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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 14, 1901, Image 11

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#OKS AND AUTHORS.
JBt TALK OF things present
and to COME.
b«*n decided that the new book of
II I**1 ** Hewlett, "New Canterbury Tales."
t? xc übllghed In this country without lllus
*!! jj^ugh the English edition has a large
sSS ' f plai« by W. Hyde, and the first an-
J -**^.ests were that they were to be used in
*f!Trica.n edition. The book Is now en the
»** , will be ready late this month or early
utbor of "An Englishwoman's Love Let
"*i, written a romance called "A Modern
** a „ mh i C h Doubleday. Page & Co. are about
'-* ,' )( .v Animus of old was a youth whose
'he earth, made him strong by contact
th j S story is of a boy who is similarly
Ilened by contact with the earth in many
•*"¦ mjujiX . in various places and con-
; C »-n Laae a.nd his American representa
*Mr T«nple Scott, have suddenly parted
•*. " and the disagreement has l*d to two
~^Vcne by against the other. Mr.
- establishment, in lower Fifth-aye.. is in
*** of Mr. i •¦¦¦»• It will be remembered
*?!,^ bus ii n ess was moved thither a few
** v ago. when the stock and business of
f^e Hanson & Comba were taken over by
*? „'c. Mr. Scott was Mr. Lane's repre
2 M la this country for about eighteen
ia& states that he had a contract to
:1^' c m that position for about three years
Of- ' —
-eceived from the International News
— -ay «w» first number of " The Connoisseur:
*^Laiiae for Collectors." published in Lon-
Ltj Sampson Low, MarFton & Co. The lllus-
S "frosi photographs, prints and drawings.
'."„ ..,-. produced, though we must pro
• ••¦«t the disfigurement of the most im
*',\' illustration, a double page reproduction
.. ..... 's "Miranda," with a businesslike in-
Ijtita we within the body of the plate.
to important, however, than any question of
•.f-iden is the scheme which has been adopt
er lie text. Current exhibitions and many
if the matters given prominence in most
.liHf"" are in this one neglected, and an
LtJimade instead to provide such articles
lleierious collector would prefer to see. We
-a an article in this number on the hallmarks
triS English silver; another on Sheffield plate;
chJriTcn color prints and papers on the art of
s£ecsss i^y on the principles of book col
«jtK. C a old lace and gems— with the best
Jchcis of collecting those treasures— and. after
1 IMb several pages relating to recent sales of
note, prints, manuscripts and works of art.
Jen the philatelist is considered by the editor.
¦to includes a short account of South African
or sumps in this number of the periodical.
sac contributions are well written and illus
sted and well printed. There is an effective
mm bearing a design by Mr. Byam Shaw, and
¦ the magazine sells for a shilling in England,
eh presumably no great increase of the price
:tbis country, the outlook for its fortunes is at
¦it promising.
That vivacious traveller and writer Herbert
"•net. with Olive Vivian, has written a volume
c The Romance of Religion." soon to be pub
tted by Longmans. Green & Co., In which he
aesribes a number of striking and picturesque
rjEgions observances, mostly in the Catholic
at Orthodox Greek countries of Southern
Sunn*. Mr. Vivian congratulates himself in
his vrtbc* on receiving compliments from
Boas* Catholic friends whenever he has writ
:sn articles descriptive of Roman Catholic cere
rxrials:.««. ; - -- - .
Astaßsr appreciation has been granted me by
L-ctlmacdrttes of the Orthodox Church when I
lave bks> after dinner speeches in Servian
a— an rli r To crown my delight. I only need
* be complimented by a Dervish when my
MBtr-Awth chapter shall have been translat
i Turkish.
An elaborate volume on Chinese porcelain, by
OHM Monknouse, is promised by Cassell &
Bar next month. It has twenty-four colored
latsiand illustrations in the text.
to September 10 Anthony Hope's latest book,
Thftrun of Blent," was published by McClure.
ÜBpt & Co., and before its appearance had
Ssrty been sent into* its fourth edition, its
satietß thousand.
Ho.-ace E. Scudder has •written a life of James
¦¦efl Lowell, which Hourbton. Mifflin & Co.
31 publish in two volumes, uniform with their
¦"Brside Edition of Lowell's complete works.
&re will also be a large paper edition, limited
*250 copies, uniform uritn the large paper
•m of the completed works, with two por
•Si &l& ether illustrations. Mr. Scudder's
|«A is said to be a full, orderly and definitive
•tapfcy of Lowell, at once a narrative of his
Sand a study of his character and literary
j***. It reveals the intimate side of his
«,aad will include many of his letters never
i^B printed, and some important papers
** 1-2 did not print in bis collected works.
* tie making of books on Wagner there
"¦•to be no end. Announcement Is made by
by Francis Gerard.
*• "Wagner at Bayreuth and the Festival
¦*•" It treats epeciaiiy of the "Nibelungen"
¦¦IIS and "Parsifal," and will contain Jllus
"-".osg and portraits.
*• October "Centurj" will contain an article
w " Jn3ge Howland, of this city, on "The
¦twof La-*- in New-York." popular in treat-
J^»lth a large number of illustrations, in
'¦ff »«rt«mlUß by John S. Sargent of Am
****r GhDate and James C. Carter, as well
, •¦frrtt* of other noted lawyers, and draw
- - ** -York law offices and law courts.
rt,f" Ms - 11 win Publish next month the
tuf series of "Gibson books," drawings
'i V C ' D ' Gibson. This will be "A Widow
, ~f friends." a pictorial history of the life
|^*flimiine youns widow, as It has ap-
- tbe pages of " Life -" There are be
!iec:loas from other recent works of Mr.
**tt more than thirty new drawings
lerttc 'ore printed.
g**«. main & Co. have been bo much
a, ?*- J by the eacceas of their limited edi
|>W. Henry Jaires-a "A Little Tour in
W' Published last year, that they have
J g to make a aimiiar publication of Will-
Kwfl Howel1 «'« "Italian Journeys." This.
W.- *• myß^te(l by Joseph Fennell. Mr.
*%£ "^ tlloroi «*ly revised his book, and
m i new preface for It. Mr. Penneil has
v* dties that Mr. Howells describes.
• £ aesiga. are said to be real illustrations
'Zt"~* t 'J? l *- ***** pa e limited edition
& aau^, C ° Ples< Xt Was found that the
last year of the "Llule Tour in
•^ Wit* failed to meet the demand*
52 p~* Pr ° JeCt a work d « P"ve of the
* biok aU GaUery in London ' «»*""« to
*•>**- -^. the NaUonal Gallery, published
* t*"-2? WUI - be in two volumes and
01 * 1 " eXt raomh - There will be
*$ >1« n tonfrep°rSction s IllUStrat!onß be-
u *ir tone reproductions.
"' W oit' haß ma(Je a handsome volume
HW- , ;• RoßSettl>B translation of "The
*.i110i4., - anle ' ' n Whlfh .Rowetti'. text
***** fOF lh * Work Kre i88 "^ to
; w «* ftrst time. Many of u»e pictures
here r<-r>roduced are said r-ver to have been
published before.
The genera: manager at the Judge Company
announces that Mr. R. K. Munkittrick has been
appointed editor of that genial periodical. • Mr.
.Munkittrick has been writing- humorous sketches
and poems for various magazines and other
periodicals for a good many years, and his work
has found much favor. His experience with the
joys and sorrows of humorous journalism quali
fies him for his new position, for he was a mem
ber of the editorial staff of "Puck" for eight
years, from 1881 to 1889. He Is also the author
' t "Farming," "The Moon Prince and Other
Nabobs," "New-Jersey Arabian Nights," "The
Acrobatic Muse" and "The Slambangaree." He
Is an Englishman by birth, but has long been a
Jerseyman by choice.
Henry Norman's new book on "All the Rus
sias." which the Scribners will publish soon,
will have th*> descriptive sub-title, "Travels and
Studies in Contemporary European Russia, Fin
land, Siberia, the Caucasus and Central Asia."
It i* said to contain much more matter than
appeared ir. th^ papers published during the
Fprins and summer in "Scribner's Magazine,"
and the text as it there appeared has been ex
tensively revised by Mr. Norman. The book
will be lavishly illustrated, chiefly from the au,
thor's own photographs. Mr. Norman has vis
ited Kussia four times during the last two years
to collect material, and received much assistance
from high Russian authorities.
The Macmillan Company will publish a new
novel by F. Marlon Crawford, like most of his
recent works, on an Italian subject. It will be
called "A Maid of Venice." Its period is about
the end of the fifteenth century, and while it is
a romance the facts of history with which it
l«s concerned are said to he treated with scrupu
lous correctness, and to he derived from the old
Venetian chronicles. It describes the household
of a master glassblower, member of a corpora
tion powerful in those days, and possessed of
many rights and privileges.
Stewart Edward White was introduced to the
readers of American novels by "The Claim
Jumpers," recently published by D. Appleton &
Co., who have presented many promising new
Ameri'-an writers to the public. "The Claim
Jumpers," which is a story of "Western life, is
Baid to be proving a successful book.
The Putnams have nearly ready for publica
tion a large work in two volumes, entitled "The
American Immortals," by George Cary Eggles
ton. The immortals are those whose nam»s
were chosen for the Hall of Fame; but the book
is not officially connected with that institution,
and is to be distinguished from the smaller book
about it, which was also published by the Put
nams, for the New-York University. "The
American Immortals" consists of a series of es
timates of the services to the country of the
twenty-nine men whose names stand ln the Hall
of Fame, together with photogravure reproduc
tions of the best portraits that could be ob
tained of them.
THE DOYKS PRESS,
THE REVIVAL OF PRINTING AS AX ART.
From The London Daily News.
Six months only have elapsed since the first
book was issued by th» Doves Press; yet one
can hardly enter an important bookseller's shop
or speak with those interested in the revival of
printing as an art, without hearing of this press.
Its originators would be the first to admit prob
ably, that had not William Morris, by practice
and precept, awakened the enthusiasm of the
few, the curiosity of the many, in this till re
cently disregarded craft, the appeal of the Doves
Press could not have been so swift. The soil
was prepared by Morris, whose achievements
as designer of the KHniKoott Press fonts, bor
ders, initial letters, etc., to say nothing of watch
fulness over every detail, constitute not the
least of his claims to remembrance. On
the other hand, T. .T. Cobden-Sanderson and
Emery Walker, partners in this Doves Press
aim in no way to carry on the traditions of the
Kelmscott, traditions indissolubly bound up with
Morris himself. As far as possible the promoters
free themselves from memory of Kelmscott
books, and approach the problem of making
beautiful, and above all things legible, the vol
umes issued.
So far one font only has been designed. Four
and a half centuries ago. when skilled cal
ligraphers were to be found in every town, in
many a hamlet, the designing of an alphabet
was a relatively easy matter. Having thousands
of times traced with utmost care each letter,
the scribe had but to adapt the written alpha
bet, with its greater freedom, to the require
ments of print, capable of but one series of
groupings, not like the written letter slightly
to be compressed, expanded or adapted at de
sired places. But as calligraphy is a lost art,
the Doves Press, like the Kelmscott. has gone
back to the birth time of printing for inspira
tion. The Roman type used was suggested by
a Pliny executed by Jensen in Venice, 1478.
The Doves type is larger, and less heavy than
that of Morris; moreover, there Is some thicken
ing and thinning of the line, which Morris re
garded as a blemish, and it is pure Roman, in
stead of having a tendency toward Gothic, like
that of the Kelmscott printer. There are no
leads between the lines, and the space between
the words as small as possible consistent with
legibility. The initial volume, being in Latin-r
at one time it was the custom not to separate
Latin ' words at all — has intentionally lesser"
p paces betweea»the words than the two booklets
in English. As to the paper, the aim has been
to get it as light as is consistent at once with
durability and with the requirements of two
side printing. It is made by Messrs.- Batchelor,
and is akin to a paper used for a Tasso printed
by Glunta in the fifteenth century. Few ques
tions are more important than the placing of
matter on the page. The Doves Press regards
two pages and not one as the unit to be iilled
decoratively. No general rule, it is wisely held,
can be laid down. in this matter, for the length
of the lines, the character of the typography,
whether or not there are paragraphic breaks in
the page, and other influences, operate. In a
word, as an artist uses 'his color, so must the
printer determine exactly what his margins are
to be. The Ink is practically the same as that
used for the Kelmscott. For long the ideal of a
vellum binding was to have it a? white as possi
ble. The Doves Press, on the other hand, binds
Its volumes in" limp vellum on which the hair
marks, of no mean decorative value, can clearly
be seen; from the .utilitarian point of view, too,
this is wise, as when the vellum is scraped to, a
greater extent a fleshy instead of a leathery
substance Is reached, and the binding is less
durable .
Three books, or, rather, booklets, at present
Lear the imprint of the Doves Press, and at the
end of each is added the name of the compositor,
J. H. Mason, and of the pressman, H. Gage-
Cole. In January there was published a Tacitua
in Latin, edited by J. W. Mackail. a small
4to of 33 pp. of text, the twenty-five copies on
paper of which were priced at -Jos. In Febru
ary came Cobden-Sanderson's essay, "The
Ideal Book," of uniform size, containing 9 pp.
of text, broken up into paragraphs and sections,
three hundred copies on paper of which were
Issued at 12s. (id. During the present month
we have had, In similar format, an address. by
J. W. Mackail on William Morris, 27 pp. of
text, with no break in the pages, new para
graphs being Indicated by a specially designed
mark. 300 copies of which on paper were priced
at IS*, each. From the commercial standpoint,
it is instructive to note that on such a basis
the Kelmscott "News from .Nowhere," of over
three hundred pages, would have cost about £15,
as against Its actual issue price of two guineas.
Each" of the booklets was out of print long before
its publication, and the Tacitus realized no less
than £4 12«. at auction in the beginning of May.
Moreover, "The Ideal Book" has changed hands
at over £4, and the, Morris, .although but just
issued, cannot be procured under from £2 to £3.
Really the first book to be issued by the Press
will be Milton'e "Paradise Lost." This is to
liave a. rubricate! Initial at the beginning of
each of the twelve books, nor is it probable that
the Do.yes will go much further, for the present
at. any rate. In the way of decoration. Simplic
ity even severity, are watchwords. One great
work Is in contemplation. :It is proposed to
print a small edition, not exceeding five hundred
copiep, of the Authorized Version of the Bible.
The publication will be Jn five parts folio, about
thirteen inches by nine Inches, the pages? will
run unbrokenly, even in the case of fresh chap
ters, but here and there rubricated initials are
projected. The parts' will probably be bound in
limp vellum, but so bound that in the end they
can be formed into a single volume;, perhaps to
be covered with pigskin. Not book collector*
only, but the general public, will watch with
Interest the development of this enterprise.
XEW-YOKK DAILY TRIBUNE, SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER U. 1901.
PORKS AT A PEDANT.
MR. ANDREW LANG HAS FUN WITH PRO
• FESSOR BRADLEY'S COMMENTARY ON
TENNYSON'S "IN MEMORIAM."
¦ From Longman's Magazine.
Tennyson was not fond of people who kept
detecting "unconscious borrowings" by himself
.from other poets. He said something very
sharp about them. Scott did not care; no, nnt
I when he found that he had unwittingly taken
•a line from a poem by the valet of a friend.
In the preface to a little collection of verses
from his novels he frankly declares that ho
'cannot pretend to be certain which F.re <">f his
own composition and which are not. En re
vanche, when he heard Cleveland's song in "The
Pirate" sung he said: "Pretty words. Are they
I Byron's?" To take an example from the level
at the foot of Parnassus, I once read, in an
American paper, some lines attributed to Mr.
Austin Dobson. "Not bad for Dobson," I said
freely to a friend. But it was proved on me that
the rhymes were my own! A bard who forgets
his own verses may be pardoned for remember"
ing those of other people and mistaking a
half line of somebody's else's for his own. I dare
say that Tennyson' did this occasionally, but
he could hardly say that "the sun pets" without
being accused of unconscious borrowing.
One does not feel certain that memory. rather
than invention, marked many of the passages
where memory gets the credit. Kingsley wrote,
"The harbor bar is moaning." and Tennyson
wrote, "May there be no moaning of the bar."
But what can a bar do if it does not "moan"?
Was Tennyson to try to find another phrase—
"no yelping of the bar," "no roaring of the
bar," "no growling of the bar" — what?
"Murmur of the bar" is not sad enough for the
purpose. Bon Gaultier had used the "moaning
of the tide" (with a picture of a howling bull
dog, "the moaning of the tied"). Did Bon
Gaultier borrow from Kingsley or Kingsley
from Bon Gaultier? Then both Coleridge and
Tennyson write of "the last red leaf." or "the
one red leaf, the last of its clan." What else,
I ask, was Tennyson to call the last red' leaf?
"Yellow" would not scan; "brown" would not
be so good a point of color. Had Tennyson
foreseen Mr. Bradley, he might have dodged
him by writing "the last dead leaf"; but that
might have been reproved by some other com
mentator as implying that there were also liv
ing leaves which, on deciduous trees, at that
season, there were not. Tennyson has "drop
ping day," and Virgil has "solem cadentem."
The sun must pet down somehow, but Tenny
son's way of phrasing the day's descent must
be •an unconscious reminiscence. "Seraphic
flame" reminds us of Milton's "flaming seraph,"
and Pope's "rapt seraph that adores and burns."
Well, I presume that there is Hebrew author
ity for this flamboyant character of seraphs,
and any poet may make them blaze, if he likes,
off his own bat. The lines In lxxxiv (Tenny
son's regret that he could never be Uncle Alfred
to Hallam's children) are quite natural, and de
manded neither originality nor reminiscence.
Hallam was going to marry the poet's sister;
their male issue, if any, would have been the
poet's nephews. Mr. Bradley remarks: "It is
unfortunate that, the finest lines recall Lamb's
exquisite "Dream Children.' " I do not feel the
misfortune. Cannot a man be sorry that his
friend's possible sons, his own nephews, must
never "babble 'uncle' on my knee," without be
ing indebted, consciously or unconsciously, to
Lamb? Tennyson talks of "tender gloom." and
so does James Thomson; and Tennyson may
have unconsciously remembered, or may have
independently invented, the phrase. Nobody
can say which view is right, and what does It
matter? Mr. Bradley justly remarks that to
doubt Tennyson's originality ln the creation of
poetic phrases would be to show the extreme of
critical incapacity." It would, indeed— or, not
quite. The real extreme of incapacity is dis
played in the "construes" of Tennysonlan pas
sages which Mr. Bradley quotes from some or
the commentators. I think of a middle class
mind (intellectually middle class) going at 'in
Memoriam" earnestly, aided by these unspeak
able commentators, and in search of Culture.
I know that this middle class mind will hold
that Tennyson prigged that last red leaf of his
from Coleridge. „
We may talk of "unconscious memory, nut
this laborious dullard, who reads poetry with
commentaries, will run off with the wrong Idea.
He is like the young lady who. hearing "T»cks»
lev Hall" read, allowed that it was pretty, put
asked "Who is 'the individual Withers"' It Is
a pity that such well meaning but helplessly
prosaic persons should think It a duty to study
"In Memoriam." They won't "see Plotlnus.
Enn. IV. viit. I." as they, are recommended to
do In a spirit much more Christian. I admit,
than mine. Mr. Bradley has tried to help these
weak brethren and sisters. His account of the
sequence of ideas and general componltion of
"In Memoriam." and hip explication of what can
hardly be called the poet's "philosophy (Tor it
does not pretend to be a philosophy*, are lucid
and generous. It is only the references to un
conscious borrowings" and the revelations Ol
the hallucinations of some commentators that
make me what Mr. Bradley calls "the exas
perated reader." Just conceive the cretin who
takes the gentleman requested to "leave his
sister when she prays." etc.. for— Lazarus; or for
Tennyson himself! (xxzili). Yes, ethically I may
be wrong— perhaps we ought to be gentle to
the poor of spirit; perhaps we ought to try to
teach them to understand. But, practically.
considering the brevity of life. Im It unwise to
entreat them to go about their blameless busi
ness and leave the Muses to persons born t<
enjoy the Muses? At ail events. ;n the .Interests
of my peace of mind, I am glad that 1 never
read any other commentator «!> Tennyson. I take
refuge "under his wings. If he let interpreta
tions pass "which ar>- unquestionably wrong,
he clearly did not disturb himself about les
pauvres d'esprit Mr. Bradley writes: "There
are hosts of misinterpretations which I have
left unnoticed." Those hosts are the children
of lee pauvres d'esprit embarked in a galley
where they have no business. Mr. Bradley will
find higher matter for his Oxford lectures.
HOOK H OF THi: WEEK.
THE I/>XE?OMEST POL.U By AVhW- Far-.-.- .: Brown.
Square 16mo. pp. 76. (Houghton. Mllllin & Co.)
-., TV i, am WRITING EKOUSH. Second series. By
T £r*o liat«L 12mo. pp. K>». (Houston. Mifflin &
Co.)
OUR LADY VANITY. By Ellen Olney Kirk. 12mo, pp.
203. (HouEhion. Mifflin & Co.)
* «!T'CSGEST SUGGESTION AND OSTEOPATHY. 12mo.
p 31-1 (The Prog Ivt Osteopathlc and Suggestive
Therapeutic Publishing Company.)
FROM SQUIRE TO FRINCK. Being a History of th»
' Rise of the !1 *is« of Clrksena. By Walter Phelp«
Dodge. Illustrated. Svn, pp. 100. (T. Fisher Unwtn.)
THE VOYAGE OF iTHOBAI* By Sir Edwin Arnold.
12mo. pp. -2«. (G. W. Dilllngham company.)
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN TROTTING
AND PACING HORSE. By Henry T. Coat«s. The
American Trotting Turf In 1089 and U*m). by A. M.
Gillam. an>l What to i»> Before the Veterinary Sui
peon Comes, by George Fleming. U'mo. pp. 143.
(Henry T. Coatea & Co.)
A RABBI'S IMPRESSIONS OF THE OBERAMMERGAU
PASSION PL.AY. it.iri^ a Series of Si* LActoraa.
with Thrf- Supplemental Chapters Bearing on th«
Subject By lUbbl Joseph Krauskopf, D. D. I2mo,
pp. 228. (Philadelphia: Edward Stern & Co.)
THE AMERICAN JEWISH TEAR BOOK. 5689 (Septem
ber 14 1901, to Octotber 1, 1S««). Edited by Cyrua
Adler. ' IMn, pp. 321. (Philadelphia: Thfc Jewish
Publication ..Society of America.) *
JACK EtACBB. By Henry Somerville. t2mo, pp. 430.
iMcClure. Phillips & Co.)
IRISH PASTORALS. By Shaw F. Bullock. 12mo, pp.
300. (MoClura, Phillips & Co.)
Y.I. OENTILOQUIO DE SANTILX.ANA. With Eighty
Proverbs Selected from the Folklore of the Spanish.
Knitted by Fernando Staud y Xlmenez and Hubert M
Skinner. Souvenir Edition. 1-mo. pp. 200. ' (Laird
& Lee.)
THE GRIM GOD SUCCESS. A Novel, By John
Graham. 12mo. pp. 2int. (Frederick A. Stokes Com
pany.)
A EnORT HISTORY OF THE HEBREWS TO THE
ROMAN PERIOD. By R. L. Ottley. With maps.
I2mo, pp. 821. (The Macmlllan Company.)
LITERARY ASSOCIATIONS OF THE ENGLISH LAKES.
By the Rev. H. D. Rawnaiey. In two volumes.
Illustrated. Each 12mo, pp. Vol. I. xlv, 236; Vol. 11,
x. 251. (The Macmlllan Company.)
AMERICAN HISTORY TOLD BY CONTEMPORARIES.
Vol. IV.. Welifin« of the Nation, 1845 lutKi. Edited
by Albert Bunhnell Hart. Bvo, pp. xxl, 732. (The
Macmlllan Company.)
THE FALLEN STUARTS. By F. W. Head. Cambridge
Historical Eerays, No. XII. 12mo, pp. 3u«. (The
Macmlllan Company.)
MARYLAND AS A PROPRIETARY PROVINCE. By
Newton D. Mereness. Svo. pp. 530. (The Macmlllan
Company.)
THE CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF ELY. A History and
Description of the Building, with a Short Account of
the Former Monastery and ct the See. By the Rev.
W. D.. Sweeting. 12mo, pp. i:mj. (The Macmlllan
Company.)
THE WOULDBEGOOD9. By E. Nesbit. Illustrated by
Reginald B. Birch. 12mo. pp. 313. (Harper & Bros.)
CATIIJIOAN. A Novel. V.y Robert V.*. Chambers. 12m<j.
pp. 513. (Harper & Bros.)
ELECTRO-MAGNETS: THEIR DESIGN AND CON
STRUCTION. By A. N. Mansfield. lSmo\pp. IK>.
(I). Van Nostrnnd Company.) . y
PRIMITIVE MAN. By ilorlz Hoernes. l*mo, pp. 135.
•'Ths Temple Primers." <The Macmlllan Company.)
THE DEERSLAYER. By ' James Fenlmore Cooper.
13m0, -pp. *». ¦ "Macmlllan's Pocktt American and"
English ClasHles." (The Macmillan Company.)
THE STUDY AND CRITICISM OF ITALIAN ART. By
Bernhard Berenson. 4to, pp. 1"2. i George Ball &
Sons.)
DANTE GABRIEL ROSETTI. An Illustrated Memorial
of His Art and Life. By H. C. Marilller. Folio, pp.
172. Second edition abridged and revised. (The
Mu-nr:.::ar. Company.) ; N -'.
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LONDON HOUSED.— Applicants desirous of rrourtn? FXTR
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CHESTERTON A SONS, 15, SLCANB STREKT. LON
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LONDON MANSION'S AND HOUSES. Furnished cr fn-
J furnished, neighborhood Buckingham Palace and other
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venor Place, (Mar Victoria Station), London), England.
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LONDON SHOPS.
PETEB ROBINSON
Ltd.
Dry Goods Store, Oxford St., London.
100 Shops and Show Rooms. Latest
Fashions. Best Style. Moderate Prices.
THE
Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Company,
LTD.,
"2, Regent St., London, W.
Choicest Stock in the World of
DIAMONDS, PEARLS,
RUBIES, SAPPHIRES,
EMERALDS, OPALS, &c,
AT MERCHANTS' PRICES.
The
Goldsmiths # Silversmiths Company, Ltd.,
112, REGENT ST.. LONDON, W.
IRISH LINENS ~
At Manufacturers 1 Prices,
made and marked without charge.
IRISH LACES
Direct from the cottage workeri,
beautiful examples of Irish
industry— At first cost.
Walpole Bros.. Lim.,
" Belfast House."
Belfast, Dublin and
89, New Bond Street, London. W.
H. P. Truefitt, Ld.,
13-14 OLD BOND-ST., LONDON, W.
(Through to Burlington Arcade.)
Hotel Cecil London, and
Elysee Palace Hotel, Paris.
High-class Hairdressing by female experts. Manicure
and Chiropody by New York operators- First and
only "American Shaving Saloon " in Europe.
O x 0°
ART IN JEWELS.
Illustrated Catalogue post free.
85. New Bond Street, )
143. Regent Street, ' LONDON
43, Burnngtor Arcade, )
PARIS SHOPS.
LOOIS VU'^ > j
TRUNKS AM- BAGS 111 1
Always \x i
I, RUE SCRIBE, PARIS
London Shop Removed to !
]|'», \e\v Bond Street. |
AllSizfs Ail Prices, Nowhere E!s:. ;
¦ -~-*- ¦*-i~n-i.rij-i_r_rt_rL-n-n.i-tru*i_fi_ii-r«_n-X.n--r k i_-_n.'*'.*Li
FURS.
P.M. GRUWWALDT, PARIS.
0, kM I! I)r! LA PAIX.
London hotels.
THE CHARING CROSS BANK (Established iS7O).
llt'lM Bi*b«|Krat' SfHithm (n«ir (ornhillV
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I ji«r rf at p r annum lubjr- 1 t» X month*' notice of wlthirawil.
I per rent per annum suhjert In C months' n«t|u »f i»ith.lr,iif V.
' prr lit prr annnni iab|rtt to I - montlii' notice ol witbilr»<il.
Spfdal iprin« for loa».-r pfru>ds. IntiTf «1 paid quartvlr.
Ill* nninablr ll»|M.vit luih pay iiciili I per rent, and are saf* invMtaflnt.
Write or rail lor ;¦ i\ .v. L Hilli.im» AH. T. Tall, Joint »»Il,kr«rv
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AN AFFAIR OF THE SOUTH SEAS. A Story of Ro
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KARAIi.A' 1 . COUNT OF GERSAY. A Romance. By
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foreign Rrasrts.
The Gordon Hotels
The GORDON COMPANY are the GREATEST HOTTT PROPRIETORS in tk*
WORLD and have carried HOTEL MANAGEMENT to tlic hiyh-st state of perfection.
FIRST AVEME HOTEL
S H^h Hiaim) LONDON
One of the best for real comfort and
moderate charges. Near the city and
business centres. C^b'e address "First;
Avenue, London." !
THE <3-O:FL:DO3Nr HOTELS XjUVrJL'JL'JbJIP
E W {\4'{\ 1 |J/\/l| I Largest and most magnificent hotel
* *"l»fCl Wvtll in Europe. Mode rut: Charges. Bed-
LONDON [ WHI|>B »*'-*•••» rooms from $1.50 per " ay Self'
¦nVriUILFII! t •aarini Orut- contained suit's.—- A. Judah. Manager.
European Trains de Luxe and Palace Hotels.
FROM LONDON. TTRST CLASS HOTELS.
Mediterranean Express to Nice, Monte Cairo ' Gheiirch Palace..
Carlo, etc. j ) Shepheards' Hotel.
Rome Express to Genoa, Rome, and Moute Carlo . . Riviera Palace.
'Naples. • Nice Riviera Palac
Accommodation mum he rrirnri, in i«<ivnn.-<- for irnln- nn.i 1i.i1.-l- „ r i -, i -„ ,i. n »l
LONDON BOTELS.
SAVOY HOTEL, LONDON
HOTEL DE LUXE OF THE WORLD
The rooms are bright, fresh and airy,
and delightfully quiet. Bathroom to every Suite.
SAVOY RESTAURANT.
The most famous Restaurant in Europe. The
Orchestra plays during Dinner and
the Opera Supper.
/^LARIDGE'S HOTEL,
Centre of Fashionable London
The List Word" ef ZModern.
Koiel Luxury, Charming suites <wdh private
entrance, bathroom, etc. ¦' Over 300 rooms.
Nearly 100 bathrooms.
A magnificent Royal Suite.
I THE BEST PEOPLE |
H stay at the |§
¦ Great Central!
B when visiting B
I LONDON I
THE
LANGHAM HOTEL,
LONDON.
Unrivalled Sttantion In Portland Place.
At Top of UfK-iit St. \\ .
Convenient for the Bent Shop*. Theatres, Etc.
Every nodern Comfort and Convenience.
Moderate Tariff.
THE HOTEL CECIL
GIBRALTAR.
First Clasi la Every Respect. The only expressly
constructed Hotel in Gibraltar. Highly recommend
ed. Perfect Sanitation. Telegrams 'Cecil Gibraltar.'
HOTELS IN ENGLAND.
HOTELS IN IHE BRITISH ISLES.
LONDON .......
MIDLAND GRAND HOTEL
LIVERPOOL ....
ADELPHI HOTEL
LEEDS
QUEEN'S HOTEL
BRADFORD .....
MIDLAND HOTEL
MORECAMBE BAY .
MIDLAND HOTEL
DERBY
MIDLAND HOTEL
MOl N r EPHR MM-Tl
«iH » VKI.IT— ISLE OF WIGHT
IIOLLIKR'S SHANKLI> HOTEL. . Light.
¥Hi"TT\VS-Y-COED «XOHTII UA1.K51....
HIII^ v.vc WATERLOO HOTEL.
ADERDKKX. G. X. S. ll >, „X - p AL ACE -HOTEL.
rßln i.'v n*V (Ahenlri-mhlrri. f; >. K>-.
CHIDES AY UOTKI . I'OHT ERHOL. > n.
Tariitn of the Hotels and full pnrtlonlnr*
«. tn rnnl" "»»T »»« »«»«« ¦* <»>•* Enropfnn
"»m<"ii of •Tribune- at 140 Fleet Street.
London.
_ , „ a t SOUTH SEA. PORTSMOUTH.
Olieen « nOtt'. Fine .Marine View. Facing
Isle of Wight. Lovely old Hardens. Tennis, etc. Adjoins
Royal Yacht Club. Frequent boats to Cowes. Ryd« and
Somhampton. "ROYAL PIER HOTEL" under aarr.a
direction. Opposite Queen's residence — Osborne.
Upoer Norwoo^ Queen's Hot»1.
Near Crystal Palace, London. Healthiest situation ti»
Encland. Lovely gardens. Bearding terms from »2.50 per
day. Special terms for large parties. Convenient train
«er\-lce for City ar.d West End London.
Norfolk Hotel. Brighton. England.
Elite Family Hotel. Overlooks sea-wall promenade and
lawns. Fine publlo rooms. Perfect sanitation. Shaded
electric light?. Lift. Delicate cul&lne. Choice wines.
Jules A. Crelghton. Up.
The Howard Hotel
Norfolk Street, Embankment, London. Every modern
tomforu Overlook* Embankment and River. Elejaat
public rooms. Electric :.>;ht throuchout. American sys
tem elevator*. Fixed tariff. t
EUROPEAN RAILWAYS.
THE SCENIC LINE.
MIULA.M) RAILWAY OF ENGLAXD.
The most Interesting antt picturesque route from North
to South through the centre of England. EXPRESS
TRAINS LIVERPOOL (Central) to LONDON and PRIN
CIPAL TOWN A Also LIVERPOOL. (Excaanyel to scot
land THROUGH TICKETS to LONDON. PARIS and ail
D»rt«. NEWEST TYPE of Rollins Stock on Express
Trains BAGGAGE CHECKED through from hotel, resi
dence or pier m New York to any part of Load Obtain
guides, time tables, mipi, &c.. at the MIDLAND COM
PANY"S AGENCY (Messrs. Thos- Cook * Son). 261 and
1,183 Broadway. Xi » York. - <
- FRANCE AND BELGIUM.
Hotel Chatham,
Hotel Continental,
DA DIC Parisian Home of
r Alllva Distinguished Americans
-foreign Utsous.
THE GORDON HOTELS ARE:
Horn HATFI 1 rurmTTOU wrm. >m«iTiL
H9TFI IKTM>'>l' 1 nTTMTin? mr. *\n«\T«.
¦ or> r:.- -i. v •!'.--. '\«rM?<Ti
ttitrrnu:!. r.m\ Uotsu i"»til ?kz wrl. *td*. l»i *.
wnmcL ?wwi ih» fiurn;i «««rn. i.af«:v
FIRST nnrE linTEL KBTn - ir T nftrr ','.. r PK.JETWH
Lrosmoß hotel J k " E " D EES BWR"
HOTEL MKTtOfO-I > „ IMTH. HErSSr«)LS. tUXSL
ruMirEß^^. > bksztm. ''• i: tun u!f»r»
FRANCE AHU BELGIUM,
GRAND HOTEL rie IATHENEE.
15 RUE SCRIBE.
OPPOSITE THE GRAND OPEPwA.
The Modern Hotel of Paris.
A ABMBRUSTER, Manager.
Hotel de Lille et a'Albioo. Paris,
2'J3 11 ! 16 '?.'• Honore. the fln»st part of Paris. Near
j MM Gardens. Place Vendome & New Opera. Ist
I claa*. Moderate terms. Ali home comforts. Free light
»nd service. Larje Hall. Ladies" drawing room. Res
taurant. Dining room. Lunch & Table .Thole dinner at
separate tables. Perfect sanitation Slectrtc llgh' •'-'-.'ugh
; l"d..feJS: a gAD^^rcfrfe'Sr" WU>> ~ M> *""
HOTEL BEDFORD PARIS.
t«F«f.f * rf rea . de - cc 1c1 c U Healthiest een,
tral site. Elevator. 81-ctrlc LJeiit. Baths Telephone etc
I American plan Cable address: Bedfortel. A. B. C C*««^
RRIK9FI L[ GB ' ND HOTEL
UIIUUyLLU 6flll Riom. American B»f.
HOTELS IN GERMANY.
Frankfurter Hof,
Frankfurt A/ Main.
NASSAUER-HOF HOTEL,
Wiesbaden.
NEULLENS HOTEL,
Aix-La-Chapelle.
HOTEL CONTINENTAL
IIIIIIIPII ALL moders comforts
nIUIHUIia FINEST SITUATION
FOUR SEASONS HOTEL
Munich
HOTEL STRAUSS
isS* Nurenberg
Gd Hotel de Rome,
¦ BERLIN.
HOTEL BELLEVUE,
DRESDEN.
! Distinguished House of old reputation. Unique
position. R. Ronnsfe!d t Gen. Manager.
CONTINENTAL HOTEL
Lfr«,9UCII \ Fine 01 Cenlral Station.
rSbtien f Fine Old Garden.
AUSTRIA AND SWITZERLAND.
HOTEL BRISTOL
l/lsti-'-n^ The Pln "* Hotel
? IvfliliCl '» Austria.
Located on the V «hlonnhl». ICarnthcrrln*.
¦ nil tin- favorite resort of American*. Per
fect French Cuintre acd choice nlnct.
Gd'Hotel rlungaria
BUDAPEST
First-Class Hotel with Panoramic Mew over tis
Danube. Every modern comfort. Exclusive America!
and English patronage. CHARLES J. BUSGL*, Mai
sger, formerly of Imperia! Hotel, Vienna.
INISSBRUCH-HOTEL TYROL,
. COLD SUNNY WINTER RESORT.
Pry climate, free from foe and sheltered from call
winds. Full of Vitality, and recommended by medical
authorities. All sorts of winter amusements—
• - f.-. :r.«. toboranntnic. theatres, balls, concerts, etc
First rate educational advantage?. Illustrated history
¦ent free. AJ rrc=^ CARL. LANDSKE. Hotel Tyrol.
I HOTEL DE LA VILLE7
It/l # i Railway Tickets.
Milan, L^ : -rV' r: -;:- M « M .
The Baur au Lac,
SBT"" Zurich.
Gd. HOTEL NATIONAL,
Lt'CERNE.
ITALY AND SOUTH OF FRANCE.
"EDEN PALACE,"
STANDING ..v rA ftA .
BEA V TIFUL PRJ TE PARK. UV 1 1 UO«
HOTEL p^~
royal DANIELS
ALL, MODERN COIfFORTS. f __ _ „
NEWLY REFITTED. *^O Lifts.
Venice. J;::.:r^
1 WHIVV* J Railway Ticket*.
GRAND HOTEL,] Xr
Venice. L Appointed
Urns a Fromtmg* of 300 Foot o*\ A. PU.MTI,
tArn Grmu<X C*a*l. i MflMfMk
11

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