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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 02, 1902, Image 2

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cf conditions and the operators' refusal; they heard
of th.- miners' proposition to arbitrate and the
operators' further refusal. Ninety per cent of the
people have agreed that the miners are right and
the operators wrong.
LET NEEDY BE HELPED.
1 understand there is some dissatisfaction and
misunderstanding about the distribution of the e
llcf fund. The operators have seat men among >ou
to urge you to bedissatistied. Through the new*;
JSpera they have told you that you were dissatU,
lied. We have sent a circular to all the locals
which will explain in detail the plans for distrib
uting relief, and 1 trust when you hear It read
th -re will be an end to dissatisfaction ana misun
derstanding. While we haven't got millions, *£
bay^ .enough to «cc to it that no miner will starve
during the continuance of the sink. (Loud cheers.)
1 rant to appeal to men with means to refrain
from applying for relief. Let the fund be bed by
those who .-.re in absolute nee.) of help. Be pa
tent with your con«nitte« Put your shoulder to
the wheel and do poor share of the worK- lJon t
depend altogether on your officers to win your
light If we are to win we must all noli.
The one among you who violates the law is the
worst enemy you have. No one is more P'eAjed
than the operators in New-York to hear of oisorder
In th- co:.! regions. I want our men to exercise tne
rights that inure to them under the laws, but I
want that no man shall transgress the laws.
The strike will be won. (Loud and lon* cheers.)
I have no more doubt about it than I have that I
am standing here addressing you. The operators
are trying to make it appear that the strike is
beginning to break op. There is a saying that
those who come from afar can lie with Impunity.
At ghamokin the operators tell the strikers that the
men at \ViJke=Harre are returning- to work. At
WUkesbarre they tell them that the men at Shamo
kin are returning, and at other places they tell
them that the men at Scranton are weakening. I
fail to see any signs of weakening here. (Laughter
and apnlau?c> „ .
This Is possibly the last time I ever will talk to
you. I want you to listen to me. I want to impress
on yon the importance of winning this strike. If
you* win M you surely will win. there will be no
more strikes: there will be a basis of adjustment
arrived at which will prevent strikes. If you lose
the strike the operator's will make you pay for their
strike losses by reducing your waces. And if you
lose the strike you lose your organization. I trust
and hop* and constantly pray you will stand a,« you
did in 19 JO. (Cheers and cries of "We will!")
ALL VOTE TO CONTINUE.
Before the handshaking began Chairman Phillips
asked all who favored a fight to a finish to raise
their hands. Every hand went up.
Twenty-five years ago to-day— August 1. IS77— ten
thousand striking miners, who had been out for six
months, met at this -ante Round Woods, in almost
the Identical spot where to-day's meeting was held,
end with uplifted hands avowed that they would
not return to work until their demands were
granted. That afternoon occurred the memorable
riot in Lackawanna-ave.. when a company of hastily
formed vigilants killed two men. Bred upon a pro
cession made up of striker? from this and another
mass meeting, who were bent on burning breakers
and who had nearly killed Mayor McKune. when he
tried to halt them. A week later the miners went
back to -work without gaining any concessions and
with their onion disrupted.
As a precaution apainst a possible disorder a "big
squad of police w.-s kept in reserve at headquarters
and twenty patrolmen were stationed in the neigh
borhood of* the Oxford colliery, which yesterday re
sumed operations and which was almost within
Eight of the mass meeting.
MITCHELL DEFIES ALLIAXCE.
HAS STATHD HIS POSITION. AND DKKZBS
RIGHT TO INTERROGATE HIM.
itv telk<;ral'jj to rui: tribine. ]
M'ilkesbarre. Perm.. Aug. I.— President Mitch
ell left this city to address a mass meeting of
strikers in West Scra:iton this afternoon. He
refused to discuss the injunction granted by
Judge Keller in West Virginia against him and
other miiie officials, but said that he would issue
a statement when he had read the f«\ll text of
the opinion.
Mr. Mitchell to-day gave out an answer to the
open letter sent him by the Citizens' Alliance.
In it he denies the right of the Citizens' Alliance
to call on him to declare himself specifically
against disorder, on the ground that he is an
American citizen, and believes in obeying all
the laws, and that all his speeches and state
ments show that he Is opposed to disorder. He
Questions the honesty of the Citizens' Alliance,
and Intimates that its real purpose is to destroy
the miners' union and render futile the work
men's efforts to obtain higher wages and better
conditions of employment. He alludes to the
fact that, large rewards are offered by the Alli
ance for breaches of the peace, and asserts that
they are all made in the Interest of the mine
1 operators. He asks why no rewards were of
fered in several cases, which he names, where
strikers were shot. ;
He concludes by saying that there have been
some transgressions of the law by members of
the miners' union, but that there has been less
lawlessness on the part of the miners than on
the part of the coal and iron policemen.
GUARDS COST TOO MUCH.
OPERATORS DECIDE TO REDUCE THEIR
NUMBER ABOUT ONE-THIRD.
Philadelphia, Aug. 1. — No" men have been sent to
the anthracite coal region* from this city to act as
mine guards for more than two weeks. The rea
son assigned is that the big operators by whom
they were employed had found the expense too
heavy, and that, moreover, they came to the con
clusion that the large force which had been en
gaged in this city, York, Baltimore and the
South was not required. It was therefore deter
mined to drop at least 30 per cent of the total
number ongaped. estimated to be about five thou
sand, and after that to fill the places with men
who could be hired at lower wages.
All sent from Philadelphia received $2 50 a day.
About one thousand were thus contracted for. Of
these it is believed that three hundred io four hun
dred have returned home. Their places were filled
with men who could be got in the coal country
itself for 52 a day.
COAL COSTS AROUND $7 IX CHICAGO.
Chicago, Aug. — Hard coal prices -went up 10
cents a ten In Chicago to-day, making an advance
of 50 cents since April. Should the strike end, it
•will be fully thirty days berate the market here
can to supplied with anthracite coal. No hard coal
is being received, and the stock on hand Is not
large- Prices now range from $<; 90 to $7 13.
RISE IN PRICE OF ANTHRACITE.
Anthracite coal was higher in price yesterday by
•wholesale. The following -were the ruling prices:
Stove. $5 45 alongside; chestnut, $s 23; No. 3 buck
•wheat, $4 25. and pea and dust. $3 00. It «ai> said
by dealers that this was from $1 to $3 90 a ton
above schedule prices. Several of the dealers said
that, though the schedule prices had not changed
since the strike, prices actually paid were far
above the schedule. In some cases the prices
ranged from $1 to $3 90 a ton above schedule price.
This was denied by representatives of the coal
carry: companies. An official of the Erie Rail
road said:
"I know of one case In point. One of the com
panies released ten thousand tons of coal the other
day to a man at the schedule price of $4 90. There
is, of course, very little coal to sell. and the com
panies are only caring for their best customers."
For domestic use the retail schedule price was $8
a ton. Dealers were in some Instances receiving
higher prices, some getting as high as $9 00 and $10
a ton.
roUSCIfOX AGAINST STRIKERS.
BRIDGE COMPANY SAYS THEY KICK AND
EEAT ITS EMPLOYES.
Justice I' -k<y, yeM'-rday. in the Supreme Court.
Brooklyn, granted t- c application of the Empire
Bridge C< mjiany for a temporary Injunction re
straining the Inside Iron Workers from interfering
by violence or threats with the company or its
employes, or persons seeking employment at its
plant, at Clay-st. and Paige-aye. It is said the
trouble is due to a rec. Nt strike of the employes
of the bridge company.' caused by the discharge of
several of their fellows prominent in the union.
Counsel satd that in an attempt to force the com
•<u make its shop union, the strike had been
declare*" . The strikers, he asserted, had picketed
all the street? approaching the shop, save one. which
was kept open by the police and the company's new
men were being beaten, kicked and threatened by
the strikers. Counsel for the. strikers believed
that the authority of the courts should not be ln
snccessfully too readily on behalf of em
ployers. 'There Is a demagogic cry sometimes,"
remarked Justice Dickey, "that the courts are for
- I Now. it is my experience that the poor
man gets the better end of it every time."
COTTOX SPIXXERS UXDECIDED.
Manchester, Aug. I.— A general committee of the
Federation of Master Cotton Spinners decided to
day to wait to see what effect the forthcoming
holidays will have In reducing the output of cot
ton manufactures before adopting artificial steps
to that end. The latter course had been re.-.,ni
mendeil in order, to meet the American action in
raising the price of raw material. The commit
tee believed. hoWV»r, That the August holidays
■would considerably decrease the output.
BOYS' CADET CORPS.
I'kuloKrapha of the members of the Cadet
Corps of W«verley < out • « 1 1. .111: 1 Church,
Jersey City Hei ht». A brief account of the
'fun and the benefit they receive from this
' oirgranication. .See Tlie Saodar T»-ii-- «c to-
ARBITRATION SUCCESSFUL
THIS GOVERNMENT WELL SATISFIED
WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF IHE
. LAST SIX YEARS. x *k t !
IBY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Washington. Aug. I.— The government is
pretty Troll satisfied over Its experiences with In
ternational arbitration in the last six years, and
it is not likely to hesitate to submit to an im
partial tribunal any matters of dispute which
may arise with other nations, except such pre
posterous claims a? those advanced by Canadian
politicians over the long ago defined Alaskan
boundary, and which cannot be regarded as
open to any question whatever. Most of the re
cent controversies in which the United States
has been concerned, and which have been sub
mitted to arbitration tribunals, have arisen from
damage claims filed by American citizens against
Latin-American republics.
Judge PenflpJd, the solicitor of the State De
partment, who prepares all the international
cases of American claimants, nnd on whose
judgment they are pressed or abandoned, says
there have been sixteen cases submitted to arhi
tration by the United States since March 4, 1897,
and of these three are still pending. Only two
cases have been lost out of the sixteen. One
was a small case against Mexico, which was de
cided by Mr. Quesada. the Argentine Minister
nt Madrid. The other was ■ claim 01 $10,000
against Salvador, which was regarded by this
government as a perfectly plain and Just case,
but the arbitrators, unfortunately, were citi
zens of other Latin-American States. The re
maining eleven cases were won outright by the
United States. In two of the three still pending
the courts have unmistakably Intimated a ver
dict for the United States, and the third is re
garded as a foregone conclusion in favor of this
country. As a general thing this government
assumes all the expense of pressing tho just
claims of its citizens against other States, but
in the case of comparatively generous awards
the State Department expects the successful
claimant to pay the necessary expense, at least
in part, and in few cases arc private counsel
fees paid by the government.
THE PIOUS FUND CLAIM.
A notable instance of tho assumption by this
government of the expenses of arbitration is
that of the Pious Fund claim, which has the
distinction of being the first case ever placed
on the docket of The Hague International tri
bunal. This Is a claim by the Roman Catholic-
Church of California against Mexico for more
than !?I.oo<HMi<t of accrued interest, as has al
ready been told in the history of the case pub
lished In The Tribune on July 23. The State
Department induced Congress at its last session
to appropriate ?. r i<>,o(H} for the conduct of the
case, without expense to the dn'mant. as it in
volves considerable expenditure for printing and
for transporting original records, that would
cause ton great a draft on the emergency fund
of the department. The government has also
furnished all the legal talent required to pre
sent the claim properly to the arbitrators and
,0 make the argument, by detailing Solicitor
Penfleld to go to Holland and appear for the
United States. He will sail from New-York on
August ML and will be compelled to remain be
fore the tribunal until the end of October, when
the hearing will be closed and the arbitrators
will have a month in which to render their
decision.
The action of the department In assigning
Judge Penfield to the case when he cannot
easily be spared from his duties in Washington
is in part due to the great amount of money
and the principles involved. A favorable de
cision would mean not only a Finn in excess of
$1,000,000 gold for Interest from 1868 to this
time, but would bind Mexico to keep up the
payment for all time in the future, unless that
government restored th" original fund to the
California bishop. But the whole attitude of this
government toward the case is calculated to
convince those who are responsible for the
maintenance of the obnoxious friars In the Phil
ippines that the United States can be truste 1
to act for the best Interests of its people ail
over the world, and Is not to be influenced by
considerations of petty prejudice or partisan
expediency.
BRAZIL COMING TO TERMS.
TO GIVE SATISFACTION FOR FIRING ON AN
AMERICAN SCHOONER.
[r.v TELEGRAPH TO the TIUP.fXE.I
Washington. .Aug. I.— The State Department has
received from Charles Page Bryan. Unite.l States
Minister to Brazil, a draft of a protocol submitted
by the Government of Brazil for the arbitration of
the claim of George C. Beaner and others, owners
of the schooner James A. Simpson, who live in
New-York. Brooklyn. Jersey City, Hoboken an.i
other Eastern cities. An agreement for arbitration
was reached some time ago by Secretary Hay and
the Brazilian Minister at Washington. The pro
tocol, which has not yet been signed, suggests that
the case be submitted to Mr. Grip, Minister of
Sweden and Norway at Washington, and this
proposition. If accepted, will delay the case some
what, as Mr. Grip is away on leave of absence, an'l
will not return until October.
The schooner James A. Simpson, of New-York,
was built at St. George, Me. The vessel arrived at
Rio Janeiro on August 29. 18S3, at the time of
the revolution of that year. Permission was given
to dock the vessel and discharge the cargo, and
the vessel remained several days discharging
freight. On September 9 the captain went ashore
on business, and. desiring to return, signalled for
the long boat, which started for the shore in charge
of the steward. When about twenty yards from
the wharf it was fired upon by a company of
Brazilian soldiers stationed on the wharf, notwith
standing the fact that a large American flag was
hoisted at full mast. One bullet passed through
the oar, one through the Hag, and two penetrated
the flagstaff. The steward was uninjured and
hastily returned to the vessel. The greatest dam
age was done to the vessel Itself. It wan In range
of the firing, nd the shot raked it fore and art
Satisfaction was at once demanded, but the Brazil
ian Minister did nothing, except explain that an
hour before a launch of the insurgents had ap
proached the fame wharf and been fired on, and
that the soldiers had mistaken the American Bag
for the flag of the insurgents. A claim was filed
•with the State Department at Washington at one-,
but not until the present time could Brazil be
persuaded to pay any attention to it.
TO PRIXT ITS OWX POSTAGE STAMPS.
THE BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING SIJ;
MITS THE LOWEST BID.
Washington, Aug. The government will prob
ably print Its own postal stamps, as the result of
the bids opened at the PostoffW Department to-day
for the contract for supplying stamps for the four
years beginning October 1 next. It had been said
that the price asked by the Bureau of Engraving
and Printing was exorbitant, and that the work
would have to go to a private concern. The
bureau's bid, however, proved the lowest. It Is
as follows: Five cents per 1,000 of ordinary postage
stamps; seven cents per 1.000 for postage due
stamps; 15 cents per 1,000 for special delivery
stamps; $2 &2 por 1,000 books containing twelve
stamps each; $3 45 per 1.000 books containing twenty
four stamps each, and $4 40 pt r l,0«)0 books contain
ing forty-eight stamps each. The only other bidder
■was the American Bank Note Company, of New-
York, whose bid Is estimated to be about $15,000
higher for the four years than the bureau's bid.
SOME STATISTICS FROM GERMANY.
[BY TELEGRAPn TO THE TltllllXK. ]
Washington, Aug. I.— There were nearly 18,000
Americans In Germany, according to the last cen
sus, out of a total population of 63,587,000. and 40,000
Russians, 55 Swiss. €9,000 Italians. 88,000 Dutch and
380,009 Austro-llungarlans, a total of 730,000 aliens.
The emigration last year from Germany was 22.073.
These figures are reported to the State Department
from the embassy at Berlin by Secretary Dodge.
He also says that there were 1,071 strikes in 1901.
Involving 141.220 persons, as against 1.4C2 strikes.
Involving 298,81* persons, in 1900. In 200 cases in 1901
the strikers were successful. in 285 they were par
tially sill 11— III and in 571 they failed. Th. Budget
for th. German colonies amounted In 1902 to
$B.9ol^'«i and in 1901 to $7,949,200. The total trade
with th- colonies in "1900 was valued at $13,527,5(10.
In 1S» at $12,709,200 and In IKB at $n,0G7,0tt>.,.,, i ;•••'•
PREMIERS STILL IX COXFEREXCE.
London, Auk. The conference of colonial
Premiers to-day was again taken up with considera
tion of the tariff and shipping questions. The
final meeting, it is expected, will be held on Au
gust 8, after which the proceedings may be sub
mittted to Parliament in the form of a Blue Book.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SATURDAY, AUGUST 2. 1902.
ARMOR VERSUS ORDNANCE.
THE NAVY HAS A NEW PLATE OF OUEAT
RESISTING POWER.
Washington. Aug. I.— Naval officials hope to
offset the recent development in high explosives
and armor piercing projectiles by the army
through a considerable improvement in the re
sisting power of the armor plating of v battle
ship. Lieutenant Cleland Davis, attached to the
Naval Ordnance Bureau, has produced an armor
plate which was recently tested at the proving
grounds at Bethlehem, and the results encourage
the naval officials here to believe that the armor
plate has again overtaken the gun in the never
rndlng struggle for supremacy.
This plate is obtained by a novel process, car
bon being driven directly into the surface of the
hot plate by an intensely powerful current of
electricity, the result being a face as hard as
glass, and of any thickness desired, supported
by a tough back, which, it is believed, cannot
be cracked. The depth of the hardening is regu
lated by the length of time the current plays
on the plate. It is said that an average plate
c;,n be completely treated electrically jtt ft*»
hours. Moreover, the plate is said to lie a third
lighter for the same resisting power, which
means a great saving to constructors.
TREASURY DEFICIT IN JULY.
EXPENDITURES $7,507,870 GREATER
THAN RECEIPTS.
Washington. Aug. 1.-The monthly comparative
statement of the government receipts and expendi
tures shows that for July, 1902. the receipts amount
ed to $49,305,691 and the expenditures to $50,813,667,
leaving a deficit for the month of $7,507,876. The
receipts from the several sources of revenue are
given as follows, compared with July, 1901:
Customs $24,430,713 Inc. $3 106.T50
Haemal revenue 21.615.124 Dec. *":^|-^!"
Misrellaneous 3.20«.*« Inc. J.US.C.ST
The decrease in the receipts from Internal reve
nue is due to the Revenue Reduction act passed at
tne last session of Congress, which went into
operation on July 1, 1802.
The e> penrlltvires on account of the War Depart
ment show an Increase of $1,560,«W, and there Is an
Increase on account of the Navy Department of
$) 375,ttft.
An unusual expenditure in July wr»s about $3.27).
i*«i paid to several of the States, under a ruling by
the Controller of tlio Treasury, for expenses con
nected with raising troops in the Civil War.
The monthly statement of the national debt
shows that at "the close of business on July 31, the
debt, less cash in the Treasury, amounted to
$573,910,367, which is an increase, compared with
July i, of $4.4."i.X,128. This Increase Is accounted for
by the reduction In the amount of cash on hand.
PHILIPPINE COMMERCE.
A MARKED DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
SPANISH AND AMERICAN AD
MINISTRATION.
[BY TELEOP.APH TO THE TRinUNR.I
Washington. Aug. There Is a marked and grati
fying Increase in the customs receipts of Insular
possessions, the same being taken as a barometer
to Indicate the successful administration or mis
management of their respective governments, and
the customs collections In the Philippines afford an
interesting study, as they Indicate the ability of the
government both to administer affairs and provide
for U: ■ ...; rn»e of administration. While Spain ruled
in '"■"■ arc irv!ago customs duties were high, and
to :'• ;t .1.,. schedule of rates as published in the
tariff tnere were certain percentage! and surtaxes
added, which made th« rates more eXCesatVC than
would appear from a simple examination of the
published tariff. For example, under th.- Spanish
tariff, Paragraph IS"), the duty on oak staves was
stated to be .40 cents .1 thousand. The '■official
VHiue" was placed at t'-'Jt a thousand, and to ar
rive at the total amount of duty to be collected
upon one thousand oak staves it whs necessary to
add together: The duty as per tariff, Ml cents; 10
per cent of the above duty, 4 cents, and percentage
of official value, $17 GO; total consolidated duty,
OS O4. . « .w\|
This calculation had to bo made for every entry
by Importers, thus giving rise to numerous dis
putes and mistakes and opening the way for lrr#RU
[arltles. The following table shows the comparison
of total customs receipts under Spanish and Anv-i
can administration, and la self-explanatory:
Year. Bpsaisk. American.
1600 $3,140.95499
1-I.] 5.M0.403 41
iftU 4/'2T, .v.7 12 — —
18!i3 4.238,81* 37
ISJH 4.702.932 84 —
1885 4.421.71*41
IBM 0,040,706 SO
IHm 6,W3.13t)12
:-■.•■ - .-.I (10H month*) $6. 2.* 2. 738 12
!-■•■• 1 ""> :i--;i! year — 11,403.813 OS
1800 (July and August) • 3.4&0.028MJ
Average yearly receipt* ii v ">
•97. inclusive 4.334.175 lo
Average monthly receipts 301,13124 570,720 70
The total customs receipts for the fiscal year
ended Juno 30. IM9. were SU.4O.n3tt Mexican
money — more than twice those of the year 1597,
under Spanish administration; 127 per cent more
than the total for UK, and nearly three times those
of 1835; 22 per cent more than the entire revenue of
the archipelago from all sources for the year 11*90.
and only IS per cent less than the average yearly
revenues for the Islands from all sources of Income
for the eieht years in tn* period IK>O-'37.
The above figures relate to the earlier period of
American occupation— a time when revolution seri
ously Interfered with thr normal flow of commerce.
It was felt from the beginning that the Spanish
tariff should be revised, arid this work was per
formed after the most thorough discussion both at
Manila and Washington. The tariff finally enacted
and approved by Congress on March 8. 19^. pro
scribed rnt.-s which, on the whole, were much lower
than those which obtained under the, old tariff.
There was no little concern on the part of those In
authority as to the Income that would be derived
from the new tariff, for all such legislation Is prob
lematical until put to the test by actual experiment.
The gradual Increase of customs receipts has, how
ever, been gratifying, as shown by the following
table:
Receipts for the four months ending:
April .?«. ISW. .$1.21R«.',7 33; April 3" !!»>1 .. .$2 771,303 00
April .'SO, 1900.. L.889.284 82| April 30, i:«ii:. . . 3,.Mt4.(»75 03
The above sums are In United States money, and
it will be noted that there lias been a steady in
crease in the collections, the revenues for the" first
four months of the current year being more than
rtouhle those of 1899. under a tariff with rates on
the whole much lower than these in force In the
former period.
NAVY WILL USE POPGUNS.
SUB-CALIBRE TUBES AND SMOKELESS
POWDER AT MANOEUVRES.
Washington, Aug. The joint war manoeuvres
off the eastern end of Long Island will be robbed
of their spectacular features, so far as the navy is i
concerned, by the decision which has been reached
to use sub-calibre tubes in the large guns. These
tubes are only an Inch in diameter.. It also has
been decided to use smokeless powder. The firing
of smokeless powder creates practically no report,
and. of course, is not appreciable to the sight
Some question has arisen as to the ability of the
umpires ashore to determine the- points of the war
game if they are unable to see the smoke from the '
gutiH or to hear the Bound of their explosion The
army, on the other hand, will employ the old I
fashioned black powder from the fortifications and I
there will be plenty of din and smoke when they co i
into action.
CANNOT SAVE GUILTY CADET.
I
DISMISSAL THE IMPERATIVE PENALTY FOR '
• / ■ !
HAZING.
Washington, Aug. Ex-Delegate Crnndnll. of
Arizona, was at the War Department to-day in the
Interest of Cadet Pendleton. who has been found
guilty of hazing at the West Point Military Acad
emy. Pendleton was appointed to the academy by
Mr. Crandall. and he has a great interest in hav
ing him retained, as he would be ready to enter the
army next year. He was Informed that the law In
the case is explicit, and that neither the Secretary
of War nor the President can prevent the dismissal
of a cadet who is found guilty of hazing.
1
BOM EH RECOVERED XEAR MELBOURNE. I
Melbourne, Aug. I.— So far sixty-seven bodies
have been recovered from the Mount Kimbla Coll- i
iery, at "Wollongong, where an explosion, occurred
yesterday. The work of rescue Is much hampered
by afterdamp In the mine.
IT ' . % _
A XE\YFOrXDLA\D ARBITRATOR.
London, Aug. 1. — Alfred Lyttleton has been ap
pointed arbitrator In behalf of Newfoundland to
adjudicate the claims held by Mr. Reid, the rail
road contractor, against the Newfoundland Gov
ernment. He will sail for St. John's about the
middle of this month.
bay siiiiiii: horse: show.
Some of the oHIcIuIh In charge of the allow,
nlno Home of (he homes entered In th*
• <oiiijM-mioii. *«•<- Tlj«- Sunday Tribune to
••"»rr©-«r. . .
;GEN. SMITH LEARNS FATE.
GETS FIRST XEWS OF HIS RETIREMENT
| vs; AS TRANSPORT NEARS SHORE.
San Francisco, Aug. I.— Standing on the bridge
of the transport Thomas, eagerly waiting, with
the ship's. captain, for a glimpse of his native
shore. General Jacob. H. Smith, who was tried
by court martial for having ordered the island
of Samar transformed into "a howling wilder
ness," was doomed this morning to learn that
the President had retired him from active duty.
The pilot boat which met the Thomas Just out
side the heads at 2 o'clock this morning brought
to General Smith the first news of the Presi
! dent's action. In the falling light of a bin
nacle lamp the veteran read the message that
apprised him of his fate. An hour later the
dawn came, and with It the sight of land, but
I General Smith had retired to his cabin, where,
with his wife and chief aid, Lieutenant J. H.
' Shields, of the 12th Infantry, he discussed the
outcome of the long ordeal through which he
had passed. Six hours later, when the Thomas
reached the quarantine station in the harbor,
. Major Duval, of the transport service, boarded
the ship with his secretary and met both Gen
eral Smith and Lieutenant Shields at the door
of the general's cabin. A sealed document from
the War Department was handed to General
Smith. It contained the official notification of
President Roosevelt's action, and upon reading
it General Smith retired, overcome with emo
tion.
General Smith was not seen again until the
United States Custom House tender Hartley
j was ready to take him and his party ashore.
I He denied himself to all interviewers, who were
met by Lieutenant Shields. Together with his
wife and aid. General Smith proceeded to the
Occidental Hotel, repairing thence to Army
i Headquarters, In the Phelan Building, where he
! remained all the morning. Lieutenant Shields
: said:
General Smith has absolutely nothing to say
for publication. He is not at liberty to talk,
and furthermore, has nothing to say. He h:i3
been hopeful that the President would not take
action against him, nnd. of course, feds keenly
the force of the blow he has received. The gen
eral admitted to the court martial that tried him
that he had issued orders which, in effect, ex
pressed his desire that the enemy, if obdurate
and unconquerable, be not spared— in fact, that
the country be laid waste and no prisoners be
taken. The literal construction of these orders
and their exact interpretation made up the
bulwark of evidence against the general at the
court martial. There is no doubt that General
Smith did not mean nil he saii. Ho certainly
did not expect the action that the President has
taken.
General Smith, who Is Venrlng civilian attire,
appeared exceedingly nervous and worn. His
sixty-two years are plainly read in his every ac-
Uon, and his Intimate friends fear he is break
ing down under the severe strain to which he
has been subjected in recent months. It is not
yet known when General Smith will go East.
His sealed orders reri«lre him to report to the
adjutant general at Washington, and it Is like
ly that he will lose no time In starting for the
national capital.
Repeated efforts made to induce General Smith
to dtocusa h!n campaign in the Philippines and
his court martial failed entirely. He even de
clined to take up the subject with intimate
friends.
The transport Thomas brings portion? of the
°..">th nnd 2(>th Infantry regiments and the nHU
Cavalry.
THE PLANS OF THE VATICAN.
FRIARS IN SHALL NUMBERS TO BE WITH
DRAWN.
' Rome, Aug. J.— According to statements ob
tained from reliable sources It Is the Intention
of th* Vatican that the friars of the Augustln
lan, Dominican. Franciscan and Recolleto orders,
now In Manila, who number al>out four hundred
and fifty men, should lenve there In smull num
bers at different times, so that when the moment
comes to resume negotiations between Governor
Taft and the Apostolic delegation, all the friars
will have left the archipelago In such a way
that the friar question will have resolved itself
without the necessity of further discussion.
THE VATICAN SAID TO BE PLEASED.
Rome, Aug. I— The •'Osservatore Romano."
the Vatican oriran, reproduce* an interview
with the Right Key Thomas O'Oorman, Hlshop
uf Hlmix Fulls, S. 1).. concerning the Taft nego
tiations, says that those negotiations were hnp
pily ended, and nd.is: "The gift of the Tope to
the President is proof that all was concluded
according to the desires of the Vatican."
CONSTABULARY DEFEAT BOBBERS.
Manila, Aug. I.— A force of constabulary dis
covered recently an extensive KaMpunan organi
sation In Tayabas Province and captured the
headquarters and record* of the organization.
When the police attacked the headquarters the
natives fled, leaving six prisoners and one dead
man. A confession made by a prisoner and the
documents taken revealed the existence of an
extensive active organization.
The constabulary columns In Cavlte hnve met
again the bands of Feliaardo and Montalion
and scattered them in running fights. Captain
Bam&gon, a bandit, was killed and Felizardo
was forced to abandon his horses.
GOVERNOR OF PAKAGUA.
Manila, Aug. I— Captain William A. Phillips,
of the l<Hh Infantry, has been appointed Gover
nor of the Island of Paragua.
SOLDIERS ASCEND MOUNT MAYOR.
Manila. Aug. I.— A party of soldiers has suc
ceeded in ascending t ne volcano of Maytm,
which Is active. It took the party twenty hours
to reach the crater. This was the second ascent
of this volcano ever iniule.
EMPEROR'S PARDOX CRITICISED.
DUELLING DENOUNCED BY MANY GERMAN PUB
LICATIONS
Berlin, Aug. I.— The pardon of Lieutenant Hllde
brand by the Emperor is universally disapproved
outside of military circles. Even the aristocratic
"Grcnzbote" says the attempt nt discrimination
• between the duel and the duellist Is a mistake, and
! leads to confusion between the public conscience
i and confidence in generaL The paper adds:
The stability of the monarchy Is shaken by this
pardon, which is Incomprehensible to the people's
sense of justice, and which contradicts former
ministerial declarations. The thoughtful, serious
spirit of our people fails to understand these fro
quent changes of ideas and decisions. Moreover,
the Christian conscience of the people is dis
quieted. Concerning duels, the public's attitude is
entirely In line with Christianity and its ethical
verities, and the people's feelings should be spared
even where they are not sympathized with.
The popular Idea of the significance of the pardon
i 18 that the government's anti-duelling order was
, merely a matter of form, to stop the moral pressure
; being brought against army duels.
| KAISER'S SPEECH AT SCHWERIX.
Schwerln. Aug. I.— At ■ banquet In his honor
given here to-dny Emperor William acknowledged
the welcome accorded to him. rind said he zealously
cherished ami fostered the hope that the close
and warm relations between MecklenburK-Schwerln
and Prussia would continue. The Enrvperor said he
had never entertained any doubts of the fidelity of
the people of Mecklenburg-Schwerln, and con
cluded his speech by calling for three cheers for
the Grand Duke of Mecklenburs-Schwerln.
PLAINFIEL.D, »• J.
Th* Mayor of I'lni ufiel<|, O. 1,. Jenkins, ex
plain.* the very rattle feature* of that
city for !i 01:1 en of \en-York t>ii*tii<--<» mem.
See The SuuUmjt Tribune to-morrow .
MB. BALDWIN IN NORWAY.
EXPLORER TELLS OF EXPERIENCES IX
THE FAR NORTH.
Honninssvaag. Norway. Aug. I— Evelyn B.
Baldwin, the arctic explorer, arrived here to
day. He reported all his men in good health,
and said: "We have been bafflerl, but not beat
en." Mr. Baldwin continued as follows:
The year's work has been successful in that
enormous depots of condensed food have been
established by means of sledges, one in Rud
Land, within sight of the Italian expedition
headquarters, another In latitude 81 desreea 0.1
minutes, and a third at Kane Lodge, freely
Island These depots, together with houses ana
stores left at Camp Ziegier. will afford the means
for a largp Polar dash in fife All channels
through Franz Josef Land remained blocked
with ice in the autumn of 1901. and prevented
the establishment of depots by steamers M
year The breaking up of ice early in June
compelled the use of reserve supplies, hence the
departure from Camp Zlogler on July 1 in order
not to imperil the expedition. I dispatched fif
teen balloons with :'>uo messages, and on June
1 obtained the first moving picture of arctic
life I also discovered Nansen's hut, recovering
the original documents and securing paintings o^
the hut. Marine collections for the National
Museum, including new charts, etc., were ob
tained. .
In the field work thirty men. thirteen ponios.
sixty sledges and 170 dogs were employed from
January 21 to May 21. and this severe work
resulted In the destruction of sledges and de
pletion of the food for ponies and dogs, thus
rendering our return imperative. I shall remain
at Tromsoe a week for repairs to the America s
rudder and propeller frame, which were broken
by the ice on the return voyage. The main
anchor was lost in a gale in October.
Mr. Baldwin sailed from Vardoe. Norway, on
July 30. 1901. An auxiliary expedition started from
Vardoe on July 7. 1902. under command of William
S. Champ, to Join him.
SEW ITAUAN-BWIBR RELATIONS.
CHANGES IN MINISTRY MADE PTBLIC
CAI'SE OF TROUBLE.
Berne. Aug. I.— Dr. G. Carlin, former Swiss
Minister to Italy, has been appointed Minister
to Great Britain, replacing Dr. C. D. Bourcart,
who is ordered to Washington to relieve J. B.
Pioda, Stvfrss Minister to the United States,
who goes to Italy.
Dr. Bourcart declined the post. These changes
are due to the resumption of diplomatic rela
tions between Italy and Switzerland following
a settlement of the differences that grew out
of a demand made by Commandatore Silves
trelli, Italian Minister to Switzerland, .for the
punishment of the owners of an anarchist news
paper which it wa« alleged had published an
article insulting to the memory of King Hum "
bert The Swiss Government objected to tne
language used by M. Rllvestrelll in making the
request and asked that he be replaced by an
other minister. The severance of diplomatic re
lations followed. A settlement of the differences
was arranged through the mediation of Ger
many.
ITALY APPROVES OFCHAXOB.
Rome, Aug. I.— The announcement of Minis
ter Pioda's transfer from the United States to
Italy was well received here. It is considered an
excellent selection and will go far toward re
storing good foellng between the two countries.
P. B. BTMOHQ REPENTANT.
ASKS MAY YOHE TO FORGET HIS FORMER
OFFENCES.
London. Aug. I.— May Yobe drove to the Savor
Hotel this morning and registered as Lady Franela
Hope. She spent the day at th* hotel dejectedly,
reading and rereading ■ batch of letter* which »be
had just received from Putnam Bradlee Strong, and
In which, while urging forgiveness and beseeching
news of Ml*» Tone's future movements, he care
fully disguised his own place of residence. On the
Inside flap of one envelope Strong wrote: "Send
word by him (bearer) if you forgive me."
On reading this Miss Yohe exclaimed:
There have been all sorts of friends here to-day
offering me all sorts of inducements to leaVe, here
but I care only for Itraul~ Where is he? Why
don't they bring him to me? Why does he write
me If h<« doesn't love me? 1 would; forgive him in a
minute If he would only say that he is sorry.
Miss Yohe grew quite hysterical. Strong's letters
declared that he was within a day's rtde of Paris.
which was obscure enough to leave Miss Yohe in
doubt as to whether he was In England or at
Genoa.
Miss Yohe had all her trunks packed In readiness
to ico to Paris, but an intimation she received that
Strong was not there finally decided her to remain
in London. Kef erring to this decision she said:
I don't see how I can spend another night In this
miserable place, but I suppose I must.
Prior to leaving London Strong told his friends
he Intended to go to the United States and never
to see Miss Ytrtie agrnln. It is now evident that he
has changed his plans, and that a reconciliatory
meeting between him and Miss Yohe is only a mat
ter of -1 few day*. Such a meeting would probably
have occurred already tf Strong were not doubtful
as to Ml*» Yohc'« attitude li» the matter of criminal
proceedings against him.
NO RECONCILIATION. SAYS FRIEND.
Thero will be no reconciliation between Miss Yohe
and Captain o--<>n«. If "Manny" Friend's opinion
count- In the matter. Mr. Friend yesterday reiter
ated his assertion that Miss Yohe hated her for
mer Idol.
"Of course, It wouM be unprofessional of me to
discuss the terms of the agreement made here."
said Mr. Friend. "But you may be sure rhere will
be no reconciliation. Miss Yohe if* going at once
to Genoa to redeem her Jewels pawned there; aba
is not going to meet the captain. I am positive of
tliat. I have not heard from her yet. but. of course.
1 shall. The atory U all wrong."
HITCH IX CMXF&E TARIFF.
SIP. JAMES L. MACKAT'S PIRN'S MAT NOT HE
ADOPTED.
Ixmdon. Aug. I.— A news agency dispatch from
Shanghai says that a serloun hitch has occurred,
between Sir James L. MacKity and the Chinese
treaty commissioners, threatening to Interrupt the
negotiations looking to the adoption of Sir James
L. Mackay's scheme for Chinese tariff revision.
A dispatch io "The London Times" from Shang
hai on April 25 <i"°ted a Chinese merchant to the
effect thnt the Chinese native merchants opposed
Sir James 1,. Muckay's tariff plans b*vuuse ot lack
of belief that the British government would keep
China to her engagements.
BRITISH PLANS UNALTERED.
Poking, Aug. 1. — Advices received here from
Shanghai say the disagreement lietween the
P.ritlsh and Chinese treaty commissioners arises
from the fact that the Chinese object to the
British regulation concerning Inland navigation,
while the British commissioners insist upon the
acceptance of Sir James L. Mackay's scheme In
its entirety.
AUSTKIAX PMTJi DEALERS AXXWUS.
FEAR LEST PICTURE POSTAL CARDS MAT
SEniOUSLT INJURE- TRADE.
Vienna, Aug. I.— The annual report of the Aus
trian Association of Paper Dealers says that th©
stationery business will be ruined unless the use
of picture postal cards as substitutes for letters
should diminish. The enormous extent to which
the picture cards are used on the Continent is
shown by the fact that more than two hundred and
fifty thousand of them were mailed from Graz this
week, at the time of the German Sangerbunil
festival.
THE ESTATE OF LORD FAUWCMfOTB.
London. Aug. I.— The will of the late Lord
Pauncefote. British Ambassador t.» the United
States, has been proved. The vain* of the h
tate is placed at £03,700 (S3IN,. ri00).r i 00).
MR. s'IACKELTOX ELECTED.
London, Aug. I.— D. E. Shackelton. a member of
the Labor party, has been elected to the House of
''ommonn without opposition, to nil the vacancy
In the seat for tho Clitheroe Division of Lancashire
caused by the elevation to the peerage of Sir L'Kh-
BATTLE AT AGUA DUL
FIERCE FIGHT MADE BY INSURGENTS
REBELS DRIVEN BACK.
Panama, Aug. 1. — The peace commissioners
who left here on July 29 on the British stearnei
Cana to visit the revolutionary General Herrera
near Aqua Dulce, returned to Panama at nooi
to-day. They said that they were enable t<
fulfil their mission because a severe engage
ment between Herrera's forces and the govern
ment troops has been in progress since Tuesday
July 29, when the revolutionary forces began t
attack Apia Dulce.
At 5 o'clock on Thursday morning the bes
battalions of the revolutionary forces attacke
the government intrer.chments with fierce com
age. The slaughter of the revolutionists is sal
have been excessive and barbarous. That sam
afternoon the white flag was raised in the'
camp, and they asked for an armistice durin
which they could bury their dead. This wa
granted. The losses of the rebels up to Wednes
day. July .'!<>. were reported at over two hun
dred. while the government forces had had eight
men killed and eleven wounded.
General Moreno, one of the peace commis
sioners, who returned to-day, says that the in
trenchments at A ua Dulce are masterpieces 0
At ta the expiration of the time of armistice thi
engagement began again with the same fierce
ness Nine government battalions which ha
not taken part in the fight, were still being hr\
In reserve Safa^f Governor of Panama, hal
General Salazar. Governor of Panama, ha
received a letter from the government Genera
Morales Berti saying he Is enthusiastic as to th.
outcome, and that he hopes to win a ■■*«■<
which will decide the fate of the isthmus Gen,
era Ha aLar, in his turn, is doing everything i,,
hi 9 power to help General Bert! At 3 o ctocl
this afternoon he dispatched further supplies o1o 1
provisions and ammunition for Bern's army a,
Aqua Dulce. .
CLOZriiK OF FHESCM SCHOOLS.
MANY DECREES SIGNED BY PRESIDS2T
LOUBET.
Paris, Aug. I.— A Cabinet council was heM a
Ramboulllet, where President Lr.ui et is staying
to-day. The Premier, M. Combes. explain*
that six thousand religious establishments ha
not applied for authorization as required by th
Law of Associations. Half of the number act«
in good faith, belonging to the category ■
charitable institutions which -ever- exernpte.
from the operations of the law. All save tan:
hundred of the remaining half had obeyed M
Combes's circular and closed voluntarily. Tbi
others had decided to wait for the decrees d
closure. These decrees were submitted to Presi
dent Loubet to-day and he signed them.
HATTI\\> MABCB OX CAPIT.
FIRMIN'S ARMY KEORGANIZED-DEPirril
TO CONFIRM ELECTIONS.
Port-au-Prince. Hayti. Aug. I.— The Firmi
army, commanded by General Jumeau. whici
r?treated to Arcahaie after its recent defeat;
has. been reorganized and is now marching t|
the capital. Deputies t.:. the number of sixty
four, constituting a H— «■»— . have assembled to
the customary verification of the validity of it
elections.
KI.KA HARK.
A rhnnniail spot near Tnnner«*vllle. In «
CataklUa. sod »t>me of the <iu;;int Sw
architecture In vogue there. See The Sand
Trlbane to-morrow.
HOLBEIN BE ATE X BY TIDE.
WELL KNOWN SWIMMER UNABLE TO rRO3
THE CHANNEL. -^
Dover, Aug. I.— Holbein, who started at i
o'clock last night from Cape Gris-Nez. France
to swim across the English Channel to Dover
was obliged, after a plucky effort, and when I
sight of his goal, to abandon the attempt, ow
ing to unfavorable conditions. He was subse
quently landed here.
Holbein was in the water thirteen hours. an.
was beaten by the strong tide. He was str
swimming well when urged to desist, as. at th
rate of headway he was then making, it woul
have taken him thirty-six hours to complef
the journey.
Although Holbein failed in his attempt t
cross the Channel, he covered much more tha
the distance from coast to coast. At 5:30 o'cloc
this morning he had covered thirty miles, an
was then only eight miles off the French coai
It had been expected that Holbein would rea*.
Varne buoy, six and a half miles off Dover, t
the western tide. but. as he failed, a consult;
tion was heM aboard the tug accompanyin
him, and he was advised to quit. Holbein wr
bitterly disappointed, but climbed aboard with
out assistance. To every one's surprise, he we
fresh and strong. His temperature was norma
He took nourishment frequently through <.v
night from a rowboat. and maintained a stead
stroke. He was guided by powerful gas lamu
placed on a small boat. The tide threatened t
carry him to the open sea when the attempt we
abandoned.
Collar-comfort is so well
worth having, that our name
in the collar is well worth
finding; you're sure of the
first if you find the second.
We mention two new ones:
Cluett brand "Aldine" 15c;
Arrow brand "Ashbourne" 1 5c
CTuftt or Monarch Shirts »m» right for too
a* rot these Collar*. -st dealers sell then.
Cluett, Peabody & Co.
R| 3 Par,: f »■•«••*
ad way's S
Jg TorpiU Li"*
■ay ana «■• » S)1 -
Pills sss?
PARKER'S
Hair
Balsam
' Promotes tho gro>MQ or xne n.ur ana
! gives it the lustre andafflclnesa of youth.
; ' When tha hair la gray or faded tt
; 1 BRINGS BACK THE YOUTHFUL COLOR.
1 ; It prevent* Danclrulf and hair falllnsr
| and Ice-pa scalp clean and healthy.
The largely- Increased circulation
of The Sunday Tribune necessitates
onr coiner to press early Saturday
night. Advertisers will confer n. <<•'
vor by sending? In their copy at that
earliest possible moment. 1

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