflicted with them
were most painful. He finally became bo
violent that the hospital attendants were cotn
j.. lied to place him under restraint with cuffs
and belt.
"God baa ordered me to inflict all the In
juries 1 can," he shouted, "anil He will not allow
me to t).- held responsible!"
On Wednesday afternoon another attempi was
made to examine Vogelie. His wife was present
again, and as soon as he .saw her h>- became
maniacal. Ho struck Wripht, a nurse, several
times and kicked him in the abdomen. His
wife tri.-d to quiet him. ami he sprang at h^r
throat like an enrapt d beast before anybody
could interfere with him. With Mis ri^ht hand
Vogelie Kras-- m her throat, ami before the
nurs.s could l •%. se the hold of the madman he
had choked hi: Vife until she was almost un
conscious and was black iti th- face.
Yesterday the madman made an attack on
«>¦!).. linen. Langtry and Uidwig. day nurses.
Vogelie fir.-t bit Lantry in the left arm three
times. O'Donnell went to the assistance of his
fellow nurse. In attempting to make the
maniac loosen the hold which he had with his
teeth O'Donnell also was Mtten. His injuries
were on the left hand, and were serious.
Vogelie Iwld to O'Donnell with the prlp of a
bulldog until Ludwig went to the rescue of
the .thrr two nurses. The madman then
fastened his teeth in the left arm of I,udw Ir.
He was finally overpowerd and placed ln a
strait jacket.
"] have l>it ye all. and 1 am content, shouted
the maniac. "I have executed the Lord's or
ders, and His will has been done."
.4 V ARTIST srnrs \ RUXAWAY.
BRITIPKD BT His ROUGH EXPERIENCE. HE 1^
TAKEN TO THE HOSPITAI*
Cannonine Victola, twenty-four jrean old, an
artist, of No. ."'.<»¦> Kast Thlrtleth-St., was pain
fully but not seriously injured last evening, in
attempting to stop a runaway hois- that was
dashing down Eitlhth-ave., near Fifty-fourth-st.
The horse was attached to a butcher's wagon,
driven by Kdward Arnold, of No. 434 Wast Fifty
fourth-st.. and owned by Charles Herman, of No.
833 Ninth-aye.
Victola ran into the street and grabbed the
bridle of the runaway. He was thrown to the
pavemet.t and received several bruises. Dr.
Lyndon took him to the Roosevelt Hospital in
an ambulance.
CARS EC IK LIBRARY REFUSED.
New-Castle, Perm., June 27.— City Council of
New-Castle has rejected Andrew Carnegie's offer
to give money for a free library. To accept the
gift the council was bound by Mr. Carnegie's offer
to raise W.OOO annually to maintain the library, pro
vided $40,000 was received. The union men here ob
jected to taking the money. The council has from
time to time deferred action on the matter, and it
now goes by default.
POLAND! POLAND! POLAND!
The purest natural spring water io the world.—
Advt.
BARGE CANAL PROPOSED.
WESTERN ENGINEERS WANT WATER
WAY COST] 5300,000,000.
CONOREM TO RK APKFP TO BEAR EXPENSE
¦ '!•¦ A GREAT UNDERTAKING
IN THIS STATE.
(bt Tri.E.:R»rn to thi; thibink 1
Albany, June 26. Mr. B 1. State Engineer.
stated to-day that a few days ago he received <\
visit from two eminent engineers, who brought
him a letter of Introduction from Mr. Hay. Se<
retary of State. Their names h" unfortunately
hail forgotten. These gentlemen said the object
of their visit was to secure a copy of Mr. Bond's
recent elaborate report upon the probable cost of
constructing s barge canal across this State, and
any other statistics bearing upon that subject In
bla possession.
Th->y stated that practically every State In the
Northwest was In favor of the construction of a
lar^.-r canal over this State for tho sak.- of low
ering the n,nt of the transportation of wheat
and other Western products to Eastern markets.
The failure of the canal men of this State last
winter, however, to come to any agreement upon
s plan for canal Improvement was discouraging
to Western shippers, and therefore th<>y dow
thought an appeal should be ma.de to Congress
to Improve the canals of New-York at the ex
pense of .-very State In the I'nlon.
The Western engineers said that It wan be
lieved West that a twenty-one-foot canal should
be buiH from Buffalo to Lake Ontario, aiui then
from Oswego, on Lake Ontario, to the Hudson
River. This is the least expensive line for such
a canal, a canal of twenty-one feet In depth
would cost about $300,000,000 i The United
States, the Western engineers said, would have
to undertake it. New-York state could not tie
expected alone to accept such a financial burden.
Further, the Westers visitors said that before
Congress met again, in their belief, the Congress
men from the States of Indiana Illinois, Wis
consin, Minnesota, lowa. South Dakota, X.
braska and North Dakota would come to an
agreement upon a policy of canal improvement
to be undertaken by the United states Govern
ment, and that this policy would include a twen
ty-oiie foot canal from Lake Erie to Lake On
tario, and from Lake < 'ntario to the Hudson
River.
si. \ \T(>lf dORMAH TO SEEK His OLD BEAT.
CAKDIDACT ANNOI SCED HY FRISNDS AT DINNER
IN MIS HONon IN BAL.TIMOJUE SUBUBB.
Baltimore, June 17.— Tbe candidacy "t f..rm>T
Senator Arthur Pua Oorman for re-election to that
body by the legislature which is to be chos n tbli
fail was informally announced to-daj :«i a dinner
given in his honor at the eountrj home of jos.[>ii
Frtedenwald, one of Mr. Qorman'a most ardent
admirers. After the dinner some speeohmaking
was Indulged in. Mr. Corman Mmiell taking part,
but niakinj.; Tv» allusion to his desire to r- turn to
the mire.i States Senate. Mr. Prledenwald, bow
ever, spoke .»r him as the next Senator from Mary
land, governor Smith alluded t" hhs as tti.- logical
choice for the place, while former Governor El EL
Jackson, Colonel 1.. Victor Bsugkman, Btate Ben
ator Olin Bryan, Controller Joshua w. Herlni and
others spoke In the most BattCltag terms of th.
chief Kue.st. who smilinfly listened without any
attempt at disclaimer to the complimentary thinus
said about him. The invited KUests lnrluded nearly
all the old line Democrats of prominence in the
State and the leaders of the party In Baltimore
County. Mayor Ilaye;, «-ho is not believed to favor
Mr. Gorman's candidacy, was invited, bat did not
attend.
POLAND! POLAND! POLAND!
The purest natural spring water in the world —
Advt.
FAST TRAINS FOR ST. LOUIS,
via Now York Central-Big Four Route. Leave
Grand Central Station 5.30 P. M.: arrive St. Louis
0:50 next evening:. Close connection for Kansas
City. No excess fare.— - i .
THR FIRST TRAIN TO ENNTS— TtTTPArRTTTf? TBW TRACK.
DIES SOOX AFTER HIS WIFE.
JOSEPH F DALY. OF YONKERS. EXPIRES
OX DAY OF MRS. DALY'S DEATH.
BE DEFENDED BENJAMIN H. APAMS TN THE
BUNDAI <;-T,F PI.AYINC, CASK RK<"ENT
LY—PRKSIDKNT OF UESTCHE3-
TER BAR ASSOCIATION.
Joseph F. Paly, one of the SBOBI prominent
lawyers of Westchester County, died at his home
in Warbnrton-ave., Y.mkcrs. at 4 o'clock yester
day afternoon, exactly three hours after the
death of his wife. Both deaths were sudden.
Mr. and Mrs. Daly had been ill only a sh>>rt
time. Mrs. Daly was recovering from the grip,
and had become debilitated from thr- attack.
The cause of her death was heart failure.
on Jun- 11> Mr Daly tried a ease against the
Metropolitan Railroad company at White Plains
and recovered a verdict of £&00ft He r.turned
home and complained of not feeling well His
was not supposed to be of an atanatag
natai . Yesterday morning John Bremen. Mrs.
Daly's father, called upon his du-ushter. and was
Informed that both Mr. and Mrs. Daly were
much better. At 1 o'clock Mr. Etrennan and his
family were told of his daughter's sodden death
and ;>!so of the critical Illness of Mr. l>a!y. who
had lapsed into unconsciousness, from which he
ili.l not recover.
Mr. and Mrs. Paly were married in Yonkers
fifteen years ago and leave two sons, Russell and
Carroll. Russell was graduated yesterday from
School No. »">, and the news of his mother's death
was taken to him just as h«- was about to re
(¦•¦i\.- his diploma.
Mr. Paly had been identified with many prom
inent court cases throughout the state, and
was a recognized authority on municipal and
civil law. His recent notable case was his de
fence of School Commissioner Benjamin H.
Adams in tlie Sunday golf matter, which re
sult"'! so successfully for Mr. Adama As a
lawy.-r Mr. Daly placed principle above prac
tice, and many cases were tried by him free
of cost where be believed that injustice was
being done to those whoa lie represented. Be
was Identified with many social organizations.
among them b.iukc th.- New-Y<>rk Democratic
Club, in which be was a charter member: the
New-York Bar Association, the Westcbester
County Bar Association, of which he was the
president; member of tin- city Ctafa of Tonkers
and the City Club of Mount Vemon; member
of La Kabida Council and the Knights of Co
lumbus.
For yi»ars Mr. Paly had been one of the
Strongest powers in the Yonkers and YVest
i hester County Democracy. He ser»ed nine
yean as Corporation Counsel of Yonkers. and
during that time lost only two eases acaius: the
municipality. Ho bad served for some time as
a member of the Yonkers Board of Education,
and on June 1 was reappointed to the ofAcc
under a Republican administration.
Mr. Paly was a selfmada man. Born in
New-York City of humble parentage. he
struKKie.l to acquire an education in the New-
Yorh public schools, and later at Cooper Union
and the University of New- York. At Cooper
Union be had as classmates Recorder GoA and
Judge Fitzgerald. Mr. Paly's standing at the
bar was so marked that he was the recipient of
many honors, among them being his appoint
ment as a State bar examiner for the lid Ju
dicial District.
The funeral of Mr. and Mrs. Paly will he
held at the Church of the Immaculate Con
ceptlon <n Yonktrs 'in Monday at In a. m.
ONE DROWNED; TEHEE ESCAPED.
BOAT UPSETS AND Kt'lK MKN ARK THK<>\VN
INT.) KAST RIVER.
A fwboat in which were four men was upset
In the East River near South Third-st., Brook
lyn, yesterday afternoon, and one of the men,
Arthur Rooaey, seventeen years old. of Fulton-
Bt. and ReM-avt*.. was drowned. His body was
not re.-ovred. Policeman Timothy Smith res
cued Charles Smith, twenty-two years old, if
No. 14"_' Johnsun-ave., and th.-- two other men
who had been thrown into the water swam
ashore and disappeared.
POLAND! POLAND! POLAND:
The purest natural spring water in the world.—
AHvt
PRICE TFTREE CEXT& 1
THE BLUE A VICTOR.
YALE DEFEATS HARVARD J2V
ANNUAL BOAT RACE.
•VARSITIES* HEART-BREAKING STRUG
GLE—YALE FRESHMEN AND HAR
VARD FOUR WIN. j
tBT TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIHr>-K.|
New-London. Conn.. June 27.— Under eonGU
tlons that were perfection Itself, and in the pres
ence of thousands upon thousands of frantically
cheering spectators. Yale to-day defeated her
ancient rival. Harvard, in what is unanimously
acknowledged to be the most bitterly fought and
most closely contested race ever rowed by the
college eights upon the river Thames. From the
crack of the referee's Pistol until the three-mlla
t!ag was reached and passed no open water
homed between the two boats, while the lead,
narrow as it was at all times, alternated con
stantly, and as the pendulum of victory swung:
ever so lightly to and fro. wild cheering from
the partisans of the respective crews marked Its
progress, while the roars of saluting cannons
echoed and re-echoed across the placid river and
the crimson and the blue wen flaunted skyward,
in a hundred different forms, and when In th«
last mile Yale's oarsmen pulled themselves to
gether from what threatened to be a fatal col
lapse, regained the lead and slowly but steadily
forced their shell to the front, the uproar from,
the two observation trains, the hundreds of
yachts, launches and steamboats that lined the
last few hundred yards of the raceway, was
simply indescribable.
WON IN THE LAST FEW YARDS.
The die was cast ,"00 yards from home. Har
vard fought on with the pluck of the desperate,
but all in vain. Yale ran straight and strong
to the en. l and shot past the judges' boat a
winner by a scant two lengths, having covered
those four heartbreaking miles— just how heart
breaking none will ever know save those who
have sal in m 'varsity shell— in 12.".:.'".7.
The Yale oarsmen finished the race In com
paratively good condition, but Harvard's eight
appeared to be badly done up. No sooner had
the beaten crew sent its shell across the finish
line than Gooilell. who pulled the i,., oar. col
lapsed utterly and fell upon his back in a faint,
his arms dragging limply in the water at either
side of the boat. Captain Bullard was not
much better off. but did not go under entirely,
while Goodelt soon revived under the plentiful
sptsshtngs showered upon him by his fellows i a
ilefeat.
Yale scored a second victory in the freshman,
race that opened the clay's programme. After
the first naif mile the result was never in doubt.
The Eli youngsters proved themselves superior'
in watermanship an i condition, and. taking a
slight lead in th • first half mile, increased it
constantly, winning an easy victory by four'
and one-half lengths in 10:27 4-.-, Harvard's*
freshmen required V>AS time to cover the two I
miles.
HARVARD'S FOUR OAR VICTORIOUS.
Harvard's single crumb of comfort was hand- !
Ed out to her in the two mile race for fours, i
This race had been conceded to the men from
Cambridge from the very first. It was simply a
question of the margin of the victory. The wear
ers of crimson made it a good wide margin ;
catching the water first, never being in trouble.
thereafter, and crossing the line six lengths
to the good of their exhausted rivals. They
rowed a clean, strong, powerful stroke, and
POLAND! POLAND! POLAND!
Advt! PUreSl natural sprln » * ate ' ln th world,-.
COMPLETE SUMMER SCHEDULE
trlbutlon on Friday c: this week.—

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