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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 17, 1901, Image 1

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V OL LXI N° 20.02!*.
MOURNING ALL ALONGTHE WAY
PROGRESS OF THE M'KIXLEY FUNERAL TRAIN FROM
BUFFALO TO WASHINGTON.
GREAT DEMONSTRATIONS OF LOVE AND REVERENCE.
The body of President McKinley was taken from the City Hall in Buffalo
yesterday morning and escorted to the railroad station, where It was placed on
board the funeral train, which started for Washington at 8:34 a. m. It was
accompanied by Mrs. McKinley and the members of the family. President
Rooseve't, members of the Cabinet and personal friends.
The honor and love which the inhabitants of this country bore to the late
President were touchingly shown by the crowds which, with bared heads, lined
almost the entire route from Buffalo to Washington. Silence and reverence
marked the demeanor of all the spectators.
SCEXES AT DEPARTURE AND ON THE ROUTE.
[BY TELF.GRAFH TO THE TRIBrVE.]
Washington, Sept. — A touching and mighty
tribute of love and reverence was paid to the
ration's dead President to-day all the way from
Buffalo to Washington. He drew men to him
In life: in death he seems to have reached out
from the further shore and clutched the very
heartstrings of the living. The train seemed
hardly at any time to be out of sight of bared
heads. Even when the solid string of Pullmans
wearily climbed over th«» back of the Al'.e
ghanles and plunged down the heavy grade or.
the bank of the sinuous and musical Sinne
mahoning into the beautiful valley of the west
branch of the Susuqehanna. men were there to
do reverence to the illustrious dead.
There was a new President on the selfsame
train; a Governor, Senators and soldiers of
national fame gave to the living freight ¦
character of rare distinction, but the nation's
heart was in the last car. In a black casket,
¦star a sheaf of ripened wheat.
THE NATION'S LOVE SHOWN.
It must have been a soothing day to Mrs. Mc-
Kinley. Bracing air a:.d sunshine, the presence
. of tried friends and the memory of a great
¦ presence were all hers. Perhaps more than all
was th» mute but unmistakable love of those
who never saw her husband face to face. These
were they who, not knowing, still had great
faith and love. That was the touching part of
!t all. Now and then an urchin would forget
hjmself and break out with a cheer, but this
' happened only twice. The great masses were
silent and reverential. ¦ • • *
While the Pullmans were clicking over . the
rails down the Elope of the Alleghanies, In
Northwestern Pennsylvania, a curve was round
ed, and there, high on the bank, silhouetted
against early fall foliage, stood two hundred be
grimed Polish and Hungarian coal miners, with
heads bared and limbs almost as rigid as if
carved out of rock — hundred smooty faced
rebukes to the assassin in the Buffalo cell. It
was a picture in white and black, indelibly
flashed Into the memories of those on the funeral
train. ¦
SCENES ALONG THE LINE.
There were other pictures that touched the
heart. Deep In the heart of a strip of wood
west of Renova, perched on the bank against a
background of purple asters and wild caraway,
stood a stalwart woodsman with his wife, and
In the mother's arms was a chubby baby. The
man's hat was off, and the mother's han«"
moved that of the baby in a silent godspeed.
Back in an open field, thirty rods from the rail
road tracks, just west of Sunbury, stood a
country schoolhouse. The American flag was
at halfmast from the school flagstaff, and the
boys and girls were all clinging to the top board
'' the fence, like a string of birds to a limb.
Down In Sunbury village there was a row of
children four hundred feet in length. The hands
of the youngsters kept evenly suspended stream
ers of red. white and blue bunting.
At Port Allegheny men, boys and girls vented
their patriotism first by standing at attention
** the train slowed up. and. second, by gather
ing in a bountiful supply of souvenirs. Pennies
&M dimes and quarters were placed on the
rails. The car wheels flattened them out. Stick
pins and ornaments were to be made from some
of these coins and others were tucked away.
Heneoforth they will i- M<-Kinley souvenirs."
West of Williamsport workmen are construct
ing a new railroad bank. As the train passed
two or three hundr»J foreign born laborers.
spades In hand, stood at attention, with heads
barM
ROUTE LINED WITH PEOPLE.
si US walls and fences alongside the track
••re crested with people near all the villages.
The farmer ploughing alone in the middle of a
ftp acre lot knew the train. Over and over
. again men working in the fields, sometime*
aim-.*- obscured by trees, could be observed
"landing with bared heads as the train passed.
There were indications that in many instances
••Bs* distances had been travelled to obtain a
fluting glimpse of the train.
There was in it all the reminder of a partial
i " r of gratitude which the reverent spectator
¦»S trying to pay. Mechanics stood within the
•had v , of new shops made possible by the
•ifitocraft of the dead President. There was a
I'-ok of splendid and lofty reverence on the
*'•-• of bare armed workmen, with tasks un
fi °n». as if they would proclaim to those in the
;, »in and to their neighbors that McKinley
. *•' one who had made their lives happier, as if
'¦ *Wf. £°!? nd ' Poland! Poland! Poland! .
ru^ft natural Spring water in the world.-Advt.
AC * ORB THK CONTINENT ON A PENNSTI
. VAN!/, RAILROAD TOUR. BNNBYL
*^'v"ana' r ,h;Vr r^? ny conducted tour to Call
*«T York v,^m V a ?, on " Arlz will leave
they were in partnership with him. as if thpy
realized what Whittler meant when he wrote:
Like warp and woof all destinies are woven fast.
Locked In sympathy like the keys of an organ vast.
Pluck one thread and the web ye mar;
Mreak but one of a thousand keys and the paining
Jar
Through all will run.
The solemnity was accentuated at Harrtabuig
when there was borne on the air from the
breasts of fifteen thousand people the strain=
>f one of the President's favorite songs, "Nearer.
My God, to Thee." President Roosevelt's eye!
isrew moist a.« he looked at the boys and girls
waving their Stars and Stripes. "How very'
wonderful and impressive." said Senator Fair
j! anks to Senator Hanna. The only rejoinder
lot the Ohio Senator was, "And the best of all
iis, he was worthy of It all."
REVERENCE IN ALL SECTIONS.
I The night came on, lights made the car? more
jbrilliant. Looking out into the twilight th"
[scenes of the day were all repeating themsplive*.
jThe heart of the lumberman on the tributaries'
I J
if the Susquehanna was no more responsive
¦than the farmers and villagers of the Dutch]
| ttlements In the southeastern part of the
iState. On station platforms were men and
]women and children. It mattered not that noj
lone inside the cars could see them plainly. The
[doty of the day was to stay and see the funeral
train and wish peace and happiness to those
who, on account of kinship, most keenly felt
his loss.
FUNERAL TRAJX START*.
.MOURNFUL PROCESSION THROUGH B UK-IS
---- '•¦¦ ¦ rV
FALO'S STREETS. . &|
Buffalo. Sept. 16.— The silent form of "William?!
McKinley was borne from this city in imprtF-9
sive state this morning and taken on its last^N '•
journey to the national capital. Thousands jgj'
upon thousands watched the impressive pruees-jS
sion this morning moving toward the railroad
station. Buffalo stirred early this morning, but%
eager as its inhabitants were to secure a place?!
from which to view the departure of the I*rc-si-E>
dent's body, police and soldiers had anticipated^?
them. At the Milburn house, where the family
at the dead statesman slept; at the Wilcox&i
a house, where the new President reposed, <mdH
downtown near the City Hall, where the ailentjj^
form of Mr. McKinley lay, the guards wereflj
formed early and the streets were kept clear ofll
¦ people. It was not a particularly pleasantß
Jrnorning. The sun shone, but the wind blew inß
-t'ung and litful gusts, tearing down the mourn-B
ling draperies and raising clouds of dust. a*
I TENDER CARE FOR MRS. M'KINLEY. M
8 At the Milburn house the servants were astlrH
s:"»rly and there was more activity than has beenj^j
seen since the shooting. By 0:30 o'clock trans-©
jfer wagons and carriages were drawn up at thf»^J
scorners near the house and those within were&'
•up and preparing for the journey to "Washing- X
ton. Mrs. McKinley was not awakened untiin»a
after 7 o'clock, when Dr. Rixey went to '-hcß
room with one of her attendants. She had no ing
slept well despite the fact that she is almost tx-K
'Shausted and that Dr. Rixey had given her aR
sleeping potion. The first thing she asked was-flp
a repetition of the query of the last two days.B
'When can I tee the Major?" Dr. Rixey toldpjj
her that they were going to let her see him to-agj
day. She then allowed her attendants to dresK2&j
her, and at 7:4T» was ready for her light break
fast, which she took In her room alone. At 7:.'i<v|j
the baggage was ready and two truckloads of it»ij|
were taken to the station. In one wagon was ;ipp3
hospital bed, and it was thought that this wasFSJ
for use if the journey fatigued Mrs. Me Kin!' yu
Colonel Binghain, who was in charge of the ar-RJS
rangements. said at 7:4.") that none of the party||j
would go to the City Hall where the body l<'» v .raj
but that all would go directly to the train. Thisgl
was done particularly to spare Mrs. McKinloy.gSj
At 7 '¦'•'- the Misses Duncan, nieces of the Pr<"-:-i IE
dent, were driven to the train, so that theyß-1
might make the car ready for Mrs. McKinleywl
with those little touches that only women know.l|l
A few minutes later Senator Fairbanks, Con-R$
troller Dawes and Elmer Dover, secretary tegs
.Senator Hanna. came from the house and <n-ES
tered a carriage. A White House messen^erEa
rushed down the walk and ordered the win.l;r.\
in one of the carriages closed. pa
LEAVING THE MILBURN HOUSE. E3
At precisely 7:35 o'clock a pathetic proces-H
-i<-«n left the house and walked to the ear-pa
riages. Mrs. stcKinley, in mourning, and sup-|||
ported by Abner McKinley on one Bide and Dr.B
Rixey on the other, was the central figure. Tola
the surprise of all, she walked briskly, with herß
head erect. Her long black veil was down, soH
that her face could not be seen. She enteredM
the carriage with her niece. Miss Barber; AbnerS3
McKlnley and Dr. Rixey, and they were drivenH
at once to the station. The family of AbnerH
McKinley, other relatives of the dead PresidentH
and Secretary Cortelyou followed in other car-W
riages. and the Milburn house went back lntoH
the possession of its owner, who had given itRJ
(Continued on second pace.) raj
Poland! Poland! Poland! Poland! §1
Purest natural Spring water in the world.— Advt. Hi
THE PHILIPPINES. CHINA AND JAPAN yj
•re best reached by the "Overland Limited" to S.mß
Francisco via the Chicago an.l North- Western^!
Union l'.tisfi<- .'lnri Southern Paeliii- Kys. and fastiß
steamers beyond. Diversity of routes. Particulars^
'it North-Western Line Office. 461 Broadway.— Advt.g
AUTUMN TOUR TO THE PACIFIC COAST. B
Pennsylvania Railroad thirty day personally con-B]
ducted tour to California and the Grand Canon ofM
Arizona. Leaves New York by special train Scp-S3
t ember 23. Kouad trip rate JlSs.— AdvL £,
NEW-YORK. TUESDAY. SKITKMHKR IT. 1001. - FOURTEEN PAGES.-»T». c ?ffi£Y.?£w
SAILORS CARRYING THE (Oil IN INTO THE BUFFALO CITY HALL THROUt4H
A DOWNPOUR OF RAIN.
MR. ROOSEVELT'S POLICY
THK PRESIDENTS PLANS FORM
COUNTRY'S WELFARE. \-
WILL FOLLOW EXAMPLE OP HIS PKKI>
i ECESSOR IN FOREIGN AND
DOMESTIC AFFAIRS.
Buffalo. .Sept. 18. — President Roosevelt has out
|lined in some detail the policy he will follow
during his Incumbency of office, it will
membered that only a few moments before he
took the oath of office he stated definitely:
"It shall be my aim to continue absolutely
unbroken the policy of President ftfcKinley for
the peace" (and be emphasised the word), "pros
parity and honor of the ¦• nu.t'- .-•
Yesterday the President fathered together
some personal friends in Buffalo and those
members of the Cabinet who were her- ;-.;•.. il
gave to them such Ideas as he had alread) •¦¦ ¦
iablished for the conduct Of public affairs and
his own policy. In no sens-- are tbe\ divergent
from what has been understood as Mr Me
Kinleys policy. This policy, as outlined to hi.-
friends at yesterday's conference, was a.s Esi-i
hows:
i A more liberal mm* ex t<Mi«l reciprocity .*'
I r^
ill the purchase nml mile of eoni in oil 1 1 1 ho M
'that (he overproduction at thin country ran '•
In- «HtiMl':i<-t<>ril v il i-.|ii<M-il of li> fair nntl:^
equitable an-uiiKemeiilM with foreign cou«i-J..i
j tries. p
1 The abolition entirely of < ..in in .• r.i.i 1 «ar|
; ,*£»
I with oilier countries ami tin- adoption of
; reciprocity tre«tie». jjl
j The abolition of Mitch lartwii on forelKi>s*
....<>. l- ii h are no liiiikit needed for revenue. V
If nueli abolition ciin he had without luiriiiy
I
ito thin country* industries anil labor. •''_•
< y*i
; Direct commercial linen to he established ¦
[between the eastern coiul of the i alteslH
Mate* and the pi. its lii South \imll<ll. II 11(1
[the Pacific Count ports' itmt Mexico, 4 e-i-«jj
Irnl Amerlcn. anil South America. '.'
| The pncourneiiiK of the me n- Ii aii iinirliiffj
j Jf
:in<i the iiiiii.iiiii-. or shtas which mliiill carry #
[the Antcrlcnu Unit I nil he owned ami con- *
'trolled hy Amcrlcan« nnd American .-npllal. I
i The ItuilillriK anil completion as mooii ii i i' "j
iiponHlble of the isthiui in canal, ho an to « i c j
.lirect writer communication with the coasts* "i
of Central America, outh America ami ,-j
Mexico. $
The construct lon of a cable, owned l>> the j.
j \r!
government, connecting the li In ml of I lie '¦"
I'nlteil Staten with foreign possessions, nota-
' lily Hawaii "mi the Philippines. |
The use of conciliatory methods of arhitrn-
lion In all dispute* with foreign mitioiis no
an to avoid armed Strife, ¥f
The protection of the Having" of the people jj
in bunks and In other forni.l of Investments Kf
by the preservation of the commercial pros- I
parity of the country and the placing in !••> -X
sltioiiH Si trust men of only the highest In- I
tesrlty. Xi
MRS. M*KINLEY*S CONDITION.
STANDING THE DREADFUL ORDEAL
WELI,— FEARS FOR THE FUTURE.
Washington. Sept. Hs.— Mrs. McKlnley' has
stood the strain of the trying ordeal following
the death of the President without breaking
down, and her physician. Dr. Rixey, is encour
aged to believe that she will go through the
state ceremonial without collapse.
The half hour she spent beside the coffin on
the train this morning was followed by a period
of depression, but Dr. Rixey induced her to jleep
this afternoon. Now that she has gone through
the trials and fatigues of yesterday and to
day, those nearest to her feel there is little seri
ous danger of Immediate collapse. Their dread
Is for the future. When the nerve tension of!
the present ordeal is over, and when the widow
is back alone in the old house at Canton, with
the flood of reflection and realization that must
come upon her, then .
Poland! Poland! Poland! Poland!
Pure* natural Bprlns Water in the world.— AH. t.
BKAUTIFUL . PICTURE) OF M'KINLEY.
appropriate for decorative purposes. Reproduction
of oil painting 1:1 seven colors. Price, ten cents.
Discount to dealers. Judge Company, 110 Fifth Aye.
-Advt. SHSBSSBIFSIBHi
The most possible pleasure for J /# is the Day
Una Steamers* West Point or -Newburgr excursion.
Grand Scenery. Delightful music A. M. & P. M.
¦Advt.
CZOLGOSZ INDICTED.
Ml RDERER OF PRESIDES!
ARRAIGNED IX COURT.
•ASSASSIN REFUSES TO ANSWER QUES-'
TIONS— EX-JUDGES LEWIS AND I
TITUS NAMED AS COUNSEL. \
[BT TELEORArn TO THE TIUBCNE.J J
Buffalo, Sept. While the lifeless body of
President McKlnley was on its way from this
•city to Washington. Leon Czolgosz, the Presi
dent's murderer, was indicted by an Erie County'
grand jury for murder In the first degree, ar
raigned before County Judge Edward K. Emery.
and. evidently with the purpose of feigning in-
M«ity, stood stolid and speechless before the
court', refusing to open his lips i*» answer to all
questions put to him.
| The examination of the witnesses before the
grand Jury, the arraignment of the prisoner, his
sudden appearance in the courtroom and his
disappearance again to his place of mysterious!
[concealment, were all done so quickly and clev
erly by the officials in charge of the ease that
[the busy city scarcely had an inkling of what
Iwai going on, and. aside from those associated!
[with the court machinery, not one hundred. peo
'pie knew that this all important work was
being done.
i At 111 p. m. the grand jury left the Jury
'room in the District Attorney's office and
(walked through the second floor corridor to
[the County Court room, where Judge Emery;
'was waiting for them. There were not a dozen'
people In the room. The usual form of report-!
Ing the indictment was gone through with, and
I j
the jury was excused. Judge Emery remained,!
[together with Frank Haggerty. the court ste-.
[nographer, and a few clerks, for they knew that
[within the next hour the assassin would be
brought In and the first important step in the
great trial would be taken.
CONFINED IN THE PENITENTIARY.
I The fact that Czolgosz had been Indicted
soon spread through the building, and a crowd
Dt small proportions began to assemble in the
courtroom. Every one wanted to get a glimpse
of the wretch who had committed the cowardly
murder, and beyond that every one was inter
ested to know from what hiding place he would
appear, as the spot of his confinement has been
a mystery since the day before the President
died. On Friday morning last, when the Presi
dent's life was despaired of. the murderer was
stealthily removed from Police Headquarters,
md since then no one has been able to learn
whore he was confined. Some have said that ho
.vas confined in the jail in Delaware-aye., up
pottte the City Hall; others have insist.-.! that
he was in the penitentiary in another part of the
<ity, while others have declared that he was
shut up in one of the strong buildings at Fort
Porter, the United States Army post on th>
banks of the Niagara River. The manner in
which he was produced in court to-day would
seem to prove beyond question that he had been
kept in the penitentiary. There 13 a* secret un
derground passageway extending from the City
Hall to the jail, and it was through this pas
sageway that Czolgosz was brought this after*
noon.
LED OVKR SPOT WHBI VICTIM LAV
Unexpectedly he was led up the stairs from
the basement of the City Hall, hand- ¦uff-d to
Detectives Geary and Bull'van. and as he was
conducted across the first floor to the stairway
leading to th»» courtroom he walked over the
very spot where the President's body lay last
night, and as he turned a corner by one of
the pillars it was necessary for him to lower his
head to prevent a fold Of the crape still fes
tooned upon the wall EMM brush ine his faro.
It is now admitted that he has been con-
(< onftuntMl on Sriond Putte.t
Poland! Poland! Poland! Poland!
Purest natural Spring water in the world.— Advt.
A.NOTHER PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD TOUR
A TO CALIFORNIA
Leaves New York by Special Pullman train Septem
ber ¦ Only $!"¦" round trip. Thirty days of trans
continental sightseeing.— Advt.
IX WHITE HOUSE AGAIN
Where McKinley Lived as President
His Body Lies.
READY FOR STATE FUNERAL TO-DAY
The body of President McKinley arrived in Washington at 8:38 o'clock last
night, and was escorted to the White House, where it remained over night,
At 9 o'clock this morning the body wi'l be taken to the Capitol, whera
funeral services will be held in the rotunda. After the services the body will lie
in state the remainder of the day. In the evening it will be again placed on
the funeral train and conveyed to Canton, where the burial will take place
on Thursday.
THE NATION'S CAPITAL RECEIVES ITS HONORED DEAD.
Try TTLEGHAPH TO THE TRIBI'.VE-l
Washington, Sept. 18.— William McKinley's
body rests to-night in the White House, whose
walls for more than four years knew him as
master. Late this evening, after an all day
ride from Buffalo, his coffin was carried across
the threshold of the Executive Mansion, which
he left two months ago in the plenitude of
health, power, energy and fortune. Under the
massive chandelier In the East Room, in the
same spot where Lincoln's body lay before it
was taken to the Capitol for funeral honors, the
dead President is to wait the hour when he.
too. is to make his last journey behind muffled
• Irums up the stately avenue which links the
,Federal capital's two chief centres of thought
land action, the seat of executive with that of
[legislative and judicial power. The vast East
Room, which has glittered with the changing
[fashions of a century; which has seen the life
jof the capital and of the nation reflected in the
stir and brilliance of its social gatherings:
which has echoed to thousands of voices of
igayety, of sadness, of frivolity, of diplomatic
compliment and of grave and subtle statecraft,
is again turned Into a silent chamber of mourn
in?:, whose occupants watch noiselessly at the
bier of the ruler the nation has steadfastly
(trusted and exalted.
| Very appropriately the White House is closed
to visitors, only the dead President's wife and
the intimate friends of his household sharing
his last hours in the home in which he spent the
four crowning years of his career as a leader of
the people.
I In compliance with the later and simpler
plans for the funeral determined on in Buffalo,
no ceremonious display marked the reception to
night of the funeral party and the transfer of
the body of the dead President from the rail
road station to the White House. Some mili
tary honors could not be avoided, but, so far
as practicable, the capital's official and public
tribute was held strictly within bounds. In to
morrow's ceremony all branches of the gov
ernment will unite to do homage to the charac
ter and services of a chief magistrate whose
virtues show all the more pure and lustrous
against the blackness of the crime which cut
him off at the very apogee of reputation and
usefulness.
SAP MARCH TO UIIITF HOUSE
* PRESIDENT M'KINLEY'S BODY BORXEI
THROUGH PENNSYLVANIA-AYE.
iBT TELECHAPH TO TIIK TKIBD.NE.I
Washington, Sept. 16. — Never until to-night
did a President of the United States traverse
the magnificent stretch of Pennsylvania-aye.
between walls of his fellow citizens without re
ceiving a cheer or a handclap. That was the
experience of President Roosevelt. But he was
preceded by the hearse which bore to the White
House for the last time all that is mortal of
his predecessor, and tens of thousands of men
and women stood mute and motionless. More
tear dimmed eyes than ever before gazed upon
a spectacle on the capital's splendid through
fare followed this impressive procession.
Save the clatter of horses' feet and the half
muffled roll of wheels, not a sound was heard
during the entire progress from the Pennsyl
vania station to the White House that a little
more than two months ago was left tenantless
by the departure of the republic's chosen leader
for his simple cottage home among his lifelong
friends and neighbors in Ohio in the hope there
¦I building up his wife's pitifully depleted
strength. As the hearse, drawn by four horses,
swung slowly into the White House grounds
from Pennsylvanla-ave. there broke from IsM
throng that lined the street the soul moving
melody of "Nearer. My God, to Thee." In soft,
tremulous, subdued tones the old hymn was
chanted, and in gentle waves the strains swept
down the great lines of people that stretched In
measureless numbers down from the White
House almost to the Capitol. It was the song
the dead President loved most— the song that
swelled his throat when his voice was almost
too weak to chant it on his bed of pain when
the doctors told him that his life could not be
saved. And as the melody rolled from group to
group throughout the city women wept aloud,
and men. rough featured and grizzled, once
Poland! Poland! Poland: Poland:
'urest natural Sprtni; water In the world.— Advt
WASHINGTON TRAINS VIA NEW JERSEY
CENTRAL.
Washington trains via- the New Jersey Centra!
from Liberty Street Station. North River. 12:15. 4:30,
tloe 10:00. 11:30 A M . 1:00. 1:30. 3:40. 5:00. 7:00 P. M.
Modern and improved parlor and sleeping cars. Un
excelled Dining Service and superb through coach
equipment.— Advt. ; I
PRICE THREE CENTS.
more bared their heads and bent their bodies
in silent supplication.
SORROW TOO DEEP FOR DISPLAY.
There was no notable display of the physical
signs of sorrow. The building from which*
drooped black crape was the exception. Instead!
of this usual emblem of mourning, the starry:
banner of the republic floated at halfmast from
roofs and windows. The air was soft and
balmy, and from a cloudless sky the very stars
seemed to shine with unaccustomed dimness.
After the procession started from the railroad*
station not a sound marred the awful solemnity.
People a block away from the line of march?
would not have been aware of any movement ors 1
the great broad avenue but for the presence of
the crowds and the occasional glint of a bayonet!
and sabre as soldiers and sailors marched withl
slow, measured tread. The hush that fell upon
the city when it was known that the train bear
ing the body of the martyred President had ar
rived was scarcely relieved, even after th^
hearse had conveyed its precious burden to thai
doors of the White House, and the huge gate*
of the Executive Mansion yard, that seldom ara
closed, were swung together to keep back th»
vast multitude that swept slowly toward th»
forbidden ground. The population of Washing
ton and the many thousands .-•- visitors quietly,;
uncomplainingly turned their footsteps toward'
their homes and hotels. leaving the downtown
streets of the city almost deserted before 1O
o'clock.
It was at Mrs. M.-Kinley's request that the
grounds were kept clear of the crowds. She
wanted to have the White House to herself and
her sorrow for to-night. To-morrow she will;
turn her dead husband over to the nation, and}
in the great rotunda of the Capitol, under the*
vast dome, the people who loved and nonoredU
him in life will have an opportunity to pay the
¦
last evidence of their respect. Then she will
take him to her home in the little Ohio town
where they were married, and where she ex-i
pected to round out their happiness after he had!
retired from the stupendous work of the chief
magistracy of the nation, and to bury him ben
side the graves of their two children and of hisl
father and mother.
Standing watch over the bier in the huge,?
dimly lighted East Room of the White Housrf.
to-night are hale and hardy soldiers, sailors and?*
marines, old and gray and bent comrades of thai
Grand Army of the Republic, and members ot\
the Loyal Legion. They will keep their sad ;
vigil until morning, and then, to the accom
paniment of muffled drums, the bier will b4T;
borne to the Capitol, where the funeral services^
will be held, and the body will lie in state until*
to-morrow evening.
ARRIVAL OF THK BODY.
ESCORTED BY MILITARY FROM RAIL*
ROAD STATION TO WHITE HOUSE.
Washington. Sept. 10.— The train bearing;
President McKinley's body arrived at the Penn
sylvania Railroad station at 8:38 p. m. Th*
streets around the station and Pennsylvania-.
aye. to beyond the White House were densal
with people waiting to view the march to the*;
White House.
Mrs. McKlnley and the first mourning party
from Buffalo arrived at the White House at
•¦> :.J. The shades of Mrs. McKinley's carriage
were closely drawn and under the most strln-.
gent orders from Secretary Cortelyou abso-,
lutely no others than officials were admitted j
.-yen to the White House grounds. Amongj
those in the carriages which drove up with Mrs.
McKinley were several members of the Cabi
net, Dr. Mas] and several White House at
tache's.
Meanwhile the coffin was being removed from
the observation car.- One of the large windows
was lowered at the side, and slowly and care
fully the coffin was slipped out through the
opening and tenderly received on the bent shoul
ders of the body bearers. Four artilleryman
from Fort M Henry were on the right and four
sailors on the left. Straightening themselves
under their burden, they walked slowly toward
the hearse. Before the coffin marched four oifi
, . ; .; m ,;..•¦ Parker. Colonel Bingham. Oap'.ain
liilnioreaiid Major McCauley. anil in that order,
while the officers on either side and in the en- '
trance stood with uncovered heads, the body,
was carried to Sixth-st. and placed in the hearae-
As the coffin emerged a bugle note arose cleirly
and "taps" rang out. That was the only sound
that broke the dead silence.
Just beyond the entrance to the station Presi
dent Roosevelt with the. members of the Cabi
net had paused <in.i had taken station so as to
leave a broad space for the funeral procession, i
Poland! Poland! Poland! Poland!
Purest natural Spring water in the world.— Advt.
P\CIFIC COAST AND THE GRAND CANON OP
ARIZONA.
I Pennsylvania Railroad personally conducted tour
leaves New York by special train September sV
Round trip rate only Jlßs.— Advt.

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