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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 09, 1901, Image 1

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V LXI...-:N TO - 20.021.
WHAT MOVED CZOLGOSZ.
DISTORTED IDEA OF FREEDOM,
SAYS DR. HAMILTON.
BLAMES SENSATIONAL PAPERS — MAN
INFLAMED AGAINST HAXNA AND
MORGAN BROUGHT TO HTM
RECENTLY.
Dr. Allan McLane Hamilton, professor of
mental diseases at Cornell University Medical
College, was seen yesterday afternoon at his
home. No. 44 East Twenty-ninth-st.. by a Trib
une reporter and asked for his opinion as to the
-endition of President McKinley and as to the
probable influence which led Czolgpsz to shoot
the President Dr. Hamilton said that he
thought the chances of the President recover
ing were good. He had formed an opinion from
what he had read of the shooting that the act
of Czoi&osz was "largely due to the deplorable
Influence of certain sensational newspapers that
have worked upon such minds as his."
He went on to say that a man whose mind
was disturbed by the readirg of such papers
was recently brought to him. The man said
that he was going to put out of the way several
proictr.ent K»esi whom he referred to as the
oppressors of the ¦workingman. Two of the men
whom he said he Intended to kill were J. Pier
pout Morgan and Senator Hanna. It may be
remembered that Dr. Hamilton was called by
the government as one of the chief experts in
the Guiteau case and testified at that trial.
"Do you think that President McKinley win
recover?*' asked the reporter.
•I have thought from the first that his
chances," replied Dr. Hamilton, "were good, al
though I am not a surgeon. To begin with, he
fell Into the hands of 6ome good men. More
over, there was little or no shock, he possessed
wonderful vitality, and the bullet which passed
through the stomach did not perforate the in
testines as well. The ball which has not been
discovered is apparently doing no mischief now,
and it is not likely to do so. It is very hard
to see how any Infection of the abdominal cavity
rould have occurred from the escape of any
large mass of food from the stomach. If such
had been the case he would have manifested
perious r.toms before this. It looks to me
very much now as if Mr. McKinley would be
in a State of convalescence within two or three
weeks, although at best this is only an opinion
baaed upon evidence of which every one Is in
possession.
UNDER ABLE SURGICAL CARE.
"The physicians have undoubtedly made a
careful examination of the clothing worn by
Prfsident McKinley when he was shot and the
hat <2kerchief used by the would-be assassin, for
it is conceivable how parts of either of them
might have found their way into his body, later
doir.pr possible mischief. It is a great pleasure
to me to know that he is attended by such men
as Mynter, Parke and Mann, all of whom are
skilled, especially in abdominal surgery."
Dr. Hamilton, when asked if he had been called
io examine Czolgosz, „;d he had not. He added
that while he could not express an opinion as to
the exart mental condition of Czolgosz at the
tim« of ihe assault on President McKinley, he
had no doubt that insanity would be thought of
as a desperate defence, a* it was in the case of
Guiteau.
Continuing, Dr. Hamilton said:
¦There would be some who would consider
the behavior of the prisoner as representative of
a which Included many semi-insane people
who are more or less irresponsible, for the ranks
of anarchists are largely recruited from this
ciass of persons. But in the present state of
public f (.-fling it is quite probable that he will
receive his deserts, and that hereafter much of
the tentimentulism that has hitherto allowed
such creatures to escape punishment will be
done away with, and a stern example will be set
to would-be murderers and other disturbers of
the public peace.
"From what I have read of the case I am of
the opinion that the act was largely due to the
deplorable Influence of certain sensational news
papers that have worked upon such minds as
bis.
DISTORTED PUBLIC SENSE OF DECENCY.
"No one <?xrept a physician who sees much of
insanity or persons whose mental condition is
doubted ran appreciate the influence of the
present distorted public sense of decency. This
is manifested by a lawlessness which finds ex
pression in F-ome of the public prints and in the
deliberations of societies instituted for the re
l.ef of the oppressed. This literature and these
societies are usually a menace to law and order
in putting into the heads of half cracked people
pernicious ideas which they almost immediately
si ujjon. So far it would seem that little or
to Interference has been excited .is has been the
case in other parts of the civilized world, and a
distorted idea of freedom in action and speech
hes b.'n cultivated by a too liberal government
and press.
" As far as my own experience goes. I have of
late been numerous cases of disturbed mental
states which were directly due to these influ
•rces. Only the other day a man was brought
to me who drew from his pocket numerous care
fully preserved clippings, which turned out to be
aeendlaty in character, and he announced his
intention of putting out of the way several prom-
Iner.t men whose names have been before the
public as the heads of trusts, and who were
•Ul^ged to be the oppressors of the workingman.
One of these was J. Pierpont Morgan, and an
'•ther trr.s Senator Hanna.
"Persons actually insane have had new and
fergerous delusion* ptarted in this way. and
iEfiividuals "who are harmless and who before
fcad exercised self-control were put in such con
dition that they needed restraint."
GUITEAU NOT INSANE.
"Doctor, is it not generally considered that
Guiteau was insane?" the reporter as.ked.
"Yes. it was. and I have read in the morning
f&pers a comparison of the assassins of Lincoln
tad Garfield and the assailant of President
McKinley. bile 1 have said that I cannot
exprevp an opinion of the last case. I am quite
porltive that the popular opinion in regard to
Guiteau is erroneous, and la held by the public
*ho know nothing about the subject except the
obtained from the newspapers at
the time. Guiteau in court and Gulteau in
prison were different people. In the latter case
«* was cool, logical, and persistently declined
1( > talk about his crime or his trial, while in
wort his whole idea was to impress people by
«« conduct that he was insane.
"Secretary Elaine told me some years after
"it trial of several things that led me to believe
\w GuSteau had acted from a sane though fool
»a motive, and that he had planned the crime.
*¦ well as his escape, in an ingenious manner.
? a many ways the conduct of the prisoner at
buffalo seems to resemble that of Guiteau. Un-
« f >ubtedJy when the police finish their investiga
tes there will be much of interest revealed.
1 Co not for a moment wish to be understood
41 *a.ylng that he is insane or should not be
*unleh«<l."
SUPPLICATION AT TORONTO.
lET .KAJ-H TO THE TBIBUXE]
Pronto, fiept. B.— ln all the churches of this
* ly bulletins reporting how the President had
***** the night were read at the morning ser
**•• *n<J prayers in his behalf were offered up.
MINISTERS THE COUNTRY WIDE VOICE NATION'S EULOGY,
HOPES AND FEARS.
LOUD CALL FOR THE WIPING OUT OF ANARCHY.
North and South, East and West prayers went tip from pniplts yesterday that the life of
President McKinley would be spared. Mingled w jt n the expression* of a Nation's hopes and
fears were denunciations of the assassin and calls for stamping out anarchy.
In niiNwrr to a proclamation issued on Saturday by Mayor Van Wydt churches of all de
nominations hi Tliis city offered prayers for the President's recovery.
At a !»prvi<p in the church attended by President McKtnley -when !n Wnshlnjrton. the R^v.
Dr. Kajrlor, in his sermon, said that the attempt on the President's life had almost converted
him into an advocate of lynch law.
EXTERMINATE ANARCHY.
DR. LOUIS A. BANKS, FORMERLY OF
CLEVELAND, SAYS IT MUST BE
STAMPED OUT.
Dr. Louis Albert Banks, who came here re
cently from one of Cleveland's foremost Metho
dist churches to become pastor of Grace Metho
dist Episcopal Church, in East One-hundred
and-fourth-st.. spoke there on the shooting of
President McKinley as a prelude to his sermon
yesterday morning. President McKinley's couch,
he said, was the centre of the prayers and sym
pathies of the civilized -world. He called for the
extermination of anarchists, root and branch,
and attacked conditions which could breed such
a class of men. He sad:
Three times In the nation's history have the
Ameriiar. people been startled and horrified at the
n of the President, but the last case Is
n,ur< significant with meaning In many ways than
eith-r of the others. Abraham Lincoln was stricken
down at the close of a lons and bloody civil war
by a man full of sectional and traditional hate.
Garfleld was the victim of a ne'er-do-well demon,
who was a sort of froth on the wave of great po-
THE SPOT WHBBE PRESIDENT M'KINLE V STOOD WHEN SHOT IS SHOWN BY THE
TROSS.
lltlcal excitement. But the bullet aimed at th»
heart of President McKinley was deliberately fired
by an anarchist, and it la that which gives It Its
great significance. Whether it shall be proved that
this vile creature is a part of a general plot or no.
it is true that the general plot or all anarchy is to
commit Just such crimes a.- this
It is safe to say that the couch on which Presi
dent McKlnley lies is to-day the centre of the
sympathy and prayers of the civilised world. Presi
dent McKinley has steadily grown on the nation
and on the world since l) - was first made President.
He has proved himself a greater man than even
his friends believed him to be five years ago. No
ruler, not even excepting President Lincoln, has
e\'er had a greater variety of new problems to
face <»r a heavier load of official responsibility to
carry, and surely no statesman has ever borne
the burdens of .1 great nation with a nobler forti
tude or with a more genuine Christian philosophy.
The white light which always beats upon a man in
such a place has brought out those great and
splendid characteristics of manhood which have
constantly endeared the President to the masses- of
American citizenship. Men who have differed from,
him In politics have vied with his political partisans
in admiration and love for the man himself. Ah v
man as a husband, as a friend, as a Christian, in
all the places where a man's personality touches
his fellows, th« American people have felt that
they ould hold up the President of the United
States and say with pride, "Hero is an American
gentleman!" But what does anarchy care for all
this? Nothing, absolutely nothing
And what shall we do about it? There is. of
court* but one opinion among all good citizens
throughout the civilized world, and that is that
anarchy so far as possible, must be stamped out of
existence root and branch. A tltne Ilk. this ought
to bring to the front the discussion of Rome of the
t-eed« of anarchy we are sowing. It will be a good
thinr if it quickens the. determination on the part
of good citizens in every city to put a stop to the
rale of law. whether ft be In the legislatures or by
the police. Th. lawlessness of cur *r*at cities Is a
Continued on fourth pace.
NEW- YOKE. MONDAY. SEPTEMBER 9. 1901. -FOURTEEN PAGES.- W t*. c °tS?.S.Va2S.
POLICE DEPARTMENT
CITY OF BUFFALO.
/3 ?>• S a
*}}**...75?.&***£.....^T. .Ir. .^ff .^r*.y.
Crime
•..*•¦ ........M.......— 1.11 ¦¦¦.¦.. MM irf^l 1 11
Age 28~ Height £~ Ft.7y£ln.
Weight /$ & Build ?H. -
Balr/^/^^^ Eyes £2lf^<*-£.
Complexion /^» Moustache *"' ""»
Born /^t^^rt^ ...??2<£^L ~ .
Occupation t r *^^T'.
Date of Arreit <& Zjlist- ~ /^*/
Officer »•— $(?-&*>*«-**-
Officer -Zf-fasiM. <o (rCtrr**-**-
Remark* ....^{p^Ci^L^
TTTE OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF CZOLGOSZ
AT PRESIDENT'S CHURCH.
THE REV. DR. NAYLOR ALMOST AN AD
VOCATE OF LYNCH LAW.
Washington, Sept. 8. — "The exigencies of life
are such that no man living can count upon
the continuance of existence for any length of
time. Among these exigencies are disease, ac
cident and the bullet of the asaassin, such as
we have heard of in the last forty hours. That
occurrence at Buffalo Indicates that no man is
safe from the shaft of death. It is very diffi
cult to get away from it, and while I have ever
been loyal to the law and have ever contended
for its strict enforcement, I must say that the
affair of 4 o'clock Friday has almost converted
mo into an advocate of lyn<-h law. Surely there
was no occasion, no reason, for that dreadful
deed, and, whether the work of a sane man or
a lunatic, there can be no justification foe it.**
The above extract from the sermon of Dr.
H. R. Naylor, presiding elder of the Washing
ton District, was the only direct reference made
In the- regular sermon preached to-day at the
Metropolitan Methodist Episcopal Church,
which President McKinley attends when in
Washington. The sermon was brief, and the
service was converted into a gathering of sym
pathy for the President. The prayers were sup
plications for the t»riy restoration to health of
the President, praise for his personality, and
admonition to Mrs. McKinley to stand firm in
this trying time. After the regular service the
congregation, which was large, transformed
Itself Into a mass meeting, and on motion of
Judge T. H. Anderson, of the District Supreme
Court, by a standing vote directed that the fol
lowing expression" of the sense of the congrega
tion be sent to the President:
The board of the Metropolitan Episcopal Church
and congregation assembled extend to you and
your devoted wife the deepest sympathy, and ear
nestly pray that God in His great mercy may
comfort and sustain you and spare your valued
and useful life to the Church and nation.
The message was signed by all the members
of the official board.
WOULD HAVE KILLED CZOLGOSZ.
The adoption of this resolution was followed
by remarks from several of the leading: mem
bers of the church, all filled with sentiments of
the deepest regret for the Buffalo tragedy and
highest praise for the President as a man and
a member of their congregation. When the
meeting finally adjourned, the members of the
Con tinned on fourth p«ge.
POLICEATWORKONPLOT.
CONFIDENT THAT CZOLGOSZ
HAD ACCOMPLICES.
SOME PROGRESS MADE IN BUFFALO
ST'SPECTED ANARCHISTS EXAMINED.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBVNE-1
Buffalo, Sept. S.— General Bull, superintend
ent of police, told a Tribune reporter to-night
that he- was making- some progress in g-etting
at the accomplices of Czolgosz. "Czolgosz," he
said, "is sufficiently bright to plan and execute
the crime which he committed without any help,
but he did not do it alone. We have got far
enough with our investigations to make sure of
that fact. Naturally, it is a difficult matter to
lay hands on the men who instigated the shoot-
Ing. It does not take long for a criminal to get
away, and the Poles of Czolgosz's class are
naturally crafty. We have examined a number
of people to-day, and there are more to follow.
The man Alfonso Stutz, locked up last night
on suspicion, seems to have a clear record. He
came over on the Deutschland last week, and
his presence at John Xowak's hotel in Broad
way, was probably accidental. He was former
ly a lieutenant in the German army, and is held
on a charge of carrying concealed weapons. He
may have become friendly with Czolgosz while
at the hotel, but it is extremely doubtful about
his having had criminal knowledge of the at
tempted killing of the President. His weapon
was a pair of brass knuckles. Czolgosz is prob
ably a dyed in the wool anarchist. H*> does not
know anything about what has taken place
since the shooting. It would please him to hear
that the. President waa dead. He would die per
fectly happy If he knew that he had succeeded
in his design. No one outside of official circles
has seen Czolgosz or talked with him. The
statements purporting to be statements from
SECRETARY CORTEr,YOU GIVING OUT BULLETINS TO NEWSPAPER MEN IN
FRONT OF MILBURN RESIDENCE.
Czolgosz ar« largely imaginary. He has not
signified any desire to have a lawyer or spir
itual adviser."
From other sources it waa learned that Csol
rosz is a healthy animal. He sleeps and eats
well This morning after breakfast, thinking
that the composed demeanor of his guard indi
cated friendliness toward him personally, he
asked the puard for a cluar. He got a refusal
end a tongu-* lashinsr.
DO NOT WANT HTM EXPLOITED.
The members of the Cabinet are doing every
thing in their power to prevent the sensational
exploitation of Cjolgosz. both because h« un
doubtedly craves notoriety and because his fel
low anarchists throughout the country lov» It.
They do not desire to plaoe any utone in the
path of the authorities who are laboring to
unravel the plot, if any plot existed, and all the
machinery of the government Secret Service will
be used to aid the State authorities In the
prosecution of their investigations. But by the
direct request of Secretary Root, on behalf of his
colleagues, the District-Attorney and the police
will not permit the prisoner to be seen or inter
viewed, nor will they discuss the methods or
the results of their efforts to discover the origi
nators of the plot. All that ha.i leaked out from
the jail shows that he is vain and boastful of
his crime, and would, if he had an opportunity.
Continued on second puct.
PRESIDENT BETTER.
Not a Single Unfavorable Symptom
Develops.
HOPE FOR RED >VERY GROWS STRONG
The chances of President McKmley's recovery were considered grea- /
Improved last night. No unfavorable symptoms developed, and tie atfWsHm
physicians and others at his bedside feel confident that, though not yet out
of danger, his life will be spared.
Dr. Mcßurney. of this city, was called into consultation and joined In th«
favorable opinion of the other physicians.
The President had four hours' natural sieep yesterday afternoon and too*
nourishment for the first time since he was shot.
Vice-President Roosevelt and the members of the Cabinet who are in
Buffalo expressed great encouragement, and the good news spread rapidly
and widely.
BULLETINS ENCOURAGING.
DR. M'BURNEY JOINS WITH OTHERS IN
GIVING FAVORABLE VIEW OF THE
PRESIDENT'S CONDITION.
Buffalo. Sept. B.— The following bulletins were
issued by the President's physicians to-day:
1» p. m.— The President is* resting comfort
ably and there is no «i»e«-lal chance since
the lant bulletin. Pulse. 13Ot" temperature.
lot. Hi respiration, ;to.
P. . M. RIXEY.
M. D. MANX.
ROSWELL PARKE.
HERMAN MYXTOR.
ECGEXE WASP IN.
CHARI^ES M BI'RNEJT.
GEORGE B. CORTBL.YOU. Secretary to the President.
4 p. m.— The President since the last bulle
tin, has slept quietly, four boars altogether
since !> o'clock. His condition Is satisfactory
to all the physicians present. Pulse. 12S|
temperature, 1O1: respiration, - - .
' - P. m. RIXKY.
m. d. JIAXX.
ROSWELL PAKKE.
HERMAN MYXTER.
EIGEXB IVASDIX. !
CHARLES m'birmc\.
GEORGE 11. COIITELYOV,
Secretary to President.
Noon The Improvement In the President's
condition has continued since last bulletin.
Pulse. 12S; temperature, 101 degrees; respi
ration, 27. P. M. RIXEY.
Dr. Mcßurney is here, and will meet the
President's physicians in . consultation at . «i.
o'clock. GEORGE B. CORTEL.YOU,
Secretary to the President. .
9 a. m.— The President passed a stood night,
and his condition this moraine Is quite en
coaraglng. His mind is clear and he is. rest-
Injf well: wound dressed at S:r.O and found in
n very satisfactory condition. There is no
Indication of peritonitis. Pulse, 133: temper
arareV respiration. 24.
P. -M. RIXEY.
M. D. JIAXX.
iiosavem* parke.
HERMAN my.\teu.
¦venom avasdix.
George B. CORTELVOr.
¦Secretary to the President.
S:2O a. m.— The President has passed a fair
ly Rood nlarht. Pulse. 122« temperature.
102.1 denreesj respiration. 'M.
P. M. RIXEY.
HERMAN MY>TER.
GKORGE B. (ORTELYOr.
Secretary to the President.
Secretary Cortelyou gave out the following
statement at 6:30 p. m.:
The public will be kept fully advised of the
actual condition of the President. Each bulletin
is carefully and conservatively prepared, and is
an authoritative statement of the judgment of
the physicians as to the most important feat
ures of the case at the time issued. The facts
will be given GEOPGE B. CORTELYOU.
Secretary to the President
This statement is intended to put at rest any
idea that the official bulletins underestimate the
conditions, and at the same time to give assur
ance that those with the President intend that
the people shall have the facts.
A HACKING COUGH can be cured with
JAYNE'S EXPECTORANT. -Advt.
PRICE THREE TEXTS.
FEAR GIVES WAY TO HOPE.
CONFIDENCE THAT THE PRESIDENT*
THOUGH NOT OUT OF DANGEB,
WILL RECOVER.
IBT TEI.EGSAPH TO THE TBXBrJnB-'l
Buffalo. Sept. B.— Brightening faces, heart*
made lighter and buoyancy and cheerfulness la
the throngs In the streets here to-day, were th»
barometers of the constant hope rising that
Czolgosz's bullet Is not going to accomplish !t».
murderous task. There was. no escaping the>
atmosphere. It pervaded the hotel corridors,
where men said feelingly, "He's going to pull
¦
through." There Is only one "he" meant. Men's
thoughts in Buffalo seem to run on a slngla
track. The bulletin from the Milburn house Is
the thing of all others that will sweep men to*
gether as the hurricane tangles tall grain*
Emotions have been at the breaking point sine*.
Friday, and a reference to the President op
Mrs. McKinley has been enough to soften the*;
strident voice and change the strenuous gaasM
into one of pity and deep solicitude. To-day:
the sun came through the clouds, and the goo&4
cheer was like a cooling summer breeze.
The attending physicians, Vice-President^
Roosevelt, the members of the Cabinet and]
others in a position to know the facts, express);
increased hope that the President will live.
ALL. THE NEWS REASSURING
Every word that came to-day from the house*,
where President McKinley lies battling for Ufa
was reassuring, and to-night the chances of hlsK
recovery are so greatly improved that all of
those who have kept the patient vigil at hiae
bedside feel strongly that his life will be spared. *
The developments of last night and to-day weraS
dreaded, but hour after hour passed and thy ;
patient, under the watchful eyes of physicians^
and trained nurses, showed not an unfavorably
symptom.
Five times the doctors and surgeons asseo^
bled for consultation, and each time the verdict,
was unanimous that what change had occurred!
was for the better^ Not the slightest premonW,
tory symptom of peritonitis appeared, and thai
fresh hope, born with the morning, grertef
stronger and stronger as the day advanced^.
until toward evening the confidence expressed.;
in the President" recovery seemed almost to***
sanguine. ]•
DR. MBTJRNETS OPINION FAVORABLE^
Dr. Charles Mcßurney, the famous New-Tor^
surgeon, who had been summoned in consult**
tion. after a thorough examination, in which haj
said he had not found a single unfavorably
symptom. Joined in the last afternoon bulletin*
which declared that the President's condition?
was satisfactory to all the physicians present. It;
is not strange, therefore, that the Vice-Presl-»
dent, the members of the Cabinet and other vts^
itors who called came away with lighter heart*!
and buoyant tread and gave expression to thSt
most optimistic sentiments. And the Joyful tlslJ
ings went out beyond the bluecoated picket Moat*
to gladden the hearts of the silent throngs gatW
ered there.
GOOD NEWS SPREADS QUICKLY.
The news spread over the exposition citM
with lightning rapidity, and thousands came foM
carriages, in streetcars and afoot to learn fo«
themselves of the faith and confidence that ex-»
isted about the Milburn house. The brightness
of the day. with its flood of sunshine and its}
cool, bracing atmosphere, only added to the gen-*.
era! cheerfulness, and when a score of newsboy*,
darted into the crowd about & o'clock, shouting
"Extra! The President will live!" it was with
difficulty that they could suppress the shouts of
thanksgiving that rose in their throats. And
the newspaper men. many of whom have been
at their posts Tor forty-eight hours continuously,
remained steadfastly throughout the day in th*
little white walled tents across the street from
the Milburn house and flashed the news over
land and sea to inspire the hearts of waiting
millions.
NOT YET OUT OF DANGER.
And yet. despite all this optimism, the Presi*
dent is by no means out of danger. Not one of
his physicians, not one of his advisers who la.
admitted to the inner councils, has the temerity
to go so far as that. But if the President con
tinues to improve for one more day the danger
of peritonitis, which is most dreaded, will hay*.
practically disappeared.
Yesterday one of the doctors thought forty**
eight hours would be the limit of the dang«r
from that source, but his more conservative col™
leagues believe at least twenty-four hours, po*.
albly thirty-six, from this time must elapse be-.'
fore the poaiibility of peritonitis shall have van*,

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