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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 04, 1902, Image 2

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inidfiay it became necessary to turn on the .lghts
The darkness this morning was not due tS the
thunderstorm entirely, but also to the thick, neavy
atmosphere of fog and hincke combined.
It war probably not so dark outside of^the city
out of the way of smoke and fog. £™ "^f^Ar
same thing in other cities when a heavy thunder
storm came up. the darkness being caused also £
•city smoke and foe-. When you have a thick : at
mosphere and a thunderstorm com^red ro « f t h 7
fiarkness-that li the sum and substance of the
~*- P to Ba. m. this morning there had been no
thunderstorm to*re to 5P«.k of thls . " mm ™ 1 r er : h^ t
at present the conditions ar* favorable for thun
derstorm* over this section of the countr>. The
southeast winds kept the temperature down this
morning, but the humidity was high ■ almost -'
Faturatlon. before the storm. At «■ a. m the nu
mkJity -was S3 and a temperature of -2 degrees
made It very opp^ive. This is the highest hu
midity we have had for some time.
OWS CAVE-IK
PANIC FOL
DWELLERS IN HARLEM FLEE FROM
HOUSES— NARROW ESCAPE OF
WOMAN AVD CHILD.
Great excitement followed a cave-In In One
hundred-and-forty-afth-st. and Bradhurst-ave.
yesterday in the height of the storm, and a
dozen or more occupants of houses at Nos. 35?
and 323 West One-hundred-and-forty-fifth-st.
fled panicstricken to the street, where they
huddled. drenched to the skin, for half an hour.
That a woman and child who sought refuge
from the storm on the stoop of No. 323 West One
buxtdred-aad-forty-Sfth-st. MR not instantly
killed by the cave-in was due to the presence
of mind of Thomas Hayden, who lives at that
number. Without the slightest warning, from
the house line in front of Sam. 321 and 323 and
for a space five feet beyond the curb line, the
. street caved in to a depth of twelve feet, ex
posing the water mains and service pipes. The
immense cavity immediately filled with water,
and for a time it was thought the two houses
•would collapse. It was said by experts of the
' "Water Department who visited the scene that
-had not the storm subsided and the rush of
•waters quieted the two houses would undoubt
edly have followed the first cave-in.
The earth under the pavement in front of
' TCos. 321 and 323 it was found after the storm
of last Monday had washed away, leaving the
flagstones slimly supported. Men were put to
■work at once filling in the gap. and by Satur
- day night had all but completed the work, and
' the workmen left the pavement, so it was
' thought, in a safe condition.
The occupants of the two houses were greatly
alarmed by the darkness which preceded the
storm. Mr Hayden. who is leader of the New
• York Democracy of the XXIIId Assembly Dis
trict, saw a woman and child on the stoop rf
his home, wher.? they had taken refuge from
the downpour. Mr. Hayden at the same time
- saw the earth Bear the curb line trembling.
and. recognizing the danger, called to the
■woman to flee for he'- life. The woman saw the
danger and, seizii.. Lei child in her arms, fled
to the street. '.-.** she started to pause on
the sidewalk, but, it slowiy sinking beneath her.
• the fled on to the centre "f ii»2 street. A
' moment later, with a roar, me pavement sank
! downward, and there yawned in its place a
: p-eat dark hole, which extended from the north
• west corner of the two thoroughfares for over
: a, hundied feet up One-hundred-and-forty-flfth
;Ft A second later there came a second roar.
• and it was found that the rent had crossed One-
I hundred-and-forty-fifth-st. at the northwest
corner of Bradhurst-ave. to the home of Charles
E. Seeth.
Seeing that th« front walls of the foundations
of the houses at Nob. 321 and 323. as well as
| those of Mr. Seeth. had been exposed by the
i cave-in, the occupants became excited, and,
" fearing the houses would follow, a dozen or
! more fled to the centre of the street, where they
remained until assured all danger was past.
: No. 321 is a three story brick house, occupied by
John Blacktcrd as a confectionery store and
' home. All of Mr Blackford"s family were among
those who fled into the storm for safety. At No.
: ?.23 no one was at home except Mr. Hayden and
a. servant. They, too, joined Mr. Blackford's
family and the others.
Immediately after the cave-In the cavity be
gan to fill with water, and in half ah hour was
c whirlpool. The Water Department was com
municated with, and Thomas Dolan. one of r.he
superintendents, with a corps of workmen, at
once shut off the water. It was found that an
old service pipe, evidently used by some con
tractor to sui ply water to a building in course
of construction, had been broken, and for days.
• probably, had been pouring a steady stream of
. water under the sidewalk in front of the two
houses. The water in the cellar of Mr. Seeth's
home -was nearly six feet deep. The Water De
partment informed the Street Department, and
the work of filling up the cave-iu was begun at
once.
SHOCKED IX CHURCH.
CELEBRANT CALMS FEARS OF CONGRE
GATION — WOMAN FAINTS — LIGHT
NING FOLLOWS CHURCH
WIRES.
A panic, due to the storm yesterday, was nar
rowly averted at the Church of Our Lady of
Solace, West Seventeenth-st., Coney Island.
Special services were being held and the church
-was full, mary children being seated in th*
front pews.
The intense darkness alarmed the children,
and when the rain came it increased their agi
tation Suddenl-" a heavy thunder clap sounded
just outside the chur.h. and the lightning whicn
followed played over the meadows and around
the church, following the electric wires in the
building.
Father Brophy. the celebrant, stilled the alarm
among the acolytes and congregation, and the
services v-re continued.
Achille Cirriani. of No. 35 West Flfteenth-st..
Coney Island, and •'Willie" De Vere. eleven years
old. of West Twenty-second-st.. Coney Island,
•were injured somewhat by the electricity. Eliza
Latour. of Surf-aye. and West Seventeenth-**-.
fainted. They were attended by ambulance sur
{T^ons snd w«rt *■" their home?
TREE.< SiFFER IX RROOKLTX.
MARCONI POLE STRUCK AT NAVY YARD—
SEVERAL WASHOUTS.
Although yesterday's storm in Brooklyn was
the most threatening and severe, from a spec
tacular point of view, this summer, the damage
done was comparatively slight.
At the Brooklyn Navy Yard the tall mast
•which has just been erected as a part of the
Marconi system attracted the lightning, and
fifteen feet of the top pole was broken off.
The electrical apparatus had not yet been put
in place.
Th* fi^cp"!* on the armory of Troop C, in
JCorth Port land -a ye.. was struck and destroyed.
~ ■ ■ -c were wubovts at Sixtieth-st. and
Eighth-avf.. ?outh Brooklyn, and in Harmon-
M ■(-twecn Knick?rbocker and Irving ayes.. in
the Eastern District.
nty or thirty trees In various parts of the
city were struck by lightning and blown down.
BEAT VICTIMS LEAP TO STREET.
. CRAZED BY HUMIDITY. MAN KILLS HIMSELF
-ANOTHER BADLY INJURED.
Unable to sleep, and, as believed, crazed by
- the heat, two men in different parts of Brooklyn
got up from their beds and Jumped out of the
window ' early yesterday morning. One was
killed instantly. The other was taken to the
Seney Hospital, and is in a dangerous condition.
James Clark, twenty-eight years old, a waiter,
, of Stamford, Conn., was sleeping on the fourth
floor of the Mission Lodging House, No. 16 Til
lary-st. Other men in the same room heard
him complaining of the heat, and talking inco
herently during the night. About 5 o'clock he
1 g-ot up and went to the window and, after stand
ing there a few minutes, climbed out on the fire
escape and leaped to the street. It rvas a fall
of seventy feet, and when the ambulance sur
geon arrived Clark was dead. His skull had
been smashed like an eggshell.
Patrick Manning, forty years old, Jumped
from the second story window of his home at
No. 44.'. Twentleth-st.. about 4 o'clock. He had
been overcome with the heat on Saturday after
noon, and was taken to his home. He began to
moan toward morning, and his wife got up to
*et him some ice water. While sha was out of
the room Mannfjig jumped out of the front win
dow. He was tak^n to the Seney Hospital.
where it was paid that he was suffering from
contusion of the spine and concussion of the
brain.
WIRES SLIGHTLY DAMAGED.
At the Western Union office last evening it was
said that there had been a slight damage to the
wires between Jamaica and Babylon in the storm,
but all offices had been reached at the usual Sun
day hours between 5 and 6 o'clock. There was also
a little break between Port Chester and Bridgeport
on the Eastern line. Outside of that no damage
was done. There was no storm up the State.
At th- Postal Telegraph Cable Company the nigh,
wire chief said the wires were In a bad shape
around Baltimore, where there had been a severe
storm. The company, however, had communica
ticn with Baltimore, and was not affected other
wise by the storm
HOME TORX FROM TOP TO BOTTOM.
WOMAN UNCONSCIOrS FROM SHOCK
CHURCH LIGHTS GO OUT WHILE SER
VICE IS PROCEEDING.
Plainfield. N. J.. Aug. 3 — A brief, but vigorous
storm visited Plainfield this morning. A bolt of
lightning struck the home of George Studer.
No. r»So Arlington-aye.. badly shocking Mrs.
Studer and doing considerable damage to prop
erty. Mrs. Studer was unconscious for some
time after the shock and is still in a serious
condition. The house was torn from roof to cel
lar and filled with sulphur smoke, but there was
no fire.
Edgar Brokow, who was closing a window in
the Park Avenue Baptist Church, near by on
Park-aye.. was thrown down. He suffered con
siderably from the shock. All the lights in the
church went out and the building was plunged
in darkness In the middle of the service. The
storm was accompanied by heavy clouds which
made it very dark. The rainfall was great,
temporarily flooding the streets.
WINDSTORM DOES MUCH DAMAGE.
Niagara Falls. N. V.. Aug. 3.-A windstorm
struck St. Catherine's, Canada, about 1 o'clock to
day, and did considerable damage, but. so far as
known, did n<-i ca-se any fatalities. It destroyed
a one story house in Lake-st.. blew out one end
of the brick earn of the Niagara Falls, St. Cath
erine's and Toronto Railroad, picked up tMjJJt
car bodily and dropped it twenty feet from tho
track and scattered telegraph and telephone Wires
about the streets. Several houses were removed
from their foundations.
POSSIBLE Ml RDER AT PARK GATE.
MAN POUND DEAD WITH BULLET WOUND
IN HEAD AND NO REVOLVER NEAR.
The body of a man was found yesterday morn
ing by one of the Park attendants lying along
side a bush near the entrance tc Central Park.
Sixth-aye. and Fifty-ninth-st. The attendant
shook the man to wake him up. but found that
he was dead. He promptly summoned Police
man Mac Donald. who was on duty at the Fixth
ave. entrance, and the latter summoned an am
bulance from the Presbyterian Hospital. When
the latter arrived Ambulance Surgeon Winches
ter made an examination of the man and found
that he had died from a pistol shot wound over
the heart. The man was found lying on his face
with one hand under his body and the other
band extended. There was no indication of a
Ftrupgle nor was any pistol on or near the
man's person.
One of the man's rockets was turned inFi<>
out. and this, with the absence of the pistol, gave
rise to a rumor that the man was murdered.
The body was removed to the Arsenal and the
clothing searched, hut only one cent and a pair
of spectacles was found. The park police are
of the opinion that th^ man committed suicide
and threw the pistol out into the roadway, where
it -was found by some passerby, who carrier! It
off. Word was sent to the central office, and
two detectives are investigating the case. The
man was about forty-five year? old and
weighed 130 pounds. He has brown hair, mus
tache and eyes and wore shabby sack grey coat,
brown vest, black trousers, derby hat and tie
and lace shoes.
FIX D ft XO TRACE OF STROXG.
MAT YOKE REACHES PARIS IN A STATE OF
NERVOUS PROSTRATION. BUT RE
COVERS SUFFICIENTLY TO
RELATE HER WOES.
Par:?. Aug. 3.— May Yohe reached Paris this
morning, and up to to-night she had not yet seen
Putnam Bradlee Strong or learned -where he is.
Miss Yohe arrived at the railroad station here
at 6 o'clock this morning. She was in a painful
condition and unable to walk or stand as a result
Of having sprained her knee on the eve of her de
parture from London yesterday. This sprain oc
curred In the same place where she had previously
broken her leg. The accident caused Miss Yohe
considerable suffering, and her nerves were com
pletely unstrung. She had to be carried to a car
riage at the station and to her room on her arrival
at the hotel where she is stopping. She was in
such a state of nervous prostration that a doctor
who was summoned presented complete repose
and would not allow "her to see any one during
the day. The doctor called on her three rimes to
day, and ordered her to rest for at least a week
to permit the recovery of her injured knee.
Miss Yohe became calmer this evening and In
sisted on taking a short drive in the Bois de Bou
logne. A representative of The Associated Press
saw her to-nignt. She was evidently greatly dis
appointed at not having h»«rd from Strong, and
said:
I came here straightway upon receiving a mes
sage in London from Mr. Strong, through a friend.
that unUss I came to meet him in Paris he would
do away with himself in forty-eight hours; l,ui I
have not seen or heard anything of him yet. nor
co I know where hz is. He said he would tKlepranh
me to the hotel here, but I have received nothing.
I do not want anybody to think I am running after
Mr. Strong, because i &m not: but I fee) that if
he comes to me and acts like a man I can for
give him and forget his cruel treatment. That is
why I came here
"I sacrificed everything," went on M!ss Yohe.
•with tears In her eyes, "to my love for him. and
feel it bitterly hard to be treated !n this way."
She then opened a gold locket which she wore at
her throat and showed two photographs of Strong;
she said she had three more photographs of him
on the mantelpie.-e 1n her bedroom.
As soon as Miss Yohe is well enough to travel
again sne is going to Genoa to redeem the jewels
pawned there. She deposited the Jewels she brought
with her and he. pawn tickets wjth the manage
ment of her hotel.
Wben asked if she Intended to reappear on the
Eta^e Miss Yohe replied emphatically: "I do not;
I received an offer while in London from an
American Impresario to appear In Paris, but I de
clined it. " Miss Yohe said she and her mother had
enough money to live on comfortably.
TO TRY TO ARBITRATE THE TROUBLE
FIGHT BETWEEN PAINTERS' VNION'3 BHOfGHT
DP AT C. F. f. MEETING — DELAYING
WADLEIGH HIGH SCHOOL. WORK.
The question of doing something to stop the fight
between the Amalgamated Painters' Society and
the Brotherhood of Painters, which has tied up
work on many buildings In this city, was brought
up before the Central Federated Union yesterday
by School Commissioner Samuel B. Donnelly, dele
gate of Typographical Union No. 6. Mr. Donnelly
said that the fight was injuring the cause of labor
here as similar fights of unions had done in other
cities.
"The public," said Mr. Donnelly, "is strongly |n
te-.-sied in the state of affairs at the Wadlejgh
High School, where all work is tied up by a fi>rhi
between the two unions of painters. Every effort
whs made to bind the contractors to have the
school finished by September 8. It will not be fin
ished by that time, and the plans for finding ac
commodation for three thousand school pupils will
be upset."
Mr. Donnelly 6aid he spoke to one of the dele
gates of a painters' union involved in the dispute.
He was told by this delegate that the dispute.
whatever it was, would have to b« fought out if
twelve thousand children were deprived of school
accommodation. ... . __
"It must be remembered, continued Mr. Don
nelly, "that the building committee of the School
Board Is no cheeseparing concern. It has always
paid strictly union wages" .
After some discussion It was deddeo. on the ad
vice of Mr. Donnelly, that the Amalgamated
Painters' Society, the Brotherhood of Painters and
the Building Trades" Council should be requested
to appoint a committee to arbitrate the trouble in
the interest of organized labor. It was also decided
that Sheriff O'Brien, former president of the Cen
tral Federated Union, should be asked to be tne.
bearer of the request for arbitration.
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. MONDAY. AUGUST 4, 1902.
TO KP]EP MEN FROM MINES
Continued from flritt paare.
B. E and X were immediately- thrown out in skir
mish lines. They beat the underbrush and laurel,
which is five or fix feet high all around the camp,
but they could find no one. The regiment was then
I called to quarters, and fifteen minutes later an
other shower of stones was thrown at the stable
guard, which is located south of the Sib. Regiment.
The guard turneo out, and three men were seen
running along the road In the opposite direction
from where the outpost was stationed. The
strangers were not pursued.
Shortly after 3 o'clock this morning the third and
last attack was made, and it was of such a nature
that the bugler, under orders from Colonel Hoff
man, sounded the whole regiment to arms. This
time the stable guard was again the object of the
mysterious attack. Stones in volleys were thrown
at the guard and at the sentries nearby. On ac
count of the laurel, underbrush and the darkness,
the soldiers could not see the offenders. However,
the sentries fired about a dozen shots into the
bushes, but no one was hit. Some of the bullets
went whistling over the tents of the sleeping sol
diers of the 12th Regiment across the road.
The noise of the firing and the bugle call to arms
stirred up the 12th Regiment and the Governor's
Troop of cavalry, which is located close to the Bth
Regiment. Colonel Clement, of the 12th Regiment,
sent out detachments to investigate the trouble, as
did also Captain Ott, in command of the cavalry.
The Sth Regiment. Colonel Hoffman said, was un
der arms and ready for action in three minutes.
Another thorough investigation was made without
result, and then the command, after standing in
formation for thirty minutes, was called to quarters
and not again disturbed.
Colonel Hoffman made a full report to Brigadier
General Gobin. who came to camp during the day
to mike a full investigation. He put Stoponitz
through a searching examination. The prisoner
said there were only four men in , the body. Me
gave the name of one of them as Michael U^oMz
and said he did not know who the ° tne , rs , n e lf-
While under examination he made several contra
dlctory Btatments. General Gobin fays that he
will turn Stoponiti over to the civH 'authorities to
morrow . He will be placed in Pottsvllle jail.
The brigadier genera] said he had Js»ued orders
that stringent measures be taken with all sucn
°" e i n have ordered several rounds of ball cartridges
to be issued to each sentry." he said, and that
the officers of the guard be instructed to .have .thorn
used. The guard at the camp will also be In
fcofonel Hoffman said that he 'did not know
whether the stonethrowing was done to annoj the
troops or to see what the regiment would or could
d ° ; Last night's occurrence demonstrates that we
can be ready for any emergency in three minutes
he said "and hereafter we will stand no nonsense
and will give a bullet for each stone. , mone
The colonel Bald there Is an ugly feeling among
many persons against the troops. Reports are being
made to him daily of soldiers being elba and
otherwise annoyed on the streets, It was the in
tention of Colonel Hoffman to give a parade in the
town proper as a compliment to the brigadier gen
eral, but owing to last night's affair It *"A cc 1
that it would be better to have the parade take
place within the camp. quiet day. There was a
large Sunday crowd nut. The regimental chaplain
held services In the morning, and in the afternoon
each command gave a dress parade. To-morrow
the cavalry will be sent out on short marches.
General Gobin to-day gave out the following state
"^The published reports to the effect that. members
of the National Guard refused to work in laying
water pipe to the camp and that certain soldiers
had suggested that they were union men and there
fore could not assist in the work, are absolutely
untrue and without any foundation.
SAT NO UNION MAN HAS RETURNED TO
WORK.
Shamokln. Perm.. Aug. 3.— At a meeting of the
executive board of the United Mine Workers held
here reports were received from every local in the
district to the effect that not one member of the
union has returned to work since th*- strike, and
furthermore that they have no intention of doing
so unless ordered back to the mines by their
officers.
VIOLENCE IN OHIO VALLEY STRIKE.
OPERATION OF CARS ON CAMDEN ELEC
TRIC ROAD PREVENTED.
Ironton, Ohio. Aug. B.— The strike of the em
ployes of the Camden Interstate Electric Railway
almost completely tied up the line from Guyan
dotte, W. Va., to Hanging Rock, Ohio, and inter
mediate points to-day. In seven hours all the non
union men W --> driven from the cars in this city
by violence. Crowds gathered at street intersec
tions hurling fruit, eggs and other missiles at
motormen and conductors. At noon James Sanders.
a union man who refused to quit work, was taken
from his car and dragged toward the Ohio River.
On promising not to resume his car he was escort
ed home in a roundabout way to escape the crowds.
The conductor in the same car and linemen were
taken home, in cabs to escape the mobs. Can were
held up all over the city until noon, when traffic
was suspended The non-union men also were
afraid to run through the crowds at Catlettaburg
and Ashland. Ky.. and other points on the Ken
tucky and West Virginia side of the Ohio River.
The Ironton strikers ran cabs and secured more
passengers than the streetcars, women who chose
that mode of conveyance In preference to street
cars, Ing ••• • red by the crowds.
The concert at Beechwood Park, the railway com
pany's pleasure resort, was abandoned, the Iron
ton Orchest a declining to play after the strike
was declared. The crowds of union sympathizers
had full sway without molestation from the au
thorities, not ,i policeman appearing at any of the
points of disturbance. The local militia will start
for camp at Ncwa'v to-morrow, and the preserva
tion of order will devolve upon the officials in case
of more serious outbreak*, almost certain to occur
if the enrs are operated. Seth Vlnson of Hunt
ington W. Va., general attorney of the Camden
company, arrived here this evening and held an in
formal conference with the strike leaders. He eald
the company was willing to recognize the union.
but there was no assurances to-night of speedy
settlement.
r>F\rn or JOHN P. mo fax.
HE WAS POSTMASTER OF WHITE PLAINS
WELL KNOWN IN WESTCHSBTER
POLITICS.
White Plains. N. T.. Aug. 3.— Postmaster John P.
Moran. one of the most prominent citizens of this
place and a well known Republican politician of
Westchester County, died at his home, in Hamilton
ave., yesterday. The cause of death was rheu
matism of the heart He was born in this village
on June 20, 1858, and was the son of Patrick and
Maria Haley Moran. He was educated in Canada,
and for many years had been a successful real es
tate broker. He was an ardent Republican, and in
politics was a protege of William H. Robertson,
who was Collector of the Port of New-York. He
had been police justice, school trustee, water com
missioner, police commissioner and receiver of
taxes of White Plains. He served several years as
an assistant clerk to the Senate Judiciary Commit
tee at Albany, and for a number of years was in
the New- York Custom House. He was appointed
by President McKlnley on March 17. 1895, as post
master of White Plains, and on March 17 last
President Roosevelt reappointed him for a second
term. He was also a member of the Republican
County Committee and a police commissioner of
White Plains when he died. Mr. Moran was mar
ried in June. 1900, to Miss Anna D. Quinn by the
Rev. Dr. Brown at St. Agnes' s Church, New-York
City. Besides a widow, Mr. Moran leaves a
brother. James H. Moran, and two sisters, Mrs.
William Cutter and Miss Mary Moran. Funeral
services will be held on Tuesday at 10 a. m. at St.
John's Church, In this village, when a requiem
mass will be said. Mr. Moran leaves an estate of
poo 000
PAXGFROI S MOSQUITO RITES.
PHYSICIANS FEAR FOR LIFE OF MAN STUNG
ON NOSE BY INSECTS.
Perth Amhoy, N. J.. Aug. 3.— Christian Jensen, a
policeman of this place, is suffering from mosquito
l.ltes, which, physicians fear, will prove serious. It
was first thought that two boils had gathered on
his nose, but the attending doctor diagnosed the
case as poison from mosquito bites. Jensen's no?e
Is three times its natural size, fiery red in color,
and he suffers great pain.
KILLED IX APARTMEXT EOI'SE.
BOY LOST HIS BALANCE AND LANDED ON
TOP OF ELEVATOR.
Paul McQueen, nine years old. living with his
parents on th« fourth floor of the apartment house
at No. 2,400 Seventh-aye., was fatally Injured yes
terday by a fall from the fourth floor to the top
of the elevator cage which stood two floors below.
According to the story of the elevator boy. John
Snow, Paul got in the elevator on the ground floor
about 1 o'clock and was taken up to the fourth
floor, where his parents live. The boy got off, and
Snow started <30-*n with the car As he cached
the second floor he was startled by a crasn
against the roof of the elevator. Looking up, ne
saw the unccr-sckjs and bleeding form of the boj
lying on th* :""on work.
Snow stopped the car and cried for assistance
The boy'- fa'her had iust come to the elevator
shaft to call Paul. and. hearing Snow's cries,
looked down and saw his son's body. Mr. aic-
Queen. assisted by others, removed the lad. He
was unconscious, but still breathing. Dr Browne
H. Foreman, of No. 2,394 Seventh-aye., the fjimib
physician, was called. He found the lad suffering
from shock, internal injuries and severe contusions
about the head and hands He died at I o clocK
It is the opinion of Mr. McQueen and the elevator
boy that afte. leaving the car the lad managed
in some way to open the door of the elevator shaft
and while watching the descending car leaned out
too far, lost his balance and fell.
SEES BROTHERS DROWN.
THIRD SWIMS TO SHORE WITH ONE
DEAD. WHO HE THINKS IS LIVING.
Three Carter brothers, Joseph, Thomas and
John, of No. 63 South Washington Square, went
swimming in the Harlem River at Two-hun
dred-and-thirty-third-st. yesterday. The cur
rent carried Thomas and Joseph out too far. and
they were drowned in sight of John, who swam
out to save them, but only packed up Thomas.
He swam 150 yards to shore with him, to have
him pronounced dead by a doctor.
Thomas was eighteen years old, and Joseph
twenty-three. The tide was strong at the time,
and the current bad enough to cause John to
warn the younger men, not «n strong swim
mers as he. to he wary of the rush of water
down stream.
Both Joseph and Thomas ventured further out
than John, and he- heard them call to each other
to make for shore again. He saw they were in
trouble, and that they wore making no head
way in getting in. He started out toward them,
and then saw that they were being carried down
the stream, and by their motions he knew they
were struggling to keep afloat. He swam as
swiftly as he could, and shouted to them to
keep up, hoping the shouts would be heard by
people who could come to the rescue. There
were no people in boats near there, however,
and none on shore, as the joung men had gone
bathing in a seculded spot.
John swam hard and got to Thomas. He
thought him exhausted as h» saw the body
below the surface, and he dived and came up
with Thomas on his hack.
"Hold on! We'll get ashore:" he cried to what
proved to he a dead body, but he made for the
shore. The swim was one- of a hundred and
fifty yards. John made the shore and found a
couple of men, who had run up. An ambulance
was sent for. while the men tried to resuscitate
Thomas but the surgeon who arrived with the
ambulance from the Fordham Hospital said the
boy had been drowned, and that John had swam
ashore with a dead body.
SAXDWICHES SAVE THE DAT.
CONEY ISLAND AS OPEN AS EVER— NO
THIRST UNSLAKED.
The perennial sandwich worked overtime In
Coney island yesterday. It was Captain Knipe's
first Sunday, and in compliance with custom the
fiat had gone forth that the "island must be closed
tight. " Therefore the old sandwiches, with a few
new ones, were impressed and did their duty nobly.
They were of the kind rendered familiar by long
acquaintance, "rolls and frankfurters." "hot roast
beef," with all variations of "ham" and "cheese."
The storm In the forenoon caused predictions
that the day would be dull, but the hot weather
following the rain drove people out of the city, so
Coney Island presented Its usual plethoric effect.
As to It- quietness, one Ignorant of the fact that it
was officially declared "closed tight" would have
said It was as "open" as usual. The Bowery was
crowded with pleasure seekers; pianos ground out
execrable ractlme; fiddles squealed and cornets
blared: "barkers" were on the alert to entrap the
unwary Into the show?— short. Coney Island was
doing business at the old stand.
The drinking places were as busy as usual,
though not many persons danred last night, per
haps because of the heat. in some places the
sandwiches which constituted the "meal" with
the drinks ren*»lned on the tables through many
changes of <•• ipants: in others, they were re
moved With the empty glasses. The waiters ■were
kept busy, mi 1 trade was reported to be In a flour
ishing condition.
At the. police ' ition It was said no arrests hnd
been m;t'!>- for violations of the excise law.
"No: every one is serving menls with the drinks.
Nothing doing." said the man at the desk.
"REP TIGHT" RULES ON A TOUR.
HE FINDS CONDITIONS JUST TO HIP LIKING
-SERGEANT DEFENDS POLICE AC
TION' IN RIOTS.
Arrayed in ■ b!a-k cutaway coat and a panama
hat, Captain Bernard J. Gallagher, the new ruler
in the Eldrtdge-st. precinct, went forth early yes
terday to hunt for vice. For th« moi-t part his
rambles through the district were alone, the cap
tain preferring not to attract attention by numbers.
His Inspection was thorough and afforded him the
greatest satisfaction.
"I think this is about a? clean a? any precinct
In the whole city," said the captain to a Tribune
reporter as he returned from his last tour about
11 o'clock. "This district Is greatly changed since
th« old days that 1 read about I defy any man to
show me any place run In violation of the law at
the present time. I've been through the district;
very thoroughly and I find it in good shape. No. I'
didn't Issue any special orders to-day, there was no
occasion for them "
The sergeant on duty at the Eldrldge-st. station
echoed the opinion of his chief and hail a note of
protest to make about the riots last week.
"I don't see." he suid "what else the people could
expect except night sticks. The way the women
act is something tierce. Things keep getting worse
and worse over here. The people expect everything
and there's trouble if they don't get it. They com
plain about Inspector Cross's action at those riots
and yet the Inspector wasn't on the spot until th."
trouble was about over. The only hope of dealing
with the people over here in such times is with 8
stink."
DARKNESS RECALLS ]ffRDER.
ON A PAY UKK YESTERDAY M C. D ROR
DEN'S BUTLER WAS SHOT.
The intense darkness of yesterday recalls the
mysterious murder that was perpetrated at the
house of M. C. D. Borden. of No. 25 West Fifty
sixth-st.. during a Fimllar period nf darkness
on May 27, IMC.
At about 1.30 p. m. on ths f day, when the city
was Ptill darkened as a result of a violent rain
storm, Ferdinand Harris, a negro butler in Mr.
Borden's home, was shot by two unknown men
in the long narrow hall leading from the kitch
en to the basement entrance. He had gone to
answer the hell.
Four Phots were fired, and the servant died in
a few minutes. The murderers were never
caught, nor was it ever determined what the
motive of the crime was. The darkness made
their escape easy.
ARREST FOR SPOTTTXG A DRESS.
BP.OOKLYN WOMAN COMPLAIN? OF MAN
WHO SPATTERED WINE AT DINNER.
Mrs. Elizabeth Strobel. of No. 37S Van Buren-st..
Brooklyn, while dining with her husband at No. 44
West Twenty-etghth-st last night, had some wine
spilled on her dress. She caused the arrest of one
of three men sitting near her. He described him
self as John J. Kelly, of No. 3G3 "West Side-are.,
Brooklyn. The police say there is no such avenue
In that borough. The woman manager of the res
taurant says she thinks the three young m.'n are
Wall Street brokers. All three were In evening
dresa. They sat near Mr. and Mrs. Strobel and
hu.i ?om>- red wine and coffee. The young man
who gave his name as Kelly jokingly spattered
coffee on his companions. Mrs. Strobel said some
went or. her dress, and she says she complained to
Keliv who. however, kept on with what hi- con
sidered a Joke and did the same thing with the
wine. Mrs. Strohel's dress font was soiled, and
she then declared that that was too much, and her
husband ran into the street and told Policeman
Mclaughlin, of the West Thirtieth-?:, station.
a
HPIRiTI'ALISTS: AT LAKE PLEASANT.
Lake Pleasant. Mass., Aug. 3.— The New-England
Spiritualist Association opened a thirty days' ses
sion here to-day with A. H. Dalley. of Brooklyn,
presiding. A lecture waL given by Albert P. Blinn.
of Boston, on "Immortality" and an address by
Mrs. Tillie Reynolds, of Troy. N. Y.
CALLED TO PRESBYTEKIAX CBUSCE.
South Orange, Aug. 3 (Special).— A call has been
offered to the Rev. Robert Hastings Nichols, of
TJnadilla, N. T.. by the congregation of Trinity
Presbyterian Church, South Orange. The Rev.
Asa Wynkoop resigned the pastorate a year ago
to go abroad for his health.
FIGHTIXG 019 7 HE ISTHMUS.
GENERAL SALAZAR REPORTS BATTLE
STILL BEING FOUGHT DES
PERATELY.
Washington, Aug. 3.— 'Battle still being
fought desperately" These words were con
tained in a dispatch received at the Colombian
Legation to-night from General Salazar. the
Governor of the Department of Panama, and
were in answer to a message asking that official
for information regarding the contest which
has been in progress since Tuesday at Aqua.
Dulce, when the Colombian revolutionists began
to attack that place.
The officials here are anxiously awaiting addi
tional news of this fight. The understanding
here is that the government's force of about
seven thousand men is engaged with a large
portion of the revolutionists, who have in the
Department of Panama about four thousand
men in all.
Aqua Dulce, although only seventy-five miles
from Panama, is in ai. inaccessible part of the
country for ready communication. It requires
eight days to make the overland journey, while
water communication is irregular and 's carried
on mainly by small boats.
CHOLERA IX PHILIPPIXE*.
MANY DEATHS IX THE PROVINCES-TOTAL
CASES PLACED AT TWENTY-EIGHT
THOUSAND.
Manila. Aug. 3.— While cholera is decreasing
in Manila, the reports received from the prov
inces show a large number of cases and deaths.
Last Saturday there were 60-j cases and 525
deaths from --holera in the provinces. Since *he
outbreak of the epidemic there have been
throughout the archipelago a total of 21,40s
cases of cholera and 1&1C6 deaths. It is be
lieved that many cases were not reported, and
the total number of cases is estimated at 28.000.
Forty-eight Americans and eighteen Europeans
have died in Manila since the outbreak.
JOBANXBOB DEMANDS IXQLIRY.
MYSTERY SURROUNDING THE CRUISE OF THE
BALDWIN-ZIEGLER EXPEDITION
Christiania. Aug. 3.— dispatch to the "Mor
genhladet" from TromsSe, Norway, says that
Captain Johannson. of the America, which ar
rived at Honningsvaag, Norway, on August 1,
with Evelyn B. Baldwin, the Arctic explorer,
on board, has asked to be examined before a
maritime court concerning incidents which oc
curred on board the America on the voyage of
the Baldwin-Zlegler arctic expedition. To this
dispatch the "Morgenbladet" adds that there are
sensational reports in circulation, one being to
the effect that Captain Johannson was deprived
of his command on the voyage.
Another dispatch received here from Tromsoe
says the pilot of the America has demanded an
inquiry into several mysterious deaths among
those on board the vessel.
rAXADA-rAPE TOWX LIKE PLAXXED.
FORMER GOVERNMENT MAT SUBSCRIBE MONEY
TO FOSTER TRADE WITH AFRICA.
Johannesburg. Aug. While giving testi
mony before the Trade Commission, Mr. Jardlne.
Commissioner of the Canadian Government, said
Canadian traders could not compete successfully
in South Africa until such time 1 as a direct
steamship line between South Africa and Can
ada is established. Mr. Jardine said that If his
report on trade prospects in South Africa was
satisfactory the Canadian government would
be willing to devote money to such a purpose,
and that he hoped to have a steamship line
running from Halifax to South Africa within
six months.
novrxiox coupaxy at work.
NEW-YORK MEN LIKELY TO OBTAIN SUBSIDIE3
' FROM CANADA.
iPT TELEGRAm TO THiT TRIBCNI.]
Halifax. Aug. 3.— James G. Cannon, president of
the Fourth National Bank: Samuel Woolverton.
Thomas Ewing and W. Porter, all of New-York,
•who compose the reorganization committee of the
Dominion Securities Company, arrived in Sydney
by a special train on Saturday afternoon. They
proceeded to Louisburg to examine the terminals
of the Cape Breton Railway. Mr. Cannon stated
that the affairs of the company had been satis
factorily settled. They examined part of the Cape
Breton Railway, and found everything as repre
sented. He also said: "I have seen documents
purporting to contain the subsidies from th» Do
minion Government, and I have not the slightest
doubt that we will get such subsidies." The party
leaves here for Quebec to-morrow. The impression
here is that both the provincial and federal sub
sidles in all $6,!<X) a mile, will be voted to the com
pany in view of the rapid construction of the new
line.'
XEVT EXGLAXD COTTOX if EX TO EIGHT.
OPPOSING RAILROADS' PLAN TO DISCONTINUE
THROUGH TARIFFS FROM THE SOUTH.
Boston, Aug- 3.— The cotton brokers have united
with the cotton manufacturers of New-England to
fight the action of the Boston and Maine and New-
York, New-Haven and Hartford railroads in their
plan to discontinue the through freight tariffs on
all-rail cotton from Southern points to New-
England mills. A call is about to be issued for a
meeting of the brokers and mill men for the pur
pose of preparing a case to be laid before the In
terstate Commerce Commission. The mill men as
sert that the railroads have no right to deprive
them of transportation facilities so long available;
that the "per diem" claim of the roads— namely,
that they cannot pay 20 cents a day for the use
of foreign car 3 because cotton traffic blockades
the cars at the mills— is not borne out by facts, and
that the object of the roads is to compel shipment
of cotton by water, in order that they may simply
handle cotton from the wharves to the mills, ob
taining their own rates for the business, instead
of only a part of the tariff on all-rail business.
TWO DEATHS FROM HUDSOX WRECK.
INJURED PEOPLE IN* THE HOSPITAL. DOING
•WELL.
Hudson, X. T.. Aug. — The people who were in
jured In the collision on the Albany and Hudson
Electric Railway last night and are now In the
Hudson Hospital are doing as well as can be ex
pected. Marjorie Hoysradt. who was killed, died in
eight of her mother. Miss Hoysradt saw the ap
proaching electric car from the rear vestibule of
the detained car. on which she was a passenger.
but was caught in the wreck before she could Jump
Edward Doyle, a five-year-old child, died in his
father's arms after being fatally crushed. Thou
sands of people visited the wreck to-day.
Miss Hoysradt had a number of relatives in this
city. Her brother. Sanford G. Hoysradt, started
for Hudson early yesterday morning. Miss Hoys
radt, who was seventeen years old. was a grand
daughter of the late General Jacob Hoysradt of
Hudson, and a daughter of the late Major Albert
Hoysradt.
THOMAS KIXG DEAD.
Elizabeth. X. J . Aug. 3 (Special).— King,
for many years a well known dealer in paints at
No. 38 West Thirteenth-st.. New-York, died to
day at his residence. No. 410 Westminlster-ave..
Elizabeth, after a brief illness. He was eighty
three years old He retired from business some
years ago. The firm is conducted by his only son
Thomas L. King. Mr. King: was one of the
pioneer members of the "Westminister Presbyterian
Church, of this city.
REDISCOVERY OF EROS. -
Denver. Aug. 3.— Eros, one of the small planet 3 ■
asteroids of the solar system, was rediscovered
yesterday morning by Professor G. J. Lyng. who
was operating the telescope in Chamberlain Ob
servatory, at University Park. Eros was first dis- j
covered from an impression on a photographic ;
plate exposed by Witt at Berlin, in 1599. In October. !
19C0. the planet came close enough to the earth so I
that it could be observed optically, and was visible
for observation until June of last year when it <
again became Invisible The reappearance of the
planet has been awaited with much interest by
astronomers on account of variations in its bright
ness, reported by various observers, which it was
desired to explain.
BOMBS WORK DISASTER
FOUR SPECTATORS AT ITALIAN CELR.
BRATION SERIOUSLY INJURED.
The terrific dynamite explosion which occurred <
at 11:30 o'clock Saturday night while the mi.
Jans of Mount Vernon and vicinity were cafe
brating the feast of Madonna Del Arco with a
brilliant display of fireworks, seriously injured
four spectators and badly frightened three them
sand more. who were assembled on a grandstand
in North Third-aye. In the crowd on the grand
stand were Mayor Fiske. the aldermen and many
citizens and their families, invited to witness
the fireworks as quests of honor. The injured;
were:
LOUISE DE AGRAMANTO. of FleetwooS. daoshter of .
New-York liveryman. shoulder and breast badly cm.
HENRY BERGEB. twelve years old. of No. 13 p earl _
st. . both legs broKen and arm and shoulder badly cot
Dr E*,S. NEWELL, consulting physician from Mobs*
' Vernon Hospital; slightly injure-} by b«ingr struck by
a piece of the bomb.
GEORGE REIDER. eight years old, son of 9. ReH,.
. a clothier, of No. 4 North Fourth-aye.. Mount V«l
non: both legs broken
ANTONIO SEPANTO. of No. 4& North Fourth-***. ■
arms, hands and face burned.
The injured persons are now In the Mount
Vernon Hospital. It is feared by the physicians
at the hospital that they may have to amputate
one of the legs of each of the boys. The other
patients are doing nicely.
The accident was caused by the premature
explosion of a large dynamite bomb filled with
colored figures, which Sepanto, who was in
charge of the fireworks, was about to send Into
the sky. The makers had timed the fuse to ex
plode the bomb at an altitude of 100 feet, bat
it exploded inside of the iron mortar instead,
and s*nt fragments flying in the crowd. A score
of people who were close to the mortar were
knocked from their feet and hurled in ail direc
tions.
Sepanto was picked up about thirty feet from
where he was standing when the explosion oc
curred. The other victims were struck by fiy
ing pieces of the mortar, which was made of a
heavy iron sewer pipe partly imbedded in the
ground. The fragments nearly severed the legs of
the two boys. The report of the explosion shook
the grandstand and was heard for miles. The cel
ebration broke up in pandemonium. Detective
Atwell and a squad of police who were on duty
had all they could do to prevent a stampede.
They held the crowd in abeyance with their
nightsticks until the injured were taken out
and sent to th* hospital.
The committee in charge of the display ar
ranged a competition between two firms of fire
works' manufacturers. It was said yesterday
that one firm, in order to outdo the other, made
a bomb too large and in consequence it stuck
in the mortar and went off there instead of ex
ploding, as it was timed to do, in the air. The
Italians declare that they are not responsible
for the injuries of the spectators. They say that
those who were hurt were warned not to stand
so close.
yEJV TRIAL 0 SyOTT BIRD MIXF. CASE.
Butt*\ Mont . Am?. 3.— A dispatch from Helena
says the Supreme Court yesterday handed down a
decision in the suit of the Anaconda Copper Com
pany against F. A. Heinze and the Montana Ore
Purchasing Company, in wiiicij the plain US sought
to recover title to the Snow Biri ilir.e. in Butte.
The Supreme Court sustained the contention of
the Anaconda company and ordered a new trial.
In the decision rendered i: is held that Urn lower
court erred In refusing to allow the plaintiff to
submit testimony in rebuttal.
BLACK or GREEN
Is the best tea for the
poor man because pure
and economical, and best
for the rich man because
none better can be bought.
The qualities which have
made Ceylon Tea so popu
lar predominate in
W¥B *■ ! !■ y Ife
CEYLON TEA
HALF POUND 30c. ALLOROCERS
Hot weather comfort de
pends more upon one's collar
than most men are aware of.
The shape illustrated above
combines both style and ease.
Ask for Cluett "Aldine" 25c
or Arrow "Ashbourne" 15c.
They fit Claett or Monarch Shirt* or aay
equally good shirt — if you em find one.
Good dealers tell "ess.
Cluett, Peabody & Co.
gfl AMERICAN MAN'S WHISKEY. eT
■ fi -»-» • TRADE— MARK
A blend of tour absolutely ->ure whiskies. nOB» of taJ^
lets. than 3 years old. each one la inch proportion »« ■•"•
to destroy the flavor of t.*ie other— the blend maklnf «••
of the finest flavors as well as the richest whiskey •»•"
offered in America. L. J. CALLANAN. Grocer aad Wl=«
Merchant. 41 end 43 VESEY ST.. N. T.
Monthly price list mailed on application.
HaJET vSr every well rei"J"
rfffW* £'**3k lat i Hob— hoM- X
MTmI Slisl instantly relte'***
8 BJ H 9 S9 B 9 ail Bowel Com-
ulalnts. DtßillK**
Dy»ent»ry. Cholera Mr bus. Cramps. &c. ■ Tits ***•
remedy known for Mosquito Bltea. Stings of Insect*
Burns. Bruises. Sprains. Headache, Toothache »ad v *~*
of all kinds. Sold by Drufguta.

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