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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, February 18, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXI-. N° 20.183.
STREET CLEANING TARTS LOADING IN BROADWAY. REHTND ST. PAUL'S rHFROH.
REPEALING WAR TAXES.
THE UNEXPECTED HAPPENS
IX THE HOUSE.
STAYS AND MEANS BILL PASSED t'NANI
IfOUSLY OX THE DEMOCRATIC
LEADER'S MOTION*.
[BT IHMUn TO THE TFIBfVE.]
TTashington, Feb. 17.— After sharp parlia-
Msrtary sparring over the adoption of a special
rule reported by Mr. DalaeU, of Pennsylvania,
for the Committee on Rules, the War Revenue
Reduction bill, wiping out the taxes levied
to meet the extraordinary expenses of the war
With Spain, passed the House this afternoon
■without a dissenting vote The result was a sur
prise to all the seasoned Republican leaders, as
th«y were not forewarned of the intention of
Mr. Richardson, of Tennessee, the Democratic
taster, to ask unanimous consent for the bus
rwsion of the rules and to put the bill imme
diately on its passage without debate. It was
anarthe Democratic leaders had vainly tried to
obtain a modification of the special rule reported
-V Mr. Dsla»H. fixing the time for closing the
debate at 4 o'clock to-morrow afternoon, that
Mr Richardson, obtaining the floor on some pre
text that did rot appear plain even to Speaker
Henderson, announced that his side unanimous
ly favored the repeal of all th» remaining 'war
taxes, and that, as a. protest against what he
Balled the "gag rules" of the House, he moved
that, without further preliminaries, the 1 bill at
once be put to a vote.
republican; LEADERS ASTONISHED.
Mr. Richardson's motion caused a lively rom
mction on ■he Republican side of the chamber,
>'«.«ts. Payne, Grosvenor. Cannon, Dalzell and
ether leaders quickly gathering in front of the
Speaker's desk and holding hurried consulta
tions, while the Democrats applauded Mr. Rich
ardson's sharp move. The astonished Republi
can leaders consulted Speaker Henderson fre
quently while the confusion lasted, and as no
b<yjy offered any objection to the Democratic
leader's request for unanimous consent for the
Mil to be placed on ps passage, the rollcall on
->lr. Kichardson's motion was ordered without
more ado. Every member in his seat— 27B in
all— registered his rote for the bill in a voice
that rang out resonantly. The incident was
sue of the most remarkable in the recent history
of Congress. A bill that lops off from the pub
lic revenue more than $75,000,000 passed the
House without debate or division, and amid a
FiJenrp, afur the House recovered from its sur-
I'rise. that was oppressive. When this had been
plished the House Immediately adjourned.
leaving the bewildered spectators in the crowd
ed galleries wondering what had happened and
what it all meant. The members Bled out leis
urely, the leaders of the two sides good natured
ly chaffing one another, as if each political party
had achieved a great victory.
riGHT OVER THE SPECIAL RULE.
Preceding the unlooked for result there was a
spirited sage at arms between Messrs. Dal
*■'■'.. Babcock and Cannon for the. Republicans,
end Messrs. Richardson. Underwood. Hay and
Ball of Texas, for the Democrats, over the
adoption of the special rule limiting the debate
and cutting off all amendments. With charac
teristic heat and fury the Democrats denounced
the rule as "tyrannical." "brutal." etc., and with
calm assurance the Republican leaders defended
" as customary and in thorough accord with
the latest approved methods of the House. Mr.
Richardson tried to make a point against the
Republicans by reminding the House that the
precedents established by the Reed rules were
Ignored by the one reported by Mr, Dalzen for
Jnis emergency, but Speaker Henderson broke
yie force of .this argument by proclaiming
•^nkly that the rule complained of was the
**•<*> counterpart of a rule adopted by th
iJetaocrats on a similar occasion when they last
Controlled the House under Speaker Crisp. Mr
Richardson at '.ast resorted to the usual for
mality of moving to recommit the rule to the
committee, and when the Speaker ruled this
m of order, the Tennesseean appealed from
•"* decision of the Chair. The appeal, on mo
■JJ of Mr. Dalzel!. was laid on the table by a
Pi v Party vote. Following these defeats Mr.
Richardson made his surprising flank move
■•■*, with the result stated.
GRATIFICATION IN r THE SENATE.
Although considerably surprised at the out-
Co m» i n the House, the Senate leaders almost
Without exception expressed great gratification.
T*o of the most Influential majority members
«f the Finance Committee, to which the bill will
„ referred when It reaches the Senate, told a
J r f* Pendent of The Tribune that they be
!ri ■ 1? '*' r " 1 I'l pass their body with no more
in V cn or delay than the measure encountered
'/t>iL * House. They said, further, that the only
sra i Uon to '* * bin Jn £ through without
trt f un*u * n * ramo from Senators on both Rides
th * chamber who are not members of the
« ORllnnrd on Vnif 4
— - —H , i _
!£• AUGUSTINE. PALM BEACH AND NASSAU.
p^f!?J train service via Southern Railway to
Tha V* Eaet Coast resorts. Three great trains.
.ilvt 0 ' th « Southern's Palm Limited, leaving
«-~g ,/-**» 12:40 noon for Bt. Augustine. N. Y.
*1 *n-J 1.1*5 Broadway.— Advt-
DANISH TREATY RATIFIED.
PURCHASE OP WEST INDIAN ISLANDS
APrRO\ ED BY SENATE.
ACTION TAKEN AFTER ONLY ONE HOI'RS
DISCUSSION.
Washington, Feb. 17. -To-day. In a little more
than an hour's time. th<> Senate ratified the
with Dean irk ceding to the United
for (5.000.000 the Islands of Pt. Thomas.
St John and Pt. <~roix, composing the croup of
the Antilles known ns the Danish West Indies
and lying just east of Porto Rico, und. thus, so
i this country is concerned, consummated
a transaction which has been under considera
tion Intermittently since th« administration of
Lincoln
The. treaty and the report on It were read at
length, and there was some discussion. Senator
Cullom, chairman of the Committee on Foreign
Relations, made a speech explaining th«» ad
vantages of the acquisition of the islands, and
Senators Bacon and McLaurin, of Mississippi,
made brief remarks, saying that while they
could not Indorse all the provisions of the agree
ment they would place no obstacles in the way
of ratification.
Senator Bacon moved to amend the treaty by
striking out the second paragraph of Article 111.
reading as follow •:
The civil rights and the political status of th»
Inhabitant iif the islands shall be determined
by the Congress, subject the stipulations con
tained in the present convention.
He based his opposition to this provision on
the general ground that the constitution should
extend to the islands when they became a part
of the United States. He said, however, that
failure to accept the amendment would not pre
vent his voting for the treaty, for be believed
in the Monroe Doctrine. Under that do-trine
this country could not permit any Kurope an
power to acquire the islands, and -we could not
in fairness take this position and then cur
selves refuse to buy them when they are for
sale. The amendment was rejected without di
vision.
SENATOR CULLOM'S EJCPLANATION.
Senator Cullom explained all the provisions
treaty, and gave a detailed account of
the island's resources I r trade value to
th< United States He said the provision affect-
Ing the civil rights of the inhabitants was simi
lon on the same subject in the
Spanish treaty concerning Porto h ;
Ltor Cullom said that in taking the islands
the United States would assume no burden of
as by the terms of the agreement all
claims held by Denmark against the Insular
iry would be cancelled )K- placed the
total of these claims at $2,000,000 He a
i the nature of the obligations the United
would assume with reference to th^ St
Thomas Floating Dock company and the West
India ai d Panama Company, saying that on the
apt] franchise It would be necessary t<> pay
a subsidy "f (4,000 a year for three or four
and that in both cases fher«» was nr\
agreement to protect the charters for the time
■ i by Denmark. He also gave a detailed
St, Crolx Sugar Company, ex
plaining that the government of Denmark had
assumed debts amounting to about (700.000
for that concern, but had agreed to wind up
the affairs of thp company as soon as practica
ble, thus relieving the United States of nil com
plications '■!! account of that company.
Senator Cullom explained that under the terms
of th^ treaty th" United States would take pos
n of the islands as soon as ratifications
could be exchanged, and paid that it would not
be necessary to delay that act until the appro
priation of money to pay for them could be
The harbor at Bt Thomas Island was
described as one of the safest ami best In the
West Indies, and the importance of Its posses
sion from a strategic point of view whs enlarged
upon. He said that the control of that harbor
commands 'he military situation so far as n< pes
sary In Cuba, and that it we are to build a
across the Isthmus of Panama the owner
ship of th" harbor by the United States is es
sential, as it guards the approach to it.
itor Cullom's motion to ratify the treaty
then was adoj ted by a viva voce vote.
TREATY WITH ENGLAND RATIFIED.
Washington, J-" 1 b 17 Th» Senate, In executive
to-day, ratified a treaty between the I'nited
. and Great Britain, extending for twelve
months from July CV IMI. the tim»> within which
British ■ or foreign possessions may give
the convention sipned March 2.
MM. for the tenure and disposition of real and p*>r
sonal property.
FOR CUBAN RECIPROCITY.
PLANS UNDER CONSIDERATION ON
BOTH SIDES OF THE HOUSE.
Washington. Feb. 17.— With the passage of the
War Revenue Reduction bill in the House to
day, Informal plans are being considered on both
Fides of the chamber for the consideration of
the Cuban reciprocity question now pending be
fore the Ways and Means Committee. Chair
man Payne said to-night that no definite plan
had yet been matured for taking up the ques
tion, either by the Republican members or by
the committee fis a whole. At the same time
there is a pretty general understanding among
the Republican members of the committee that
Ihey will confer on the subject later in the wee*.
The Democratic embers of the Ways and
Means committee met this afternoon immedl
atets after the passage of th* War Revenue Re
duction act to consider plans for dealing with
the Cuban reciprocity question when it comes
up. No definite line of action van determined
upon.
NEW-YORK. TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 18. 1902. -SIXTEEN PAGES.-.^aaaWSW
SCENES IN LOWER NEW YORK DURING THE STORM.
UNDERBID BY BELGIANS.
BRITISH STEEL MANUFACTURERS LOSE
HOMp CONTRACTS.
TRIP OF BOER DELEGATES—BLUE BOOK
ON AFRICAN CONCENTRATION CAMPS.
(Copyright; 1902 By Th- Tribune Association.)
IBY CAM?: TO THE TRIBOTE )
T,ondr>n. Feb. 18. 1 ». m.— The British rail
manufacturers have been outclassed by their
Belgian rival? In bids for large contracts of
material needed for the electric traction sub
urban line? of London. The Highways Commit
tee of the Common Council will report to-day In
favor of the acceptance of the foreign bids,
which are IS per cent below the lowest English
tenders. This is fresh proof that the steel plant
of the T*nir--<1 Kingdom Is behind the time* and
incapable of keeping abreast with foreign coun
tries The ahfff'nce of Ornun and American
competition In these contracts Is explained In
the trade as the result of the unusual condi
tions prevailing In th« I*nlt*d States, where the
■apply of Iron and steel is Inadequate for meet
ing the requirements of the home markft. Con
siderable imports of mtmjrt have been ordered
from Germany, because the material cannot be
supplied with Kufflclent rapidity for home con
sumption In the LTnli I Btal and thc-r» his
been mHoui delay In carrying out contracts of
Am*rl<-an firms f^r railway construction in
Mexico and other foreign countries. American
and German competition was shut off for this
reason from the London County Council's work.
But even with this advantage, flip English and
Scotch manufacturers lost a good contract from
the lower prices of Belgian material. I-4rge
contracts for electric equipment of the Hudders
fieid tramways have be*-n awarded to a. Man
chester firm. An Immrnsp amount of municipal
work of this nature will come into th» m.irket
In th» course of a few years.
The departure of the Boer delegates for Amer
lea Is not regarded by the English press as a
serious incident. British officials are not con
vinced that Lord Cranhorne has come out well
In his explanations of the secret history of
diplomatic action In the Spanish-American War,
since he has enabled the German Emperor to
prove that th" Berlin Foreign Office disapproved
of the meddlesome intervention of the powers.
but they comfort themselves with the reflection
that an object lesson has been offered against
the Interference of the American Government in
affairs in South Africa The best point made
against the government Is Lord Rosebery's con
tention that the ministers Insist upon making
peace with the Boer leaders fighting In the field,
whom they have themselves by the proclamation
of September 15 condemned to perpetual ban
ishment. This argument weakens the force of
Lord Lansdowne's reply to the Dutch Govern
ment, and may facilitate the final recognition
of the Boer delegates as negotiators. The Brit
ish Government, however, like the American
Government before and after the war with
Spain, will not welcome Intervention of a for
eign power.
Influential Welsh delegation i\iii visit thr
Colonial offW to-day for the purpose of asking
Mr. ."ham! erlaln to provide a transport to carry
a larj?" number of Welshmen from Patagonia to
Canada. William N. < Iri f?lt h. Canadian fle»nt at
Cardiff, atv! w .1 f>rs, from Swansea, who
visiird Patagonia, head the delegation Sir
John Llewellyn will entertain the delegation at
luncheon after the official Interview. About
1,500 of these Welsh piettlera upy 70.00fl
acres, divided Into 350 farms, where no produce
< .in be grown without Irrigation, and where re
curring floods have proved disastrous. Th"
transplanting of this agricultural colony to
Canada is advocated strenuously by the Welsh
delegation.
The Kronprins Wilhelm was in communication
with the Marconi wireless telegraph station at
the Lizard from 12:30 o'clock until '.» yesterday
morning. At <h» latter hour the German liner
was calculated to be 1-1" miles west of the
Cornish coast Ove s hundred words were sent
through between 8:50 and 9 o'clock.
The Brussels correspondent of "The Standard"
states that Dr. MUller will i»» received by th*
President, to whom he "ill hand a letter from
Mr Kriiger.
A considerable sensation was caused In th»-
Parliamentary lobbies last evening by the pres
ence of a young giant from Georgia Standing
7 feet 7 inches, he towered In a striking way
over the surrounding throng in the outer lobby.
Another blue book was Issued last night deal
ing with the South African concentration camps
The reports by Dr. Kendal Franks, who visited
the various camps In the Transvaal and Orange
River Colony, are satisfactory on the whole.
Dr. Franks, however, reveals a deplorable state
of affairs at the MafeMng camp, which has
suffered much from an insufficient supply of
medical men and nurses. I. N. F.
AUK YOU INTERESTED IN STATISTICS.
The lead that 'i* bouse of Moet & Chandon
has in importations to any one country distances
by thousands upon thousands of cases, any com
petitive brand. Moet & Chandon White S«?al of
the famous vintage of ISM. with its gigantic
strides has an increase In 1901 greater than. 100
per cent of the combined Increase of all the. other
— uapasnea Imported.— AdvL
THE WALL-ST. STATUE of GEOBGE WASHINGTON
HEAVY SNOWSTORM STRIKES CITY.
Railroads. Street Traffic and Mails Delayed— Wood-
A snowstorm that would have ranked as a blizzard if the weather had been mlder kept the city in its grasp all
day yesterday. In the early part of the day there was a gale oi forty miles an hour, accompanied by a heavy snowfall.
At the same time the thermometer was nt SW degrees above zero The high wind continued, while the temperature re
mained nearly unchanged, but the snowfall became lighter later in the day and ceased in the evening. Less than ten
inches of snow fell in the city, but the snow was blown in drifts, which seriously blockaded traffic.
The weather prediction given at the local Weather Bureau last night was: "Fair on the coast, snow in the in
terior; Tuesday slightly colder, with high northwest wind* on the coast; Wednesday fair." At 8 a. m. yesterday the
temperature was 30 degrees and the humidity was 100. At Bp. m. the temperature was 27 degrees and the humidity
was sVI
"General delay in traffic in the city was caused by the storm. Vehicles of all kinds had difficulty in getting through
the streets. All the surface cars were delayed by blockades the greater part of the day. many stoppages being caused
by trucks that could not be moved out of the way of the cars. The only lines of travel not seriously affected, were the
elevated road ?, the trains of which were crowded most of the <!a\
There was considerable delay in the running of trains approaching the city, and the mails were I^'* s The "t<-»rrn
was violent along the coast from the Carolinas to Vow England. Hurricane Signals were hoisted ai Samh Hook m the
Sound boats stopped and there were delays in frrrv traffic. The delivery of freight ar the steamship piers
was abandoned for the daw
There was little suffering in the city, because of the absence of severe cold. No accidents ol importance were re
l The -now and wind interfered with business in the city to such an extent that several of the department stores
■ d.
Reports from almosi ill parts ol ork ami the \>\* England States showed that from eight inches to two
f snow had fallen, and that high winds anied the storm. Cotmtry roads were impassable.
In Eastern Pennsylvania the heavy fall of snow impeded steam and surface railroads, but the West enjoyed clear,
fair and almost summerlike weather.
DETAILS OF THE HEAVY STORM WHICH AFFECTS A WIDE ARI A.
THE CITY WAKES UP TO FIND
ITSELF BURIED IN SNOW
DRIFTS.
The New-Yorker who went to sleep at a rea
sonably early hour on Sunday night was aston
ished to find the city snowed in when he awoke
yesterday morning. He might have been par
doned if he thought the city was in the grasp
of a regular blizzard. Snow was falling rapidly,
coming down In large, soft flakes which filled
the air so completely as to make vision across
a street almost impossible, and was blown in
drifts by a gale that was bowling along at
forty-knot speed.
Although the snow did not appear until mid
night, there was a fall of seven Inches by s
o'clock yesterday morning, and there was no
indication of ceasing. On the ground the snow
was distributed so unevenly that some places
were bare, while <"i many sid'Mvalkst on the
north sides of streets the drifts were thre^.
four and even five feet in height. The tem
perature was only slightly below freezing point.
ntid therefore the snow was damp and soft.
Wh«*n it was formed in drifts by th<» howling
gale it was so firm that a man rould walk over
it without sinking far
it was the comparatively high temperature,
in fact, which prevented th» big snow hi el
yesterday from being classed as a blizzard. In
the great blizzard that fled up the city on
March 12. 1888, the mercury fell to «', degrees
below zero, while the wind blew at the rate of
sixty miles an hour, and there a* a fall of
two feet of snow. In the blizzard of February
18, IWO, 'he temperature was near zero, while
the wind went about as fast as it did yester
day, and there was snow enough to block all
trains running into the city and nearly paralyze
local traffic. The thermometer showed 90 de
grees above zero yesterday morning, and even
the high wind did not make the cold penetrate
houses and warm clothing sufficiently to cause,
suffering.
1 Thirty-six decrees, more cold, added to the
snow and the wind, would have made a blizzard
TO THE SOUTHWEST VIA ATLANTA AND
MONTCOMERT.
One day In Atlanta, using 3e.aboard Air Un* Ry'»
train 27. known as "Seaboard Fast Mail.'" leaving
W 23<J Stre«t Ferry. P R R.. 12.10 A M. Sleep«r
optn 10 P. M. Office. LIU Br-.ail-xiv.-A4 .t.
bury at Work Before Snow Ceases.
of 'his storm." was the e\p<*rt opinion clven by
Mr Emery, the local forecaster, if th" Weather
Bureau At the same time Mr. Kmery said there
was a prediction for Iwww traperoton last
night, and higher wind, and the storm might
b> i ome a blizzard after all
WARNINGS FROM WASHINGTON.
' Heavy snows n n 1 lies will prevail
durine the next twenty-four to thirty-six hoars
in the interior ol New- York and New- England
and along the New -England coast." was the
message sent to" Mr Emery from the Waaktsajr
ton Weather Bureau early in the day.
"Hoist hurricane signal w iirninijs. ." p. m.. at
Bandy Hook and New-York. ' was the BSessatS*
sent in the afternoon
The storm continued all day until evening
without much sign of abatement, but in the
evening the snow ceased to fall and the weather
grew colder. Mr Emery said that th* shipping
interests were warned on Saturday that there
was an advancing coast storm, which was cen
tral yesterday morning along the New-Jersey
coast. It was attended by high winds in the
Middle Atlantic district, and by heavy snow
along the Jersey snore, and also along th«» south
ern portion of New-York. There was a heavy
snowfall yesterday In Eastern Pennsylvania.
The snowfall In the lake district, the lower Ohio
and upper Mississippi valleys, the District of
Columbia. Maryland and the extreme southern
part of New-England was) light.
The storm yesterday caused general trouble
and delay In traffic in all parts of th-» city,
while many incoming trains were delayed and
the ferryboats at some points ran irregularly.
The elevate*! roads in the city were less affected
by the storm than other lines of travel, and
they did a rushing business all day. Officials
of the Manhattan Railway Company said that
all locomotives and cars on the lines in Man
hattan were in use.
There was a general blockading of the electric
roads in the city, although the Metropolitan
Street Railway Company sent sweepers along
the tracks at frequent intervals and kept many
men employed in clearing away snow. The chief
trouble, the officials said, was caused by ve
hicle? that got in the way of the cars. Many
of the blockades were caused by trucks that
became stuck in the anew beside the eartracks.
Contlnnrd on *hird yum.-.
DUMPING SNOW AT NEW TIER NO r>, EAST RIVER.
PRICE THREE CENTS,
RURAL NEW-YORK AXD NEW
ENGL A XD S WEPT B V GALE
AXD SNOW.
fBT TELEGRAPH TO THE THlßr!re.l
New-Haven. Conn., Feb. —An old fashioned
blizzard has been going on all day long, and to
night the snow is still falling, threatening com
pletely to tie an the electric lines of the city and
all transportation. The storm Is the worst that
Connecticut feats experienced since the November
I lizzard of IS?S, and in many ways it resembles th*
severest snowstorm ever known here, the famous
blizzard of ISSS.
The storm began with heavy northeast sales early
this morning, and by noon It was a blinding
mixture of high winds, piling snowdrifts and heavy
contjnuius snowfalls. Up to noon five inches had
fallen on the level, and by this evening this had
increased to nine Inches. In many downtown sec
tions the drifts have piled up to six feet high,
making walking impossible.
• The severity of the storm her* crippled the elec
tric, car lines early in the day. completely shutting
off some of the outlying suburbs this afternoon
and delaying traffic In the centre of the city. Snow
pkMUtns were sent out early and kept the car lines
in the business section open most of the day. This
evening the drifts el snow on the tracks kept
pangs of men working till midnight. This coon
it took the station cars an hour to run the eight
blocks to the centre of the city.
Business was practically suspended herd an day.*
and several of th* stores closed at neon. Tha
schools wen closed.
The Consolidated road suffered heavily owing to
the severe drifts in the cuts on the smaller di
visions. There were no stalled trains reported, but
all of the jiMm rotary ploughs wen out. and many
trains had two and even three locomotives, espe
cially on the up-country divisions. All day lons
the Consolidated road ran from twenty minutes to
two hours behind time. The new interlocking sys
ten on the road was made useless by the storm,
and consequently the delays were most serious on
the New-York division. Th- railroad was to-night
preparing for the worst time since the blizzard of
All of the towns in this part of the State ar»
from eight inches to two f»et under snow and
local trolley roads were finding it hard to 'mov
their cars. Bristol reported fifteen inches of now
fall to-night, and similar reports come in from
other towns. Sound shipping was stopped thta
noon the New-York steamers being three hours
behind time The Starin Line steamer Glen Island
was five hours late and occasioned much anxietr
up to noon, when «he arrived.
EASTERN SECTIONS HAMPERED
Hoosick Falls. N Y. FeK K -A heavy Mow .
storm, accompanied by gales, set in early to-day
In Eastern New- York Appearances indicate mere
severe weather than that of two weeks ago Tre*-
FROM BUZZARD TO ST \\Y CLIME

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