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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 05, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXII N° -20.351.
rRILMVIRS BREAK (T.
UAFFKN WEARY OF FURNISH
ING PATRONAGE.
TRIPLE LEADERSHIP TXIOCGHT TO BE
pOOMED, and some SEE I>EV-
T'UY'S STAR RISING.
■ ;;.,, ■ . - President HafTen ha? broken with the
triumvir*. and will not be at the much adver
se conference at Tammany Hall to-day.
"WtbfT wili Mr. "Sport" Murphy, the leading
nirci ii the email stock company that has made
- * successful show of itself at the Wijrivam since
JjjFt spring, Mr. Murphy was last heard from
in Michigan. Now ]■• is believed t<> be attending
to ilie Interests of hie East Side constituents at
„,. Saratoga racetrack. Borough President
HaTfen'f defection probably mean? the wind tip of
thf show. fTo is iir«=-'l of th*» far<-e. and h«» i? ex
c**d:nply weary of providing ■11 the patronage
lhat goes to T.immar.y Ball in these •parlous*
itoes. TChen :i?)<>d \<y a Tribune reporter yes
terday if he would be at the conference at
TBTninany Hall I<<-Uay. Mr. Haffen said:
•I yha!l m»t po near Tammany Hall to-mor-
i U w. I did not agree to [tend any conference
there to-morrow. I've got other engagements."
••Will Mr! Murphy be there?"'
"I do not Know anything about Mr. Murphy.
. don't know whether he is in the cits or not.
All 1 know Is that I am not proing: to attend any
ronferecce at Tammany Hail to-morrow."
The breaking way of Mr. Elaffen, if it is true
lhat he has served final not ire on his associates
that the phow is over, means that the patron
of The Bronx from this time forward will KO
more largely to tin friends of Mr Haffen than
heretofore. Mr. Ilaffcn is looking ahead. He
Tap most successful when he v.-as in opposition
to the Tammany organization in The Bronx.
His shmtir.pr down on the jrivlnp out of patron
ape means That hereafter the Tammany dis
trict aders will have to look out for their
followers themselves.
The breaking tip of the triumvirate was what
the political sharps nave been expecting for
?=ome time. It has been an advisory committee
that has not advised. In a manifesto issued on
June 12 the triumv'rs made a statement that
discredited their collective standing, because it
■was not regarded as candid. They said:
"The condition* that permitted individual
leadership On Tammany Kail) have passed."
There isn't ■ leader in Tammany Hall to-day
who does not expect that at pome time in the
near future a leader win "prow up" to the situa
tion, and take the place of Croker. It Is be
lieved by many people That Devery, the man
who knows what he wants and Is not afraid to
fight Ear It in the open, and the man. further
more, who by flippant characterization of the
triumvir? practically overwhelmed them with
ridicule — many people believe that this same
Devery will be the next leader of Tammany.
DID NOT GET TO THE "SINS."
PEVERYS ORATOR SATS THE EXCUR
SION "COVERED A MULTITUDE"
t ■ <B1I!" JDevcry. the mixer of political hot drinks
1- "-*•« TJCth District— "Bill," the .. "cfeampeen"
giver out of Ice, popcorn balls, excursion tickets
and "rainbows"— "Mr. Devery of the "West Side"
— sot hit In the eye last night with a half of a
bumefl out Roman candle. The missile was
thrown by a bey at Nlnth-ave. and Twenty
seventh-st. Devery had delivered a speech to
the David McCoimon Association in the Bide
room of a saloon at the place named. The "Big
Chief was making his way through the crowd
toward another saloon further up the street,
when the bomb thrower perpetrated his dark
deed. The lad doubtless had broken the candle,
in a moment of patriotic fervor, over the head
of a citizen, and was looking around for a mark
to throw at. Devery's broad brimmed straw
hat, tilted like the sail of a sloop in a ten knot
breeze, afforded rot a bad mark for the young
patriot.
"VYhizz-z-pirl!
The paper tube struck Devery on the brim of
the hat, and one end hit him in the eye. The
crowd halted in apprehension. What would the
big fellow do at that? Pointing his outstretched
arm. In oldtime police fashion, at the offending
■rd he directed the attention of a patrolman
to him. There was a darting motion by the
policeman, and then a youth shot through the
crowd, head down, eluding the grasp of the
pursuer and laughing scornfully at the man
under the broad brimmed hat. Devery, not
being in a mood for revengeful deeds, passed
on amid the plaudits of the multitude, which es
corted him to the next refreshment place.
T'n- McConnon Association iim« ting was pre
sided over by James McDermott. After the
chief had arrived Mr. McDermott, in an ad
dre F c of welcome, said: "Mr. Devery. we are
with you first, last and all the time. We don't
want nothin* from you. We ain't grafter?. We
are only skilled v .rkmen."
In response the Chief, amid great applause,
said: , "In acceptta" this here invitation to speak
to m i know you are all skilled -mechanics—
laboring men. You have got nigger quarters
here. They ain't room enough. Bern, as I can
eadenstan*. nearly all of you men in the past
has been Sheehan men; but now you will work
under the banner of the peepul-that is \\ ill
aun S Deverv for leader. (Prolonged cheers).
•As your president has said. 1 know you don t
want anything from me. A:- your president
says I know you can't be bought. lou are with
the peepul. for the peepul. all the time. '
After Mr. Devery got through with his speech
there was great enthusiasm. He was followed
by John ' <;oldri<k. the ex-secretary of ram
many Hall and George Washington Gibbons.
Illr. Gibbons usually says something wortn re-
oTthe women and children of this ; district
•ir* on their knees at.this time.' said Mr Gib
irons -praying for the man that perpetrated that
grar.* a<t "cf full— full— fullanthropy by giving
that excursion last , v . .->:. (Great applause
r>on't that excursion cover a multitude ——
Mr. Gibbons paused right there. That was
■There he had a right to stop if he wanted to—
at multitude"— and he wanted to. The crowd
roared back an affirmative answer that assured
the distinguished orator that the excursion had
covered a multitude, and Mr. Gibbons let It go
at that. „
Ai the and saloon meeting Mr. Devery got
another enthusiastic greeting, and his remarks
*-«re true and important from his point of view.
inn RET. E. L. ATKIXSOITS BODY FO(TXD.
•tn-kiial of p.n.-roR OP ciii-nm '"" THE
nnpiiANV to nr. held to-dat.
Plymouth. Mass.. Aug. 4.— The body of the
IPv-?v. Edward 1.. Atkinson, rector of the Church
of the Epiphany.- New- York v City, who was
drowned in Boot Pc.Jl on Friday las*, was re
covered this afternoon by a driver. *:
Funeral nervices will be held at the home of
George Atkinson. In Reading, to-morrow after
noon.
Hr?n^trl*r «ll R R. tickets between New -York
ar.d Albany ar^ go«a via Day Ltiv steamer*. Music.
:>(w landing. \V. 13»th St.— A<l»t.
POCONO MOUNTAIN SPECIAL
via Lackawanna Railroad to Delaware Water Gap
Stroudßb-urp and Mt. Pocono. leaves » r^> B \ n rt
Saturday* at 2 P. M. No etop between New "iork
the <_ia:.- Advt. £, . ; __ ,
THE FIGHT AT AGUA DULCE.
REBELS SAID TO HAVE SUFFERED
DEFEAT.
MANY OF THE REVOLT'TIOXARY TROOPS
E \in TO Rfr ItESERTIXG— BATTLE
MAY NOT BE OVER.
F'anama. AtiK. 4. — Telepraphic communication
with San Carloa was re-established this after-
T^onn. and at ."> p. m. General Salazar received
a tplepiam from Snr. Carlos saying that some
revolutionary officers belonging to the forces
under < leneral Hearers had passed that town in
flight. They reported the defeat of the revo
lutionists at Aqua Dolce. This news has not
been ronfinnedL and details and further Informa
tion are awaited.
The United States cruiser Ranger is reported
to have pone to Aqua Dulee for the purpose of
bringing the wounded back to Panama. Definite
news of the engagement is expected when she
urns.
TeleKraphlc communication extends only to
Cham*, which Is three days journey from Aqua
Dnlce, and it i.« consequently impossible to ob
tain details of the engagement.
The government gunboat Chucuito. which was
sent from here with ammunition for General
Morales Bertl. could noi deliver her cargo be
c.iuso the port of Aqua Dulce had been captured
by the revolutionism. Water communication be
twfen the government troops at Aqua Dulce
and Panama Is consequently interrupted.
A eovernmrnt officer who was captured by the
revolutionists In January of this year in a pre
vious battle at Aqua Dulce has made his escape
from General Hern • amp and reached Pana
ma. He reports that many revolutionists are
dfsertinjr. partly because they are forced to
right against members of their own political
party, as well as on account of the heavy losses
the revolutionists are said to have sustained
every day since the beginning of this battle.
It Is believed that the battle will last several
days longer. General Balaxar, Military Gov
ernor of Panama, to-day said that if General
Herrora's forces were not defeated within five
days he would march with all the forces he has
in Panama to attack the revolutionary leaders
r?.ir guard. General Salazar has received a
t» iegraphic message from the Colombian Minis
ter of War asking if reinforcements are needed.
ar.i saying that if bo he will send them imme
diately. .. . .
The government gunboat. Boyaca. whtcn Ik
missing, left here last Tuesday with reinforce
ments for General Morales Berti. who is near the
port of Auga Dulce. She was attacked by the
revolutionary fleet and obliged to retreat. Since
that time 'nothing has been heard of the
Bovaca- but. being faster than the revolution
ary gunboat Padilia, she if believed to have
The Boyaca*? rudder was recently found to be
in bad condition, and the repairs made to it were
conducted rapidly and not too thoroughly Gen
eral Salazar. Governor of Panama, Is of the
opinion that some accident has happened to the
gunboat which has left her helpless at sea or
stranded on the ccast or on some island.
FEARS FOR A COLOMBIAN SHIP.
THE RANGER TO GO IN SEARCH OF THE
BOTACA.
•Washington. Auc Captain Potter, of th« Ran
ger has informed th- Navy Department from
Panama that the Governor of Panama requests
that the Ranger g= to sea and endeavor to locate
the steamship Boyaca. which, it Is feared, has
broken down and is in distress, and aboard which
were a. lar*e number of people. T.he department
has authorized the Ranger to proceed on this mis
sion.
Th( . vessel referred to tn Captain Potter's dis
patch is th« Colombian punboat Boyaca, which
arrived at Panama on July 28. after having taken
troops and provisions to General Morales Berti at
Acua Fml'-e It was at this port that a peyere
battle with the revolutionist* was bepun on July
ST and It may be that the Royara was again f*nt
with relnforcf-mftnts to Aeua Dulre.
MAJOR GORGAS SAVES A LIFE.
JUMPS INTO HAVANA BAT TO RESCUE
DROWNING CUBAN BOY.
{Copyright; 1902: By The Tribune Association.)
[HT CABLE TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Havana, Aug. 4.-MaJor Gorgas. U. B. A..
jumped over a high wail Into the deep water of
Havana Bay this afternoon and saved a young
Cuban boy from drowning. The major was talk
ing at a telephone when he heard the boy's cries,
,nd rushed out and jumped into the water with
all his clothes on. The Cuban crowd shouted
-Viva el Americano!" as the major brought the
boy out.
RABBI JOSEPHS SUCCESSOR.
BERNARD L. LEVINTHAL BECOMES
HEAD OF ORTHODOX .TEWS.
Philadelphia. Aug. 4.-Bernard L. Levlnthal,
for eleven year* chief rabbi of the orthodox
Jews of Philadelphia, has been appointed to
succeed Chief Rabbi Jacob Joseph, of New-York.
a- the bead of the Orthodox Jews In the United
States. The position was made vacant by Rabbi
Joseph's recent death.
Rabbi L,' vinthal came to Philadelphia eleven
mars a o from Kowno. Russia, to take the place
made vacant by the death of his father-in-law
SiS Kleinberg. It was he who started
th*- Kosher Beef Association to inspect the meat
eaten by orthodox Jews, and see that the ani
mals were killed according to the Mosaic law
The rabbi has been active in the Zionist Soci
ety founding the branch in this city He is
vice-president of the Federated Zionist Societies
of the United State*. He was also last week
elected vice-president of the American Jewish
Orthodox Society of Rabbis of the United States.
GATES WOU AX AND CHILDREN.
POLICEMAN REPRIMANDED BY MAGISTRATE
FOR AN ARREST STOPS A RUN
AWAY TEAM.
Policeman James A. Murray, of the East One
hundred-and-fourth-st. station, who was se
verely criticised by Magistrate Pool in the
Yorkvilie court yesterday for arresting Mrs. An
nie Cooper on a charge of accosting him In the
street, came out in another role last nlf?ht when
he stopped a team of runaway horses in Third
ave. at Kiphty-fifth-st The horses were fright
ened by a fire engine, and Murray turned them
out of th* way of a crowd of children and a
woman with a baby crossing the street. The
policeman was wounded in one knee, and his
clothing was torn, but he reported for duty.
Borne citizens started a petition in his favor to
].<. presented to Commissioner Partridge.
Murray was at Third and Blghty-fifth-st.
on his way to the station when Fire Engine No.
S-. in Eighty-rifth-pt., was called out. A two-;
horse delivery wagon stood near the corner, the
driver being in a house near by delivering goods.
The horse became frightened by th«- engine ana
dashed toward Third-aye. A hurdy-gurdy was
at the corner, with a crowd of children around it.
The team was dashing down toward them when
Murray rushed out and grabbing the bridle of
the .nearest horse turned the team aside. He
hung on and was dragged off his feet, but suc
ceeded in turning the team Into Third-a.ve..
keeping them from running down a woman and
child crossing Eighty-flfth-st. He was dragged
nearly a block before he stopped the horses.
"THE CINCINNATI AND ST. LOUIS LIM
ITED."
Five trains a day from New York to Cincinnati
ami St Louis by the New York Central, including
■The Limited." " leaving New York at 5:30 p. m.—
AdvL
NEW- YORK. TUESDAY. AUGUST 5, 1902. -FOURTEEN PAGES.- b> Ta.^aS^SKut,-.
COSTLY WORK OF RAZING
CITY WILL HAVE A BIG BILL FOR TEAR
TNG DOWN* BURNED ARMORY WALLS.
The prospects ar<= that the city will have an
enormous bill to pay for the tearing down and
removal of what remained of the "Ist Regiment
Armory, at Thirty-fourth-st. rind Park-aye..
after it was destrowed by first last February.
Canavan Brothers, who are doing the work,
have had an average of four hundred men em
ployed at the ruins ever since July 11. accord
ing to a statement made by Mr. Canavan las*
night. The laborers receive $2 a day. the car
penters .*.". 75 and the shorers ?4 50. Mr. Tana
van could not srive an approximate idea of what
the work had cost up to date. A Tribune re
porter who viewed the ruins yesterday afternoon
could see no one at work. A watchman who was
stationed at the Thirty-fourth-st. entrance said
that the workmen had been withdrawn last
Wednesday. Mr. Canavan declared last night,
however, that his men were at work on the ruins
yesterday, and that they had not been with
drawn at any time. He said that at times four
hundred and fifty men were ensragred in tearing
down and removing- the walls and debris. All
that appears to have been accomplished, how
ever, is the removal of the west wall, which was
cracked in places and pronounced dangerous by
Inspectors of the Buildings Department. The
watchman Bsttd. tfcsit i; would nobabii take
three months to clear away all the debris. The
wall that wa* removed was of large
blocks. These blocks, according to Thomas O.
McGHI, chief inspector of the Buildings Depart
ment, were considered to be the property Of
Canavan Brothers, and were used by thorn in
the building of a church.
The Board of Estimate has appropriated $13.
350 for this work, as follows On March 5, $2.ri00
for the removal of the rums and the preparation
of the site for a new building; July 1. $SSO fo r
boarding up entrances, watchmen and superin
tendents' time; June 6, $10,000 to provide moans
for the construction of a new building. It Is
likely that all of this money will be eaten up
before the work is fairly started. Chief In
spector McGill said yesterday afternoon that
the department had received a bill from Cana
van Brothers for the work up to and including
last Wednesday. Mr. McGill would not divulge
the amount of. the bill. It was suggested thai
the bill was a public record, but Mr. McGill
thought otherwise. He said it was being
checked up by the building inspectors who were
detailed on the work, and th.it several items of
expense might be thrown out. Until It had been
properly verified and accepted, Mr. McGill did
not consider it to be a part of the records of the
department. Mr. McGill added that the work
was personally Inspected daily by Perez M.
Stewart. Superintendent of Buildings.
"Mr Stewart knew at the .start." said Mr. Me-
Gill "that no matter how conscientious an eco
nomical a Job was done, there would be some
criticism when the bill was rendered. It was
safe to assume that there would be some "hol
ler.' Therefore. Mr. Stewart personally super
vised the work. On one occasion the contractor
told him that he had one hundred and sixty
four men at work on one of the walls. Mr. Stew
art thought the number was less, rind the men
were ordered to line up so as to be counted.
There were 171 men. and Mr. Canavan imme
diately started an Investigation to find where
the additional seven men came from. It is al
leged that they slipped In over the walls and
through the openings so as to obtain time checks
when the day's work was done. Watchmen were
then stationed about the ruins to prevent a rope
tlon of this abuse. ,
"The Canavan Brothers have a well equipped
emergency corps and all the paraphernalia
necessary for this class of work. They hire
Whatever help they need to do Jobs of this kind,
and send their bills to this department. No,
there is no contract price Canavan Brothers
are paid according to the number of men they
Mr. McVsill said that John J. Jordan, assistant
superintendent, and James Flaming. Harry Mc-
Gee P H Raub and Thomas Sanderson, in
spectors were assigned to the work in addition
to Mr Stewart himself. Mr. McGill said that
Canavan Brothers used their own money to pay
their workmen, and would probably have to wait
six months before being reimbursed by the city.
ATTEMPT TO WRECK 1 TRAI\
BOCK AW AY 'BEACH ENGINE JUST TOUCHES
HEAVY TIES PLACED ON TRACK.
What is believed to have been an attempt to
wreck a train on the Brooklyn and Rockaway
Beach Railroad was made on Sunday night. At 8
o'clock a train of four cars, well filled, left th*
East New-York station on its way to Canarsie.
William Davis, too engineer, was pushing his train
aloiiK at a. good rati of speed for his lir.e, which
never makes unusually fast time, when several
dark objects on the track ahead wore revealed by
the headlight. William Warner, superintendent of
the road who happened to "-..-» riding in the engine
cab at the time, was the first to see th..- danger.
He shouted to the engineer and applied the air
brakes. The train came to a standstill Just as the
cowcatcher pushed gently against a heavy railroad
tie that was lying directly across the track.
Examination snowed that three ties had been
placed across the. track at intervals of about four
feet. As the roadbed and rolling stock of the rail
road are not the heaviest or most modern, there is
little doubt th.it the train would have been
sent off Into the ditch if it had run with any force
Into the obstructions-
Th" place where the train wrecking; attempt was
mane If a lonely spot between IJumont and Sutler
eves. Although p. brief search was made in the
vicinity, no clew as to who placed the ties on the
(rack was discovered. Superintendent Warner said
vestrrday that the company would give a liberal
reward for Information which wouM lead to the
punishment of the miscreants.
S»80 mil.es IN SB hours..
The new "20th Century Limited • of the New York
Central and Lake Shore does this every da >- an ,
effect? a great saving to the busy man who travels
between the East and West.— Ad'vt.
RrPSKT.T, PAGE.
r> n his eighty-sixth birthday, yesterday. be stopped inn* enough from work at his n»sk to have his picture taken.
FORMER SENATOR AND WIFE THROWN
FROM CARRIAGE IN SCOTLAND.
lyondon. Auk. 4.— While former T'nited States
Senator Don Cameron and Mrs. Cameron were
drlvinp this afternoon from Fort William. In
verness-sbire, Scotland, to Inverlochy Castle,
Loehaber, which he has leased for the summer.
the horses shied and the carriage ran into a
cart. lioth Mr. and Mrs. Cameron were thrown
out. and the ex-Senator was severely injured In
the groin. With the exception of shock. Mrs.
Cameron was not hurt.
M DEUTSCH BADLY HURT.
THROWN FROM AtTTOMOBTLE SEVERAI.
RIBP BROKEN.
Paris. Auc. 4. —M. Deutsch, donor of the prize
of itK'(M»» ;ran<-*< offered for the Inventor of a
diri^ibl-' balloon, which was won by Santos-
Dumont, was seriously hurt in an automobile
,)■ Ident in a suburb of Paris to-day. Several
of his ribs were fircken, ani he was otherwise
injured.
EXPIRES JUST BEFORE TIME FOR NEIGH
BOB'S FUNERAL, WHICH HE WAS
TO CONDUCT.
<<ranß<\ M J.. Aug. 4 (Special).— When the
time arrived yesterday for the Rev. Dr. "William
Bryant Brown to leave his home, at No. S7
Chestnut-st.. Bast Orange, to conduct a neigh
bor's funeral th* clergyman himself was dead.
T>r. Brown was eighty-six years old. After
on h^ retired to his room, and his gTand
who went to call him. found him dead.
T>r. William B Graves, who wa <•.■!!!••■!. ascribed
■ fa I .ure.
Dr. Brown was born in Thompson, Conn., on
June '_:' ISIS. In l x -~>4 he went to Newark as
jiartor of the First Congregational Church,
then th" only church of that denomination
on the Atlantic slope from Xew-York City to the
Gulf. After the death of his wife, when he had
[ served after nearly twenty-five years as pastor
I in Newark, in which he aided in forming thirty
new churches, Dr. Brown resigned, and was
made pastor emeritus. He then became secre
tary of the American Congregational Union,
which '.van badly handicapped, but Its
Influence increased. Dr. Brown received the
degree of A M. from Oberlln in l*r>o
and P. D. from Princeton In IS7G. He
I was twice married, the first time to Miss O.
; M. Messlnger. of Wrentham, Mass., who died in
i 1877. Three years later he was married to Miss
i Charlotte Emerson, youngest daughter of the
: Rev. Dr. Ralph Emerson, for many years pro
! fessor in the Theological Seminary at Andover.
, Mass. Th- death of his second wife occurred in
1 ISO.".
On June 20. his eighty-sixth birthday, he
preached an anniversary sermon in his oia
church in Newark. Dr. Brown leaves nue sister,
the Rev. Antoinette Brown Black well; one son
and four grandchildren. The funeral will take
place at his home o n Wednesday afternoon, and
will be conducted by th«> Rev. George L. Hans
com. pastor of the First Congregational Church,
of Newark.
COOK P&BONED A 1 IV HORNE.
SCiN <.F lANADIAN PACIFIC RAII.UAV MAN
OKTAINED ON ARRIVAL PROM CUBA.
Richard B. Van Home, son of Sir William C.
Van Home, of the <"anadlan Pacitli- Railroad,
nnd the chief force In the new railroad being
built through the centre of the island of Cuba.
was pent to Swinburne Island by Dr. Doty yes-
terday for observation, owing to his physical
condition. He arrived here from Matanzas on
the .steamer Curityba on Sunday night. His
: temperature was 10?> degrees, and ho was de
tained as a precaution. It is not believed that
he will develop any disease that will require his
detention beyond a day or so. as a high tempera
ture doea not necessarily mean the presence of
any malignant disease
It was reported yesterday that Mr. Van
Home's illness was due to the efforts of a cook
! in a Cuban camp to poison him in revenge for
some fancied wrong done him by Mr. Van
Home. Mr. Van Home. who is only thirty years
old, IS the chief engineer of the new Cuban rail
road. He had discharged a native workman,
who d> dared that he would get even tn some
way. The discharged workman obtained ad
mission to the camp again later in the guise of
h cook, and Is said to have nut poison in Mr
Van Home's food. Mr. Van Home had the
symptoms of a person who had taken poiso n
j several days before he sailed for this country,
and became violently ill on the way ttp the
,st He was the only person on the ship to
be detained when the vessel arrived here.
Dr. Doty said yesterday that Mr. Van Home
wan not seriously sick, and th&t his high tem
perature was the only reason for detaining him.
He added that Mr Van Home had said some
thing about poisoning. Sir William C. Van
Home. who is in Montreal, has hern informed of
his sons illness.
COLORADO AND RETURN
by th« "Colorado- Special." leaving Chicago 6:30
P. M. daily. Low excursion rates every day via
Chicago & North-Western and Union Pacific Rys.
Offices 287 and 461 Broadway.— Advt.
DOX CAMERON INJURED.
PASTOR DIES SUDDENLY.
DIED AMID DEAD BRUTES.
FORMER SINGER; OUTCAST AND DRUNK
ARD, FOUND IX FILTHY HOVEL.
(XT TELEGRAPfI TO mr. TKIBUNE.I
Oyster Bay. N. V.. Aug. 4.— ln a five room,
white frame cottage, which stands on a hillside
roadway at Bayville. Long Island, two and a
half miles from Oyster Bay. Miss Ada Sweetser.
sixty-eight years old, a haggard drunkard, who
had been driven from town to town on the south
side of Long Island for th - last fifteen years,
died of starvation at 1:30 a- m. to-day. In the
lest few months she frequently had been picked
up in the roadway by neighbors while lying- on
th" ground insensible from whiskey, and re
moved to her mattress, which lay in the corner
of a filthy kitchen. The only other article of
furniture in the house was a rusty wood stove
and an old table.
A boy of Bayville, who missed the old
woman's stasperlns steps for over a week, went
to the pack window of he>- house on Saturday to
see if «he was sick. He soon inf-'rmed Dr.
Richard Seaman, of Lo Mist Valley, who has
cared for the miserable woman periodically for
several years, that fhe -was dying for want of
food. "When the doctor arrived it was too late
to prolong life. Women went to the house to
offer ■salstsnm as soon as th?y heard of the old
woman"* -in.lition. but they were torced to
leave by Ine stench that pervaded the wails of
the room in which she lay. scantily covered by
the rapped cl>thingr. The doctor remained near
until she died.
Dead dogs and chickens had lain In the room
for several days. She had inclosed the dead
dogs In a satchel, which was found In a closet.
The remaining four dogs, starving, wriggled
about the kitchen, their bones more prominent
than their flesh. The live chickens walked
around the filthy place with drooping heads, al
most featherlfss, and their shoulder bones
raised over their backs until they almost
touched. The living birds and beasts we re
moved as soon as the woman's death became
known and killed or fed by the people living
near by. The body now lies on a worm eaten
. tress, which is hidden by a new white sheet.
For many years Ada Sweetser was supported
by a substantial allowance from relatives in
New-York and Brooklyn. They provided her
with coal, wood and groceries. But these were
sold, and the proceeds spent for liquor. When
It was found that she persisted In this the a!
lowance was reduced to 920 a month. In addi
tion to house rent. Some of the names recorded
as relatives who sent her contributions were
Mrs. Ordiville. No. 124 Joralemon-st., supposed
to be her sister, and Ellie Bishop Marvin. No.
447 Franklin-are., Brooklyn, thought to be a
niece: Mrs. A. C. ports. Pocantico Hills,
Westchester County. N. V.. probably a sister of
Mrs. Marvin, and Ami-down Lane, of the firm of
Lane A Co.. drygoods merchants. in Leonard
st., New-York.
In her youth Ada Bweetser sang on the ama
teur concert stage in New-Tort City. It was
after she had been jilted by a man to whom she
was engaged, it is said, that she resorted to
drinking. Thereafter she lived for the most part
alone, though at times she shared her cabin with
a pauper girl, who now lives in Oyster Bay. She
also housed a drunken brother who died in a
poorhouse in New-York. Among other places
she lived at East Deer Park and Carmach.
While at Long Swamp she was repeatedly rolled
to the town lockup in a wheelbarrow, almost
dead drunk, and punished by the town Justice
for disorderly conduct. Her actions finally be
came intolerable and she fled from that town
to Bayville. leaving her filthy shelter in flames.
She remained in Bayville three years before
her death.
She spent her last cent for rum. and died with
a flask containing two or three pulps by her side.
In her dying moments she wrote in broken
sentences on the back of an envelope the fol
lowing:
•I am very hungry and wanted to go out Sun
day and yesterday for our dinner or something
to "eat. as there is not one morsel in the house.
I am just dying by inches. Leading such a life
I cannot exist."
"Addle" Sweetser had relatives in Brook
lyn. Mrs. Marvin, of Xo. 447 Franklin-aye.. a
niece of the dead woman, went to Bayville yes
terday to make arrangements for the funeral.
A Mrs. Ordivilie. said to be a sister of Miss
Sweetser was reported to live at Xo. 124
Joralemon-St At that house no one of th
name could be found.
FIFTH DEATH BY ELECTRIC SHOCK.
-Struck six times by an electric light wire, con
taining I. .="•*• volts." This was the decision of Cor
oner Banning. Ct Mount Vernon. last night, after
he had Investigated the cause of the death of Frank
Seiner, a twenty-three-year-old lineman, of New-
Rochelle. who dropped dead while handling an
electric light wire.
Seiner, who** father died la.-t week, was stand
ing on the ground In East Third-M.. holding a
rope attached to a new wire, which swung close to
his head. Suddenly he was seen by Foreman
Charles William* swing from side to side, then
leap In the air and finally fall to the ground dead.
A though Seiner ha.l on long rubber glove* the
live wire struck him en the shoulder six times,
and eaf h time" the current parsed through his , body,
burning »lx .tors marks on his arms. His aged
will kill Is prostrated. makes the fifth lineman that
will kill her Seiner makes the fifth lineman that
ha" beer, killed in a similar way while repairing
wires In \Ve"tcho»"«r County in the last two week*.
TO GRAND RAPIDS DIRECT.
Through car by the New York Central l and Michi
gan Central leaves New \ork dall> at 4.00 d. m.
for Detroit and Grand Rapids.-AcU t.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
A\ ARMY CONTROVERSY.
ALARM OVER WEAKNESS OF
COAST DEFF.yCES.
MUCH BAD FEELING CAT SKI >- CONFLICT
BETWEEN FRIENDS • AND OPPO
NENTS OF GENERAL MILES.
(NT TT.t.i '.RWH To the T.;tit«rNE.l
Washington. Aug. 4.— The annual summer
alarm about the weakness of the army coast de
fences has been ■ fruitful subject of discus
sion at the War Department for several days,
with the usual result of stirrins up much bad
blood between the staff bureaus, which divide
the responsibility for mounting the heavy arma
ment of forts, on the one hand, and the artillery
corps, which tires the his weapons, on the other,
resulting in a sharp draw of the customary
line of army controversy between the friends
and opponents of the lieutenant general com
manding. The old conflict of fighting officers
against the Ordnance Bureau is at the bottom
of the sensational allegations circulated last
week as to the unpreparedness of the forts to
resist attack, and the woful condition of weak
ness prevalent in the whole establishment of na
tional defence.
DISAPPEARING CARRIAGE FIGHT.
The disclosures are the direct result of th*
fight in Congress throughout the last session
aca-inst the confirmation of General Crozler as
chief of ordnance and against the disappearing
gun carriage which he perfected. General Cn
zler won that fight, but Congress in the Fortlfl
tion act provided that a board of army and
navy officers should report before next session
on the performance of disappearing carriages
In acfial practice before any further appropria
tions were made. This board, which has nothing
to do with the condition of the coast defences
or efficiency of the forts, but is confined to
comparing the merits of old fashioned gun car
riages and the more modern contrivances for
handling the big weapons, has visited several
forts, and. after trying some of the guns, has
postponed its decisive tests until after the army
and navy manoeuvres a month hence. This
postponement, while due chiefly to the necessary
participation of its members in the manoeuvres,
was LO some extent brought about by th« in
collusiveness of it- comparative tests, and this
in turn was caused by the unfamiliarity with
some of the gun carriages manifested by th«
officers and soldiers charged with operating
them, their lack of proficiency in drill, and the
belief that conclusive results could not be
reached until a few weeks' more practice -with,
the mechanism could be had by the gun crews.
in charge. Generalizations were found Impossi
ble by the members of the board, and for that
reason no sweeping conclusions could be made.
Ten guns on disappearing carriages were fired,
of which seven functioned admirably in every
particular, while three developed Imperfections
due partly to unskilled and clumsy manipula
tion, obscure defects in minor mechanism, or a
combination of both. ,
DEFEAT OF ROOT'S STAFF Pt*AN.
These troubles were not confined to the Juris
i diction of any single branch of the military es
, tablishment, but served to emphasise th» «vt»s
: of divided responsibility, -which Secretary Boot ;
'■ labored to eradicate by his general staff propo
. sition, which was defeated In the Senate by the
: opposition of General Miles. Before a big gun
' can be fired absolute harmony and co-operation
■ must be secured on the part of the engineers
' who make a base for the gun. the ordnance of
' fleers who build and mount it and furnish the
! powder, the signal officer? who aim it and the
I artilleryman who leads, elevates and fires it.
! Too many cooks spoil the broth most effectively
! in shooting off the 10 and 12 inch rifles, especially
i when all four of them are responsible to different
I heads in Washington, and none are subordinate
I to any of the others at the actual breech of the
weapon. The system is exactly the reverse of
that which prevails in the navy so far as gun
I firing goes, and naval officers declare that. with
such elaborate co-operation depending on con
flicting experts, no gun would ever be fired from
a warship on the high seas, where the target
shifts constantly with, the motion of the vessal.
MANY GUNS NOT READY FOR SERVICE.
The troubles are not new. General Crosier,'
after an exhaustive tour of inspection last year,
made an elaborate report on the imperative- de
mands of the service, the necessity for money
to give men experience with the weapons
through drill and target practice, and simplicity
and efficiency of organization. Congress, in
the press of what it regarded as more impor
tant business, ignored the recommendations,
and another year must pass with half of th»
guns in the fortifications simply protected so
far as possible from rust, instead of being oc
casionally tested under the conditions of war.
The other half are efficiently manned, and
might be relied upon to-day to fulfil all the
offices for which they were designed. Mora
artillerymen, with better pay and greater ex
perience, are urgently needed, and convincing
arguments on the subject are likely to be forth
coming when Secretary Root makes his annual
report to the President. it will be shown, for
Instance that modern ordnance cannot be made
efficient ' by such simple operating devices as
met the requirements of the old low powered
piece., of twenty-five years ago. and that skilled,
men to manipulate the new mechanism cannot
be induced to leave lucrative employment in th»
machine shops for an army private wage. It
can be shown that remarkably high percentages
of efficiency have been obtained in special case*
I V persistent concentration of such skilled effort
as must be practised generally on every gun in
ail the forts to produce the results the country
needs and expects from the coast defence sys
tem Finally, there will be convincing proof
that remarkable progress has been made, in
spfte of the scattered responsibility and C—
flicting elements which are inseparable from
"xT« Sir statutory restrictions on rational army
development, that snghi modification by lecisia
r ur£ in 1 that every -an he retted upon
to prMu'e its calculate.! offensive effect after
a few months of intelligent attention.
TWO KILLED BY TRAIN.
A NEW-YORK LAWYER ONE OF THE
OCCUPANTS OF A CARRIAGE
WHICH WAS STRUCK.'
Andrew G. Partzlg. sixty-five years old.. and
Albert Trior. a lawyer of this city, living in
Newtown. were killed yesterday afternoon at
the Maurice-aye. CfMasßi of the Long Island
Railroad in Newtown.
They were driving behind ■ fast horse in a
light "road wagon, and it Is declared that no
warning of the & roach of a fast eastbound
train was given. The locomotive hit the wagon
just at the seat. The horse was killed. Both
men were thrown out and Mr. Partzig was in
stantly killed. Mr Trior was still alive, although
hopelessly hurt He was taken to St. John's
Hospital. Long Island City, where he died last
evening. m
CRANBERRY LAKE AND BACK, ».
Excursions every Sunday to the Lackawanna
Railroads new picnic resort. Special train leaves
N«>w York at 3:45 A. M.. returning leaves th* lake
at 6:15 P. M. Delightful ride through Summit, Mor
ristown and all the Oranges.— Advt.

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