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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 01, 1901, Image 1

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V OL - LXI - X° 19.95 L
LONDON TRANSIT PLANS.
IT SCHEMES CALLING FOR A HEAVY OUT
LAY OF CAPITAL*
XEARL RUSSELL'S TRIAL IN THE UPPER
\ HOUSE THE EDUCATION BILL—
TRIAL. OF THE PYX.
I <OpyrljAt: 1S01: By Th« New-York Tribune.)
\ IBT CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE.]
London. July 1. 1 a. m.-This great city has
shown marked dilatoriness and lack of Initiative
- In the past in the matter of rapid transit, but
some atonement Is now being made for previous
Bhortcomlngs. Never in the whole history of
London has there been so.much stir over projects
for linking up the districts as that now being
witnessed. The House of Commons committee
has given its sanction to extensions of the Lon
don United Tramway Company's system,
amounting in the approbate to many miles of
line, and the Joint committee of both houses of
Parliament la deliberating on a sheaf of projects
for tune" rail ways, involving a capital outlay of
£50.000.000. The Middlesex County Council an 3
the' London County Council are engaged in per
fecting.plans for schemes of electric tramways
•which in each case will, if sanctioned, make nee
essary an expenditure of £2.000.000. There is
also in prospect a further application by the
London County Council to Parliament for au
thority to institute a municipal steamboat ser
vice, and coincident with it a demand for power
to run omnibuses.
Probably The most interesting item in the busi
ness which will come before the House of Lord?
tr.-day is that relating to the trial of Earl Rus
ftdL The committee appointed last week to con-
Btder the pmp-r methods of procedure will pre-
Ff nt a report. The deliberations of the commit
tee have been private, but it is assumed that
precedent wIB be strictly adhered to. There
PSCBBS to be every probability that the trial may
come on while Parliament is in session, as other-
Vise every peer must be specially summoned
lo attend a Lord Stewards' court.
Fnr the remainder of the session the House of
Commons wfn be entirely devoted to government
fcmllinr It is understood that Sir John Gorst
\rill introduce a new education bill this evening,
Tiut he is not likely to make a long statement,
as the bill merely embodies the chief working
clause of the measure which has already been
introduced and fully explained. A special meet
ing of the Liberal Education Committee will be
held immediately after the introduction of the
KM bo consider what step? shall be taken in re
gard to It. The leader of the Opposition may ap
peal to the government to delay the progress of
the bill until the school boards throughout the
country have had time to consider its proposals
a:.d communicate their opinions to the House
<>l fommor.s.
Henri Bourassa. the French Canadian, who is
making a short stay in London, admits that he
and his faithful pair of followers stand almost
alone in the Canadian Parliament as supporters
* * the Boer cause, but he maintains that he rep
tj ents a tremendous body of opinion in Canada,
rly tt.e whole of the Province of Quebec and
_*-ge part of Ontario, Canada, is, he complains.
' -Kept in the dark with regard to South African
affairs. He Is not very hopeful about the future,
but he will keep pegging away nevertheless.
Referring to the matter of the relations between
the United States and Canada, Mr. Bourassa
expresses the opinion that American capital is
breaking down the barriers between the two
countries.
Charles T. Yerkes is soon to play a new part.
He has promised to take the chair at the anni
versary festival and banquet of the Royal St.
Anne's Society on July 11. This is one of the
oldest charitable organizations in the world, and
thrcueh Mr. Yerkes's chairmanship it Is expected
to gain many thousands of pounds.
The trial of the pyx. or the testing 4*f the
tnoney of the United Kingdom, will take place at
Goldsmith's Hall on Wednesday. The ceremony
is a very ancient one. The first known trial for
which a writ was Issued took place in 1281. Ed
ward 111 in 1345 formally established the cere
irnny. which down to 1870 took place at uncer
tain intervals. An act passed in IS7O, however,
stipulated that the trial of the pyx, which is a
box or chest in which are deposited specimen
< oins, shall be held at least once In every year
* in which coins have been issued. I. N. F.
THREE TOURISTS KILLED.
GERMANS KILLED WHILE ATTEMPTING,
THE ASCENT OF THE ERZ GEBIRGE.
London, July 1— "Bohemia papers," says a
dispatch to "The Daily Mail" from Vienna, "re
port that three German tourists— Wesinitz.
Meixner and Fischer — were killed on the Erz
Gebirge. near "Weipert. They were roped to
gether. One lost his footing and fell over a
precipice. The others held him suspended. He
urged them to save themselves by cutting the
rope, but they refused, and. renewing their
efforts to haul him up, all fell down upon the
rocks."
A RUSBIAX EX PLAN ATI OX.
"ATTEMPT TO JUSTIFY M. DE WITTE'S RE
CENT TARIFF DECREE.
. St. Petersburg. June 30.— Confirming state
¦ ments already telegraphed to The Associated
I Press, the "Journal of Commerce and Industry."
ir representing the Russian Ministry of Finance,
•/^plains Russia's attitude toward the American
|~£>Jtjr against British parafflne manufactured
Horn Russian naphtha.
The article declares that Secretary Gage's
! •^sure ' as "manifestly designed as a re
t : ." adding that this supposition Is strength-
V ]j ;n^' by the fact that Article G2O had never pre
viously been so construed. It asserts also that
Mr. Gage did not mention Rumanian naphtha.
B which is likewise imported into Great Britain. '
The contention, therefore, is that Russia's
I answer In raiding the duties on bicycles and
r resin, is Justifiable,
M. DE WITTE GOING TO MANCHURIA:
St. Fetersburg. June 30.— 1t la asserted that
V M. de Witt*, the Finance Minister, will start for
P> Manchuria in July.
L- THE is ALT COMBIXATTONB
f\. '^y— —
I BRITISH TRUST PROFESSES IGNORANCE OF THE
AMERICAN CONCERN.
| London. July I.— Some misunderstanding seems to
) have arisen in the United States as to the nature
of the combination completed last Friday at the
meeting of the Salt br-«on In Liverpool. A, a mat
ter of fact, the announcement made by Mr Ward
L ''¦¦¦¦ ~' ¦'¦„-¦.¦
rlp^^^^Jfca^vis*? TElo^ -^g^^T/ **- ""^^^r^
TIIIXKS KARIAD FASTER.
KENNETH M. CLARK WOULD RACE FOR
THE AMERICA'S CUP.
BELIEVES HIS CUTTER SUPERIOR TO SHAM
ROCK II— ANXIOUS FOR A THOROUGH
TRIAL OF THE YACHTS.
Rothesay, June 30.— A development as intense
ly Interesting as it was entirely unexpected has
occurred concerning the challenge for the Amer
ica's Cup. This is due to the action of Kenneth
M. Clark, owner of the cutter Kariad. Mr.
Clark has had three opportunities of racing the
Kariad against Shamrock I, and he has wit
nessed all the trials of the two Shamrocks since
the challenger was refitted. His observations
have led him to doubt seriously whether Sham
rock II is^good enough to send to American
waters"in challenge for the Cup. He has a belief
amounting" to a conviction that the Kariad is a
better boat, length for length, than Shamrock
11, and he df^irea to see this question settled be
fore jit)'' yac it goes out. as a challenger.
Mr. Gf^fk said to-day that he had no desire
\vhateveVV> push himself forward in the matter,
and ia^jAn^ ; > hr v:> en „.;»ort'.mits«~of rfiolv— .
ing his ojrty doubts quietly in the ordinary races
in which li* expected the two Shamrocks to take
part. ; . . ' . \
"It now appears, however." said Mr. Clark,
"that the challenger will only be tried against
Shamrock 1. Even if both sailed to win. the re
sult would only show which of the two excelled,
and would give no real proof as to whether either
Is the best boat we have available. The contest
is an international affair in the fullest sense of
the word; and, for the credit of British yachting
and the good of sport, it is desirable that the
British side of the contest should be upheld by
the best available boat. I believe the Kariad is
faster than either of the Shamrocks. I may be
wrong, but that is my opinion, and I consider
that I have excellent reasons for holding it. I
desire an opoprtunity to enter the Kariad in the
trials. If this request Is not granted. I shall;
challenge Sir Thomas Upton to trial races be
tween Shamrock II and the Kariad, to be sailed
over courses similar to the course for the Amer
ica's Cup and on the American measurement, in
order to decide which should be sent as the chal
lenger."
When asked whether the Kariad was eligible,
and whether he would carry through the chal
lenge if the Kariad should prove the faster, Mr.
Clark said he had no desire to go to the United
States, but if it should be proved that Great
Britain had a better chance of success through
his boat, he was prepared to carry the challenge
through. So far as the eligibility of the Kariad
was concerned, he said he understood there
would be no serious difficulty, as the Royal Ul
ster Yacht Club had lodged the challenge on be
half of a cutter under ninety feet waterllne, and
as he was a member of the club and his boat
answered the description.
"If Sir Thomas Upton has the better boat."
Mr. Clark concluded, "I shall be delighted to
stand aside. My only desire is to Insure the
sending of the fastest British yacht, and this
cannot be secured beyond question without a
trial."
Mr. Clark, who is chairman of J. P. Coats Lim
ited, has owned many steam yachts. The Kariad
is his first big racing cutter. She was built last
year to a Watson design by the Hendersons for
C. D. Rose, who had the misfortune to lose two
sons in the South African war. and she was not
launched until purchased this year by Mr Clark
WON BY THE METEOR.
Travemunde, June 30.-The Meteor, with Em
peror William on board, won to-day's yacht race
in Lubeck Bay.
CUBA'S ELECTORAL LAW.
THE MEASURE TO BE DISCUSSED IN THF
HAVANA CONVENTION THIS WEEK.
Havana. June 30.— During the coming week the
Constitutional Convention will discuss the Elec
toral law. The project submitted by the com
mission provides only for the election of con-
L* nen. governors. State representatives
mayors and councilmen. No agreement has been
reached as to whether or not to eject the Presi
dent and Senators by direct popular vote.
The discussion of the Electoral law will un
doubtedly open up an argument by the Conser
vatims against a federal republic with many
provincial officers as entailing heavy expendi
ture. The Conservatives will oppose granting
tbaoteta autonomy to the provinces and munici
palities. An effort will be made to change the
constitution and to invest the central govern
ment with appointive and veto power.
. stisrssl suffrage seems to be a popular
movement, but the general opinion is that it will
b- impossible to get the convention to chance
th<» form of voting.
Governor-General V.'ood is improving, but his
physicians advise him to desist from public
duties for a time. He rereived th-- cabinet secre
taries yesterday and to-day.
WHERE FLOWS THE HUDSON RIVER
there runs the New York Central: . throuch the
most delightful region of America. Fare, 2 cents a,
mile*— Advt.
- fv:' ¦' ; - ' ' ¦
XEW-YOKK. MONDAY. JULY 1. 1901.— TWELVE PAGES.-» f Ti 1 . c ffiVru H «
CORNELL 'VARSITY EIGHT.
COLUMBIA •VARSITY AND FRESHMEN (FRESHMEN TN FRONTi.
CAUSE OF THE FAILURE,
ASSIGNEE OF HENRY MARQUAND & CO.
EXPLAINS IT.
Frank Sullivan Smith, the assignee of the
banking and brokerage firm of Henry Marquan**
& Co.. who made an assignment on Friday, said
yesterday afternoon to a Tribune reporter that
he thought the primal cause of the failure of the
house was its transactions in Industrial stocks.
He further said that ho was of the opinion that
a statement regarding the exact condition of the
firm would not be ready before Wednesday.
"The house," said Mr. Smith, "was a very
heavy holder of Industrials, and when the banks
ceased to consider them good collateral the firm
sold Its industrials at a sacrifice. Industrials
ceased to be popular last year. Among these
stocks held by the firm were American Car and
Foundry. Steel and Wire, and also Air Power."
Continuing, Mr.'SYnlth said: "It is practically
impossible for me to say when a statement re
garding the exact status of the firm's affairs will
be ready/ I think it will not be ready before
Wednesday next. I am not taking anybody's
word for the firm's affair!?. I am going to rely
upon the investigation of the chartered account
iLnt-uho -I* now going over the books of the
house. As to the statements that have been
made that I was once employed as counsel for
the firm, I wish to say that I never was counsel
for the firm and never had a retainer of the
firm. For some years I have had a pleasant re
lationship with Henry Marquand. He Is an ad
mirable man. I have a well margined account
with the firm, which I did not withdraw."
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
"Do you know the details of the real estate
transfers in which Henry Marquand and Henry
Q. Marquand figured and which were recorded
on Friday?" was asked.
"I am told by Mr. Ward, of Robinson, Riddle
& "Ward, that the real estate transfers recorded
last Friday, in which the names of Henry Mar
quand and Henry G. Marquand appeared, were
old matters, and were made a considerable time
before the firm failed. Mr. Ward is a brother
in-law of Henry Marquand. Frank B. Poor,
junior member of the firm, also recently figured
in a real estate transaction In New-Jersey. I
asked Mr. Poor about this New-Jersey realty
transaction. He said that he had transferred
some property In New-Jersey to raise money to
put Into the firm. He also said that he realised
$20,000 from the sale of this property; that this
sum he put into the firm, and that the buyer
of his property In New-Jersey had got a good
bargain. He thought that he could save the
firm from going under. I know that he did have
some additional funds on Wednesday and
Thursday. He thought all day Thursday that
the firm would pull through. He said that he
got the money from the New-Jersey deal."
"Can you tell me anything about the mort
gage given by Henry Marquand to the Colonial
Trust Company which was recorded on June 27
last?"
"I heard about six months ago that the Colo
nial Trust Company took security from Henry
Marquand & Co. for all the indebtedness then
and previously incurred by the firm, and that
Henry Marquand had given a mort — to the
trust company covering his Interests in the
Guernsey Building. For some reason unknown
this mortgage was not recorded until the other
day.
INDEBTEDNESS REDUCED.
"I also understand that the indebtedness of
Henry Marquand & Co. to the Colonial Trust
Company was reduced about six months ago
from $250,000 to $140,000. I am also informed
that Henry G. Marquand advanced to Henry
Marquand & Co. from first to lust $1,500,000."
"Have you anything to say about the assets
and liabilities of the firm?"
"My impression is that the liabilities and as
sets have been greatly overestimated. The only
examination that I have been able to make is of
the loan account, and that has been by personal
interview. I have not yet seen the receiver of
the Seventh National Bank. I do not know the
condition of the firm's account with the bank,
but I consider all of the other loans well se
cured. The collateral for these latter loans were
satisfactory, and 1 am satisfied that there will
be no sacrifice of the collateral by hasty and in
judicious sales."
"Has the failure had any effect on the health
of Henry G. Marquand?"
"I learn that Henry G. Marquand Is a man
well advanced in years, and that he has been in
feeble health for some time. Ido not think that
he would be able to travel at present to this
city." „
F. B. POOR IS NOT DISHEARTENED.
HAS NOT TOLD HIS WIFE YET OF HIS FIRM'S
ASSIGNMENT.
Frank B. Poor, of Hackensack. N. J., whose firm.
Marquand & Co., failed last week, said yesterday
to a Tribune reporter that he was glad he had a
home to live In. Their beautiful house is owned
by Mrs. Poor, who on Monday last presented to
her husband a baby daughter.
"It was a hard blow to think that Monday was
the happiest day in my life and the following
Thursday was the saddest day in my life, hut If
hard work will do it, I will be on top again a few
years hence," paid Mr. Poor. 'I last night dis
charged my coachman and other men about my
grounds. I must sell some of my horses and curtail
expenses. I have not told Mrs. Poor of my trouble
yet. She is hardly strong enough to hear such
news."
At the first Intimation of a Cold, take
JAYNES EXPECTORANT— Advt.
RIVAL OARSMEN AT POUGHKEEPSIE.
DEADLY HEAT CONTINUES.
NINETEEN FATAL CASES IN AND NEAR
THE CITY.
I
FORECAST FOR TO-DAT PROMISES MORE
OF THE SAME CONDITIONS— CROWDS
FLEE TO THE BEACHES.
Fatalities continue with the prolongation of
the heated spell. Yesterday there were nineteen
deaths' wrflch s were directly attributable to the
heat and twenty-five prostrations. The fatal
cases are:
BIL.TERS H»nry. twenty six years old. a lodger In the
]<vlirlnK house. No. 8H Broadway. Brooklyn. In the
Wllllamsburjr Hotpltal.
COLE. Mrs. Elizabeth, fifty-two yearn old, of No. 167
Eighth-
FARP.KIJ. John, fifty years old. of No. 400 West Thtrty
»<?vrnth-»t.
OAM.AOHKR. John, thlrty-ceven years old. of No. 4"
Concord-«t.. Jersey City. T? In tit the. first death from
the heat In Jersey City this year.
IIEIN 1 . Mary. »eventy-on«> years old. of No. 5 East Six
teenth- ft.
KENNEDY". Margaret. fifty- years old. of No. 1.577
Second- aye.
KENNEDY. Robert, fifty-five years old. of No. 408 East
Twenty-isecond-st.
Kr.ACfl. William, seventy years old. of No. 515 East
Or.^hurire.Vnnd-nlnety-nlnth-st. ; died at his home,
- - .Ji^'.DJi. t.;ri.k<". rp^r'nduerd by heat.. __ •
KRACTER. John, »lxty-fou~ y«ars old. of No. 32 S'econfl
arc
LEE. Thomas. thirty-six years old. of No. !H9 West
Thlrty-elphth-M.; died at Roofevelt Hospital.
LEVER, George, forty-two years old. of No. XV* Rleerker
»t.: rii.-.l at No. 521 Hudson -Ft.
LEWIS Mr*. Jessie, seventy three years old. of No. 47
I: itm * : ¦ lirooklyn.
MORAN, John, twenty-one years old. of No. BU West
Fifty fifth st.
MULLEN. Chnrles. thirty-two years eld. of (to. 440 West
Flftyfourlh-st.
O'NEILI/ Patrick, twenty-seven years old. of No. 240
East On* hundred' h st.
OTJRinN. . three months old. of No. 408 East
Fifty fourth «t.
riIAI.KN. James, fifty-three years old. no home; died In
Bell* HoapttaL
QL'INN. Sarah, forty-two years old. a domestic, of No.
181 Columbia st.
Unknown man. overcome at Ma<lisnn-ave. and One nun
dred -and-Mxteenth-st; died in Harlem Hospital.
Manhattan Islanders moved out of town yes
terday. That Is, aM who could went away to
escape the extreme heat that made the entire
city, from the Battery to the Bronx, like a fur
nace. Those who went out of town returned to
cay that they did not think the day had been
especially hot. but those who were not fortunate
enough to be able to escape were certain that
there had been no hotter time in the town since
the summer began. The latter were correct.
The mercury caught up to the SO mark soon
'Efter <> o'clock in the morning, and did not re
turn to it until late in the night. At noon it
was 88 degrees, at 3 o'clock it was 03 degrees,
and at 4 o'clock the high mark for the season—
'.•7 degrees— was attained. This was the hot
test day since June <"., IW>O. when the same
mark was registered. No June has had a
higher temperature since the local Weather
Bureau was established, in 1871. Had the
humidity been higher the heat would have
been less bearable, but it dropped from 58 de
grees at S o'clock in the morning to the low
fifties, where It remained until the evening,
when it began to go up again.
The official forecast is for fair weather to-day,
with continued high temperature, light to fresh
south winds.
The people began to 'cave the city in crowds
I early in the morning. All day long at the bridge
the throng waiting for cars was as dense as that
which awaits the same vehicles on a week day
evening when the Brooklynltes are returning
from their labors in Manhattan. AH the steam
boats, and, in tact, every conveyance that would
take the people from the city, carried record
crowds, and the various places where New-
Yorkers go to cool off. enjoy themselves and
spend their money were thronged. Coney Island
had the biggest day of the season. The thou
sands that went there from New-York alone
would make a crowd larger than any the island
had had this season, and when are added to that
those who went from Brooklyn and other places
the immense number can be guessed at.
Nearly one hundred craft of all kinds left the
city with passengers for seaside resorts. The
thousands of people that nocked from the city
seemed to prefer a trip by water, and conse
quently every kind of boat was pressed into
service to accommodate the crowds.
In the city not a breath of air was stirring to
relieve the steady beat of the heat waves.
Noticeable in contrast with Saturday was the
absence of the . dead horses that dotted the
streets, lying where they fell when they sue
; cunabgd to the heat. The drives in the parks
! comparatively clear, It being too hot for
| riders and drivers to venture forth. The Speed
way was absolutely deserted, as owners of fast
horses wene unwilling to risk their animals out
in such a nun. Uptown drives, such as Seventh
a.ve.', presented a stretch of surface from which
the air rose In quivering waves of -heat, over
which no merciful man would drive a horse for
the pleasure he himself might derive from the
rid -:. v- -J
I The: heat area has moved northward, and the
,'lake region is having some of the same kind of
Jwf atheri that has afflicted this city. Maine Is
warmer/than It has been before In a long time,
with 92' degrees In Portland and 86 degrees in
Eiaston.? ; Chicago had OH degrees, but Philadel-
J ;Kansas City and Washington were two de
gtees '/Hotter. St. Louis was the hottest place
' '^,\ i (Continued oat second pace.)
PENNSYLVANIA 'VARSITY EIGHT.
COLOXEL D. R. PAIGE DEAD.
WEALTHY CONTRACTOR WHO DISAP
PEARED FROM THIS CITY SOME
YEARS AGO UNDER
A CLOUD.
Colonel David R. Paige died at 8 o'clock yester
day morning in his apartments, at the Brunswick
apartment house, Madison-aye. and Eighty-nlnth
st. Death resulted from a complication of dis
eases, although the direct cause Is said to have
been heart failure. Colonel Page had been an in
valid for many months, and was to have under
gone a surgical operation yesterday, the nature of
which could not be learned last night, but died a
short time before the hour set for the operation.
Colonel Paige created a great stir in this city In
1892 by suddenly disappearing while under the sus
picion of a forgery amounting to about $400,000. He
¦was a director of the North River Savings Bank,
which failed in IS9O, and the receiver found that
It held about $400,000 of the paper of Colonel Paige's
firm— Paige. Carey & Co.. contractors. This paper
bore the indorsement of John Huntlngton. of the
Standard Oil Company, a brother-in-law of Colonel
Paige. When the bai.k's receiver tried to realize on
this paper Mr. Hutuington repudiated his alleged
signature and Colonel Paige vanished. He was
afterward heard of in London and in Buenos Ayres.
Paige. Carey & Co. held large contracts wUn
the city for work on the Croton aqueduct and as
signed to the r*eei\er of the b;.nk claims for about
Jl.OU'i.eco »a«ainaft-_Xhe city oi account of these
contracts. The city disputed the claims, but the
courts decided against it in 1898. and with the
money so secured Colonel Paige's creditors were
paid nearly in ful'. he became reinstated In the
business world and returned to this country to
live. In the mean time, however, Ralph Paige, a
brother of the colonel, had been sentenced to ten
years In the penitentiary for complicity in the
failure of the Painesville (Ohio) Savings and Loan
Company, which held a lot of the paper of Paige.
Carey & Co.. bearing the repudiated Huntlngton
signature, and which had only $700 in the treasury
when it failed.
Colonel Paige came of an old Democratic family,
his father having neon one of the leaders of that
party In the western Reserve. David R. was
graduated at Union College, and then entered on
his business career In Akron. Ohio, where he was
the Democratic nominee for Secretary of State
Mr. Paige was a member of the XLVIIIth Con
gress from the XXth Ohio District, and in the elec
tion for the Xl.XIXth Congress was defeated by
Major M.Kinley. He was also a veteran of the
Civil War. One son and two nieces survive him.
/. 1/ GBED A 8 SWIMMER HRnWXED.
BYSTANDERS THOUGHT EXPERT INSTRUC
TOR WAS GIVING EXHIBITION, BUT
HE WAS DYING.
Taterson, N. J.. June "O.— John Goodwin,
twenty years old. an export swimmer, who was
employed to teach swimming at the Passaic
River Swimming School here, was seized with
cramps while in the water this evening a~nd was
drowned. He was giving a lesson at the
time. Those- near him did not realize what
was th«* matter when they saw him help
less in the water and thought he was giving
an exhibition. They were lauErhine: when he
went down, and not until he failed to come to
the surface was there suspicion that he was in
danger.
A tfr.YHI.4F AT XFWPORT.
REGINALD VAXPKRBILr? At'TOMOBII.E FRIGHT-
F.N'S A HORSE- NAHR'">\V KSCAPPS.
|BT TFI F.':R.\rH TO THK TRIRfNK I
Newport. R. L, June 30.— This afternoon Reginald
Vanderbilt's automobile cans, d a runaway on Belle
vue-ave., which resulted In the demolition of a
carriage, which fortunately contained no occu
pants. The horse had been left standing with a
weight attached, but when Reginald Vanderbllt
and Arthur Gray appeared In the former's auto
moolle the horse bolted and went at a breakneck
pace throuph the crowded avenue, the Iron weight
swinging from side to side to tht^ imminent danger
of passing pedestrians and vehicles. The running
hor^e had not gone far when the strap attached to
the weight tripped it and It fell, being secured be
fort further damage was done.
BAI ttISOXMMB ARt! THE ATM HARSHLY.
ARE MEN CONVICTED IN GOEBEL. CASE VICTIMS
OF POLITICAL. FEEUN'G?
Lexington. Ky.. June 30 (Special).— Howard,
of the Howard feud faction of Clay County, and
Caleb Powers. Secretary of State under W. S.
Taylor, both convicted of complicity in the assas
sination of William Goebel. and both awaiting new
trials on the reversal of their case by the Court of
Appeals, are almost physical wrecks as the result
of their long confinement in jail. The narrow
steel cells, almost without ventilation, are proving
ruinous from a physical standpoint to the men.
already weakened by confinement. Both of the men
were fine specimens of mountain manhood, but they
are now thin and pale and move about in their
cramped quarters with difficulty.
Many state that they are the victims of biassed
political feeling. A number of the women of the
State have started a movement to raise funds for
the defence of the men and to create sympathy for
them. Close on the heels of this there were state
ments that the prisoners had planned to escape, and
they were then placed In even closer quarters than
before being caged like wild beasts. Republicans
assert that there was nothing save political malice
In the story of attempted escape, but the Jailer of
the Franklin County Jail says that a mysterious
stranger visited Powers in his cell and left a large
sum of money •and that Powers immediately began
to insist on the jail employes drinking at his ex
pense He further says that he had positive In
formation from a fellow prisoner of the men that
they had planned an outbreak and for that reason
he transferred them to the steel cages, which he
considered safe. . • '
Republicans are greatly incensed at the treatment
of the men and it promises to be a campaign lssua
at the fall election.
. The STEAMER SHINNECOCK will leave New
York for BLOCK ISLAND and intermediate land
ings on Wednesday, July 3d. at 1 P. M.. instead of
6:20 P. M.— Advt. .
PRICE TFHSs&iaa:
CREWS READY KnR RACES.
POUGHKEEPSIE OARSMEN SPEND' DAT
IN KEEPINCt COOL.
[BY TELEGRAPn TO THE TRIBENE.I
Poughkeepsie. N. T.. June SO.— Sunday was a
quiet day here for all the crews. The men -were .
glad to keep oft ihe water after their grinding:
week's work In the sweltering heat. All of the .
oarsmen save those of Georgetown kept off th»
water and spent the day In trolley, yacht and
launch rides In a vain effort to keep cooL They
have suffered Intensely . from the high tempera
ture, which ha? averaged on the river over 100 ,
degrees. They are all a lean, hardy crowd.
Columbia'? 'varsity elsht and four chartered
the yacht Queen City and left here early this
morning for West Point, where they spent their
time in recreation. The freshmen took a car
riage ride. ¦ Pennsylvania called on Wisconsin.
in recreation The freshmen took a ear
ride. Pennsylvania called on Wisconsin.
*»nd -Cornell. Wisconsin and Syracuse loafed '
away the day: but Georgetown, desiring to
make as much us«« as possible of their available
time, went out oil the river to-night for a four
mile row atrnirsst th* tide. The time was 23:15.
The situation in regard to the picking of a
popular favorite remains about the same. Wis
consin to-day appear*- to be more of a publlo
favorite than yesterday, while Cornell and Co
lumbia hold abo it the same relative positions.
There is little betting, but such as there Is 1* at
even money on any of the three leaders against'
another, and odds of 2 to 1 or 3 to 1 on a com
bination of Cornell and Wisconsin against Co
lumbia.
As the hour of the race approaches Cornell
grows more and more confident of victory. Her
attitude is now almost one of contempt for
Columbia's time trial*. The Ithacans say that
they have timed Columbia a number of times,
and that she has not done a mile in better than
five minutes. In answer to this Columbia says
that a week ago Saturday she took her last •
hard practice row. and that since then by Han
lan's orders the men have not let themselves
out Hanlan now says that his present 'varsity
is at least a minute faster than his last year's
crew, whose regatta time was 2O:f»8.
Some criticism has been made a3 to what re
lation the condition of the various crew shells
will have on the outcome of the race. It 13
pointed out that Columbia probably has the ad
vantage, as no faster boat has ever gone over
the course than that in which her 'varsity rows.
Three new cedar shells, two eights and one four,
were built for Columbia by Ruddock this year.
and Edward Hanlan says the eights are twenty
five seconds faster in the four miles than the
"tubs," as he characterizes them. In which
Columbia rowed l»st year. The 'varsity and
freshman shells cost $600 each. Cornell's •var
sity is the only other crew to use a new shell. It
was built by John Hoyle. Wisconsin will row in
the E. B. AIHs. last year's shell, presented to the
crew by a prominent business man of Wisconsin,
after whom it was named. Georgetown will also
row in last year's shell, as will Syracuse. The
fastest shell of the Quakers has gone to Henley
to win international honors, as Joshua Ward
says. The Pennsylvania oarsmen here have had
to content themselves with rowing in shells a
couple of years old.
Those rowing experts with a weather eye some
what pessimistically say that rain on Tuesday
would not be surprising. In the event of rain
or rough water, the races would have to be post
poned, to the disappointment of the crowds and
the delight of the hotel keepers. In the last few
days the conditions of water and tide have
been Ideal.
The observation train this year will consist of
twenty-eight cars instead of forty-five, as last
year. This is said to be due to the public's un
willingness to purchase seats at the tail ends of
the train.
Columbia has not found any fault with her
course, a3 she thinks that though she has an in
side position. No. 3. she is, nevertheless, fortu
nate in being alongside Wisconsin and Cornell.
the two fastest crews. She is clad thus to be
able to keep track cf them without being hin
dered by the intervention of an inferior crew.
Almost the full complement of undergraduates
is expected to-morrow, when the town will liven
up. There will be a jollification to-morrow night
when the regatta concert by the glee, mandolin
and banjo clubs of Columbia will give their an
nual concert in the Collingwood Opera House
There are ten numbers on the programme the
feature of which will be the singing of an alumni
quartet, which will include two former crew cap
tains—O. W. Longacre. of the '08 crew, and J
W. Mackay. of the *0!) and '00 eights. H. S.
Harrington, the leader of the glee club, has writ
ten a special song. All the crews have been in
vited, but being in training it is doubtful if they
can attend except for a short time.
OUTLOOK FOR MINOR RACES.
Poughfceepsie. N. V . June 30 (Special).— To whet
the appetite of the spectators, there will be before
the climax of the day comes in the 'varsity race,
two other races, each of which promises to be fully
as keen, uncertain and exciting in Its way as the
big race. Freshman eight oared crews of Columbia.
Pennsylvania. Cornell and Syracuse will compete
In one contest, and four oared 'varsity crews from
Pennsylvania, Columbia and Ccmell will row lnhhe
other race. Strangely enough, the minor eight
oared race has all the promised closeness and the
same evenly matched crews as the "varsity race.
No one is rash enough to predict a certain win
ner, so close are the known merits of Columbia and
Pennsylvania. Columbia freshmen have made the
fastest time in practice for the two miles. Their
record Is 9:33. three seconds faster than the Quaker
first year boat has yet done, and several second*
better than the Ithaca freshmen have done. Up
to the arrival of A. J. Fraser at stroke the Columbia
freshman boat was a poor aggregation, but with
him in the shell the boat seems to be ranch faster.
The Blue and White freshmen are able to stay
pretty close to the 'varsity In a two mile spin, and
Hanlan points to them with pride as sure winners.
Joshua Ward upholds his freshmen with equal as
surance, and says that they are a stronger, better
combination than last June. His whole reliance)
is placed upon them and his four, and he thinks
that they will not find the Columbia freshmen a
difficult proposition to solve. General sentiment
puts Cornell in third place, and Syracuse, of course.
last. Courtney, however, displays as much con
fidence in his freshmen as in his "varsity. Their
showing in practice does not rate them on the same
high plane as the other two. Pennsylvania, has a
heavier set of freshmen than Columbia, and a con
sequent advantage. It Is a pretty even thin? for
first place between Pennsylvania and Columbia,
with" perhaps a slight advantage for the Quakers
because of their greater physical development and
better staying power. Columbia ought to be able
to beat out Cornell for second. Pennsylvania t>
considered to be a winner In the four oared race.
with Cornell and Columbia making a close light for
second place, the odds being in favor of the Ithaca
quartet. . --
FREDERICK D. COLSON WEDS.
IBT TELEGRAPH TO THE I*IBCSC«.I
Poughkeepsie. N. V., June Frederick D. Col
son. the assistant coach of Cornell, was a popular
man at the Cornell quarters to-day and received
a shower of congratulations. This morning with
their breakfasts the crew received announcement '
of his wedding in New- York yesterday to* MM
Edna M. McNary. Miss McNary -vas . captain of
the Cornell girls' crew in '9» and "M and was ar
dently fond of rowing and did much to broaden its
scope and Increase its interest at ¦.- College.
She was one who was largely responsible for the
securing of a six oared shell with sliding seats for
the girls. Mr. Co!son was coxswain of eight Cor- .
Nell crews, sevpn of which were victorious. .H«
<ste<»retl the boats that twice beat Yale and Harvmrd
and was also coxswain of the Cornel! Henley crew. .
This year he has been at the Cornell quarter* a*lp- V
(toatlaifd on aecoad pace.)

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