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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, January 06, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXL .N°- 20.140.
TRADES UNIONS' FIGHT.
pgEPABING TO CONTEST THE TAFF
VALE DECISION.
CORONATION' ROBES STILL. A MATTER OF
DISPUTE — EMIGRATION — MR.
SHAW'S PLAY.
(rpj-rrirht; IMS; By Th» Tribune Association.)
(BY CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE
London. Jan. < ?>,? >, 1 a. m. — trades unionists
are preparing vigorously to contest the claims
of the Taff Vale Railway Company against the
Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants. The
amount claimed is about $125,000. This is the
company's estimate cf the damage it suffered by
the alleged conspiracy and combination of the
Amalgamated society in connection with the
recent strike on the Taff Vale railway. The
House of Lords laid it down that a trades union
vas liable for the action of its servants or mem
bers, and could be made answerable for such
action In a court of law. Every trades union
throughout the country is watching the develop
ment of the case with the keenest interest. The
■■tOB leaders assert that the House of Lords'
gecifion places the whole of their funds in
Jeopardy, and some unions are halting between
the advisability of securing the bulk of their
funds on the Continent, an.l of finding some
means of putting their money safely away in
England.
Corr continues to prevail in court
dressmaking circle?, owing to the Karl Marshal's
order suspending the making of peeresses' coro
nation robe?. It is understood, however, that
the Queen hi? personally interested herself in
the natter, and in a few days the members of
the trad-? are likely to be again bidden to Nor
f-'.k Hooae to inspect the new model. It is be
iha' the authorities concerned contem
plate a reduction in the length of trains in order
not to waste space on Westminster Abbey's
floor. On the other hand, it Is no secret that
several women of high degree have expressed a
stror.gr diflik-^ for the whole design of their
coronation attire.
Official statistics show that 302.54S emigrants
left the United Kingdom for places outside of
Europe during 1901, an increase of 4.257, as
compared with the figures for the previous year.
As usual, the great majority of them went to
America, the United States receiving 194.855,
and British North America 43.013. The figures
in the former case show an increase of 5,497.
and in the latter a decrease of 6,094.
Among the most striking developments of the
modern drama is the growth of the Stage Bo
ciety, an association of earnest students and
lovers of the drama, •whose object is to secure
the representation of plays which in the or
dinary course of events would never be pro
duced. About five hundred members of this so
ciety assembled in the new Lyric Club yesterday
to see George Bernard Shaw's very much criti
cised play, "Mrs. Warren's Profession." Mr.
Shaw has divided his published plays into two
categorics — plays pleasant and unpleasant — and
yesterday's production belongs distinctly to the
latter category. The censor has refused to
license '"Mrs. Warren's Profession," and he can
net be blamed, for it could hardly be presented
to any but a select public without being misun
derstood. Its reception by the Stage Society
'•' as. however, very flattering and fully deserved,
the dialogue being clever and witty, and the act
ing in every way admirable. Miss Fanny Brough
was especially good in a part which demanded
quite exceptional qualities.
"The Standard," referring to a statistical ab
■tract of the trade cf the British colonies which
has just been issued, says: "The main lesson
of the return is only too plain, and it is that
the business done by England with her colo
nies is too often smaller than it should be. In
regard to Canada, it is only natural that her
chief customer should be her close neighbor;
r.or is it surprising that the United States runs
Great Britain very close in Newfoundland and
the West Indies. It is, however, disappointing
to see that we are excelled in Australia, and
so. too, it is to find confirmation of the rather
disquieting fact that Canada has difficulty in
attracting settlers, and that her territories re
main empty in spite of her improved means of
communication and the offers made to col
onists." ■
This morning's newspapers give prominence
so t report of the American consul in Liver
pool, which takes an unfavorable view of Eng
land's chances _n industrial competition with
the Catted States.
!t is estimated that the British fire Insurance
companies paid last year claims amounting to
between £30,000.000 and £35,000,000.
I. N. F.
ANOTHER BRITISH LOSS.
BOERS AMBUSH TROOPS-BIX KILLED,
THIRTEEN WOUNDED.
Pretoria, Jan. s —The Boers ambushed a party
°J the Scots Grays last Saturday near Bronk
hont Spruit (about forty miles east of Pretoria
<w the railroad). The British casualties were
dx Wiled and thirteen wounded.
THE TOTAL BRITISH LOSSES.
London. Jan. The total reduction of Great
Britain's military forces in South Africa, from
*•* beginning of the war to the end of Decem
be, including deaths from disease, men report
«* missing, etc.. amounts to 24.209 men. Of
t! & number 19.430 were actually killed or died.
A total of 34,339 men were invalided home, the
»Jorlty of whom recovered and rejoined their
■■■^ands.
TIRCHOW BADLY ISJURED.
Pathologist HURT BY FALLING from A street
car IN BERLIN
I Berlin, Jan. s.— Professor Rudolph Virchow.
»« Pathologist, slipped while alighting from a
•rmear and has seriously injured his thigh.
**c*essor Vlrchow's injury is not dangerous, ex
*» In consideration of his age.
GERMAN MORMONS' CONFERENCE.
'-'lla. Jan. The German Mormon Conference
j rr * mbie(l here under the leadership of Hugh
*tU*k ' "° a of th late George Q. Canno i, the
!*e at y?a C v* e n v,^ r ormon a 6tle -, One hundred and
*? GtrD ln ," c / ! 5 M . missionaries are now working
2?M*n4 founts ha ™ secured, it Is said, two
t *sobv «l? "I The P re 9 conference is at
el C arte? "* one hundred ft the German
TAXIJ^RD GAUGE FOR INDIA.
' • £iv J t?'..»~ The Calcutta correspondent of
II 1 ••« Ami* a ' aye that at a recent conference
S6S 61 ** ralhrtls* ™ pt the Bt * nd * rd *»"«* on the
Ip »»ssgit?g ssyytaSff' wni apply
£EATU OF AMERICAN ENGINEER.
* k-foi! A hl "' Jan 6 -Richard GoMaboroush.
• » w "» American engineer. Is dead here.
£**• th t Pt THE CAREFUL MAN
S£*i n ? t y la J Ullro *« when westward
>' <w for &&3?&r£* si^r nlent
PEKING IN GALA ATTIRE.
ELABORATE PREPARATIONS FOR THE
RECEPTION OF CHINESE RULERS.
Peking, Jan. 5. — The Chinese capital, on the
eve of the court's return, presents an animated
and gaudy scene not before equalled In its his
tory. All the palaces, pagodas and temples
have been repaired and painted to form a glit
tering spectacle. The roofs of these buildings
viewed from the city walls, are patches of shin
ing yellow tiles and brick. The walls about the
Imperial City are a vivid crimson, and the gates
leading to the Imperial City have been repaired
and gilded. On the towers above the Chen-Men
Gate stands a gorgeous structure of wood, cloth
and paper, with a yellow painted dragon en
twined about the massive cloth pillars.
Hundreds of Chinese officials clad in furs and
embroidered silks ride about the streets of
Peking, and parties of foreign soldiers, bent
upon sightseeing, roam everywhere. Thousands
of new soldiers from the province of 6han-Tung.
who are finely uniformed and equipped with
modern weapons, entered Peking this morning
and marched through Legation-sr.
The ministers of the foreign powers have re
ceived notice from the Chinese Foreign Office
that all the streets upon which the Chinese
Court will pass will be closed on Monday and
Tuesday. Two buildings in the principal street
on the line of procession have been provided,
from which the members of the legations will
b a permitted to witness the re-entry of the Court.
This is an unprecedented concession. The for
eign ministers have decided. In consideration of
recent events, not to witness the re-entry of the
Court. This decision is strengthened by the fact
that the majority of the ministers have not yet
presented their credentials.
Chinese officials have strongly protested to Sir
Ernest Batow, th" British Minister, against
British officers being in charge .ill the way from
Pao-Ting-Fu to Peking of the trains upon which
the Chinese Court will travel. They said that if
foreign officials were conspicuous at Teng-Ti
Junction the t'ourt would pn fer to leave the
railmad and take another route. Actine upon
this protest, the F.ritish Minister has reo,u. sted
the officers to refrain from making the military
conspicuous, and this request will be complied
with.
Negotiations concerning the Manchurian treaty
await the arrival of the court. Paul Lessor, the
Russian Minister to China, when discussing the
question of the railroads with the Chinese pleni
potentiaries, insisted that under ha circum
stances would Russia consent that other powers
have a hand in the construction and operation
Of railroads in Manchuria without first obtaining
Russian permission.
TWO DEAD, TWO OVERCOME.
FAMILY LIES FOR HOI'RS WHILE GAS
POURS OUT.
THAT ANP A COUSIN WERE SAVED
DUB TO A BELATED NEW TEAR*
CALL BY A RELATIVE.
Two persons are dead and two In a critical
rendition as a result of gas escaping yesterday
in the rooms of Peter A. Lynch, who lived with
his wlf*» and child on the second floor of a flat
hous? at Ho. 358 West Forty-seventh-at. The
dead are Lynch, who was twenty-three years.
old, and his son Peter, nine months old. Mrs.
Lynch and her cousin. Miss Mary Healey, nine
teen years old. a waitress out of employment,
who was living with the Lynches temporarily,
are in Roosevelt Hospital. It in believed that
from an early hour yesterday morning until 12
p. m. gas was pouring into the three rooms that
the family occupied from a gas cock intended
for a range in the kitchen. The baby was dead
when found. The father died three hours after
his removal to the hospital.
Lynch was a bartender employed in the GHlsey
House cafe. He worked at night and seldom
reached home until after 1 a. in. When he got
home yesterday morning is not known. Mis*
Healey slept in the parlor of th<» little flat and
the Lynches in the room adjoining.
All yesterday morning the tenants in the
house smelled gas. but no one seemed to think
enough about it to ask that an investigation be
made until Mrs. John De Groat, who lives di
rectly o\er the rooms of the Lynch family, at
10 a. m. sent her son to tell the janitor that
somewhere in the house gas was escaping;.
Apparently nothing was done until 2 p. m..
when Frederick Reid, of No. 217 Pearl-st..
Brooklyn, a young cousin of Mrs. Lynch, called
at the house to pay a belated New Year's call.
He rang th<> doorbell of his friends' flat In vain
and knocked on the door as well. He could not
understand why no one was at home at that
hour, as he. knew that Lynch went to work
abcut 3 p. m. At last Reid made inquiries of a
family named Kemp that lives on the same
flr.or as the Lynehs. Mrs. Kemp said that she
had wondered why she had not seen her neigh
bors all day. She did not believe that they were
heme for she had not heard them stirring In
their rooms. Then the gas was thought of, and
Reid and Mrs. Kemp at once concluded that the
Lynch family might he overcome.
John Ott, a eon of the Janitor of the flathouse,
was hurriedly summoned from his home at No.
67<3 Nlnth-ave. Messengers ran to the West
Forty-seventh-st. station and asked Sergrant
Shibles to send a policeman to the house.
Another called Dr. Morgan, of No. ."544 West
Forty-seventh-st.
Before the doctor and Policeman McGowan
and Detective Fitzg'.-rald arrived at the house,
John Ott had entered the Lynch flat by descend
ing the rear fire escape and raising a window.
The gas was overpowering, and it was several
minutes before Ott could climb into the rooms.
A gaslight was burning dimly. The gas fixture
had an attachment for a 6tove on it. It would
be an easy thing for a person shutting off one
cock to turn on the other. The one that was
intended to feed a stove was turned on and there
was no tube.
Ott first found Miss Healey. She was uncon
scious in bed. In the adjoining room he found
Mr. and Mrs. Lynch and the"ir baby. The baby
was dead. Before Lynch, his wife and Miss
Healey had been removed to the hospital.
Lynch's mother and syster, of No. 450 West
Forty-sixth-st., arrived at the flat. They went
almost wild with grief when the news was
broken to them.
Lynch did not regain consciousness. The doc
tors at the hospital fear that Mrs. Lynch when
she recovers consciousness and learns that her
husband and baby are dead will become Insane.
They will try to keep the news from her until
she becomes stronger.
PRINCESS LOUISE IKS AXE.
CONDITION OF KING LEOPOLDS DAUGHTER DE
CLARED TO BE HOPELBRf.
Berlin, Jan. s.— Princess Louise, the daughter
of King Leopold of Belgium, who was divorced
from her husband. Prince Philip of Saxe-Co
burg and Gotha. and who has been held practi
cally a prisoner in a retreat near Dresden for
the last two years, has been pronounced hope
lessly insane.
Her daughter. Princess Dorothea, was mar
ried to Ernest-Gonthler, Duke of Schleswlg-Hol
stein. brother of the present Empress of Ger
many, and her sister, Princess Siepbanie was
the wife of the Archduke Rudolph of Austria,
who committed suicide.
ll always does good and never harms—
JAYNE'S fiXPECTORANT.-Advt.
NEW YORK. MONDAY. JANUABY 6. 1902. -TWELVE PAGES.- h,^SM2^
LODGE'S CONSULAR BILL.
PROVISIONS FOR PLACING THE SER
VICE ON BASIS OF FIXED TENURES
AND PERSONAL WORTH.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Washington, Jan. 5. — Senator Lodge, of Massa
chusetts, has reintroduce'' and had referred to
the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, of
which he is one of the most active and influential
members, a carefully matured bill for the reor
ganization of the consular service. This meas
ure, which failed of action in the last Congress
because of the great press of other urgent legis
lative business, has now, under Mr. Lodge's pow
erful patronage, a more excellent prospect than
ever of reaching the statute bonk. The Junior
Senator from Massachusetts has long been
known as an earnest and consistent champion
of the merit system of appointments and promo
tions in the public service, and his already nota
ble contributions to th<» extension of that system
now promise to be magnified by his successful
efforts to establish the federal consular service
on a basis of fixed tenures and personal worth.
Xo Republican leader in the Senate is regarded
as better equipped than Mr. Loder^ to head n
crusade for the betterment of a branch of the
federal service, in which haphazard appoint
ments anil summary removals have been too
much the rule, and in which proved efficiency
has only exceptionally n-.et with encouragement
and advancement. The new importance which
tb>- consular service has assumed in the last
decade has convinced many farseeing states
men in Washington that its conversion into a
more effective agency for the spread of Ameri
can commerce is one of the necessities of th*
present; and to Mr. Lodge has fallen by general
consent th-^ initiative in this timely effort to im
provo and strengthen our expanding consular
machinery.
His skill, intelligence and power in the Penate
are thought to give ample assurance that the
much desired reform his measure contemplates
Will not be long delayed. Mr. Lodge's bill re
organizes and regrades the consular officers of
the United States and abolishes the fee system,
except for consular agents, who are to receive
c-ne-half of the fees they collect up to a maxi
mum of $1,000 a year. Consular officials proper
are to be divided into four grades of consuls
general and six grades of consuls. Commercial
agents and consular clerks are to become
consuls In the classified grades, but vice-con
suls general, deputy consuls general, vice-con
suls and deputy consuls are to be appointed as
heretofore, except that. If the President sees fit.
he may designate consuls of the fourth, fifth and
sixth classes to perform thesi* substitute func
tions.
There are to be not more than two consuls
general of the first class, at $10,000 a year:
eight of the second class, at $3,000: thirteen of
the third class, at $C,.OOO; thirteen of the fourth
class, at $5,000; thirty-seven consuls of the first
class, at $."1,000; thirty- of the second class,
at $4,000; sixty of the third class, at |8.000;
forty of the fourth class, at $2,500; thirty of the
fifth class, at $2,000. and fifty of the sixth class,
at $1,800. Within a year after the passage of
the act the service shall be classified and the
present Incumbents assigned to the various
classes as nearly as possible In accord with the
salaries they now receive. Within two years
from the passage of the act these Incumbents
are to be recalled gradually for examination, and
those who fall to qualify are to be dropped from
the service. Promotions from one class to an
other for merit are provided for, and transfers
within one class, according to the needs of the
service.
For new appointments to the sixth class Civil
Service examinations are to be conducted by a
board consisting of the Secretary of State, j
some consul general or consul designated by the
President, and the three members of the United
States Civil Service Commission. No one shall I
be examined who Is under twenty-one or over j
fifty-five years of age, who Is not ■ citizen of the
United States, or who Is mentally, morally or |
physically disqualified to properly perform the
duties of a consul. The scope and method of the
examination shall be determined by the board,
but among the subjects shall be included either
the French, German or Spanish language, such
requirement being in addition to the vernacular j
of the applicant and questions designed to as- j
certain each applicant's knowledge of the com- i
mercial resources Of the United States, espe- i
cially with reference to the possibilities of In- |
creasing and extending the trade of the United
States with foreign countries.
Any one who has served two years In th.
classified force In the State Department shall
be eligible for appointment without examina
tion to a consulate of the fourth, fifth or sixth
grade and consuls general or consuls may be
detailed to duty In the State Department for
periods of from one year to four years. After
twelve months of service no consul shall be dis
charged except for cause stated In writing, and
any consul so discharged ahull have the right to
appeal to a revistonary board. Five inspectors
of consulates are also to be appointed at salaries
of $4,000 a year.
THE LIBERTADOR'B MISSION.
REPORT THAT REINFORCEMENTS FOR IN
BUROENTS HAVE BEEN LANDBD.
Willemstad, Cnracao, .Tan. s.— The armed
revolutionary Steamer Ltbertadnr (formerly
called the Ban Righ. which loft Fort d« France.
Island of Martinique, on December SI for the
Venezuelan coasi with General Matos. three
hundred volunteers and a cargo of munitions
of war), is now reported to have anchored early
yesterday morning off Uchire. on the Venezue
lan coast, near Hio Chieo, and to have sailed
from DcWre that same afternoon. It is believed
here that the Lihertador has been successful
in executing the first part of her programme of
landing men and war material In Venezuela.
Three Venezuelan war vessels are to-day
cruising off the coast of IVhire.
ATTEMPT TO KILL A MINISTER.
BOMB EXPLODED UNDER SENOR MEN
DOZA'S HOUSE.
Willemstad, Curacao. Jan. Ik— A report has
reached here that last evening a bomb was ex
ploded at the residence in Caracas of the Ven
ezuelan Minister of Finance, Tello Mendoza.
The explosion wrecked a considerable portion of
the house, but no one was injured. The deed
has caused considerable excitement In Caracas.
General Juan Pietri, who has been active in
the present revolution against President Castro,
and who was arrested on Friday at Antlmano.
was yesterday paraded as a prisoner on the
Plaza Bolivar, at Caracas. General Pietri is
still hostile to General Castro, and he is also
opposed to General Matos.
Almost all the Venezuelan revolutionists who
have lately been here have left this island to
Join insurgent bodies in Venezuela. General
Riera, who left here last Thursday to Join in
surgent forces on the Venezuelan coast near
Vela de Coro, and who unexpectedly returned
two days later, is still here.
ANDRADE COMING HERE.
Colon, Jan. 5.— General Andrade, a former
President of Venezuela, who arrived here from
Willemstad, Curacao, on the Italian steamer
Piemonte. expects to sail for New-York next
Tuesday. The Colombian gunboat General
Pinzon was at Savanllla last Friday.
THE WAY OF THE WORLD
Is to get the best for the money. The Pennsylvania
Railroad to the West offers speedy service, secured
by ample safety devicss. leaving New York at con
venient intervals.— Advt.
DRY? NOT UNUSUALLY SO.
RIGORS OF EXCISE ENFORCEMENT NOT
APPLIED.
! •
j "LOW RULES, AND THE RAINES LAW GOES."
. THE ORDER TO THE POLICE. AND
THIRST FOUND PLENTY
TO QUENCH IT.
"Low rules, and the Raines law still goes,"
! were the Instructions issued to the Police De
partment yesterday If any thirsty New-Yorker
failed to get a drink he had himself and not the
i new administration to blame for it. To bo sure
: there were some things that a close observer
| might interpret as significant of a change in
! administration. Down on the Bowery there was
: a brightening up of signs, and here and there
: a freshly painted board indicated the "Hotel
Entrance." The curtains in the windows were
I also discreetly lowered.
! But these signs were few and not of any
; material consequence. From the Battery to th*
j Harlem River both the bibulous citizen and the
; obliging purveyor anxiously awaited some evi
j dence of a new order which should bring about
\ the "slow tight town" prophesied by the Tar
n! manyites. But no such order came.
! The. only ripple of disturbance throughout the
! day occurred in Acting Captain Churchill's pre
j cinct, the Fifteenth, when, shortly before 1 a. m.,
I William Bengali, a saloonkeeper, at No. 46
Third-aye., was arrested by Policeman Tebhow,
. who alleged that twenty-five men were drinking
; beer in the place at the time. Bengali was dis
i charged by Magistrate Pool in the Yorkville
1 Court yesterday morning.
| A Tribune reporter who visited Captain
j Churchill's station yesterday afternoon found
j the sergeants cooling their thirst with Ice
! cream.
"All there Is going now," explained one of
; them.
That this was official rather than authentic
, information the reporter proved by vtsiting a
i saloon next door, where some fifty men were
enjoying their Sunday beer unmolested.
"It ain't us, It's the 10-v ones, they're lo<skln'
; for," explained a Bowery saloonkeeper whose
', place Is under the Timothy D. Sullivan Asso
ciation. "But I ain't heard & nothln 1 dotn\ any
| how," he added. "I guess the Democrats in
: the fusion party wouldn't stand for that."
At Police Headquarters. In Mulberry-st..
there was not the slightest elgn of unusual ac
j tivity. Neither Commissioner Partridge nor
Deputy Commissioner Thuraton appeared dur
1 Ing the day. Captain Wlegand. who was in
| charge, declared that so far as he knew there
■ was nothing new being done in the Sunday
! closing matter.
"There Is still a Raines law, you know." he
| told the reporter by way of explanation.
In the lower East Side precincts the various
captains read the usual order relative to the
j Excise law to the outgoing platoons, but no one
at Headquarters knew of any special vigilance
being enjoined upon the patrolmen.
Up In the Tenderloin the name state of af
j fairs prevailed. In one of the Sixth-aye. saloons
i The Tribune reporter heard a spirited argument
a*< to who was Police Commissioner.
"Devery must have made good and been rein
stated," declared one of the patrons of the place
I ov,>r his 'high bull." "This am no reformers'
Sunday."
Deputy Commissioner Thurston was seen at
' hl« boms, No. 7:: West Blghty-seventh-st., last
night.
"No, there have been absolutely no special In
j structions. issued," he declared. "The most san
guine reformer can't expect an Instant change.
What they want is to have things a little better
now. nnd then a little better later on. an.i I j
think they will pet them "
Various policemen on their posts assured The j
Tribun* reporter there »a» "nothln' «loln'," and J
several took occasion to express their apprecia- |
tion of the new commissioner's offer yesterday j
to transfer men to stations nearer home.
"The new commissioner has already endeared
himself to the men on the force by this order,"
said an old sergeant yesterday.
Many persons were looking yesterday for some
radical changes In the way in which the law was
enforced In Brooklyn. They were disappointed,
however, because the saloons were open as
usual and there was no particular attempt on
the part of the police to close them, apparently. I
When Police Commissioner Partridge was asked '
If he had not issue) special orders for the en- i
forcement of the Excise law he said:
"We have Issued no special orders regarding .
the excise. The Excise law exists, and it is
presumed the police will enforce it. We don't
Issue special orders, and don't Intend to. except
In emergency cases. No orders are Issued about
robberies or pickpockets."
The fact that the saloons were open as usual
having been called to his attention Commis
sioner Partridge said:
"I suppose so. and you'll find other violations
of the law if you look for them. I am going to
wait anil barn before I do anything. If you
had a large family of unruly children you could
not tell to-day what you would do to them the
next week. The law will be enforced properly
and that is all I care to say."
DELEGATE HAS GROCERS ARRESTED.
John J. Barry, of No. 100 West Flfty-thlrd-st., a
delegate for an association of grocers' clerks, was
on the warpath yesterday for grocers who were
violating the law by keeping their stores open He
found two who, he alleges, were violating the law.
and caused their arrests. As evidence against the
prisoners be will exhibit In the West Side police
court this morning a box of stove polish which
he purchased for four cents, and a can of peas for
which be paid 10 cents. Barry says he bought the
articles from Frederick Busehhorn of No. 43.". West
!•"< i ty-tiftli st.. and Theodore Burke, of No. 404
West Kifti. th-st. Both grocers furnished bail.
TO Disrrss EXCISE AT REFORM CLUR
A commit tc of representative citizens will mfct
at the R.-form Club this afternoon to discuss the
excise Question. It is understood that a !ar«<*
number "f invitations have been sent out, and it
is expected that sons definite legislative action
w;n be recommended. Amonc th.-,so to be present
ore Bishop Potter, the Rev. Dr. William S. Ratns
ford. William F. Kins. District Attorney .It romi>
Colonel Willis L. Ogdon and Aciolph Openhym.
HOMER BELBY HELD For TRIAL.
Homer Beiby, the brother of Norman Selby, bet
ter known as "Kill McCi.y." was a prlsoaer at the
Harlem court yesterday morning charged with a
violation of the Excise law. St-lby v said to be the
proprietor of a saloon at No. 161 East One-hundred
ani-twenty-flfth-st.. nnd was arrested yesterday
morning by Detect!*. es Boyle and Mooney, of the
hast One-humlred-ancl-twpnty-slxth-st. station. The
waiter in the saloon, Kvcrett Bernat, was also
arrested.
Selby in his own defence said that be wns con
ducting a respectable place but that he was being
persecuted by the police. He also said that he was
selling nothing but soft drinks at the time of his
arrest. This brought a vigorous protest from De
tective Mooney, who said that the saloon was one
of the worst In the neighborhood: that it was never
closed. When the arrest was made, he dec Is red.
therf were at least fifty people In the place.
The prisoners were each held In $500 bail for trial
at Special Sessions.
HURLED FIFTY FEET BY TRAIX.
MAN IS STRUCK BT ONE AND THROWN IN
FRONT OF ANOTHER, WHICH ALSO
RUNS HIM DOWN.
Plalnfield, N. J., Jan. s.— An elderly man was
struck here by two Royal Blue Line trains this
afternoon, and killed. He was walking on the
westbound track when run down by a westbound
flyer. He appeared not to hear the whistles of
the engine, and the train could not he stopped in
time to save his life. When hit he was hurled
about fifty feet, and onto the eastbound tracks
directly tn front of a train bound for New-York,
lie was cut to pieces.
SA VAGE WORK OF FOOTPADS.
MAN FOUND UNCONSCIOUS— HE WAS
TERRIBLY BEATEN AND ROBBED.
Michael J. Sweeney, thirty-two years old, of
No. 174 Forty-second-st.. Brooklyn. Is in a
critical condition in Long Island Hospital as
the result of being attacked by footpads at an
early hour yesterday morning. He was found
lying unconscious at Bush and Clinton sts. by a
patrolman of the Hamllton-ave. station. His
face and arms were beater almost Into a pulp,
and his clothing was torn to shreds. He had
been robbed of hts watch and chain, several
r.ther small pieces of jewelry and $l"» in money,
and had been left lying insensible in a pool of
blood.
Sweeney was at once removed to the hospital,
where* it was many hours before he regained
consciousness. He said that he did not recog
nize his assailants, but he thought that there
must have been three or four of them. Captain
Miles O'Reilly, of the Hamilton-aye. station,
took charge -if the case himself, but there
seemed to be few clews upon which to work.
The locality in which the assault took place has
always been considered a dangerous one. Nu
merous (uses of highway robbery have been re
ported to the police from that section, but und^r
the old dark '.antern regime of Deputy Police
< 'ornmissioner York they were never made
public.
SENATOR FORAKER'S RE-ELECTION.
Wll.r. TAKE PLACK IN OHIO LEGISLATURE
NEXT WEKK- ALREADY CANDIDATE
BY STATE CONVENTION.
Columbus. Ohio. Jan. ft.— The Republican caucus
last night nominated the Foraker ticket for the
Seriate and the Hannj ticket for the House. The
contest was continued to-day on the same lines
over the makeup of the standing committees, and
It Is evident that the chairmanships and preferred
places will go the same way as the offices. Price,
who was defeated for Speaker by McKinnon. will
hive consideration as chairman of the Judiciary
Committee, and the chairmanship of one of the
committees on municipal affairs. In deference to
George B. Cox. will sro to some member from Cin
cinnati, but the courtesy will not be extended fur
ther.
The Senate committees are being apportioned by
a special committee on the lines of the Republican
caucus, with the D.-mocrats co-operating. As the
liquor associations threw their influence to Price,
that intrest is now attempting a fusion of the Dem
ocrats with 3uch Republicans as are opposed to
local bills.
' Senator Fornker Is not expected here until next
week, when all the committees will be made up.
It is proposed, therefore, to have a demonstration
In the Interest of harmony on Tuesday of next
week the two houses will vote separately for
United States Senator, and the next day in joint
session they will declare the result. Then Foraker
is expected to make a speech of acceptance. As
he was Indorsed by resolution at the last State
convention for re-election the Republican Joint Sen
atorial caucus this week will be merely a formal
affair.
Mayor Tom L. Johnson, who came here yester
day with the Cuyahoga delegation to attend the
opening of the legislature, has returned to Cleve
land to meet William J. Bryan there.
Charles W. Baker, of Cincinnati, has been nom
inated by the Democratic caucus for Senator and
will receive a complimentary vote.
rOBAJUCaVfi VIEWS OF CONTEST.
THE PARTY WILL NOW PRESENT A SOLID
FRONT IN LEGISLATIVE ACTION.
Cincinnati, Jan. s.— Senator J. B. Foraker, when
wen at his home here last -night, spoke freely on
the outcome of the legislative contests In the Re
publican caucuses at Columbus to-day. He said:
I did all I could to support Mr. Price, but with-
out an unkind word or thought of Mr. MrKlnnon..
In fact, the only regret 1 have m connection with
the matter was that the situation compelled me to
oppose so gex : a man. McKinnon has won a vic
tory for himself, both personally and politically.
I predict thai lie will make one of the most effi
cient Speakers 'lie Ohio House of Representatives
lias ever had. and that he has before him a bril
liant career 111 in- 1 public service, national as well
ns Star*:. His ability. Independence and character
mark him as .• exceptional matt.
Mr. Price Is a young man of "staying" quali
ties II. ■ has made a good fight and a good im
pression. He will not grieve over defeat. but. con
gratulating himself on having so many stanch
friends, will address himself to the future, and find
there his full share of rewards.
The excitement over the contest in the House has
overshadowed what was done in the Senate. The
whole trouble began there, and in the Senate was
fought out ,i mare decisive contest than was bad
in the House, Mr. Scobey being elected over Mr.
I hi by a vote of 14 to 7, or 2 to 1. Taken all in
all. there is no cause for anybody except the im
mediate participants to be disappointed.
The Republican party in the legislature will now
present a solid front and go forward without fur
ther friction to the faithful and successful dis
charge of it* duties of legislation.
1 lini.n STATION ROBBER CAUGHT.
MAN WHO GOT 8H Bl IMPERSONATING EI.E
VATED RAILROAD AGENT CONFESSES.
Through the work of Detectives McKenna and
Birmingham, of the Leonard-st. station, the
thief who so skilfully robbed the Sixth-aye. ' L"
station at West Broadway and Grand-st. on the
night of December 12 of $IiXB, was arrested
yesterday and locked up. The prisoner, a for
mer employe of the Manhattan Railway Com
pany, broke down when arraigned before Cap
tain o'Rriep. and confessed the theft, saying he
had been out of work at the time, and had had
tt» take a desperate chance to raise money.
The confessed thief is Barger Farnham, twen
ty-four years old. a good looking, intelligent
man who came to this city three years ago from
Detroit. Mich
It was 7 p. in. on December 12 when James
Newton, the day agent at the iJrand-st. station.
turned his receipts, tickets and cash over to
William Fischhr. the night agent, and boarded
an uptown train. Fischler had been in the tick'-t
office only a few minutes when a young man in
the uniform of a station agent handt-d him a
telegram which ordered him to report to the
m at Eighty-SiXthf-St. and Columbus-aye
forthwith. As agents are often relieved in that
manner Fischler was MM suspicious, and turned
the |238 in cash and the tickets over to the
bearer of the tele gl am. The stranger had crossed
over on the tracks from the downtown station,
which further convinced Fischler that he had
come from the Fi^hty-sixth-st. station.
Farnham took charge of the office after he
signed a receipt for the money and tickets.
After he had been in the office a short time
Farnham culled Edward Duffy, the ticket chop
per, and told him to attend to the office for a
few minutes, as he wanted to go to the wash
room. He locked the cash drawer and left some
change on the desk and the tickets. He then
walked out of the station. After half an hour
it was learned that a clever robbery had been
committed.
Fischler and Duffy have Identified Farnham
as the man who posed as an agent.
The prisoner snld that ■ man who was for
merly In the ernpioy of the road had put him up
to commit the robbery, and had stolen a uniform
for him.
THREE SKATED ISTO AIR HOLE.
TWO WERE DROWNED UNDER THE ICE; ONE
ESCAPED. NEARLY FROZEN
Poughkeepsle. N. V.. Jan. s.— Bert Cooper, twenty
two years old. and Arthur Snyder, thirty years old,
both unmarried, who were engaged on the new
Zabriskle mansion, at Annandale. skated on the
river from Barrytown to Tlvoll this afternoon in
company with Daniel Leary. of Barrytown. On their
return, and while near Cruger's Island, going very
fast so as to reach home before nightfall, all three
skated into an air hole.
Cooper and Snyder came up under the solid Ice
and thus imprisoned were drowned. Leary came up
In open water, and after a terrible struggle man
aged to pull himself unaided out on the ice no help
being at hand. He reached shore almost frozen and
was cared for at a farmhouse.
Cooper and Snyder lived In Mount Vermin. Va.
ROUND TRIP TICKETS TO CALIFORNIA
On sale at all ticket offices, offering diversity of
routes going and returning, via Chicago & North-
Western. Union Pacific and Southern Pacific Rail
ways. Offices. 461, 257 and 349 Broad wav.-AdvC
PKICE THREE CENTS.
MAY EJECT OLD-lI'MES.
major i:r; stein >aysiiehas
AUTHORITY. —
BILL READY TO LEGISLATE OUT BOTH
SETS AND LET MAYOR LOW
FILL THE VACANCIES.
Vnless the old magistrates in the city of
Brooklyn surrender their claims to their courts,
which they have been strenuously upholding for
the last three days— which rather seems without
the range of probability— and should the atl p>
npy-General. upon quo warrants proceedings,
find that th- magistrates chosen last November
were elected under an unconstitutional act. the
legislature will step in and wipe out both seta
of magistrates in a bill which will give Mayor
Low the power to fin th" vacancies created by
their dismissal. This plan of action has been
definitely decided upon by the Republicans and
fusionists In Brooklyn, who are Indignant at
what they term the undignified and unwar
ranted conduct of the old magistrates in at
tempting to retain possession of the courts by
force, thus turning upsid* down the entire
judicial procedure of the police courts. This will
be a sweeping measure, but it has been decided
upon after a careful conference as being tha
only way to reach a satisfactory solution of th«
present muddle.
Most of the magistrates who are holding pos
session of the courts by force are more than
sick of their undertaking. They have been
away from home for three days, subjected to all
manner of inconveniences and getting little
sleep. They are about worn out by their long 1
vigils, and are In a mood to declare a truce, if
that can be done without surrendering any of
their alleged rights. They are Democratio
magistrates, however, who are fighting to re
tain their positions, and are being strongly
backed by the Democratic organization, which
sees in the retention o-f these places about the
only vestige of political spoils that they can
hope to have in Kings County for the next tw«
years. This being true, it is not likely that they
will give up the fight.
NO MOVE BY OLD MAGISTRATES.
It is contended, however, by impartial persons,
that It Is their duty to ask the Attorney Gen
eral for quo warranto proceedings, and this 19
what the Republicans and fuslonists -want them
to do. Unless they do this, as matters now
stand, they may hold possession of their courts
until doomsday, but they will have no official
duties to perform, as Police Commissioner Par
tridge has ordered the members of his depart
ment to refuse to recognize the old magistrates
and to take no cases before them. Further than
this he has ordered the police to recognize tho
new magistrates, although yesterday all police
court business was taken before the three old
magistrates whose right to office is not disputed.
and this policy will undoubtedly be continued to
day, unless the old magistrates surrender en
tirely.
POLTCE POWER TO EJECT.
John L. Hill, counsel for the old magistrates,
announced last night that he would not take any
offensive action against the elected magistrates.
It had keen hopo.j that he would bring quo war
r:into proceedings to test the constitutionality of
the law.
The elected magistrates are out. and they
v.ant to gt-t in." he said, "and to get in they
must take the offensiv-. We will rest on our
oars and retain possession of the courts until
th-y fln.-illy have the question adjudicated."
.Mr. Hill was asked if he would advise Magis
trates Furlong. Dot. ley and Hlgginbotham tj
continue in their respective courts night and
day until ■ solution of the squabble was arrived
it. He said:
"I have advised them to retain possession of
their courts. How tht-y do that is a matter
which concerns them. I realize that they muse
be extremely uncomfortable In the small rooms
which they occupy, nnd which afford none of the
comforts of home, but if it la necessary to put
up with such inconveniences to retain possession;
there is no help for it."
Deputy Poli-e Commissioner Ebstein declares
thru tIM police have th-* authority under the
opinion of Corporation Counsel Rives to eject
the oltl magistrates from the court rooms on th<»
ground that they have no business there. So
far he has bt~^n loath to take this strenuous
means of settling matters, temporarily, at least.
but h° may be obliged to step in and exercisej
the powers thru have been given to him.
Jacob Br?nner, chairman of the Republican
Executive Committee, declared last night that
the conduct of the old magistrates In making
forts of their courts was outrageous. He said
tb.it no Republican official was ever guilty of
attempting to hold an office after the term of
his commission had expired. And, even grant
ing that there was some dispute about the ex
piration of the term, they had always been will
ing to yield a point until the matter had been
peacefully settled by courts of high authority.
No man. Judge Brenner said, be he a legally
constituted magistrate or not, had the power to
keep a citizen out of the court rooms, which
were public places, and that in so doing Magis
strate Doolt-y and others had been guilty of a
misdemeanor. Magistrate Hlgginbotham evi
dently took this same view of the case, because
he told a Tribune reporter that any one who
asked admission to his courtroom would get It.
and that all he was holding was the bench.
It Is a clear and undisputed fact that the
commissions under which the fighting magis
trates, appointed by Mayor Van "Wyck last May.
took office, are dated so as to expire on Decem
ber 31. It is contended that these magistrates,
in accepting these commissions so dated, con
ceded that the law providing for the election of
new magistrates to take office on January 1 waa
legal. And. more than that, it is declared that
they further conceded the legality of the law by
accepting nominations under that law and run
ning at the last election to succeed themselves.
Some lawyers say that if at any time they had
ground for contending that Mayer Van Wyek
had no power to limit the term of their appoint
ment, which under the old law was ten years.
as a matter of equity they have waived all
right to such a contention by accepting the com
mission so limited, and by running under the new
law for election to the offices which they were
already filling by appointment under the old.
Mayor Low has not been consulted abc
bill, which, if passed, will place the power of
nominating magistrates in his hands, but those
who have prepared the measure declare that
they are willing to accept any men whom he
may appoint. It is believed that without a
doubt he would appoint the men who wera
elected last November, including Magistrates
elect Brennan and Tighe. who are Democrats, as
well as Magistrates Voorhees and Steers, who
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