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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 03, 1902, Image 5

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RABBI JOSEPH'S OFFICE.
P,RTHODOX JEWS NOT CERTAIN WHETH
EB TO FILL HIS PLAGE OR NOT.
Discussion among the orthodox Jews of this
city with reference to choosing or not choosing
g g)djef rabbi is heard in all quarters on the
ijaet Side. On one point all are agreed, that
the late Chief Rabbi Joseph was a Jewish
tracher of learning, piety and personal charm
that are rarely found in combination. But
ssfcetber a successor to him carj or should be
chosen is much <3ebated.
FUimrallj I don't think there will be a chief
/abbi." "aid Charles Dushkind. at his home, in
East Broadway, last night, "for. In my opinion.
It jf utterly impossible to bring all the congre
gations together. f You must remember that
Jacob Joseph was net really a chief rahbi. In
j^ST ihe orthodox congregations of New-York
City united in getting him to come here, and
fora time they were united under him. Some of
ijje congregations withdrew, however, and for
♦v , last six or seven years the congregations
—jfcßjnwlecieing Rabbi Joseph as their chief rabbi
fcave been in a measure distinct from the rest."
Asked whether it was true that many Jews
thought that Rabbi Joseph was "rather out of
tuse' with his new surroundings." Mr. Dush
jrJn<3 said:
"Being strictly an orthodox rabbi, he could
be nothing but old fashionei. Still, he fully de
eerved the title ye gave him— charef. a sharp
bead.' one of the most honored designations
among the Jews, and one that has been be
ftowed only six or seven times in the ias: two
hundred years. As a matter of fact, the reason
I don't think he will have a successor is that I
don't know of a single rabbi alive who could
hold these New- York City congregations to
gether. Even Rabbi Joseph did it only a little
while. The task would require a man of extra
ordinary power and influence."
Mr. Siegelstein. of No. 169 Essex-st.. inclined
last night to the opinion that a Chief Rabbi
would be chosen within a short time, probably
■vi-ithin two months. He called the two classes
cf Jews In New-York the "Reforms" and the
"Not-Reforms." Rabbi Joseph, he said, belonged
distinctly to The latter class. Mr. Siegelstein
would not commit himself as to which class he
thought the new Chief Rabbi would be chosen
from, though he is himself strongly in sympathy
•with what he called the "Not-Reform" class.
Mr De Haas, assistant editor of "The Jewish
Wortd." said last nighT that the question of
organization under a chief rabbi wa-s still in a
nebulous condition. "It looks as if the East
Side congregations would get together on per
manent lines.- be said, "and endeavor to cover
the .hole area. At present eighteen New-York
Dsngresjationsi are together. They are inde
pendent of the conference of rabbis that nas
recently been held, but people are thinking
there will be a merger. The conference I speak
cf was called' originally to discuss religious
Questions in general, but Rabbi Joseph s death
occurring, the possibility of choosing a successor
to him was naturally considered, and it was de
cided that at any rate none of the rabbis pres
ent at the conference should allow nimself to be
called chief rabbi unless he should be forma lly
* ConsMesinc the comparative neglect with
vhich he had been treated in recent years, the
universal signs of grief displayed at Rabbi
Joseph's death muFt be set down as much to
respect for fhe office as veneration for the man.
This indicates that the downtown Jews of New-
Ycrk woul-i be ••■.-mine— eager— to receive a
lahllaial leader capable of repr^enTing them
and *»f adiu?tine: their difference? It is true
that F.abbi Jopepr. himself wjHM an argument
against this suggestion. But due provision had
rot been made fo.- his maintenance, and without
a salary asdtatOe to the dignity of his position,
no chief rabbi can keep that dignity intact.
"The readiness to receive a chief rabbi might
ha almost assumed from the aeHDea of the last
■Aek There is no need that a second experi
ment need fail, if th* proper steps are taken to
Insore a suitable Incumbent to the office. There
ceires in the difficulty."'
ETIDEXCE AGAIXST CROSS.
HEBRETV COMMITTEES HOPE TO MAKE A
STRONG CASE.
Regarding the securing at evidence apainst
Irc r .o, T-.r Crcsr. showing his alleped ill treat
meat of th* East Sid<? Jev. on the day of Chief
Rabbi Joseph'? funeral. Charles Dushkind. who
ii chairman of the investigating committee of
the Hebrew-American Leagrue. said last night
fit his horn?. No. I>>7 Ea=t Broadway, that he
tv;?s well pleased with tn progress that was
b«iTic made.
"We are getting evidence from hour to hour."
«=a:d Mr. Dushkind. "I have myself gathered
F*veral affidavits from people who heard Cross
direct r.<-.li^m*n to club right and left. And
there was practically no one to rlub xrept Jews.
I guess that by Monday we'll have a number of
affidavits showing hi* puilt
Mr r>Ushkind had just fir.isr.'-d the preparation
of an affidavit by Julius W«*tr. the complainant
Bga'.nst Patrolman Henry Do'ape. and Mr. Dush
kind i iM that there were six witnesses to the
truth of the affidavit. In it Weber declares that
■while he was standing peacefully at Broome and
Sheriff Bt»., Doup- without provocation violently
ossaulted him. striking him several blows with
his club m the head and body. ~ „. „,
"The Jewish people were much gratified, sam
Mr Dushkind. '"by the announcement of Cross's
transfer but they K-erc greatly disappointed by
the statement of Commissioner Partridge that
ihe rt«p had been decided on five days before
the troable complained of."
Three Hebrew committees are now. investi
■■.♦ing Inspector Cross's conduct. One i« the
|«Xi conunittcc appointed l.y the \ igjlance
League, another was dMMI at a mass meeting
held" on Thursday nigrht at No. 414 Grand-st.
an 4 the third is the Hebrew American I^«s:ue
<-«-.mrrittee also appointed on Thursday night.
The Hebrew American I^apruf will have an
c<ker n-ass meetinc on Tuesday evening In Ciin
tor.-f-:.
WV.NT PROTECTION. NOT REVENGE.
An atgamnm meeting to protest against the al-
Wea ■ utal clubbing of the Jews who were follow
ing the funeral of Rabbi Jos-pa. was . hcM M a " T
nfebt in the synagogue of the Congregation Mlsh
klnd Israel. No E . 54 and M Chrystie- t. The meet
ing ~ as cOsd by the Attereth Zion Association
and F. A Marks, the president, was in the chair.
Adores!-* in Yiddish were made by Rabbi Philip
Jochrt the R-v. Dr. H. MaH**M*y. the Rev Dr.
S>Scff and others, and In B«Ml by Gustav
Rogers and Albert Levine.
Letter* of sympathy with the object of the meet-
In* and regret at their enforced a bsence were re
c«ive< frcn, Conareswian Goldfogle and Maurice B.
that such r*cene could not ocrut «?.
that such a scene could not <^" r j££ of th< , r j ty
tlonfc acopted declared that tb* Jews « 9aT J
•were not yoking revenge, w "^ that their com
for their future Protection n t see Jruiltv punished,
Plaints *«c investigated and the Pum>p held
twins satisfied that the lT^^;;. lg lertKP themselves
trill be an impartial one Tney pic n -
to abide by the final decision- ■
' RIOTS DENOUNCED AT A > IEETI G -
T^ ■!■■■! afternoon «t of the lat ; Rabbi
Joseph reneraay afternoon at me j
Serving. Recreation and Religion Scho I .1-0
Columbia-^ The audience consisted ch lcfl > of U«
your.* RtM girls who ar* pupils in the schooh
ntarly two hundred nf them «re£n\ "^addresS
the parents ol S3.W P»Pil* Pg^ - t & superin
*M delivered A<3 . olp !l- B^oke first in Yiddish
had been responsible for the not in orano si.
1 PROTECTI NG A RIOT WITNESS.
■ Abraham «*r.r.«>hn. one of the la wyer* ofthe
Ea« Ma Vigilance Committee, went to the Essex
Market court yesterday and got a Bub^ for
"John Do*" in the Investigation o« ■ the Grand-«.
jlot. He said later that the trttn« * ™ H^
Ser*l ? , a Hebrew employe. al ■ Hoe fi^Sffi
had given testimony before Injector -rooks at
Police Headquarters and was atraid of violence by
other Hoe employes. The eubpeena was obtained.
the ■ryer MM. so as to compel Captain Albertson.
of she. station In. Detaaeey-*; protect the w«.
sif£s. The witneas is wanted at Essex Alar Ket
<**non Tuesday, at the hearing in cases In wnicn
s:r<*ts hay* been made. „r>-nr-ir!tee went
. fkrHr. and some members of the ro:r. 1 ?."^!, ,Jm
■ v. the police etatJon In the afternoon. It^ w " h f^
Vthen that an arrangement bad been made to ha^e
. **r*!s May at the bou«« of a member o itnewn
>ii4*t until to* was wa*U*d as a witness -m court. .
XORWEGTAX STEAMER ASHORE.
VESSEL, STRIKES NEAR CAXFO-MANY PAS
SENGERS ON" BOARD.
Inr TEi-EGRArH tithe Tninrvs.l
Halifax. Aue. The Htorwegtsa steamer
Blawmanden. which went ashore on White
Ledge about midnichi in a dense fog, is re
ported a» 11 o'oi'^k to-night in. a dangerous po
sition. She has a heavy list to port, and is
aground amidships in nine fathom? of water at
the bow and six at the stern. She is leaking
freely, but it is thought she can be saved by
di>oharsring her cargo. The steamer is stranded
about a hundred yards wee* of the wreck of the
coliu-r Tiber, which foundered last winter when
on a royag* from Louishurg to Halifax. The
vessel carries a large enrgo and a number of
passengers.
The two pa?sen?ei> Mr?. Moffatt. of New-
York, and Mr. Grey, of Elizabeth, N. J.— and
the crew were transferred to the boats imme
diately after the Blaamandem struck. They re
mnined near the wreck until daylight, and. shut
in by the fog. had H perilous experience. At day
break they landed <^n White Foint Ledge and
took refuge in a fisherman's hut.
The cargo of the Btaaroandem In the two after
compartments, which consists of valuable Ger
man goods, will be saved if the weather con
tinues smooth, but the least storm from the
east would probably break up the ship, as she
has a great rent in her bottom and is in an ex
posed position.
Captain Amunsden reports a fine passage until
the Banks were reached, when the fog Fnu^
down. Soundings were taken continually, and
no danger was anticipated The Blaamandem is
a vessel of 3.144 tons, from Hamburg to New-
Tork.
TRAIN RUNS INTO STREETCAR.
Terre Haute. Ind.. Aug. 2.-A westbound Van
dalia passenger train ran into a loaded streetcar
at Thirteenth-st. to-right. The car was demolished
and few of the passengers escaped Injury. Thir
teen are seriously injured. Several of the women
are not expected to live.
TRAGEDY XARROWLY AVERTED.
FRANK NORRIS THE NOVELIST. FRE
VENTED WHAT MIGHT HAVE
BEEN A MURDER.
[bt nuaura TO -hit. TmnrvE.]
San Franojsco. Aug. Only the prompt ac
tion of Frank Xorris. the novelist, prevented a
Tragedy this afternoon at the meeting of the
trustees of the State Home for Feeble Minded.
The board had just ousted Dr. W. M. Lawlor.
superintendent of the home, who was found
guilty of gross cruelty to his helpless charges.
Colonel John T Harrington, one of the board,
made a caustic speech, in whiah, he scored Law
lor in severe terms. ?
Theodore Lawlor. a son. stepped up to Har
rington as he sat down and told him that he
held him to strict account for his words. Har
rington, who is a Kentuckian. replied hotly: "I
am ready to meet the whole family, singly or in
a bunch, now or any other time."
A few minutes later Lawlor. in the course of
a speech in reply to Harrington, denounced the
Kentuckian as a liar.
Quick as a flash Harrington sprang from his
chair with a gun in his hand. The men were
not more than five feet apart, only a table sepa
rating them, and a tragedy seemed inevitable.
Norris. who wa? present as a friend of the Law
lors had moved around the table during the
speech of Lawlor. fearing that there might be
trouble, and as Harrington threw up his pistol
to =hoot the author caught his arm and forced it
down. Others came to his aid and the Ken
tuckian was overpowered. Tt is feared that
blood will be shed yet. as both men want satis
faction.
yorxG MAX kxocks dows old.
AGED BROKER IN-JT-RED TN RUSH FOR
BRIDGE CAR AT MANHATTAN END.
While waiting at the Brooklyn Bridge for a.
car last evening. in the rush for home, Henry
W. r>emars. a broker, of No. 380 Bergen -St.
Brooklyn, was knocked down and had his right
foot badly crushed. He also barely missed roll
ing und*>r th«> wheels of a DeKalb-ave. car as
it came around the curve Into the station.
Demars. who is seventy-one years old. was
knocked over by Thrmas B. Lannon. of No. l-> 2
Fourth-aye. Brooklyn, as the latter was board
ing a car from the wrong side. Dr. Rea was
called from the Hudson Street Hospital and
treated the Injury. Demars was taken home in
a cab. He refused to make any complaint
against Lannon.
BATTLE \T AGVA DVfXJE.
SEVEN THOUSAND MEN ENGAOED-THE RE
BUL.T IN DOUBT.
Panama, Aug. t-^-Sinee yesterday the battle
at Aqua Dolce has been the sole topic of con
versation here. Both Liberals and Oonserva
tfvea anxiously await the result of the
ment. which «rOL apparently, be one of the
bloodiest ever fought in Colombia. General
Morales P.^rti is among the most brave and ex
perienced 2«>ncrat of the Conservatives. He
h«s from 3.000 to &500 soldiers, and his force*
are strongly intrenched. General Herrera is un
doubtedly the best military leader the revolu
tionists have. Personally General Herrera is
said to be courageous and a great organizer. It
is believed he hap not over 4.<*X> men. but the
terrific charges upun th* lntrfnohnvnts about
Aqua Dulce made by his troops prove that they
are valiant.
The result of the battle at Aqua Dulce cannot
be predicted, but all agree that if General Her
rera wins the scene will be repeated here, for
General Salazar, Governor of Panama, who
made his mark in the defence of Panama In
July 1900; has two thousand men strongly in
trenched, and says he will fight as long as his
ammunition and soldiers last. A government
victory at Aqua Dulce would, it is generally be.
lieved, mean the end of the revolution.
OrEHATIOX COULD XOT SAVE HIM.
THE TOfNG MAN, PART OF WHOPE FPINAI,
OOtCKN V.'AS REMOVED. DIES IN"
CONNECTICUT.
[BT IIIIICIIIHI TO TIIE TRIBt NF..]
Glen Ridge, N. J.. Aug. 2.— John A. Nichols, son
of Mrs. Allan Nichols, of this place, who under
went one of the most difficult operations known to
surgery for an Injury received nearly three weeks
ago while diving into shallow water at Mulberry
Point. Conn., died there this morning, and his
funeral will be held on Monday at 5 p. m. at the
Church of the Messiah. Brooklyn.
In the operation performed the posterior part of
the sixth vertebra was removed, which caused a
contraction of muscles of the spinal column, which,
together with shock, hastened his death. Nichols
was «<-venteen years old, and had lived in this
place for several years. H<> was a member of
Christ Episcopal Church here, th<* cadet corps con
nected with the church and of other organizations.
OBJECT OF COLORED SIXGERS' VISIT.
' G. P. McKlnnoy. manager of the Florida Institute
Concert Troupe, has come North with a quartet of
co'.ored singers to look for engagements In the hope
of raising enough money to start an industrial
branch of the institution at Live Oak. Fla. He said
yesterday that the singers of plantation melodies
would be at No. 244 West Fifty-third-st.. for a
i time, ready to respond to invitations.
fIRST BALE OF THIS SEASOX's COtTOSf.
Charleston. P C. Aug. 2 —The first bale of cotton
from this season's crop was revived here by F. W.
Wfcgtiier, from P. W. Farrell. of Blackville. S. C.
and sold for 10 cents, being classed as good mid
dling.
LAMGE ifISERAL RIGHTS BOUGHT.
New-Wilmington, Perm., Aug. 2.— The Sharon
Coal and Limestone Company, an allied Interest of,
thf Sharon Steel Company, has closed the pur
chase of the mineral rights under fifty-one farms
around Leesburg. Mercer County, and Plain Grove,
Lawrence County. One million- dollars is involved.
Several thousand acres are embraced in the deal,
I art hi lea*e and part by purchase. .•; .. ./_.-
NEW- YORK DAILf TRIBtrSTE. SUNDAY. AUGFTRT 3. 1301.
THE LOGGETTA AT THE BASE OF THE CAMPANILE-AFTER THE DISASTER.
TWO STABBED IX EIGHT.
MAX IX DANGEROUS CONDITION— WOMAN'S
FACE SLASHED-THREE PRISONERS.
As the result of a fight between neighbor? last
night, a man and a woman are in the hospital
suffering from stab wounds, and another man is
a prisoner in ?he East Fifty-first-st. police sta
tion, charged with stabbing the man. AH are
prisoners.
Michael McGowan, of No. 315 East Forty-
Hghth-st.. and Frank Kro<?K«»l. of No. 400 East
FTty-*»ia;hth-st.. got Into a fight, and Krnppel
was getting: th<» worst of it. Mrf. Rose Min
••trfal. hi? Flster, ran out of th*> hnus? and took
his part.
A moment after Mrs. ICinstreal threw up her
hands and staggered to the curb, shouting that
she had been stabbed. Blood was pouring from
a wound in her face.
Soon McGowan cried. "I am stabbed!" He fell
to the sidewalk, and Kroegel stood for a moment
lcoking at him, and then started to walk away.
Policeman McAuliffe. of the East Flfty-flrst-st.
t-tation. who had been attracted by the crowd,
arrested him.
Dr. Quick, who came with a Flower Hospit; 1
ambulance, found that McGowan was danger
ously stabbed twice, once in the left breast, ju?t
above the heart, and once in the left side of the
back. He was at once hurried to the hospital.
Dr. Quick also took Mrs. Minstreal, who it
was found had been cut twice across the face.
The woman accused McGowan of stabbing her.
and he paid that he had been stabbed by
Kroegel. . .
SATTXGS BAXK CLOSED.
ESSEX COUNTY rKSTITLTIOK'S LIABILITIES
ASSUMED BY LOCAL TRUST. COMPANY.
Oran?* . N J.. Aujr. I.— The managers of th»»
Essex County Bavinca Bank, East Orange, have
dscMed that the best Interests of the institution t+
quire that it shall go into liquidation. This fa<n
was made known In a circular sent out last night
to the depositors. Acoompnnylng the notice was i»
irrtilar from the Essex County Trust Company,
which succeeded to the buplneps of the East Or«nit«
National Bank on July I. stating that It 1* ready to
assume all th« liabilities of the «avings bank.
The riirn County Savlnss Bank was organizer!
end opened for Iwlin— on August 2. ÜB7. Many
of its mana>£er« were directors in the East Orar.R*
National Bank, and the two Institutions occupied
quarters in the sasti" building. Aaron Adams, who
is president of the Essex County Trust Company.
has been th» only president of the Kavlnss bank
has had
The iast report of the Essex County Savings
Bank. December 31. tSU, -howt'l liabilities 1827 WZ,
as^ts {344,764 60, leaving a surplus of $17. *'.
UIBSIXG BOY EOIXn, A TRAMP.
DISAPPEARED WHEN FOURTEEN TEARS
OLD: NOW A MATURE MAN.
Baltimore, Augr. 2.— 1R?1 Charles Edward Klrch
ner. a boy then fourteen years old, disappeared
from his home in this city, and h*> was never heanl
from until to-day when h< wns sccMentsJly dte
covered by his brother In law and brought to his
bone.
The hrother In law Is a freight conductor on the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad hh'l while his trnln
waa near Baldwin he recognised Klrchner in the
person of a tramp who was stealing a ride. Upon
being brought home it was discovered that Klr«-h
m-r. now a full bearded man of twenty-five. U In
a silghtly demented condition and waa able to Klve
only :m incoherent account or his almle«s wanner-
Ingi of :he last ejf-ven years.
Rf,H POBTOFFICE TWICE IX A VOXTTI
SEVERAL BURGLARIES ABOUT LINCOLN, N. J..
-Air. TO BK THE WORK OF TT.AMPS.
[P.T rSXSWBAPH TO THF TISIHfNE.I
Plainaeld. N J.. Aog 2.— For the second time
within a month the postofflce at Lincoln was en
tered last night. As on the former occasion, the
burglars secured a quantity of stamps, but failed
to g"t any ca*h. The postofnee i» in the general
store in Lincoln Boulevard. On the second floor
the proprietor and his family live. They knew
rrfn to" hsd l evidently been used to pry the door
open A •ma" -» fP - -ntaininK the stamps, was
11^ tramps, who ,on
-reVate^n great numbers at the Gwnbrook tanks
t, ,f -, rntip -nvav Several other robberies ha\e
rf d ehTneighborhood of Lincoln. It is
SHIH 3SSs£sSsfe« fe»»
S?? it home Instead of leaving it at the office.
ARRAIGHS CARROLL'S LEADERSHIP.
UNDER IT. MR. RUSH SAT*. THE XXIXTH DIS
TRICT DEMOCRATIC ORGANIZATION HAS
BTEADILT RETROGRADED.
Thomas E Rush, who is opposing John F. Carroll
forth" Democratic leadership of the XXIXth As
sembly Dl-trict. and who was recently accused I">>
Thomas Gllleran and Timothy Dr.scoU of deserting
to the Carroll faction, yesterday issued a long circu
ar to Vhe electors of the district in which he says
hat the political conditions in the district have
been maintained In such an unsatisfactory manner
under the present leadership that a change of man
agement is absolutely necessary to prevent com
plete dissolution o? the Democratic organization of
"under the management of Rollin M. Morgan and
t~v,t, v rirroll since ISS3. the Democratic vote has
.feadi'v decreased, notwithstanding the fact that
mlnv new houses have been built and the number
£ voterT substantially increased. The executive
member Mr. Carroll, the circular nays, lives for a
S of three months annually »t Saratoga, and
>«i -Tnother neriod of three months each year
t?«w1? n Cuba and Florida, while Mr. Morgan,
the chairman of his General Committee. lives for
ten months each year at his country home in New-
Yl"«« : a nlace most inaccessible to his constitu
ents Many of the election district captains, says
Mr Rush, are non-resldi-nts of the election dis
trict over which they preside, and others do not
even* live in the Ass°mbly district.
••How much or haw little money is contributed to
rsmoalßns." the circular says, "no one ever knows.
ns Ihe treasurer and financial secretary make no
renort The proper distribution of $837,000 worth of
paKage annually in the XXIXth District ought
to show better returns than the last five elections
d The^lrcular is flsyned by twenty-five Democrats in
the district. The first signature is that of Abraham
Cane Thomas E. Rush, who has been an active
Democrat in the district for fifteen years,- is com-
Bwnded to "the voters as a suitable choice ior
leader. •.-..; :■--... -'.:vfi;
BIG ABA TTOIR B URN ED.
SIX HUNDRED HOGS IN THE BUILDING
AT KEARNY SAVED-TRAFFIC
DELAYED.
The hog abattoir established by the Central
Stock Yards Company, of Jersey City, on the
west bank of the Hackensack River, in Kearny
Township, was destroyed by fire last night. The
building was a frame structure. 200 by GOO feet,
and two stories high. In it at the time were six
hundred hogs, which had not yet been taken
from the cars. These cars were run out on sid
ings and all the animals were saved. No one
was injured, a.«= all of the employes were absent
on their annual picnic. The origin of the fire
could not be learned.
The damage Is estimated at $200,000. The only
fire engines on the scene were two that were
sent from Jersey City, the Kearny Township
department being unable to reach the fire. Those
sent from Jersey City were of little service.
owing, to the inflammable nature of the
material and the progress the fire had made
when they arrived. Six trains composed
nf six cattle cars each were also burned, and
all the trolley, telephone and telegraph wires
along the Newark Turnpike, in front of the
building were destroyed. Consequently, trolley
tranV the North Jersey Street Railway Turn
pike Line was suspended. Cars were run over
the companjr-a other line by way of the Newark
Flank Road, so that the travelling community
was only slightly inconvenienced. trn^^
A plant on the same ground was d " -^ y
eight years ago. entailing a low of $250,000
MAT RETIRE FROM POLITICS.
THE PRIMARIES IN SOMERSET COTJNTT.
N J.. INDICATE THAT L. A. THOMP
SON HAS DEFEATED C. A REED.
fnr Trt.Ec.r.APH to tht! TRißrxiU
Somervtlle N J.. Auk. 1.-The primaries for th*
election of delegates to the IVth Congress District
Hepubllcan Convention, held In Somerset County
to-day. Indicate th« retirement of Senator Charles
A. Reed from Somerset County politics and th^
... . ndency of I-ewia A. Thompson, his old op
ponent. For the nr.-.t time in many years the
prtmarlea were devoid of political atstta between
the need and Thompson factions of the party, and
Senator Reed tai conspicuous for his absence In
the political arena.
The delegates elected in most of the townships
are known to favor . nompson for the ConKre.is
nomination, nnd he will receive the solid support of
the county delegation at the Congress conven
tion to be "held at Klrmlngton on next Tuesday. It
I-. understood that Thompson does not seek the
nomination and will make no effort to wrest It from
other candidates. He will be made chairman of the
convention and receive the complimentary vote of
Somerset County.
THE CALIFORXIA FARTHQfAKE.
PEARS OF RErKTITION OF THE CAUAMTTT.
: Santa Barbara. CaL, Aug. 2-Throughout yes
' terday until 3.10 p. m. occasional slight earthquake
j shocks were felt in Los Alamos Valley.
The wagon road over what Is known as the Los
i Alamos *ran>. extending over the mountain Into
'< the valley. Is in bad condition. Tons of bowldera
' and dirt were thrown from hislier elevations, and
1 persons arriving at Loa Alamos from Lompoc yes
i terday evening report having great dUßculty in
j rnnklne their way over langerous places.
Professor Larkln. of Mount Lowe Observatory,
■ arrived n.t Los Alamos last evening. Over the tel
ephone he stated the disturbances are of a nature
. known as oscillatory earthquakes, and are of a
• common nature. He says that it Is probable they
i are due to the sunken displacement if immense
' bodies of gases, seven or eight mllea beneath tho
' surface of the enrth.
While the country about Los Alamos gives evi
1 dence of on;e having been the scene ot vast vol
i canlc. action, he observes nothing to Indicate that
i another calamity of that nature Is likely to occur.
Professor Hilgard. president of the agricultural
: department of the University of California, tele
phoned Attorney Lessle, advising him and the peo
: pl« of Loa Alamos to desert thrlr homes for places
of saf<-t> . t ■
SATS THAT BIS YACHT WAS STOLBV.
F. H. WALDORF. AN IMPORTER OF THW CTTT.
IS UOOKJNQ FOR MAN WHO GAVE HIM
A WORTHLESS CHECK.
Frederick H. Waldorf, an importer, of this city,
who lives at the Eagle Hotel. In New-Rochelle. has
offered a reward for the recovery of his cutter. th«
Pelican, which, he says, was stolen one week ago
from Echo Bay Harbor.
Mr. Waldorf agreed to sell the y.icht to a man
who said he was J. H. Langdon. of this city. for
$700. Langrdon and two sailors went to New-Ro
chelle on Sunday and Waldorf acefdrd to Lang
don's request to take the yacht out for a trlai spin.
Before leaving the harbor Langdon handed Wal
dorf a check drawn on a bank in this city for DM.
The latter at first declined to accept it. saying that
the yacht was stocked with provisions for a two
weeks' cruise and that he wanted to remove his
private property from the boat.
On Lansdon's rmmifc to return to the harbor
on Sunday night. Waldorf took the check, and ex
pected to close the deal on Monday.
Owing to his wife's Illness, he did not send the
check to New-York for collection until Thursday.
It was returned marked ••worthless." Mr. Waldorf
then Informed the police that his yacht was stolen,
and a genera! alarm has been sent out.
The Pelican is described as 34 feet over all. 2S feet
water line, painted white, green bottom, straight
hows and overhang stern.
CHILD DIES OF ALCOHOLISM.
SHE SAMPLED HER MOTHERS BLACKBERRY
BRANDT. AND THE DCM-TOR COVLP
NOT SAVE HETt.
Having surreptitiously sampled some of her
: mother's attempts at blackberry brandy. Sarah
Hockman. three years old, dir«J of acute -\lcohollsm
in St. Mary's Hospital. Brooklyn, last night.
The little girl lived with her parents at No. 385
Maiion-st. Mrs. Hockman for several days had
been experimenting with blackberry brandy, by
placing the fruit in a Jar full of alcohol. While
the ir.other was away yesterday, Sarah found the
jar and ate a number of the soaked berries. When
Mrs Hockman returnei the child was acting in
a peculiar manner. She staggered around the
room, and soon fell in a swoon- The family doc
tor was called, and had the little girl taken to the
hospital. There the doctors discovered that she
i was suffering from acute alcoholism. They aid
[ their best to save her, but it was too late.
XEW-JEKBBY TO CLAIM $4.905JM9.
IT IS THK AMOUNT OF INTEREST PAID BT
THE STATE ON CIVTL WAR TAX.
[PT TEU:>;R.\rH T<- Tin- T! It:? NX . ?
Trenton. N. J.. Aug. 2.— The State of Ne.v-
Jersey will file a claim against th government
next week for $4.111,53<>, for interest paid by th«
State on the war debt. In the Civil War the
State issued bonds for .<o,f>oo,tX>o for enuippins
troops and similar expenditures. The principal
of the bonds has been paid off by the govern
ment, but the State has not been reimbursed for
the interest paid on the bonds. An effort will
be made to secure this under a recent act of
Congress. The attention of Attorney Genera]
McCarter waa called to the fact that the statute
existed by H. M. Foote. of Washington, who has
been engaged to press the r-iaim.
It waa pointed out that Pennsylvania had al
ready recovered the full amount of interest on
its Civil War debt, and the Attorney General
communicated with State Treasurer Briggs to
get the bonds in shape for presentation to the
Court of Claims. Treasurer Briggs at once put
his entire office force to work classifying the
bonds. The force has been working overtime for
the last two weeks, and expects to have the
cancelled bonds in readiness by next Tuc-sday.
Some idea of the amount of work involved may
be gathered from the fact that bonds were issued
from I*6l to the close of the war. in sums rang
ins from (100 to $">,<VM>. the total issue being
(3.800.000. In many cases there were reissues,
and the total number of bonds actually put in
circulation will not fall far short of fifty thou
sand. The interest on these bonds was paid
from 18*52 until the date of the wiping out of
the war debt in January of last year.
THIXK THEY HAVE EXPRESS ROBBERS.
ART.EST OF SPRINGFIELD MAN" LEADS TO CONFES
SION THAT CLEARS IT MYSTERIOUS THETTS.
Springfield. Mas?., detectives sent word to Cap
tain Titus of the detective bureau on Friday night
that they had arrested Herman Llbby. a machin
ist, of that city. as a suspicious person. They
said they found him trying tn dispose of bent and
broken silver forks, knives and other ware worth
IBM. He said he got the stuff from Frederick Lit
tlefield. of No. 354 Mott-ave., this city, an em
ploye* in th<> Forty-eighth-st. and Madison-aye.
office of the Adams Express Company. Littlefield
was arrested. The police think they have the
solution of many mysterious robberies of valuable
packages in transit from the Madison-aye. office.
Detective Farley says Llbby declared he had
got the goods from Littlefield, who, he said, was
his cousin.
Mr. Andrews, manager of the Forty-eighth-st.
office an employe who handles all the goods there
and a detective" went to Springfield. Farley says
the employ* identified the goods as tnose taken
from the company's branch office. They brought
Libby her- and pot Littl«»fi«»ld to Police Head
quarters, where Libby confronted him. Llttlefteld
confessed that he had given the goods to Libby,
and that he had other valuables in a trun* at
his home. He was arrested.
LAWK TEXNIS.
ENGLISH PLATERS WIN AT LONGWOOD.
THE DOHERTTS BEAT THE WRENNS AT THEIR
OWN CLOTHIER DEFEATS LARNED.
Longwood. Mass.. Aup. 2.— The two English
tennis players. R. F. and H. L. Doherty. proved
too strong to-day for one of the best of the Ameri
can pairs. JR. D. and G. L. Wrenn. and won the
Eastern championship for doubles in three sets to
one. For two sets, the Wrenns by keeping the
ball high in the air. seemed to have a trifle the
better of the play, but the Englishmen, resorting
to the same tactics, beat them out The score was
4—6. 7-5. 6-2. 6—2.
\vtiile this match was in progress. W. A. Lamed,
the present national ternls champion, and one of
the American team who will play the Englishmen
next week for the Davis trophy, was beaten by
one of the coming young players. William J.
Clothier, of Philadelphia. This match was the sen
sation of the afternoon, and to the minds of tennla
experts makes the outcome of the next week s
contest exceedingly doubtful. Lamed being one of
those selected to defsnd the Davis Cup. Clothier
played brilliant tennis, besides being cool ana
steady while Lamed was nervous and erratic.
The score cf this match was •— 3—6. 6—2. 7—5.
The score of the Doherty-Wrenn match by points
follows :
FIRST SET.
Poherty brothers 4 34414023 3— 2S-4
Wrenn brothers 2 51041445 — —
SECOND SET.
Doherty brotherM 2841434838 90— T
Wram brothers. 46 0 4250738 44 — 5
THIRD SET.
DotMTty brothers 3 4 4 4 2 4 4 4— 2»—
Wrenn brothers S 12 2 4 2 0 0—16—2
FOURTH PET.
Doherty brothers * 4 4 4 6 4 4 4-34-6
Wrenn brothers « 2 0 2 « 0 1 o— lo—
Score by points in Clothi<»r-Larned match:
FIRST SET.
rloth r 4 2 4 5 14 4 0 4—24 — 28 —
LlTrnM .■.■.........:..:.-> 4 2 3 4 0 0 4 1-18-3
BECOND SET.
Clothier B 3 2 4 4 3 4 2 2—29—3
Lamed ..:....... 7 5420*2* 4-33-«
THIRD SET.
Clothier 2 4 4 4 6 2 4 7— 33— «
I.arn-4 .......".. * 2 2 2 4 4 1 6-24-2
FOURTH SET.
Clothier 5 444432140 4 11-4B— 7
Lamed 7 11115 4 4 2 4 2 9— 41— 0
SUMMARY OF THE DAY'S PLAY.
Lonpwood Cup for singles— W. J. Clothier beat W. A.
Larn^l. S— B, 3— «. •— 7—5.
Handicap cir.Kl<"«> iflnal roun<D— R. Bishop beat L.
pp r rry 5—7, •— t, rt—
Eastern doubles championship 'final round) — R. F. and
II 'L. Doherty beat R. D. and G. L. Wrenn. jr.. 4—6.4 — 6.
7 •'. «— 2. : 2.
DR. PIM. EX-ENGLISH CHAMPION, HERE.
England's team of lawn tennis player.? was com
pleted yesterday by the arrival of Dr. Joahua Pirn
aboard the Cunard line steamship Etruria. The
former champion of Ensland said he was in ex
cellent condition and appeared to be so. He was
especially pleased to learn of the success of the
Doherty brothers during their week of play in the
Longwood tournament, and prophesied that this
year the Dwißht F. Davis International Challenge
Trophy would cross the water.
Dr. Pirn saM that he was very rusty on his
tennis, as be had played but little in several years.
Such sntliea aa he had made in tournaments had
b<>en under an assumed name, which is a popular
method on the transatlantic courts. He believed
thiit his strokes were aa good as ever and that he
would he successful in the singles against both
Whltmsn and Earned. Dr. Pirn remarked that he
had never experienced the terrors of the American
r*verse twist service and that he had r.o tear of
It Infwt in his opinion, the steadiness and ac
curac". of the EnK-lish game would beat the tactics
and brilliancy of the Americans. He went to the
descent Athletic Club, at which ptac* -the MjOg
and Caotaln t'olllns expect to meet him to-rtay
and beXthelf practice for the international com-
P The°prosr mmc arranged by the United States
v "tonal lawn Tennis Association and the com
mUtee of the Crescent Athletic Cluh is as follows:
',S'edne!.d«y. Auguit 6-Two matches in the single,, be
ts B »nnln •»*•»> V-The doubles match batMHi lIM
ThU Sohertv *bShU of England, challengers and Uol
combe Ward an.l Dwl«W X Davis, of the Inited
States aet^nuers. to besstn at 4:15 p. m.
Friday Au ustß-Two matche. In the singles, to beein
at 3:30 t>. m. . -■
Arrangements have been made by the Crescent
Athletic Club management to seat three thousand
speotators. with standing room for nearly two thou
sand more Admission to the grounds will be orly
by invitation, and positively no tickets will be so .1.
The tickets of invitation may be secured by apply,
in«f to mer E Presby. Postofflee Box 2.337. BOS
ton Mass The courts at the Bay Ridge grounds
hive been' put in the finest possible condttion. and
now surras P s any turf neld available tn this coun
try. .
LITTLES SISTER HELPS WIN DOUBLES;
In the mixed double tennis tournament of the
Bedford Country Club, of Bedford. N. V.. maa
Elsie Little a sister of the well known expert.
R D. Little, and E. P. Fischer, of New-York Cttjr.
won the prizes presented by Mr. Kirby. Eight
teams T olaved and in the first round some close
matches were seen, but in the finals Miss EMe Lit
tle and Fischer had rather an easy time. Miss Lit
tle's clever volleying beins an important factor.
The scores follow:
Mixed doubles, first round— Miss Kirhy and Dwight
PaVtrMe- beat MUs Little and Dr. Derlokson. i— «. B-:i.
r fi- Ml« Elsie .Little and E. P. Fischer b*at Mlm Clarke
s^l H WM 7-S A-°- Mr?, ard Mr. James Cushman
h«r Ml-.S C ii'hnian in,l Gustavu* Klrhy. 6-4. 6—4. Miss
RlVhb^n and Mo'es Ely beat MiM Florence . Lounsbury
Uo^j. , Elj b*a, : Mr.
on 4 Mr« Tnmoa finhman ft— »• •>— "• MISS )-.;••>■ L4ttl*
££ E P. Ser b«T Mi, S Ficrence Kirby anct Dwlght
PFIP Fl t nal 5e rou <^iMi; s J E'. 9l c Little >ndF. F. FUcher sa«
Miss Rathbun and Mases Ely. •»— 3. »—
THE FIRE RECORD YESTERDAY.
5:3» a. m.— No. Ml WSSI S*rente*nth-»t.: James K#n
nerlv; $50.
»JB a. m.-N*. 23rt W«t Sev#r.ty-sUth-»t.:. Mrs, T. J.
Rrockway; 575.
11:30 a. m.— No. 75S East On*-hundred-*nd-tMrty--t«hth-
Bt.; Albvt Clark; $25.
125 p m— No 225 West Flftr-flrt»-»t - ; unknown. J1.",.
*;00 9 . m.-Xo. 70 Bayarf-st.; Barneu Stein; ?200. _
BRYAN AND PRESIDENCY.
HE SAWS HE HAS A HIGHER AMBITION
—THE HONOR OF PRIVATE
CITIZENSHIP.
Mountain Lahe Park. Md.. Aue. t— the pr*»»
en?e of an audience of four thousand persons as
sembled in the amphitheatre of rh Mountain Laka
Park Chatanquan Association. William Jennlng*
Bryan this afternoon Aacsassd th« ' Problesss cf
etnaaent." Mr. Bryan prefaced his addres?,
which was* of two hours* duration, with a denial
that h» will asain seek to become the national
standard bearer of the Democratic party, his ds»
nial beins: contained in the following phrases: "I
hope yon will give m*- credit with possessing a
his'ner ambition than that to be sat;»tle<i wMI the
office of President of the United States. I sis) too
democratic ro covet an ambition that orly a few la
one generation can share. I prefer the honor of
being a private citizen, an honor greater than that
of a kins."
Throughout his discussion of the momeaitons)
problems now engaging the attention of the two
great political parties. Mr. Bryan occasionally
tapped a vein of quiet humor that generated
smiles on many countenances.
■You will recall," he said, that the Republicans
have had two telling chances at me. and on this
occasion I wouhi seek one at them. In dealing
with the theme of ■Problems of Government' I
shall endeavor to Inject enough religion to suit a
Republican and enough politics to curry favor with
a Democrat."
Mr. Bryan stated that primarily tt was his pur
pose to deal with the moral phase of tne- subject..
He declared that the partisan discussion of the
tariff, free silver, the trusts and imperialism ha 4
been dragged down by campaign orators Into the
mire of dollars and cents.
In civilization, which Mr. Bryan defined as the
harmonious development of the human race, mor
ally, mentally and physically, he cited an essential
to th« continued progress of the nation. He re
garded the cultivation of the moral element a* a
paramount Issue, and declared that history sup
ported his contention that moral decay had pre
ceded the ruin of every nation that had fallen. "A
nation." said Mr. Bryan. "Is strong only In, pro
portion to its moral excellence."
He declared that the present admlnlstrat! &t.a
developed a tendency to amend God s noiy ortu
nances, "Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not
kill." "Thou shalt not covet." etc.. by aaatr.gr aa
apologetic clause, "Save when done on a, verj!
la R S a n?e" was made to the Philippe questtaa
and the conduct of the American soldiery In Jffir
pressing the insurrection. He denounced lrnpenai
r?m" at great length, then, reverting to tne cur
rency question, proclaimed himself as devout aa
he termed the pla
tocracv of wealth, the tariff and Injunctions, and
said that the only possibility of suppressing *n
archy rested in the education of the people to lov»
th Mr" K B™ m s e t"ted with marked emphasis tfcat «
he had the power every article manufactured^ tar
trusts would be placed on the free list, althou^
he sincerely doubted If this strenuous and. tragical
measure would wholly frustrate the trusts.
PURROT OUT FOR HAFFKS.
BOROUGH PRESIDENTS OPPONENTS THTN«2
EX-COUNTY. CLERK "WON'T HELP
HIM MUCH.
Henry I>- Purroy. former County Clerk, to a let
ter to ex-Assemblyman Charles C. Manrin. of the
XXXVth Assembly District, declares that he- has
determined to advise all his friends that may con
sult him that their wisest course at the approach
ing primaries win be to support Louis F. Haffen hi
his candidacy for the leadership of the XXXTVth
District. Mr. Purroy adds that he will remain a
political free lance. He believes, however that
Mr. Haffen Is better qualified to guide wisely tjia
Democracy of The Bronx than any of his rivals.
Since Mr Purroy waa forced out of Tammany
Hall by Richard Croker some years ago he has
not been activ» In politics, and the frtenas of
Senator Joseph P. H-r.nessy do not believe that ho
will influence many votes.
DO NOT KNOW TF CROKER WILL RETURN
HTS SON AND NIECE ARRIVE— DENIAL THAT
HE BOUGHT LONDON HOUSE.
Llttla light on the probability of Richard
Croker's return to this city in the fall was shed r>y
his son Frank, who arrived on the Philadelphia
from Liverpool yesterday. Mr. Croker declared
that his father was in the best of health. H«
flatly denied the leport that th» former Tam
many leader had purchfsed a town house in Lon
don.
Miss Frances E. Jenkins, daughter of Dr. Jen
kins, former Health Officer of the Port, and a
niece of Mr. Croker. was also on the Philadel
phia. Miss Jenkins said she had enjoyed manr
games of golf with her uncle at Moat House, but
that he could do no horseback riding a recent
fall having disabled his right leg. Sn» added that
'he did not know what her uncle's plans for tha
future were, but she did not think ne would re
turn next fall.
RAILROAD INTEBEBTB.
ATTTTI T»E OF SEABOARD AIR UNE.
Baltimore. Aug. i-John Skelton Williams, presi
dent of the Seaboard Air Line Railroad, raad« a>
flying visit to Baltimore this morning, returning In
the afternoon to New- York. While here he spent
most of his time in conference wltu Vice-President
j. William Mld<lendorf.
Being asked by a reporter what part the Sea
board is taking In the pending railway combina
tions reported in the South. President Williams
said: "The Seaboard Is awsi and will continue ab
solutely Independent. W.< have never entertained
a proposition to enter any combination, altnougrj
we have been approached from one or the other of
ti . various schemes of this sort. Our attention Is
entirely absorbed In developing the opportunities
of the Seaboard system."
President Williams said he £ad just awarded con
tracta for twenty thousand tons of steel rails, triis
In addition to the ten thousand tons which ar»
now being delivered. He also said that bid 3 are
being asked for about Ss\MiJM of equipments for
the line to Birmingham. Engines, coal cars box
cars and other rolling stock are Included In this lot.
CHIEF ENGINEER OF NEW ROAD.
H. A. Sumner. recently In ehaasja of the con
struction of five hundred miles of road near El
Paso for the Rock Island Railway Company haa
been appointed chief engineer of the Denver.
Northwestern an.] Pacific Railway, which when
completed will have a western connection to the
Faciric from Salt Lake City over Baratewf Clark's
road, the San Pedro. Lcs Angeles and Salt Lake.
David H. Moffat. president of the Dsatvsr, North
western ann Pacifl;. says: "Our financial arrange
m«-n-s havo been perfected, and the work Incidental
to the building of our ltne i» now rapidly progress
ing BWs for constmetiea are now being awarded
by the Celorado-U tan Construction Company. Our
road will be completed within two years to Salt
Lake City. \V • hope to let the contract for th«
large tunnel through the main range of the Conti
nental Divide in September."
PENSIONS ON SOUTHERN PACIFIC.
San Francisco. Aug. 2.— Acting on Instructions
issued by President Harnman. the heads of .lepart
ments of the Sonthets Pacific company have begun
taking a census of the employes stxty-flve years
old and over. It is thought that this Is th* fore
runner of some sort of ponsio'i system, although,
Mr Harrlman has not announc-d his plans. It is
found that, while there are no engineer! or con
ductors sixty-fire years old. a number of men in
the shops and in other esyauruaati are hi the Itii.
. .
BODY OF BLACKWELL ISLASr* PET f Of \'l>.
The boly of the young girl found Msatkaaj in th#
Erie Basin yesterday afternoon, was identified in
the evening as being that of Florence S. William
■on She was the daughter of a woman employed
on ftlsHrwell'a Island, and vcis drowned while in
bathing there about five days ago. The girl was
eleven yeara old, and waa known as the pet of tha
island. '
VALET STEALS FROM EMPLOYER.
San Francisco. \ng. i (Specia».-T. P. Heineman.
who says his father la a New-York tea importer. is
in jail here for gran.l larceny. Heineman. who ha 3
been valet of S. Prentiss Smith, a local capitalist.
stole I3CO in bills from the pocket of his employer.
He confessed Ma crime when arrested. Young
Heineman says he has travelled nearly all over
the world In' the last three years He returned
home at one time, but says his father turned him
out acain. Landing here penniless some month 3
ago. he became Smith's servant.
AZTEC RELICS TO COME TO THIS CITY.
City of Mexico. Aug. 2.-A large collection or
Aztec antiquities, collected by Leopoldo Batres.
Curator General of Mexican antiquities, is being
packed for shipment to New-York, where they will
be shown at the Congress of Americans, who ar«
to assemble there on October L Mr. Batres will
attend the congress and read a paper on the racl*l ;.
connections, habits and history o: sm^t ou«
dwellers in the Southwest ani Mexice . . _ ..
5

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