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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 05, 1902, Image 3

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MR. CARNEGIE'S GIFT.
CORPORATION TO ACT AS TRUSTEE OF
THE $10,000,000 FUND FORMED.
Washington. Jan. — Secretary Hay and a
number of others interested in the Carnegie
project of a national university met at the State
Department to-day and formed a corporation
known as the Carnegie Institution. It is under
stood that Mr. Carnesie has removed the ob
stacles that existed to the acceptance of his
110,000,000 gift to the cause of education, and
to-day's action was the first step toward giving
ie?al form and substance to the proposition.
Besides Secretary Hay. the incorporators, all
of whom were present at to-day's meeting, are
Edwin D. White. Justice of the Supreme Court;
p. c. Oilman. president of Johns Hopkins
University; Charles D. Walcott, Superintendent
of the Geological Survey; John S. Billings, ex-
Furpeon general of the navy, and Carroll D.
•p/right, Commissioner of Labor. Marcus Baker,
of the Coast Survey, also was present, not as an
incorpora or, but charged with the preparation
of the articles of incorporation.
The meeting lasted about an hour. Those
present were not disposed to discuss the details
of the project, desiring to allow Mr. Carnegie
himself tc make the public announcement.
The articles of incorporation of the Carnegie
Institution were filed with the Recorder of
Deeds in this city to-day. The articles fix the
came and title of the institution as "The Car
negie Institution," and show that it Is organized
"for a perpetual term." Its objects are the pro
motion of study and research, the power to
acquire, hold and convey real estate and other
property, and to establish general and special
funds; to assist investigations In science or art;
to co-operate with government?, universities,
colleges, technical schools, learned societies and
Individuals; to appoint committees of experts
to direct special lines of research, publish and
distribute documents, conduct lectures and hold
meetings, acquire and maintain a library, and
In general to do and perform all things neces
sary tn promote tne objects of said institution.
The affairs, funds and property of the cor
poration will be In general charge of a board of
trustees, to consist in the first year of twenty
seven and thereafter not to exceed thirty mem
bers, except by a three-quarters vote of the
board.
The preamble of the articles of incorporation
Is as follows:
TTe. the undersigned, person? of full Re and
citizens of th»» X'nited States, and a majority of
rtomar^ citizens of the District of Columbia
beta* desirous to establish and maintain in th ctj
ef Washington, In the spirit of Washington, an ln
etitutlon for promoting original research In »^nce.
literature and art, do hereby associate ourselves as
p hodv corporate for said purposes under anact to
tstablish a cod- of law for the District of Colum
bia approved March 3. 1901. Sections 599 to 604. !n
clusrve.
In pursuance of that act the provisions and
purp O!ses a'-eady mentioned are set forth briefly
In four articles.
The meeting to-day at which the Incorpora
tion crystallized was the result of a number of
informal conferences held by the corporators.
•*mo vre selected personally by Mr. Carnegie.
The definite form in which the gift of Mr. Car
negie -will be made has not been announced, al
though, according to those Irterested in the
project, it will be in a shape generally satis
factory. It Is understood that 11 will be in the
form of eilt edged securities, but not of gov
ernment issue, in view of the greater income
X>ald by outside securities. The further develop
ment of the project now awaits Mr. Carnegie's
outline of his Ideas and purposes. The next
srtep will be the organization of a board of trus
tees. These doubtless will include the present
corporators and other representative men from
all parts of the country. This will bo in line
\rlth the policy pursued in organizing the board
•lor the Carnegie Institution in Scotland.
JXSPECTIOX OF DAIRY PRODUCTS.
THE AGRICULTURAL. DEPARTMENT'S NEW
SYSTEM GOING INTO EFFECT SOON.
[by TELEGRAPH to THE TRIBUNE. ]
WaFhlni?ton, Jan. i.— lt the present plans of the
Dairy Division of the Department of Agriculture
do rot bo awry, the latter part of next week—cer
tainly by the first of the following one— the in
spection of dairy products intended for export will
he beffun at the dps] seaport cities, as well as
fit the larger interior ones. It was the Intention of
Major Alvord. the chief of the Dairy Division, to
)>epin this work on January 1, but the contractors
for printing the stamps and certificates to accom
pany the Inspection had failed to do as they
agreed, and thus delayed the beginning of the
service. The stamps are now at the Department
of riculture, and they will be sent to the In
spectors, tocrher with letters of Instruction, by
the middle of next week. They are printed along
the same general lines as those adopted by the
Bureau of Animal Industry Cof which the Dairy
Division is a branch! for th«* inspection of meats
br:4 meat products intended for export. The stamp
which will be attached to the butter tubs, boxes of
cheese, ■ ■ .1- of a canary yellow color and of
simple design. It is about th« same shape and
riz<* as the meat stamps— -3^4 by .'' . inches. Ar
ranped within a border of simi ]•• yet pleasing de-
F-ipn is the legend, "Department of Agriculture.
Bureau of Animal Industry. Dairy Inspection
Stamp," with the signature, "James Wilson. Secre
tary." To the left of this legend, within the bor
der. Is the figure of an American eagle perched on
a pair of shields, while Immediately above It Is the
number of the stamp to serve as a means of iden
tification.
The certificate which accompanies each shipment
or invoice Is muck larger— 7 by I inches— and is of
a buff color. This paper Is an example of the
American designer's art. It is bordered by a more
t!;iborat<- design than the stamp, having within it
at the top a number nd at the bottom the mono
gram "I". S. A." Within the border, in tasteful
arrangement. In addition to blanks for the name of
Ifce city, St«ite and date of inspection, appear the
Kords:
.•'•ate of inspection of dairy products for
export. United .States Department of Agriculture,
Bureau of Ailm:. 1 Industry. This Is to certify
that of . bearing stamps numbered as
.r.tiiraterj on the margin herein, which are to be
exported by . and consigned to — , have
been innr»«*cte<i and stamped In conformity with
the requirements of the Act of Congress approved
March .*, IK:<], and amende*) March 2. 1901, and that
the said products re pure, of high quality and ap
proved for export. JAMES WILSON',
Secretary.
To th«» }pft of these words is a long column of
blank lines on Which the inspector whose name
appears at the bottom of the certificate writes the
PUmbera of the stamps on th<- packages In the in
voice. The certificate also bears in the upper cen
tre an engraving of a dairy cow.
Th. \ VESHEE A PPOIS 7 Ml. \ TS.
EX-OOXGRE&SMAN JI'CAIX TO SUCCEED COLLEC
TOR NUNN.
Waehlnston. Jan. 4.— President Roosevelt to-day
informed Representative Gibson, of Tennessee, that
ex-Rejires-entatiw John K. McCall, who was the
Republican candidate for Governor of Tennessee
*Salr.Kt Governor McMillin. would be appointed Col
lector of Inte.-na! Revenue for the vth Tennessee
District, t-. succeed David A. Sunn, who resigned
<jn lhurrday. Mr. Gibson was also Informed that
J*eneral John T. Wilder would be reai»j*ointed
{-"it ••! States Pension Agent at Knoxvllie. The
Knoicvillf agency disburses pension money for
*JBht Southern States.
ha.wa confess with thk president.
*'ashlngtoa,*Jaa. '• Sewstor Harms sad an <-x
conference wtth n«slil<iiil Etoosevdi t.,-d;iy.
- over Issjtncm appofntments arc- re
to St'nator Manna, as chairman c,f the He
11 National Committee, and these matters
••we uiui-r n«. nwsioii. Senator Hanna .said bIH
tisf.ic lory.
ADMIRAL REUEY SAILS FOR WOO-HVKO
Washington. Jan. a. —The Navy Department to
<;.;. received t , ; ,(j|. dispatch announcing the dt-
Purturt; of Rear Admiral Remey, aboard his rlag
•p. the Brooklyn, from Nagasaki, Japan, for
"00-Sun*. China. The Brooklyn will start home
*»"■<! with Admiral Remey soon after the Rain
vrta *' n)r " has been fitting out at the New- York
s* . ar C lv '" on the Asiatic Station. The question
wtn v, whether Rear Admiral Rodger* or Evans
not ,£?V cha . r Of the Philippine squHdron has
salt ,v C 1 •'••termlned. Rear Admiral Kvunn will
■»« about the middle of March for the Philippines.
- WANTED, A PRESIDENT. 11
MR. CHANDLER THINKS PRESENT METH
ODS SHOULD BE REFORMED.
Washington, Jan. 4.— "The Washington Post" will
print to-morrow an Interesting article by ex-Sena
tor William E. Chandler, president of the Bpanl.^h
• 'lrtims Commission, entitled "Wanted by the
I'nited States, a President " The article la an
arpumput for reform In the prrse^nt methods of
conducting executive business. Mr. Chandler as
serts that a Prp>Ulfnt has now only three objects
WHISTLER'B "T/AVP AT.OrSTTTVNR"
Which has i-:.-t l«en sold to I. H. Whlttemore, of Kaugatuck, <"onn
(Copn ' . Nt ■» Vi "« i
In lif<>— first, to s«*« twenty thousand people a year;
second, to accomplish two thousand li tic things,
and, third, to try to do two hundred great things.
In- seeing so many thousands of people about
trivial matters and in giving hi"- attention to the
thousands of little thine*. the President, Mr.
Chandler Insists, !<• worn out and becomes physi
cally unable to grapple with the great problems to
which he ought to live his undivided attention.
Mr. Chandler cites from personal knowledge the
cases of Presidents who nave almost succumbed
under the strain, Instancing particularly President
Arthur. In whose Cabinet be was Secretary of the
Navy, and President McKlnley, to whose Impaired
health Mr Chandler attributes Inability to recover
from the shock of the assassin's bullet. Mr. Chan
dler expresses his regret that President Roosevelt.
"even with ins quickness, i.' acuti ■ - and his
present untiring Industry and unbounded energy,
has given countenance to the idea that he will do
all the appointing himself and hear all that any
one. has to Fay concerning any appointment."
Mr. Chandler thinks that '■■• great weight of the
pressure for office ought to fall on the Cabinet
ministers, and the President ought lo have more
time for Important things.
"What is wanted in the person of Mr. Roose
velt," says Mr. Chandler, "and in every other per
son whom the twentieth century may .-•■•• In the
White Home, Is a President who will be allowed to
serve the who!" people with all his heart and
strength, with ail ..i- mind and body, In the dis
charge of hiR official duties, unhindered by the
pressure upon him of bo many thousands of his
countrymen as have in ■ ■•■• .■ years encroached
upon the time and patience of our Presidents and
kept them from their public work or compelled
them to do It by Impairing t hi. 1 r physical health
and overstraining their mental powers. The time
has come when access to the President, except at
public receptions, should be limited to the Cabinet
ministers. Senators, Representatives and Ambassa
dors, and to such other persona only as are given
interviews for public purposes after written appli
cations have been received and carefully consid
ered. The public receptions of the President should
be few. and there should be no intensions upon his
social life, which he should be allowed to regulate
according to hlr own will and pleasure, and no
person should take offence because not Invited to
his presence or find fault with his selection of his
company, whatever may be its race or color. This
needed change of custom will at first, no doubt. 1*
unpopular. It will be condemned as unrepubllcan
exclustvenes*. It will require to begin the new
rule, a President who has been a man of the peo
ple, who Is known to be at heart thoroughly demo
cratic In all his Ideas and ways, and who is also
strong in his convictions and fearless in his ac
tions. Is not Mr. Roosevelt such .1 {'resident?
Will he Inaugurate the reform ?"i
COMMIBBIOXER VERKEti UPHELD.
STOCKS PLEDGED AS COLLATERAL MUST
PAY STAMP TAXES
Washington. Jan. I.— Attorney General Knox
has given an opinion in which he holds that the
certificate* of stock amounting to $25,000,000
proposed to he deposited by the Pennsylvania
Railroad Company with the Girard Trust Com
pany, trustee, as security for certain other cer
tificate* to be issued by the latter company for
the use of the railroad company are taxable un
der Schedule A of the act of June 13, 1898. and
now a part of the act of March -. 1901: The
amount of stamps required will be $80,000.
This opinion sustains Commissioner \Vrkes,
not only In this particular case, but also in his
ruling to the effect that stocks pledged us col
lateral on lime or call loans must be stamped.
Operators on the leading stock exchanges of the
country have vigorously opposed this view of the
law.
FIBHEBIEB CONGRESS M ST. PETERSBI RO
Washington, Jan. 4. The State Department has
been advised of the completion of arrangements
for the nt-xt annual session of the International
Congress of Fisheries and Fish Culture, to i>>- in id
at St. I'eterHburjr. Ttu- exhibition will open on
January 2fc. ami the iVongn is will assemble on
l-Vbruary tt, both closing on March 8. The eon
gresa will discuss questions pertaining to thepres
ent position and needs of Hsheitea and fish Indus
tries from scientific, economical, technical, indus
trial ami <oninieri-i.il point!) of \i-vv and will also
consider measures for the- Improvement of the**)
!ininch*-s erf Industry.
SAID IT WAS .1 COLD WORLD Wh MED.
St. i.ouis, jan 4 Henrj '' Tatunv aged flfty,
saarslsrjr and treasurer of the Western Commercial
Travellers' Association, was found dead in bed at
his home here to-day. He had bees ill for some
time. He left a wife »nd family. ||n Tatum said
that when her husl.in.i came horn- last night, at 11
o'clock, he said, "This Is h cold world "
A physician who was cail-<: to-day, when Ta
turn's dead body was found discovered an empty
bottle beside the bed which h-- sai<l h:id contain*-?
some kind of poison Mrs Tatum told ih~ doctor
that her h'i*batid hud sw.JluWcd the COnlSntS Oi
the bottle before he retired.
3TEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY. JANtt\lrtY 5. 1902.
"L' 4 XDALOrsiFXXE" ROLD.
WHISTL£R'B PAINTING BOUGHT BY JOHN H.
WHITTEMORE, OF NAUGATUCK, CONN.
It Is learne-fl that tho painting "I/Andalousi
e nn< ." by Whist U-r. which was on exhibition re
cently at th- Wunderlich Gallery, has been
bought l.y J. H. Wlttemore, of Naugatuok, < onn.
The purchase price- „f the rirtura has not been
Kiven. The painting is a full lenprth portrait of
a^'iman in black, who stands with her back to
the spectator, her face slightly turned toward
him. It attracted much attention here.
TO PIT COXCERTS AUAIXST. SALOONS.
A private charity ball i- to be given at the Wal
dorf on the evening of January 17, to be known as
the Knickerbocker Subscription Ball. The object
is the establishment of a series of concerts in the
tenement house distri'-ts. at a nominal i liars'* of ">
or 10 cents, as a substitute for saloons and low
resorts. Tills wot is In line with that carried on
by the University Settlement. _ If a hearty response
follows this appeal it Is proposed to make these
concerts permanent, the various nchoolhouses and
mission buildings throughout the city being utll-
Ized, as was cuggested by the Rev. Robert S.
Mac Arthur. Fifteen boxes have already been dis
posed of, and the affair promises to be ■ great suc
cess. Tickets are sold only to th -•• who are ap
proved by the. patronesses, to whom application
should be made. The boxes are MB and single
ti.-kets K.
The list of patrol is as follows:
Mrs. Robert K. Adanu. 1 Mrs. \V. >: >!1 C Phillips.
Mrs. Hermann M. m.'bks. Mn Orlandn B. (•.■?-.•!.
Mis. Frank !■:. Marker. Mm. John K. Parsons.
Mrs. Henry 1 .-,..... Mi. Wiriiam A. Parka
Mrs. Kush-ll Cnwlfs. \M' ■ Kr. •<!. rl.k Hewitt Parks.
Mrs. J..1111 Gibb. Mr-. K.in«r 1. I'Hrk.
Mrs. David H. Ivlson. , Mrs. R i»im II Knur.
Mr». Harry M. Johnson. > Mrs. G forge Moore Smith.
.Mrs. Edward Parla Jones. (Mrs. <;<•>, r«« \Vl!k!n!*m st/-t
Mr« Charles <;i!in<>ur Ker-j ion.
ley. Mrs, Frederick Pouiclas Un
Ml!.. Alt.ort KflinKh.un I>iw : derwood.
r«n<-«. 1 Mi> <'iiarl.-s IJnroln Weath-
Mrs. Kmeraon McMIIIIa I erbr-f.
Mr?, ll.irry c. McCoun, jr. Mrs. Harriion Williams.
Mrs. R <■•■!-( Nlc •!. |
NOT READY FOR "AL" \l>\\fs CASE.
IT IS ADJOURNED— "rOUCY KINO" BATS HIS DESK
CONTAINED J20.000 IN ''ASH.
"A!" ATJam.s and the sixteen other prisoners
taken in the policy raids made by the Society for
the Prevention of Crime on December 12 were
arraigned yesterday in the Court of Special Ses
sions, but on request of the District Attorney the
cases were adjourned until Saturday, January IS.
The District Attorney said that there had been so
many changes In his Office recently that he had not
been able to prepare the cases, and with the con
sent of James W. Ridc*ay, attorney for Adams,
they were adjourned.
Adams gave a list of the money and valuables
which he said were In his desk when the raid was
made on the place at No. .'..;•; West Thlrty-nrst-st
Frank Moss said that- only about $•_'(»() in money
was found there, but Adams says that he had In
Ins .1..-X .f.'it.diHi in cash, n:.o.ih»o in gold hearing Erie
first mortgage bonds negotiable. a. diamond ring
and a diamond collar button valued at $HM.
Mr. Ridgway asked for permission to see the
search warrant on which the premises were
searched, but as Mr. Qould, th«; clerk of the Court
'. I Special Sessions, was away, it could not bo
shown.
s/:\T ABROAD JO SETTLE STRIKE.
The local unions of glassblowera reported yester
day thai an arrangement ii.nl been reached between
the American Flint Class Workers' I'nion and the
Glass Bulb Manufacturers' Association which would
prevent a general strike In the trade. Some time
iiK" the glassblo>wen belonging to the union de
manded an Increase m wages of 14 per cent, and
several conferences were held between representa
tives of the union and th* association over the de
mand. The employers said that owing to Kuro
i .-an competition they were unable to grant the
demand.
An arrangement was reached by which each side
appointed a commissioner to ro to Europe and ln
vestigate the conditions under which the glass ln
candescent lißht bulbs are made. If the commis
sioner- rapt rt .-iKainnt an Increase the present
wages will continue. If they report in favor of an
increase the employers axs willing to grant it.
Each Mdc la willing to accept the decision of the
two commissioners.
ELEVATOR DROPS TWELVE STORIES.
BUGS and wink glasses are not cracked bt
Tin: FA IX— THE TEST WAS srr<?KSSFUi..
An Interesting test of the horse Safety Air
Cushion, an apparatus intended to prevent the
loss of life resulting from the falling of elevators,
was given at the Scott & Bownc Building. I'earl
and New-Chambers sts>., yesterday afternoon. a
large passenger elevator was suspended from the
twelfth floor of the building, then cut loose and
allowed to drop on a platform on which were
placed eggs, wine glasses and other fragile arti
cles. The trial was a complete success. The ele
vator crashed down with tremendous velocity upon
the cushions, but so completely did they check the
fall that the glasses were not even cracked, and
the pgxic. still unbroken, were banded round. a*
fcouvenlrs of Uie occasion*
Pleasure Planning for 1902
THE PIANOLA AJV
IMPOHTAJVT FEATWRE
Whether Self-Gratification or Entertainment for Others be the Consideration.
Most of the greatest living musicians,
the rulers and nobility of the old world,
and the cultured and refined of both
hemispheres have adopted and are using
the Pianola.
History contains no parallel to its sud
den and widespread growth in popular
esteem.
Its wonderful power to do away with
years of practice and make, in a few
flays, a musician and finished pianist of
any one. is the secret of its universal
acceptation.
There Is no Investment which you can Piayin* accompaniments with th« aid of the rtanoia. And there is bat one reason
make which will pay as large a dividend PR ITT Si 2SO the musle is hidden behind a technie. the
in pleasure as will the purchase of a ri\.ll/O &4DVJ. mastery of which but few people have
Pianola. It will give you the full use of Can ** bought by moderate monthly payments if desired. time to acquire.
The Pianola has changed all this, has slipped the holt, so to speak, unlocking the keys of the
piano and performing this same teehnle. With its aid any one can play any pinna, and play
upon it anything he desires to hear— the most difficult classic as easily as the simplest accom
paniment. He has all the pleasure of hand-playing because he controls the expression.
When you realize that for $250.00 you can obtain the Pianola, which will enable you. your
pelf, to play upon your piano everything ever written for that instrument, its purchase must
appeal to you as a practicable and profitable investment.
me AEOLIAN COMPANY. « ? w ff4>^-.MS rlu
w 657 Broad Street. Newark.
GOLD AND SILVER OITPCT.
A SLIGHT GAIN IN 1001 OVER THE PRECED
ING TEAS.
Washington, Jan. 4.— The preliminary estimate of
Mr. Roberts, the Director of the Mint, on the pro
duction of gold and lOver In the United States in
the calendar year 1&01 indicates only a slight gain
over the production of the preceding year. The
yield of Alaska fell off about $l,ooo,<yv>: Colorado
made a slight gain in gold, and the other producers '
were nearly stationary.
The yield of silver exceeded that of the previous
year by about 2.000.000 fine ounces. The total nutn
ter of ounces of tin., gild produced is shown to
have been 3.850.575, of the value of $50.218,5"0. The
number of fine ounces of silver produced was 59,653,
788, having a commercial value of J35.7?1',200. The
coinage value of the silver Is approximately $77,- .
000,000. Following is the production by States:
Fllvcr.
„ lllmj Gold. valu«. fine ounce*.
A Mama M.f."o 43
Alueka «.JHM.4f» 000
if?"*, „ 4.1«3.40t» 2.99 ft. Vlrt
California 15 7'«> 1.11R.333
<£££• -. »;E?ss 2o:m£^
"r°' Bia — W4.i»»> wo
„"•',■•. 2.273.800 4.0nn,00n
Maryland 200 1
rhl<r "! 1 n.,,,,, 1020.1.)
.Missouri m 7im>
"" i:: '.nil. nil '•'-• 5.023.8)10 i4r^o..«io
v "'' a • 3,««n.noii 4.nnn.nno
.'\, M '. X ' R32.P0J1 «4.»V>
N'.rth 1 arnllna .-..50., ,B, B . V>S
• *r*t(<*n 5,777 fc«n» i*»r ocu\
Uth Carolina I'.f> fton ** atrt
Trur:^:::::;::;:::;;:; 6 - lOI C Bfi4 no
TcnnsssM ..,*, ilfclp j
l.' X ** '•• I.loi> 477.400
vwn,»"::::::::;::::;;:::;;: **?&& I0.25a«O0
» 1 rin nia • ••• ■»» »k™
Wyoming .^..0 30:000
»<?.>L > i<i.«nft !■».—■. II
1-rltli.h Klnn.lik*! 17.!«)5.4<)t> 157J166
MINING PRODUCTS EXCEED RECORDS.
THE UNITED STATES LEADS THE WORLD IN
COAL AND IRON-SILVER. COPPEK
AND LEAD FALL OFF.
, The production and progress of the mining and
j metallurgical Industries of the United States for
I the year Just closed were revtewd In the current
I number of "Engineering and Mining Journal."
Coal, upon which all the other mining industries
, depend for fuel, was treated first, and the total
production was estimated at 301.000.n00 short tons,
an amount considerably in excess or that brought
to the surface in Great Britain, and far beyond
the quantity mined in any other country. Nearly
the entire amount was consumed at home, despite
a material growth in exports. The anthracite coal
fields of Pennsylvania contributed one-fifth of the
total. There was great development of the bitu
minous deposits of I'ennsylvania, West Virginia.
Ohio, Illinois. Indiana and other Western States,
and the softer coal entered to a greater extent than
ever before into the market for commercial and
household fuel. The production and consumption
of coke were also larger than ever before, chiefly
on account of the activity ill the Iron and steel
trades. I
The reviewer drew attention to the oil discoveries
in California and Texas, and pronounced the latter
the most important since oil was found in Penn
sylvania, and predicted that both would have an
Important hearing on the* manufacturing interests
of the States named and the Southwestern region.
The Iron trade showed a production that a few |
years ago would have been regarded as Impossible,
and th" quantity of pig iron exceeded the output
of Great Britain and Germany combined. Raw
Iron, steel and finished products showed an aggre
gate parallel with that of pig iron. The enormous
output was not in excess of the demand, and at .
the end of the year the great mills and furnaces
were almost all behind with orders. Every Indica
tion pointed to equal prosperity In 1902. for the
larger plants had engagements now that would re
quire half of the year to complete. Ore shipments
from the Lake Superior region exceeded a).t>iO.t>«) 1
tons. Export trade In iron and steel showed a con
siderable fulling off In comparison with MM, but the
home market made up the deficiency-
Gold production showed an increase, and amount
ed to between $s;:,cxjo,o<io and JX'.OUO.Ono. California,
Colorado and the Muck Hills region were ihe
heavy gold producers. Silver made no gain over :
I!X>>. and copper fell ofT slightly— 2.SoO tons. The |
Lake Sup« region. California and Utah showed
gains in copper, but they did not make up th •
shortage elsewhere. The refining interests drew
much more copper for refining from foreign mines
than 111 any previous year. There was some de- |
crease In lead, argentiferous lead falling .-ft 2<Vioo 1
tons and soft lead increasing W.MS tons. Zinc I
showed a gain, with Missouri as the chief gainer.
Exports of zinc suffered, however. Quicksilver and
nickel made good progress. The chemical Indus
tries depending upon native products made satis- 1
factory progress. in the non-metallic minerals, i
Including cement and building stone and the clay I
products, the year was a prosperous one.
In dosing the reviewer Mild: "Summing up be
history of the. year, we may Bay briefly that the ,
total production of the mining and metallurgical j
industries if the United States considerably »x
ceeded the enormous total recorded In IMO. while ;
there is eveiy prospect that a still further advance i
will be made In 1902.
DATF NAT FOR PATRICKS TRIAL.
c-.iI.NSKI. AORBE i>N JANL'ARY I.V <>SR«~>KN*E AND
GARVAS TO PROSBTTK.
Albert T. Patrick, charged with the murder of
William M. Rice, will go to trial before Recorder
• loff ln Part II of General Sessiono on January 15.
This announcement was made yesterday by Dis
trict Attorney Jerome at the Criminal Courts Build
ing. The District Attorney's office will be repre
sented In the prosecution by Assistant District At
torneys Osboroe and Garvan. Patrick will be de
fended by <'antwell & Moore. After a conference
between counsel in the case yesterday this date was
agreed on.
At 1 "/ COUNTERFEIT MILTER CERTIFICATE.
Washington, Jan. 4.— The Secret Service officials i
have discovered in circulation a new counterfeit $1 '
silver certificate of the series of IMb, check letter j
C. The counterfeit is signed "Lyons. Register." I
and "Roberts. Treasurer." It in of very crude :
workmanship. The back of the note Is printed up
side down. The paper contains no silk, and the
word "Washington" on the face Is printed In ordi
nary script type. ,
POSTAL SERVICE API'O/STMEXTS.
Washington. Jan. 4. C. Howard Buckler, of Bal
timore, formerly chief clerk to the Third Assistant
Postmaster General, has been appointed chief of
the finance division of the Postoffice Department.
Harwood M. Bacon of Detroit, has been appointed
•.t.t-r cl«rk 10 succeed Mr. Buckler.
Lyons Silks.
Arnold, Constable & Co. offer of their
Spring Importations Novelties in
Lyons Printed
Shanghai and Foulard Silks,
Printed Satin Foulards,
Empire and Meteor Crepe,
Brocaded and Printed Gazes.
White Silks and Satins
for
Wedding Gowns.
Novelties for Bridesmaids' Dresses.
Velvets.
BI'RSFn 7» HEATH IS THEIR HOME.
TRAGIC DEATH OF AN' AGED MINIS AND HI3
DAUGHTER IN BETHANY. CONN. '
Bethany. Conn.. Jan. -t— Edmund Peck, a retired
Methodist clergyman, eighty years old. and his
daughter, Mary Peck, thirty-five years old. were
burned to death early this morninp in a fire which
destroyed their handsome home in the Bethany
Turnpike. Charles Peck, of Waterbury. a son of
the clergyman, was seriously injured in jumping
from the roof.
The origin of the fire Is a mystery. The house
was wrapped In flames when a neighbor living
across the street awoke at i o'clock. His shouts
aroused Charles Peck, who was partially overcome
by smoke, but made his way to the roof and
Jumped. It was impossible to rescue the other in
mates of the house, which was reduced to ashes in
less than an hour Mr. Peck was active In the
Methodist ministry for many years, hut retired
twenty years af?o.
INSANE HOSPITAL EVESB; NO in Es LOST.
Richmond, Va.. Jan. 4.— The main building of the
Eastern Stats Hospital, at WBVamsbuis, was «le-
Vtroyed hy fire early to-day. AH the Isl patients
were j;ot out safely, and made comfortable in the
town. The loss to the State is about KBjMt.
KEEPING PET El^Y^^ AGAINST H1 ME I. 1 11 >.
Chicago, Jan. 4.— Recausc Mrs M. K. Oesd pos
sesses a pet fawn, which was iciven to h.-r la.-r
June as a wedding present. sh»- was si ISO ted on
complaint of liame Warden George Blrmli
and chnrKed with vtolatlng the State cam-
Mrs iiood had a hearing before Justice Quins, and
was given the alternative of either killing the an
imal or securing permission from the proper author
ities to ship It out of the State. It probably will be
sent to Pennsylvania to the farm of Mr. Good's
father Mr«. Good Is the daughter of the late Colo
nel .Tohn R. Hoxle. former president of the I'nion
Stock Yards and Transit Company.
FOUR KILLED IE FREIGHT COLLISION.
Johnstown. Perm.. .lan. I— Because of ■ wrong;
.signal at Nineveh Tower an eastboußd PewasylvaSßS
Rallrci<l mail ar.cl exprestl train ran Into a slow
freight, five miles west of this city, and .» *MI mm
Utes liter a w.-stbound freight cra>he.l Inlo the
wreck, causing the death of four petSSSJS and the
serious Injury of at least five oth. -rs. Th.- wreck
occurred about 10 p m. Train No. 14 got a clear
block at the tower, and. runnln< ahead at full speed,
crashed into the rear of extra freight No 4.»>. wreck-
Ing the engine and two cars of No M and the cahoose.
and two cars of the freight. Westbound fr.-i^ht
No. sM almost immediately piled into the debris,
the engine and ten, cars tumbling into the ri\er.
The dead are: .lames G. Black, engineer of No. 898,
found dead ln his cab; perhaps drowned; William
Paul, a fireman, of iiteairn. died in hospital from
injuries; Robert S. Nolan, of Pitcalrn. lirst brake
man on No SV«3. and an engineer. James Winters of
Pittsburtj. in charge of No. 14
The injured, it Is thought, will all recover. The
wreck occurred on i sharp cur\e and the passenger
engineer could i.ot stop after coming in sight o: the
freight ahead, while the westbound frH«ht ran in
be-fore a tiHuniHn could be sent forward.
MRS. ./. K. I.AXE DEAD. \
Mrs. J. K. Lane, widow of General James M. J
Lane, who was chief engineer of the New Park j
Commission of New-York City, and who died In !
IS.VJ. died on January 1 at her home. No. *> Fourth !
Place. Brooklyn. Mrs. Lans cams to Brooklyn !
with her husband In 1854. and had lived in the
Fourth Place house for forty-seven years. She i
was descended from the Ryersons. of Long Island. I
who were among the earliest Dutch settlers, and I
from the Morse family, of Delaware, of which S. ]
F. B. Morse, the Inventor of telegraphy, was a
member
Mrs. Lane is survived by four children— J.
J. Hassell. of San Francisco; Miss Lillian M Lans
and Mrs. Henry Gorham. of Brooklyn, and Walter
A. Lane, of Manhattan. • <
yoor piano, the benefit of the i;«>uius of a!l
the great composers and the enjoyment
which alone comes with producing music
yourself.
There are millions of pianos distr
throughout the world. There aiv tens of
thousands of compositions which The
whole world should enjoy. Yet how
many of thes«» pianos bring fortfl
music? A very few. These few ;•'
still smaller fraction of what constitutes
the musical literature of the piano.
Homer's Furniture.
ANNUAL REDUCTION SALE.
ITS REASON. To effect as great a
clearance of stock as possible before taking
inventory.
ITS ADVANTAGES. It affords buyers
the only opportunity of the year to secure
genuinely High-Class Furniture in latest de
signs at material reductions from regular prices
—viz.. 15 to 30 per Cent.
ITS RANGE. Each and every tine
throughout our wart rooms has its liberal quote,
of " mark downs," from the lowest to tin
highest priced, including
Bedroom Suites. Dressing Tables.
Dining Room Suites. Chiffonieres.
Parlor Suites. Cheval Glasses.
Fancy Pieces. Fancy Chairs.
Sideboards. Writing Desks.
Cabinets. Bookcases.
Also hundreds of odd pieces
impossible to itemize.
R. J. HORNER & CO,
Furniture Maker* and Importers.
61, 63, 65 West 23d Street.
(Adjoining Kden Musee>.
Fifth Avc. Auction Rooms
MB. FIFTH AVK. -\ ■ ,- BJSI St.).
W.M. H. Miioi\> Inrlloaeer
EXHIBITION
Tuesday and Wednesday,
JAM ARY 7TH AM« VTH.
A CHOICE COLLECTION OF
EUROPEAN CERAMICS.
THE CONTENTS OF THS
GROS^BAUn GALLERIES,
242 Fifth Aye.,
to«reth*r n Hi a
Remarkable Collection of
ANTIQUE PORCELAINS, dec,
removed direct from the
Lincoln Storage Warehouse,
NEW YORK CITY.
TO 111; sold
Tharadtt), Friday and >utnr«!ay,
JANVARY lITII. I«TH AND HTH.
AT a O'CLOCK.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<»** AAS*
Io o K l l i
PIANOS
Used by Eminent Artists,
BROOKLYN .OK FULTON ST. „«£ TBUSH £
VE-W TORX: * EAST UTH ST
UHCB STOCK Or UEU PIAAOS OS HIV*.
7T

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