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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 03, 1902, Image 16

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TROOPS TO REMAIN.
GOVERNOR STONE SAYS NOT WISE OR
SAFE TO -WITHDRAW THEM
AT TRESENT.
Harrieburs. Fenn.. Aup. 2.-Governor Ston*
Tnade th* fnllnwine: r»p!y to-day to the request
of the officials of District No. 9. of th* United
Mine Worker*, asking for tb* recall of the
troops at Shenandoah:
Harrisburg, Perm., Ausrust 2.
Miles Dougherty et. a!.: ■'-'-■
Tours of thr 31st ult. requesting the recall of
th* troop? was duly received. Upon full con
sideration of the letter. I am of the opinion that
it would not be wise or safe to withdraw the
troops at present. W. A ' STONE.
The Governor started this afternoon for At
lantic City t» spend Sunday. He said he be
lieved there would be no further trouble in the
strike resk>n. He will return to Harrisburgr on
Monday.
ALL QT'TET TN STRIKE REGION.
GENERAL QOBtV HAD TO ORDER PI^TMB
ERS TO DO WORK -EFFORT TO
BMD TFIKK.
{BT TELEGRAPH T" THF. TRIBCrE.]
Shenandoah, Perm.. Aug. 2— The difficulty of
getting -water to the camp of the State troops
who are guarding this city was overcome to
day, hut not until General Gobin had an amus
ing; experience. It became nei i.BHiy to pipe
water to the camp, and pipes were ordered laid.
An effort was made to engage plumbers in the
town to do the work, but they refused.
"S«> if there are not «=ome plumbers among
the troops," ordered the general.
■ Several were found. "We cannot do the work;
we belong to the union." they said.
Th<"- general smiled, and issued a military or
der detailing the men t do th.- work. It was
done promptly.
This bit of an incident was the only thing
that changed the routine of camp life ■■'-day.
A number of marches about the country were
ordered, and the work of erecting a rifle range
was begun, in order to allow those soldiers who
have not qualified as marksmen to do so.
The strikers declare that no violence would
follow the withdrawal of the troops, as the
operators fear, and that law and order would
be maintained. A number of the adjoining
towns are to join in the petition of the strikers
for their withdrawal, and they are also
preparing a bigger one. to send to President
Roosevelt, requesting him to take some action
toward ending the .strike, and also declaring
their intention to appeal to Congress. The
movement was started in Girardville. where a
mass meeting of the citizens was held, and the
request for similar petitions has been sent to
the nearby towns, and a committee is now at
v.t>rk trying to get all the towns in the coal re
gion to join in the effort to make a monster
petition.
Pr- =!<>rM John Fahey left here to-day for
Pbamokln. and before g' ni: i?: ued the following
Ftate-ment: "No num. whf ih<r he belongs to the
United Ware V orkers or not, ir ■ friend of th^
strikers if he in- ites disorder or violates the law.
I have instructed the executive hoard to take
all necessary steps to preserve order, and to
apprehend any one who rlaaatCß the law and put
him in jail and see that he is kept there. If he
is a member of the United Mine Workers we will
i-ee that he is made an example of."
The attitude of the strikers is unchanged;
they are unconcerned, loitering about the streets
as if no soldiers were in sight, and paying noth
ing but curious attention to the men who pass
in uniform. General Gobin is enforcing rigid
military discipline by keeping the soldiers in
easß|i at nightfall, and preventing their drinking
in the saloons, so that there shall be no dMh
between the men and the strikers.
A report prevailed to-day that two of the
strikers, shot on Wednesday night, died the
next morning, unattended by doctors, and that
The strikers are keeping the fact secret in order
BOt to excite the body of the miners. Strike
leaders declared that they knew nothing of the
matter.
No violence was reported in the vicinity, and
no serious outbreak in any part of the region,
t-xcept at Nanticoke. where a number of work
ers from the Auchingloss colliery of the Dela
ware. Lackawanna and Western were assaulted
by a crowd of m^n and women and stoned.
Three deputy sheriffs guarded them, and while
they were able to get the men through the
crowd without serious injury, they were unable
to disperse the mob. The situation at the col
liery 1? critical, the strikers believing that work
may be resumed there.
Phamokin, Perm., Aug. 2.— Nineteen thousand
dollars was received from Indianapolis at local
headquarters of District No. U of the United
Mine Workers to-day. The money will ho dis
tributed ameng the miners of the district as soon
as President Mitchell informs Secretary George
Hartlein.
MANY MINES TO RESUME.
SMALLER OPERATORS Will AWAIT RE
sri.TS r.y LARGER COMPANIES.
lET TEI-EORArH TO THE TRIBT
"XUkesbaxre. Perm.. Aug. 2.— Reports received
frota semi-official pourc^s throughout th»» entire,
anthracite ragSSSI are that work Is to fie resumed
next -Reek by the following lan;e companies: The
Philadelphia ar <l Reading, at the mines lying be
tween Shenati-ioah and Pottsville; the Susque
haana. Obad Company, at collieries within a few
miles of Sli';narid»>ah; th»- LebiKh Coal and Naviga
t!o3i Company, at Lansford and Summit Hill; the
Delaware. Lackawanna and Western Company, at
three mines in the Scranton district, and one mine
in the Wyoming" basin, near Ed-wardsville; the
• Delaware and Hudson Company, at two of its
mines In the Scranton " dJMri"t and one in the
Wyoming: the Pennsylvania Coal Company, at one
mine In the Pittston district, and the Temple Coal
and lmn Company, at one mine in the Scranton
• region.
As to the number of Individual encerns which
•Intend to resume, it is impossible to get the list, as
tb«y will be guided by the success or failure of the
large companies. Nearly all the washeries will
resume, as it is *>a?y to get men for the work,
laborers only being required, and this will be the
first step toward the beginning of the work at the
collieries. The Warlike, at Puryea. and the
Sterling, at Plymouth, will resume on Monday.
' The operators feel themselves placed in a posi
• tion which canges their original plans, which
b*mg to remain idle until the miners came back
to work in a majority, this time being fixed asi
toward the end of September, but now. with troop™
in the region and protection afforded, the opera
tors say they do not see why they cannot begin
operations at once.
They report that men are still applying for work.
and. in the last few days, since the arrival of the
trocps. In greater numbers than ever, except in
the region where the troops are. There they re
main away from the companies, but it Js stated
are only awaiting the Fignal to resume work to go
ba-k to the collieries. In the Scranton district the
number of applicants for w irk is larger than any
where else. Ar official of the Delaware and Hud
son said to-day that "our mines will not resume
work to-day, to-morrow or Monday, but It will not
be Ion?. We will post no notices, because they are
not necessary. We have so many applications for
work that one* we say the word we will have all
we need."
Tbe other operators expressed similar sentiments,
while In the Wyoming district the. same tone of
confidence prevails.
The operators have no faith In the efforts of the
Ftrjkers to have the troops withdrawn succeeding,
declaring It Is too apparent that there will be vio
lence if the troops are withdrawn. They point to
the fact that troops of the regiments remaining a.t
home are located In the mining centres of the en
tir* region, and can be called out quickly in the
event of trouhle.
Strikers' leaders who were asked about the claims
' of th»- operators declare they are unfounded, that
the m«n are nrm and more determined than ever
and that the outlook for victory is bright-
TRICE OF ANTHRACITE DROPS.
As a, result of the reports of a probable break In
th* anthracite strike this nzonth. the retail prtcea
of anthracite for domestic use dropped in most
ca*e* yesterday to the last schedule price of J8 a
toiu> Dealers In Brooklyn delivered a number of
i>m&ll iou of anthracite to families at that price.
Borrf- of the anthracite which has been held for
•mertencies was released yesterday, suiti tom«
anthracite from Email collie#ies which have been
working during the strike in remote P laces in t ne
mining: fields is expected this week. This will De
the first time that this anthracite has found a
market in New- York.
EXPECT SUBWAY STRIKE TO BE BRIEF.
LABORERS AXD DRILLERS QUIT WORK BE
CAUSE A WALKING BOSS WAS
DISCHARGED.
The w<->rk on the Fiibway at Forty-thlrd-st. and
Broadway, which is be!n& done by the Degnon-
McLean i ontra<-ting Company, has been interfered
with considerably since Friday afternoon by a
strike of between fifty and sixty laborers and
drillers. Most of the former have returned to their
work, but the drillers, being members of a union,
have not returned, and. according to one of the
officials of the company, will not be taken back if
it can possibly be avoided. According to one of the
members of the contracting company, the men
stopped work because a walking boss, named C. L.
Edwards, had been discharged.
Superintendent E. A. Harrick. who tias charge of
th<= work, orderei Edward Quinlan. the foreman
of the timber workmen, to take charge of the blast-
Ing work in addition to his other work. Edwards,
it is declared, objected to that order, and instructed
the laborers and drillers to stop work. They
obeyed, and Edwards was discharged by the con
tracting company. Mr. Uriggs said yesterday that
under no circumstance? would Edwards be taken
back. „,
Other drillers are being engaged as rapidly as
possible, and it is expected that by the first or
next week the work will be going on as usual.
CHICAGO GRAVE DIGGERS STRIKE.
Chicago. Aug. The grave diggers are the latest
of the wage oarners of Chicago to go on strike, and
as a result Concordia Cemetery is closed, and at
the entrance to the burial grounds the superin
tendent has posted a notice which reads: "There
will be no more burials at the Concordia Cemetery
until further notice."
The twenty-five grave diggers employed at the
cemetery are an strike for higher wages and have
succeeded in prev^ntine other laborers from taking
their place?. Three runexal processions which ar
rived at the cemetery gates yesterday were turned
back because of the strike. It Is stated that similar
strike will by Instituted at two other cemeteries.
STRIKING FISH DREBSBR&
Gloucester. Mass.. Aug. 2.— The JM striking fish
dresser?, skinners and cutters who are on strike
here for higher wages are considering a proposi
tion t" Conn a co-operative flsh manufacturing
oompanr. the capital to he furnished i-y two non
r<?;d»nts who are ipt^r^st^d in the fish trade. The
project is favored by the strikers. The female rish
handlers, who number aboin one hundred and fifty,
decided to join the strikers to-night.
STEEL STRIKK SETTLED.
Philadelphia. Aug. t— The strike of the bridge and
structural iron woifceia employed by the Pennsyl
vania Steel Company, which has been or. since
May 1. has been settled. an<l the men are back at
work. Th»- men got their demand tor 68 cents an
hour and for an eight hour day.
STREET RAILWAY MEN TO STRIKE.
Tronton, Ohio. Aug. 2— An order has hr-^n issued
for a strike of all the employes of the Camden
Interstate Railway to-morrow, on account of the
refusal of the management to recognize the union
and to reinstate discharged men. One hundred
and fifty men are affected. The ?trike. it is said.
will close the line from Guyandotte. W. Va., to
Hanging Rock. Ohio.
TO SETTLE MACHINISTS' STRIKE.
Ciphurne. Tex.. Aup. 1 George Mulberry, third
vice-president of the International Assorjntion of
Machinists, and a committee from the strikers
left here last night for Chicago to meet with of
ficials of the Santa Fe Road. It Is expected that
the machinists' strike will then be settled If it is
not settled at this meeting a finish fight may be
expected.
LINEMEN STRIKE IN NEW-ORLEANS
New-Orleans. Aug t. — Electric linemen employed
by the street railway, telephone and electric
lipht comp.°.nie~. as w<-ll as the telegraph linemen
of New-Orleans. .-Truck yesterday for higher
wages. The interests aff^^ted are regarded as
vital, although only two hundred men are out co
far. The strike was conducted quietly, but it occa
sioned serious trouble to the various companies
involved.
PREACHER TO BECOME CONSUL.
THE PRESIDENT APPOINTS A PRINCETON
THEOLOGICAL STTT>ENT TO REPRESENT
THIS GOVERNMENT AT TAHITI.
[bt nxmattra ro uu: ntnuira.]
Prin.vton. N. J.. Auc. 2. —Through the influence of
Senators Dryden and ECean and Governor Murphy
of New-Jersey. Wllliasn F. Doty, of the class at
'96 in Princeton University and a member of thr ;
senior class i:i the theological seminary h^re. has
been appointed by President Roosevelt United
States Ci.nsui to the Society Islands Mr. I>"ty,
who lives in Princeton, left her'" last Monday for
Washington to take the consular examination, ar
directed by the President, and on Thursday the
President cave him his commission, with Instruc
tions to leave Ban Francisco <>n August -1 for
Tahiti, the consular port "f the islands. II- started
!<:-diiy for San PranciSCO, and will go direct to
Tahiti.
Mr. Doty In the summer has been acting pastor
of th'- Second Presbyterian Church in Trenton, and
i^ well known as a lecturer on Alaska and Hawaii.
iwo countries in which h" labored as a I'nited
States agent during the years Ms? to ISK<>. Rrf..r.>
taking his course in the university he spent three
years in the Lawr«noeviU« preparatory school.
He was an honor man in hi? course at Prim-flon
and was distinguished as a debater, being a mem
her of the f6 Lynde prize debating team. In the
seminary h< was popular and a member of the
Friar? Club, one of the most influential under
graduate organisations.
In connection with hi? <-<>nsulship he will preach
to the natives of the islands In the French-Hu
guenot and English-American <-nape!? at Tahiti.
He is the first preacher in many years to receive
an appointment as consul. He succeeds his
brother who has hf id the offife for tw-lvc years
TRACTB MOVEMENTS.
Spokane. Wash., Aug. 2 Harry Tracy, the Ore
gon convict, passed through Coulee city. Wash.,
last nieht about II o'clock, and if? reported to have
been seen at Almira, the next station east, at ?,
o'clock this morning Coulee City and Almira are
on the Northern PaHn> Railway, midway between
Seattle and the Idaho State line. This would pe*-m
to confirm the report that Tracy is making his way
to the "Hole in the Wall" country. 1n Wyoming.
TO BUILD WAREHOUSE IS JERSEY CITY.
The Prentiss Tool and Supply Company, of No..
US Liberty-st.. has bought a plot of land, 150 hy
225 feet, in Comswmtpaw-ave and Woodward-st..
j ersey City, where it will build a storehouse to cost
$3S.ofif).
MR BAILEY PRECEDES THE CIRCUS.
.1 A Bailey. of circus fame, arrived h<*re yester
day on the steamship Philadelphia Mr. Bailey said
he had come horn" to stay, and that the circus
would soon follow him.
OUTGOMG LI\ERS CROWDED.
As bo more than two steamships left for Europe
last week, the outgoing ships yesterday were over
crowded. The Lucanla, of the Cunard Line, took
away nearly four hundred In her saloon cabins,
and both second cabin and steerage were filled to
overflowing The pier resembled a time in early
enrtne wh^n large crowds are not unusual, and an
eStra^ force of r foi|,e bad to be detailed to keep
the crowd in order.
BALDWI\ TO COMB TO THlfi COUVTRT.
Stamford. Conn.. Aug. 1 'Special) -William Zleg
]er who is at present occupying his handsome villa
at Great Island, near this city, when asked to-day
Jf he were satisfied with the result of the Baldwin
expedition, declined to make any statement until
Mr Baldwin reached this country. "You may say
that Mr Paldwin will be her.- very soon.- he said.
•And that he will tell all there is to be told." Mr.
Ziegler Intimated that he had other and later in
formation from Baldwin than that conveyed in the
i^ the press dispatches was. generally speaking,
correct.
PROMISEST ARRIVALS AT THE HOTELS.
GRAND-Captain George O. Squier U S. A.
HOLLAND-Lieutenant George C «frert3 , L S.
A M ANHATTAN-The Rev. Chirchll' i p, a cr G ee of
SS-«£%^^^Al o ? oi£0 i£d B « r f?-Snt 0 «
General James A. Gary, of Baltimore. Santos-
Dumont, of Brazil.
THERE IS NOTHING NE DWW THE SUN.
SOME ONE HAS SAID.
Thl. party ,bould consult the "Little Ads. of the
r «^U.- Something new U>**« •*•** Slla<l^«
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY. AUGUST &__ 1902.
The Tribune
Uptown Office
is now located at
1,564 Broadway
Between 36th and 37th Sts.
"DRY" SUNDAY FOR COKEY ISLAND.
CAPTAIN KNIPE, RECENTLY TRANSFERRED
THERE, TO ENFORCE LAW STRICTLY.
Captain William Knipe. who succeeded Captain
Driscoll as the commander of the Coney Island
precinct, has spoken, and as a result the resort by
the sea will have one of Its periodical spasms or
virtue to-day. It is understood that Captain Knipe
is on trial at Coney Island, and he starts out with
the intention nf making a record.
When the new commander reached the station
house yesterday he had a long talk with his pre
cinct detectives. If his orders are carried out
strictly, it i? said that more than half of the
resorts will have to close their doors to-day. Music
halls and "hotels" will be kept under the closest
observation. Nothing but "sacred music" will be
allowed, nnd no intoxicating drinks can be sold
except in places that conform strictly to the legal
requirements.
Captain Knipe was in command of the Coney Isl
and precinct six years ago. and believes he is thor
oughly familiar with all the conditions existing
there'and the dodges that are practised to evade
"I have given my men such orders as I deem
neofssary " he said last night, "and have im
pressed upon them the fact that I shall be content
with nothing but the strictest enforcement ot the
Capain Driscoll, who was deposed as commander
at Coney Island and sent to chase burglars and
tramps 'in Flatbush. was much depressed when
seen at the Smith-st. headquarters last night.
"I cant understand it." he said. "I did my duty
there and two grand juries that investigated con
ditions at the Island expressed the belief that I
was doing a!' in my power to enforce the law. If
persons want to rind wickedness they can do so
anywhere."
AXO THER 0A TS I X.I I ' XCTIO X.
OUTCOME OF CHICAGO CORNER- TALK OF
1 < VCOTT OF FIPM.
[nr TKI.EOKUIi TO THE TKIBI NE. I
Chicago. Aug. 2. — Another injunction has been
secured hy Waite, Thorburn A Co. in the Board of
Trade oats deaL Judge Chetlain ha? issued the
injunction restraining the Bank of Montreal from
paying t.-> Pratt & Buckley SUM held as margins
on oats bought of Waite, Thorburn & Co. by Pratt
& Buckley.
The restraining order also enjoins William War
ren. pres}dent of the Board of Trade, from in
dorsinc over to Pratt & Buckley certain margin
certificates for the amount of margins deposited
by W.ute. Thorburn ft Co. Tnder the rules of the
Board of Tr.ide the president i.< empowered to so
indorse margin checks.
There was a mild scare In all the pits over the
prospect of Armour having September wheat
bought to an txt.-nt which may become dangerous
to the bears who have sold the wheat short.
In corn fresti bull operation* began in a way
that gave the bears a severe shock. The S. ptember
price vsa." advanced in one hour from 66^ cents to 58
cents It Is known thai Armour ha? a big line of
corn bought for next month.
it was KaufTman. of St. Louis, who led the cov
ering on the scare to-day. On top of this the trade
feared some bull operations hy Patten, Bartleel and
h*r successful leaders.
Th< oats trade did not escape. A leader said:
"Of course (here will b<- trouble for the .shorts In
the September oats They have sold then U 32
cents for next month's delivery, and s>ri. of cash
oats an about >> cents over the future."
Traders w«-r«- furnished with no new dt-velnpments
In the defaulted July oats settlements Miny mem
bers favor a boycott of the ttrtn which went into
court to fight the corner In oat?.
TRIES TO ROB WOVBE OF S'EW-YORKER.
A SON OF DR. T. B ARN"!.r> WOUNDS A BURQ-
I,AK AT BABYLON.
Babylon. N V. Aug. 2.— Burglars attempted to
enter the house <>f Dr. Thomas B. Arnold, of N. w-
York, early this morning. They were detected by
the doctor's son. Harrison. The young mun nred
seven shots at the burglars and wounded ono of
them. The burglar was seen limping away, snd he
left a trail of blood behind him.
The burglars were seen soon after the shooting
hy the family of H. C. Thorn about a mile from
the Arnold residence. The police were informed.
but they failed to find the burglars tO-day.
CROM 1> HOLDS I /' CAR.
ANGRY AT MOTORXAN BECAUSE WOMAN AND
BAB'S IAI>I- IN AUOHTINO.
Because a woman carrying < baby had been
thrown to t!i<- ground In getting off an dghth-ave.
car at Seventy-sixth-st. last evening an angrj
crowd held up the car and refused X' allow th«>
motorman to proceed before the arrival of the
police. The woman was Mrs Camille Romano.
She was on the car with her husband Joseph and
a Sfteen-months-old baity Thej live at No.
West Forty-seventh-st. Neither the mother nor
child wem injured severely. Both had cuts on the
face and after the woman refused to mak.- a com
plaint the policeman allowed th.- car to v.<> on
Mother find child were attended :tt ROOSevelt Hos
pital and went home.
OFFERIXGB AT THE STORES.
THE "POPULAR SHOP." JOSEPH P. sTHUGH
& co.. at Forty-Becond-st. and Fifth-aye.. is
showing new Importations and choice effects in
wall papers and Japanese kv cloths.
HAHNE & CO., Newark, N. J.. are now holding
a special sale of furniture, samples of the newest
ideas in fall patterns being included Hall stands,
settees hat racks, chins closets, bookcases, parlor
and bedroom suits have been reduced in price
and form desirabl.- bargains. tree delivery In
Great ei ■ New-Y-rk is part of the store's business
system.
A D. MATTHEWS S SONS, of Brooklyn, will
start tO-mOITOW an August furniture sale, offer
ing Morris chairs, rockers, couches, enamelled
bfd« bureaus and parlor suits at special prices.
A complete line of trunks will be featured.
Women's tailor made suits and skirts will also
be shown at reduced prices
GRAHAM & STRAPS, of Brooklyn, have pro
vided extra facilities for the business resulting
from their midsummer sale. Hosiery and under
wear for both sexes will be special. Women's wash
suits and dresses, with duck, pique, pongee silk and
linen skirts will form an attractive offering Rain
coats and summer shirts will be for the men. An
assortment of books, bicycles and cameras will
also figure in the sale.
THE GRAND RAPID 3 FURNITURE COMPANY.
INC of No. 15ri West Thirty-fourth-st.. will dis
play next week dainty white bedroom, furniture,
bureaus, chiilonniers, beds and dressers.
BEST A CO., the Lilliputian Bazaar at No. fii
Wesi Twenty-third-st., will offer girls' blouses In
madras and shirt waists in fancy ginghams at re
du • '1 prices. t
DEMPSEV & CARROLL, at No. 22 West Twenty
third-st , hay.- a line Of marriage invitations.
JOHN DANIELL, SONS A SONS, at Broadway
and Ninth-st.. will during August reduce prices on
all summer goods. Brilliantinr dress skirts, shirt
waist suits, silk waists, women's gloves and laces,
and bathing suits will be special Th^ir mail ord.-r
department is convenient for out of town cus
tomers
STERN BROTHERS of West Twenty-thlrd-st..
will place on sale to-morrow a line <>f wrappers and
kimonas in lawns and dotted Swiss. Women's rain
coat* will be special; underwear, shirt waists and
gloves will prove attractive. They will al.su show
rugs and mattings. Boys' and youths' clothing,
misses' and children's suits will be displayed in
great variety, at materially reduced prices.
MEMBER OF LEGISLATURE POISONED.
Dcs Moines, lowa. Aug. 2.-Albert Potter, of
Waverly a member of the lowa legislature, died at
Mercy Hospital at 3:20 o'clock this afternoon from
the effects of poison. It is not known whether he
administered the dose himself or was murdered. He
was found in his room In the Kirkwood Hotel
this morning and was taken to Mercy Hospital.
For years he was at the head of the Red Cross
V?lternal Association, a mutual Insurance organi-
Htten and for «m<" time there has been a dls
puVe°Ve?\h°/ amounts which ■ Potter had in
■kHSSa
Steinm Brothers
will place on sale tomorrow, the remainder of their
Wooiem's Sninnimer Wrappers
and Kamonas
in Dotted Swiss, White and Colored Lawns, Etc.
at 95 C , $ 1.50 and *3.50
Reduced from $2.75 5-5° and 8.90
And the balance of their high priced
imported and Domestic Tea Gowns
at great reductions.
Womee's Rain Coats v p aiue al
in Cheviots and Coverts, $0^(1 n . 19 SA
Real value $16.00 and 19.50 at *V.OU and i^.OU
August sale of
Women's Underwear
(Second Floor)
Gowns, S9c, 75, $1,25
Chemises, 4 §c - 75, 98
Drawers, 32c » SP » 95
Corset Covers, 39c, 59, 98
Lawn Kimonas, 65c > 98 » $1 - 35
Women's Shirt Waists
White and Colored, S9c, $1,25, 1.95
China, Pongee & Wash Silks, 32.93, 3.95
Glove Department
Ladies' Kid and Suede Gloves, with 6S C
buttons and clasps, broken lines, a " at " "
Value $1.00, 1.35 and 1.50
Summer Rugs and Mattings
Japanese Cotton and Jute Rugs; Fibre Mats, East India Dhurries
and Moodj Mats greatly reduced.
China and Japan Mattings, this season's $A OH aid &
importation, per roll of 40 yds.. \J.SU ' e,.^u
Value $i2.:;0 and 14. =;o.
Final Reduction of
Bdvs' & Youths' Clothing
Boys' Sailor and Russian Blouse Suits of O^ c $ 1 (SO
imported washable fabrics, 3to 12 yrs., » J * uy
Heretofore $i.qs to 5.95.
Single and Double Breasted Suits, also 5-) q^
Cloth Sailor, 3 to i^> yrs.. broken lots, -^'^
Heretofore $s.oo to 6.95.
Norfolk Suits, of homespun, cheviots $" r\()
and navy blue serges. 8 to is vrs.. %Jm\J\J
Heretofore $^.q5 to 9.75.
Youths' Suits, of all-wool cheviots, $S 7^
serges and cassimeres. !=. to 19 yrs.. O»JO
Heretofore $Q.7=> to 11.9^.
Hisses' & Children's Suits
Girls' Sailor Suits, 9 to i: yrs., §-> j=^g«
of navy blue, brown or red English serges. Value $5.50, O»JD
Misses' Skirts, of Piques and $«j «^
linens, 14 to iS yrs.. Heretofore $2.95 to 4.95, -1 •Tfy
Balance of
Misses' Tailor-made Cloth Suits,
14 to 18 vrs. Heretofore $i2.qoto 25.^0,
West Twenty-third Street
2Vmnscmcni».
KEITH'S
■staafcdHßß inTliiiHll dssss ■■■*& ssssfcssnVi »"*•*#
niKIADWAV A 11TII ST. (OVriMOIS PERFORMANCE. K. F. ALnEE, r.eneral Manarer.
\I.\V\VS THi: IIKST VUDKVII.LK SHOW I> .\K\V YORK. -i«n» B «-r.
EUCESK O'ROt'KKK A CO. DEL IIOSQ DUOS.. SEXATOR FRANK 11K1.1.. CO.\ROV Jt MrDOVILD
in Tarlor A." I.ITTU-: EI.SIE. , MOORE * BUNV, .'"^RKAT VT< -
THE I-A VINES. 1 BAKEW & CONN- i GRANT A GRANT. PRICES 25c. s ofio fi
BROKER FIGHTB RELATIYEB.
THROWS BROTHFR AND BISTER" B HUSBAND INTO
.i:..\\i> BEFORE HE IS AKRBBTE©.
Pierce Kent, a cotton broker, of No. Si>>i East
Fifty-seventh-et-, was put In the Bellevue Hospital
Insane pavilion last nlgbt He fought his brother
snd brother-in-law si Third-»ve. and Fifty-sev
enth-st.
Kent's brother. John, of No. mo West Etghty
stcond-st., and his brother-in-law. Andrew J.
Shanley, of No. 566 Easi Fifty -seventh-st.. said
Kent was a cotton broker, "md that he had been
acting strangely for th-> last few weeks. He got
out of the house yesterday hefor>- they discovered
it and they managed to find him .ifter a hunt
through the city. They not him back to Fifty-
Beventh-St. and Thlrd-ave. last night, where he
refused to c 1c 1 any further.
Kent attracted a large crowd by fighting his
relatives He threw them off every time they
c^icht hold of him. and sent them spinning against
railfnss and Into the crowd as they tried to lead
him away. Then Policeman Barry, of the East
Ftfty-flrst-St station, came up. and Kent was ar
rested _
DEPARTMENT COMMANDESTB STAFF.
General Allan C. Bak-well. recently elected de
oartm. Nt commander of the State of New-York.
Grand Army r,f the Republic, has Issued general
orders No. 2. in which appear the official report
on the election of officers and the appointments on
his official staff. They are as follows:
Department officers- Department commander. Al
lan C. Bakewell; senior vice-commander. Clnrk H.
Norton; junior vice-commander. D. C. Bangs; med
ical director. John H. Grant, and chaplain. Will
iam E. Kimball.
Official staff— Assistant adjutant general, Wilbur
F. Brown; assistant quartermaster general. M. J.
Cummings; judge advocate. Joseph E. Ewell. de
partment inspect or, George B. Loud; chief muster
ing officer, George A. Green, and senior aide-de
camp. Henry K. Rhon^es
Council of administration— Martin Short. A. R.
Penrield. L L. Hanchett. Wlnflsld S. Newman and
Jam«s Owens.
The list of delegates and alternates to the na
tional encampment, to be held at Washington on
October 6—ll.6 — 11. also of 128 aides-de-camp, are noted.
Attention is called to the arrangements heing com
pleted for the national encampment, and, as it
will probably be the last opportunity to attend such
a convention at th* capital of the nation, it Is
earnestly urged that as many of the veterans at
tend as possible. The New-York department head
quarters will be at the Ebbitt House.
The department commander will give much at
tention during his administration to increasing the
membership of the order, both by recruiting new
members and in the restoration of those who have
been dropped for non-payment of dues. He holds
that if a comrade is poor it is all the more de
sirable that he should •>;• a member of the Grand
Army of the Republic, to fulfil the principles of the
motto. "Fraternity. Charity and Loyalty." A plan
of organization has been drafted, and a division of
labor to carry it out will be perfected, to gather all
worthy and eligible veterans of the Cj V || \y a r
within the protecting circle of fraternal regard.
JUST WATCH. • .
When you ; ara through with this part of the p»r»r
hand it tr> the Missus. See if she does not hunt up the
••LAUIe Ads. of the Pecplo" the flrst thin*.
5 7,50, 12.90
(Amnscmcnts.
Announcement*.
Mlssoula. Tetonka.
E. * W. Two New Collars. B. * W
Money loaned to responsihle individuals with
out wnirlty. OBSdMeßtlaJ. l.V> NAj-sau-st.. H. Y. Offlr« T2».
MARIXE IXTELLIGENCE.
MrVIATtRF ALMANAC.
Funrl»e 4-JSSlSnnaet 7:18 1 Moon rises 4:4SlMoon's *«■- 29
HIGH WATER.
A.M. — Sandy Hook 7:02!Oov. Ulnn'i 7:S7|H»II Cl±tt> l»-i«
P.M.-Sandy Hook 7:aijOov. I,land 7:47!h<.11 Gate Im
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAT.
Ve«sel. Frcm. r,,-
Plnn«rs Point . Dundee. July 17. 4 „
Nauplla ; Stettin. July 15..."."." H«m xZ
Condor.. Montevideo. July J2..'.'.".'.' SJe^ha^
roman-he Jacksonville. July Si.." \ ' riSS
LaUreta«ne Ha vre. July 26... sv.^ »
El Cld New-Orleans. July bb'.V.V.V.V.M^r,^
MONDAY. AUGUST 4.
Rio Grand* Brunswick. August 1 _.
Furne«Bla Glasgow. July SV . -Cly<J#
Nlcolalll Cronstadt. July i». --Anchor
Tauric Liverpool JuS 25 cand-.\m
Philadelphia PortoCabello July 24 - -White Star
TUESDAY. AUGUST 3.
Ka!»er W der Bremen. July •»» m « , ,
Frlesland Antwerp. July 26 rP Uoy(1
Grosser Kurfurst.... BremenT July v^t f ta
A""; Olbraltar. July N G Lloyd
Sardinian Glasrow i,,i ■« •*„ (i Lloyd
M«rrturr Glbraitaf Juiv'^i Allan-St*t«.
Alllanca Colon July *>q """* i," ** ■ • ' " ~
El Bio N.wVl". n . a JuVy-3i-- PaiMlß R R
San Marcos Galv».ton. July TO 31 M"r i "
Cole^ K « Pernambuco. f&&kiZ£tfSfiSZ
WKDNESDAY. AUGUST 6.
Pennsylvania Plymouth. July 28 w.-k .
Neustria Mr.n «. ulv J2J 2 H»mb-Am
Panama Itnrdeaux. j i y 24 •■•-F»bre
KarVsna Naples. July 23 Bordeaux
Georgian Liverpool. j u i a......... Italian
Ley land
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
MONDAY. AUGUST 4.
I^rsl-Charf^ton; Clyde?'. .. ** lU^ VM "' -««
Jamestown. Norfolk. Old Domlnlnn "". Ipm
00 p m
TUESDAY. AUGUST 5.
Southwark. Re'l Star. Southampton. - -*
Advance. Colon. Panama It R. " o^, -. J'S am
El Monte. Morgan. Galveston.... »^o*m l:00 pm
Hamilton. Norfolk. Old Dominion _ 012? pm
***** O^OO p TXX
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST «.
Celtic, Liverpool. White Star..... «•■«>■ _ i-> ' m
Philadelphia. Southampton. Red Star VsOam i»?» m
Comanche. Charl«-.«ton. Clyd« ' «-30 am 10:00 • m
E! Slglo. New-Orl.ana. Morgan T^ pm
Alamo. Galveston. Mallory... ■"'" l1:W p m
Princess Anne. Norfolk. Old Dominion! HZ | gg ! '"
SHIPPiyCr NEWS.
TORT OF NEW-TORK-SATURDAY. AUGTST 2. 1902.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Etrurla (Br). Fer»\ison. Liverpool July •>« »rM
Queenstown 27. with mds*. 465 cabin and 211 steer««
inSSS pm. VtrnOtl " BroWn * Co - ArAved it taTSC
Steamer Philadelphia, Mills. Southampton J\il t 2« »nd
'Xmnatmenia.
OAOI |N U Shubert. Fr^ps.
A RECORD RUN
Sam S. Shubert and Nbcon *
• Zimmerman's Production oi
The INTERNATIONAL TRIUMPH
A Chinese
Honeymoon
By Georße Dane* and Howard Talbot.
In It? Second Sii<v-e*.-fu! Year in [>>ndon.
O.NLY MATHEE SATIHDAY.
' *
UCOAI nSQUARE [35th st. I Management .
nLKALU::^ATRE.* B'way-ISam S. Shubert
L ijiiJl If ITISSa A ' H. Chamber: - | ,-i
■■ VkVkX—m Nautical Extravaganza, ;
"-^ By Clsarles D«nne* 1 - "
_ TS^^g^A^-r and Allen Lows. ■' ■
MATINEE SATIROAV ONLI
KNICKERBOCKER TOYS***.
AI Hayinan & Co ».-•■•»•.• -• Proprietor!
WB LAST MONTH
LEDERER'S £gS.
the WILD ROSE
■With the 100 pretty illrls and Comodians
ACADEMY SfhslT&m,*
E. G. Gilmore & Eugene Tmpkins Pr^pr's & Mff>t,
THI HMIU V\ IMM.
. THE FIRaT TIME IN THIS CITY.
Quincy Adams Sawyer
THE GREATEST RURAL. PLAT EVER BITTOL
r HICKS Ss— s«)— 7s— l.<*>.
MATS. WED. & SAT.. 2. EVENINGS. 8:18.
CHERRY BLOSSOM GROVE n t ££23B
TO-NISHT lonclrt COHGERT 50c. lIL
*"-. •■.."■■-■', VAUDEVILLE BILL
i &cry Eve. rxvst - AL S TRE.\GTII.
PHammersteta's. 42(1 St.. B'way ani 7th Ava,
ARADiSE BO OF
GARDENS """Sga**
Combined Roofs of Victoria and Republic The.tres.
TO-NIGHT c ItoWht 50c
IU ' wfTH GREVT -.TXR Kill
BECI^ISG TO-MORKOW !»IGHT.
- D 11^ I Italian M!Utar>- Band of «
JSL VAUDEVILLE BILL 15 ACTS.
MADISON SQ. n^T> s^S a
EVEKT EVENING AT "J» (SCXDATS EXTOBBi.
•Mikado deUghtfully sung an, capab'.y -T^^
JAPAN BY iilGnT. illuminations.
c m a a^ra. THE MIKADO.
JAPANESE IMPERIAL TROUPE
GEISHA GIRLS. JAPANESE ££»*g|
vnvFl Tir^ JVP^VESE TEA HOLS'E. JAPANiti.
CAF^JipANESn b-xTths. D'AQUIN'3 orchbwm.
50c. ADMISSION 50c
THIS AFTER-NOO>. a:3O. TO-MGHT. -.^O.
SHANNON'S uf:V.V. BAND
In POPULAR CONCERTS
EVerr Evening Qlllj'n A> fI M «" nOME
El «T4 TV. PAIn fe Gn.%!«SVIREWORKt.
FOR ! Commencing: To-morrow Evening at 9.
; WEEKS I John C. Fisher's and Tbomas E. Ey!»v s
FLOR ODORA
With »n niMEXJE CAST and Chora*.
MATI.XKK SATIKDAY AT 4 P. M.
PAS IC)K S ONTINTOtS
WILL, H. FOX— rP.OTTY TRIO.
aORANI & BETH-- FOX ,t TOXIK.
JNO. F. CLAKK-MIS.-5 NORTON.
KT'MINS TRIO— CCXJAN * BACON.
NESSES * NESSIN— WAYNE A LAMAS.
KClrcla Auditorium. B"way & **h. JVT
altenborlN
To-nisbt. "'-V- 50 c»r,ts. that a!..
SACRED N!''HT
K!-tv Hampone « »-ia!ly engased for to-night.
TERRACE GARDEN 55/1;
nZ&h AUDRAN'S "MASCOT."
Vmoww-'THE BEGGAR STUDENT."
Columbus ay. * 08th st. 3> ,I*. c-vler than th> »c«.. ->.
rr\\n ncc?<s? i t °- . iqht
J \_j) \\J) *—>) | EVERY MGIIT.
11th Week; TCJ Time. Here for All Time. I
FLOATING ROOF GARDEtN F^ B
Every Ev. St GRAND REPUBLIC. Ttt exceptei
CONTERNO-S 11TH REG. BAND ± Vau<i9v'.:v.
I v W 1-Jth S p. m.. VT. S''-.' S:3O p m. Battery 1) ? m.
illcrtmgs.
QUARTERLY MEETING OF THE AMERI
101 CAN INSTITUTE. August 7th. «t | orcl^k F. M . «
lk» West 44th Street. W3l. T. FEOPLEg. i>ec y.
<-t,erboi:rr 27. with mdse. 4M> cabin and T7* «t— ras pa»
s/n/ers V. the lnurnati-m.il Navigation Co. Arrived »t
th ««™.? t C<JtorA» n ißr». Co*. Hull July » -*» md»
to Sanderson & Son. Arrived at the Bar at 0:4.. a m
Stumer Fontabelle <Br>. 3co«. Guadeloupe WW
I^mer.ir» ZZ. Barbad ■'!• 2* Dominloa 25. Q»M««2
Antigua and St Kitf. -t> an-i St Croix '.T. wirS ™«*»»«g ,
4T» pZsMßaan so a E Outerbrtdga * Co. Arnv-d at the
Bar a- 1:"V. p m.
Steamer Topaxe ißr». Davlson. Banes July 37. with mo
lasses to the Unite,! Fruit Co. Arrived at IM -*r at
Steamer Esr-rania. Rocers. Vera Crux Ju'-y C». -cr-so
26 and Havana 2». »th mds* and H passengers to James
E War-1 £ Co. Arrived at the Bar at Urn.
Steam-r Hamilton. Bo»z. Norfolk and X"»r '" J>«*
with mdse and passengers to the Old Domini :■» ♦.'"
Steamer Cltv of Savannah. Fisher. Savannan July **
with m.'.se and passengers ttv IBM Ocean Ss Co. ...
Unlt-d States training ship Lancaster. Colvocoress**.
Hampton Roads. Will anchor off Tompkin»vi!!e.
Sandy H.ok. N J. Auk 2. 9:3i> x> m— Uir-i •oaCSWaai
mo«eraTe breeie; cloudy.
J»AIUET>.
Steamer* Statendam (t>utch>. for Rotterdam: I *"* j
<Etr>. Antwerp; Minnehaha «Br>. U->ndon: l^.h-mian .WT.
Uverpool; Astrri* *Br>. Glasgow; Wtg^JgWyJb-gJJ
ter. H»llafc*to C.er>. Fernambuco and santos: Erna » ' r^
Ktnirston. Pretoria <Br>. I>rmnda; Marac-aiN>. Fsrto
Rico, etc: Coamo. Torto Rico. El Norte. ObMBSBsSI
THE MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN POKim
Queenstown. Aug 2. 72R a m— Arriv-d. steamer rmbrl*
<Br). Dutton. lisi TlTs for Uverpool iand pro-
Uverpooi.'Aug 2-?* lied. steamer Campania .r.ri. Vla»tr.
Southr m Aag 2-Salle.J. steamer St Paul. Aftrec".
Southamrt>n. Au X 2— Sall^l. stvanvr M Pwrt. A^r«»
New-York vb Cherbourit. -— T-- .5^.,
Uverpool. Aug J. 9 a m-riaile.l. steamer Taur.c <»J.
Caven. NVw-York (not previously..
London. Au< 2— Sailed, steamer Minneapolis (Fr). C*'">
Hull luJ°2-Arrlred. steamer Martello (Br>, Jenta*
Brem N en "luL k "2-Salle,l. steamer Barbarossa <Ger). Met*
H.n& Y '^ -' a .Sv7".™, run., nw.m-y.-w (•*
Barends New- York via Plymouth and "?f"7iG*t
Rotterdam. July .TV Arrived. ««imerf •I I '"'* g£
tank). Dslldorff. New vv ' rl< ■ 3t!lt ' f 1^"* 11 «- ,v, n a
sen. Philadelphia: T>.-»n!a (Dam.
CIbSSS? al jsi? l> il^rili rll ««»«- Pontuc <Br>. tft^
Geno'aTu.yi^rrtv^eamer Uguria (itaD. **»->
Vapl^ W Ju?y k^, a^ S - steamer Nord America d»&
L.^" C svU n V^-^- steamer rv,n» M.H. <**>. ;
Hu^'r^v^Sa^. steamer Bona (Br,. Beara* |
New- York. — -'7 ]
The Marconi
Wireless Telegraph Co.
OF AMERICA i
is nor- prepared to receive through tB *«*»« ti«SS*# § j
the Pos«l Telegraph Cable Company, ana w» *• s^ ,
m.sf.se* to and from all v#s n <iul^^ t0 rwWt ■g- %>% > j
tra'vl* Sssaponack, Lone Island. Al» » £ * a &i-pi»S V
arrival, departure and pa-iaf [»* •M ™* %Sn»OM- » j
tgtnta. boards of trade «n.l to <!l V,u"* Ia»I a» the wt»» ftM
resard to rates may b* '^'^'k^Vor K&fcfl
nee* of.thePo.Ml T>UBrapn Company Nwf fp rf;vy
on<n o£ U>'« Company. *-l" Erldse oir«-- * . i
Cuy.
b« a Udy."

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