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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 21, 1902, Image 1

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V OL LXII .N°- 20,450.
\\ All -AMERICAN CABLE
77?1 XSPA CTFTC LINE NO W RE
GABDED AS ASSURED.
THE COMMERCIAL COMPANY ACCEPTS
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S TERMS
■FTTH ONE MODIFICATION.
f«ir TEi.r<-,nArn to titf nncn.]
•Washington. No*-. '_'<"» — A transpacific cable, to
t, operated In time of peace under the regula
tions demanded by President Roosevelt, and to
be gub.^ct to control by the United States in
ti m *> r * war. is at last believed to be positively
assured by the action of the representatives of
the Commercial Pacific Cable Company to-day
In accepting with a single modification the eon
flltlons '"■'"" down by President Roosevelt on
August 9 as an absolute prerequisite to that
company's receiving permission to land Its cable
In United States territory and having access to
(hr gtrveys and sounding? made by the Nero.
The officials of the administration during the
last fummer had been led to believe by the dis
regard of President Roosevelt's action by the
company 'bat there were doubts about the In
tention to comply with the requirements of the
President. There were indications that the
Commercial company v. as working with the
Ka?tprn Extension Cable Company, and did not
relish those features of th*» President's condi
tion? which would Insure its independence and
irotiM make it a rival of the Eastern Extension,
especially by the requirement that It should
tmild an Independent Hn- to China, Instead of
turning Its business over at Manila to the ex
isting Eastern Extension line between Manila
and Hong Kong. As the result of a confer
ence with Attorney General Knox to-day, the
Commercial company agrees to construct an in
dependent line to Shanghai and accept all the
utter conditions imposed by the President with
out change except the first, which is regarded
here a« being the most important of all. as It
is the one which insure* the independence of the
line and prevents its being virtually absorbed
by the Cable Trust. This provision in its pres
ent shape, it is contended by the Commercial
company, would interfere with such relations
■with existing land lines in China a? would be
necessary to secure the transmission of mes
sages from the United States to interior Asiatic
points. The Attorney General agreed that this
provision should be recast, so as to remove any
ambiguity which might exist as to its terms, It
not ing the desire of the administration to
prevent the company from making suitable ar
rangements tor the exchange of business with
connecting lines, but to make it impossible for it
to pool business with competing lines, or to be
practically absorbed by any other company.
THE CONDITION TO BE MODIFIED.
Accordingly, the Attorney General and the
representatives of the cable company will agree
on a revised draft of the first paragraph of
the President's conditions, which will then be
submitted to Mr. Roosevelt for his approval or
disapproval. The representatives of the cable
company insist that the only modifications they
want are such as will remove all doubt about
their right to make proper arrangements for the
exchange of business with non-competitive lines.
The paragraph which is to be revised reads as
That the said company has not received any
exclusive concession or privilege and is not
combined or ■eclated with any company or
concern having such cession or privilege,
such as would exclude an 7 other company or
< or,'-. -• formed in the United States of America
from obtaining the privilege of landing its cable
or cables on the coasts of China, or connect
ing them with other cable lines or inland lines
<>f China; and said company, its successors or
■is?:p'ns. will not receive or become associated
with a concern having any such exclusive con
cession or privilege The said company has not
combined or associated itself with, and will not
combine or associate itself with, any other cable
or telegraph company or concern for the pur
pose of regulating rates between points In
American territory, or between them and any
point in Chjna, Japan or other Oriental place*.
While the Commercial Cable people explain
their delay in accepting the President's condi
tions by saying that it was due to prolonged
negotiations for a landing in China, the suspi
cion if not altogether removed that they would
have been glad to have evaded the agreement
entirely had not publications in The Tribune
made it plain that any such evasion could not
be carried out successfully.
Even more important than the provisions for
assuring the independence of the transpacific
cable, are those which assure Its maintenance
and operation as a distinctively American line.
It is to be manned exclusively by American citi
tens. one of the conditions imposed by the
President being that no one not an American
citizen ■hail be employed in any grade above
that of laborer after the line has been con-
Miucted. It Is also provided that between the
United States and Manila the cable shall touch
only on American territory, and it will touch
foreign territory only at the Chinese «-nd of the
section between Manila and Shanghai. As the
Manila end of this section will always be in the
control of the United States, It can never be
used by an enemy in time of war to the disad
vantage of this country.
THE CONFERENCE WITH MR. KNOX.
At Th.-- close of the conference to-day Attorney
General Knox gave out the following state
ment:
Clare-nee H. Mackay. president of the Com
mercial Pacific Cable Company; George G.
Ward, vice-president, and William W. Cook,
general counsel for the company, had an Inter
view to-day with the Attorney General with
respect to the conditions prescribed by Presi
dent Roosevelt for constructing a transpacific
oible. These conditions were approved by the
President in July last, since which time the
Pacific cable Company has not officially noti
fied the government as to its intention or will
tagneHi to accept them. To-day, however. Mr.
Mackay explained to the Attorney General that
the delay was caused by protracted negotia
tions, which have only been brought to a con
clusion within the last few days, to secure a
landing place In China to comply with the
President's condition that an independent
American line should be constructed from
Manila to Hong Kong, thus giving an all Am-ri
«n rough line to the Asiatic continent. It
•as this condition that was supposed to be the
one that the cable company would be unwilling
or unable to comply with It now announces
Its ability and Intention to construct a line
from Manila to Shanghai, » distance of about
twelve hundred miles, and to have the same
completed within a year.
Owing to the claim by the Pacific Cable peo-
Pl<? that as they read one of the other condi
tions. It will practically prevent the necessary
Nations with existing lines in China to secure
the transmission of Amercan messages to in
terior points, that provision is being recast to
Aviate misunderstandings, and will be sub
mitted to the President in a modified form
*'lth!n a few days.
SAID TO BE EETREBB TO GREAT FORTUNE.
Milwaukee Nov 20.— "The Journal" this nfter
W*m says that a Miss Bella Brown, living at No.
** Vlfet-Kt.. this city, has fallen heir to a fortune
•Matttsd at over $10,000,000 through the^J;* ath -.f
* . ereatuncle named Leo Lawrence, of ,>•**-*. "i*
C| «y- Mr Lawr>n-e it Is said, was at one time
« member of The^ New- York Stock Exchange, and
h M an r,m'r- ,• Wall hi Miss Brown in now
*lfht»-e n V,' t Jd.^The 8( will provides the money
*'ll not Be turned over to Miss Brown until she
"*****» •>„ as* of twenty-five.
H PALL MALL LONDON CIGARETTES.
•j«i»lly recommended to gentlemen who 3 choice
Untamed to Kmoklns- the finest blends of choice
T«rkißhT «rkißh tobacco Advt-
LYNCHED IN INDIANA.
MOB TAKES NEGRO FROM SHERIFF
TROOPS ORDERED OUT, BUT
TOO LATE.
Sullivan, Ind.. Nov. 2f>Ajames Dillard the Ken
tucky negro, who assaulted Mrs. Mary Davis, of
Sullivan County, and Mrs. John I,enox. of Knox
County, on Tuesday last, was banged to a trie
graph pole on* mile east of John Lemon's farm, at
8 o'clock to-night by a mob.
DUlard was captured at Lawrenceville, 111., late
yesterday after a fight with the town marshal, in
the course of which th« negro was shot three times
and severe^- wounded. He was then taken to
Robinson, 111., for safekeeping. Late, this after
noon the negro was brought to Sullivan in a wagon
by the Sheriff and his deputies for further identifi
cation. A mob of forty or fifty farmers, heavily
armed, took the. prisoner from the. officers. The
negro was taken to the homes of both his victims
and was identified by them. From the home of
Mrs. Lemon, ten miles east of here, the crowd
started hack to Sullivan with th- prisoner, but
onn mile from the Lemon farm a rope was thrown
over the arm of a telegraph pole and the negro
was hanged.
The Governor had ordered out the Vlncennes
militia company to protect the negro, l"it his in
structions were received too late.
After hanging the negro the mob quietly dis
persed. It was composed mostly of farmers, but
was largely augmented by citizens of Sullivan,
Oaktown and other towns of this county.
GIRL HURT IN BRIDGE RUSH.
POLICEMAN DRAGS HER FROM BE
NEATH CAR \FTKU THREE TOES
1 1 VT » BEEN CRUSHED.
Miraculously. Eva Goolick, fourteen years old,
of No. 36 .- . Brooklyn, was saved from
being ground under the he;i\y wheels Of a
Graham-avf car In the afternoon crush at the
Brooklyn Bridge yesterday.
Just .'us the car was coming to a stop on the
loop at th- Manhattan Bide, the «irl attempted
tr> step off. from the front end, ;md, losing her
footing, she whirl.-, l and fell beside the car. In
h a r fright she half ruse and shoved one foot in
the path of the big front wheels.
Policeman Jones, of the bridge squad, saw
her imminent peril, rushed forward and dragged
the fainting girl out of danger, but not before
three toes ■ f her left f"<>t were badly crushed,
and her laced boot torn from vamp to counter.
Those who snw th'- accident were almost panic
stricken till their f>-ars for thr girl were as
suaged. Traffic cam • to a standstill for ten
minutes, while Hr. Rice, of the Hudson Street
Hospital, was dressing the girls Injury.
As Miss Goolick refused !>> go to the hos
pital. Policeman Jones took her to her home in
a cab.
ZALDO AND BQUIERB COXFER.
■:
PAVING THE WAT FOR TREATY NEGOTIA
TIONS.
Havana, Nov. 20.— Secretary of State Zaldo
called on Minister Squiers to-day and talked
over the arrangements for the conferences with
General Bliss. Bettor Zaldo hopes to decide
definitely to-morrow when the meetings will be
gin, and this matter will probably be the subject
of discussion at the regular Cabinet meeting to
morrow evening. The present intention of Presi
dent Palma Is to send whatever treaty may be
agreed upon to the Senate only, as that .body is
•expected to act in accardßncc with the wish***
of the government. On the other hand it is con
tended that the House of Representatives must
also confirm th.- treaty. This body, although
Radical along certain lines especially In Its op
position to granting a coaling station at Havana
and to the Platl amendment as an appendix to
the Cuban constitution, Is not considered by well
Informed persona as being irrevocably opposed
to entering upon treay negotiations with the
United States. It i* said thai some officers of
the Cabinet misinterpret the recent show of
Radicalism in the House of Representatives as
Indicating a spirit of opposition to the treaty,
and that the delay in opening the negotiations
Is due to this.
HAVANA'S POLICE CHIEF DISMISSED.
Havana. Nov. -*> Th" Mayor of Havana has
dismissed the Chief of Police. General Cardenas,
because the latter ordered the police to disperse
the striking clgarworkera, against the Mayor's
orders. Th>- strikers had become a menace to
public order, nnd It Is feared that th.- Mayor's
action will cause an outbreak of lawlessness,
though no disturbance of a serious na.tur.- has
occurred to-daj
In a conference with the Mayor the manager
of the factories belonging to the Havana Com
mercial Company refused to recognize the strik
ers' union, and declared that he would only
treat with individuals Jt is estimated that only
]<t,<MKt to 15.000 workmen are out on .strike.
EltiHT SAILORS DROWNED.
RESULT OF A COLLISION BETWEEN BTEAM
KRS IN THE TTNE.
London, Nov. '_'<». The Danish steamer Knud
JI. Captain Hanssen, from Copenhagen, ;md the
British steamer Swaledale, from Hamburg,
came into collision to nitiht at the mouth of the
Tyne. Knud II foundered immediately, and thf:
master and seven Qf her crew were drowned.
THROWS FROM TRAP AND KILLED.
NELSON HERSH, EDITOR OF "SUNDAY
WORLD." WAS DRIVING TO HIS HOME.
Nelson Herfih. Editor of "The Sunday World."
was thrown from hie trap and Instantly killed
yesterday, while driving from St. George. Statin
Inland to his home, Manor Road. West New-
Brighton. His neck and left leg were broken, and
his skull fractured. The body was round Borne
time after the accident by Adam Scott, a florist.
He aroused Frederick Hilllfier. an architect, who
identified the body They called Dr. Callahan,
bo Bald that death had been instantaneous.
Nelson Hersh was forty-one years old He was
born in Rock Island. 111. He was a student at
Yale. His newspaper career had been lons and
varied
In 188«. after working on Western newspapers,
he came to this city, and became city editor of
"The Commercial Advertiser 1 For years he was
J.h "The Herald " when-, in 18v*i. he exposed the
bad conditions exlstine in the I.udlow Street Jail,
and broiiKht about a sweeping reform.
He began bin work on "The World" In 1896, and In
a few months had earned a responsible position.
For The last two years he had been the Editor of
'■HH hh | S S wl?e a and V four children survive him.
«th funeral will be held at his home this after
™ at 3 o'clock. He will be buried in the
cemetery at West New-Brighton. Staten Island.
MAYOR OF HALIFAX ENJOINED.
CITIZENS NOT to arrm up THBIR rARNKorK
LIBRARY WITHOUT A FIGHT.
Halifax N S.. Nov. 19.— N0 little surprise was
given the City Council to-night when a deputy
sheriff entered the Council chamber during the
meeting and served a writ of injunction on Mayor
Crosby as the representative of the city, restrain
ing him from carrying Into effect the order of the
Council In rescinding the resolution of the accept
ance of $75 000 from Andrew Carnegie for a public
'library and also from notifying Mr. Carnegie of
he Council's action. The injunction was issued
In the Supreme Court at the instance of James C.
Mackintosh a hanker of this city. The aldermen
,;.Ji .h.. resolution have retained lawyers
ro h d^nn 00 t n ; suit, which will be heard in the Su
preme Court on Tuesday next.
NEW- YORK. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1902. -FOURTEEN PAGES.-^^^^-^un^
THE ORINOCO BLOCKADE,
EUROPEAN NATIONS HECTARE IT TO
BE INEFFECTIVE.
MINISTER ROWKN DECLINES TO JOIN
IN TITIK DECLARATION— CASTRO
THREATENS ENGLAND.
Caracas, Nov. 20. An effort is being made by
the European diplomats to persuade the Ameri
can minister. Mr. Rowen, to join in a declara
tion that the blockade of the Orinoco River is
ineffective, which is the position taken up by
Germany, France and Italy, as well as Great
Britain. Mr. Bowen has given a discreet re
fusal, and Is nvoldlnx the question with a view
not to jeopardize American interests and to
leave th« hands of th« Washington government
free. Th" s*"-retary of legation, W. W. Russell,
In his report- on the recent trip of the United
States gunboat Marietta up the Orinoco, holds
that the blockade of Ciudnd Bolivar la effective,
which i.'- a partial support of the Venezuelan
contention
The government organ, in a statement inspired
by the Foreign riffjce, renews its attack on the
British Minister, Mr. Haggard, who, according
to the decree issued by the Trinidad Govern
ment, furnished evidence on the illegality of
the Orinoco blockade, and asserts that the Brit
ish Minister is seeking to make an effect on the
eve of his departure. The paper criticises the
action of Great Britain In occupying the island
of rat.is. in addition to her attitude toward the
Mockad'-, and continues:
li is time thai Venezuela should lake into
serious consideration these attempts againsi her
soverelgnt] by a power which, while ostensibly
friendly. is really hostile Small peoples
through their army and navy have likewise their
strength, and .an make it felt. Let not these
attempts put President Castro under the neces
sity of acting and proceeding energetically lii>
<ause Great Britain might suffer by it.
The strong stand made by Presldenl Castro
is based on a confidence that Great Britain will
not Invite complications with the United States
by having to r.-sort to force. The belief is en
tertained iry shrewd and inipartl.il diplomats
that the ultimate objeel of Great Britain's ac
tion in making the Issue a serious one is to
bring about arbitration on .-ill the Questions
under dispute. Minister Bowen has counselled
President <';:stro to be patient, us the new
British Minister, Mr. Bax-Ironside* will shortly
relieve Mr Haggard, nnd an amicable agreement
will be reached with him.
The German gunboat Panther has arrived ;<t
Maracaibo to protect ''.••man interests there.
This port was recently Inspected by a German
officer, which leads to the belief that Maracaibo
may be «.ne of the ports seised when Germany
presses her claims.
Willemstad, Island of Curacoa, No\ lft The
strain in the relation? between Great Britain
and Venezuela, alreadj reat, !.i! .i- been Intensi
fied by th.- refusal of the British Government
to give satisfaction in Hie Ban i:!i;ti affa
by the publication by nment of Trlni
hal the blockade
of the <>rln River ports, declared bj th--
Venezuelan Government, is null and of iv>
effect. The Trinidad Government has also failed
to recognize the Presidenti ■ ition made
the day following the Might „( General Matos,
m.[ President ( irda this
further evidence that the British are en ourag
ing- the revolution Mi. ilnggard, the British
Minis-.. reiterated h few da]
to the Venezuelan Government that
Britain did not hold herself liable for the
of the Ban Rlgh, that she continues perfectly
,'.. and that, as an Indication of her con
ciliatory attitude, n!>- refused to permit the
Ban High to refli at Trinidad. This sta
la i>"t acceptable to President Castro, who m
himk on having satisfaction
The organ of the Venezuelan Government pub
lishes the aforementioned lecree of th-- Trini
dad Government, and bitterly attacks Great
Britain "n that score. It saya that Trinidad
has been the headquarters of General Matos'a
revolution, thai men and munitions have been
sent from that island, and thai Greal Britain
has incited and prejudiced the world against
President Castro. The journal declares that the
blockade is effective, and that British vessels
will be seized If they violate it Minister Hag
gard declines to make any statement, but In
diplomatic circles It la understood that Great
Britain would release her ships by force, and
that this was one of the purposes of the recently
reported entrance of one of her warships into
the Orinoco
Germany Is upholding Great Britain, and Is
threatening a rupture of relations with Venez
uela, but no action has yet been taken.
It is considered remarkable that President
('astro h;is riot re assumed the functions of th^
President of Venezuela, which he gave over to
the Vice-President when he took the field prior
to the battle of La Victoria This delay on the
part of President Castro is regarded by the
diplomats <s an Indication that he is not
satisfied that the revolution Is over, although
>ie Informed the foreign ministers that It would
be completely ended not later than December.
YALE MEN "RUSH" SPECULATORS
STUDENTS ATTACK AVARICIOUS TICKET
VENDORS POLICE STEP IN
| BY TKI.K'iRAfH TO TBS TRIld SE. 1
New-Haven, Conn.. Nov. l>t. As a result of
the great undergraduate disapproval of the
methods of oul of town speculators coming to
New-Haven and selling ti- k»t s at large profits.
it crowd of live hundred students in night
"rushed" all th>- speculators they could find,
took them to the campus, made them disgorge
their tick.-ts ;<t .SL' each, and turned them loose
again with warnings The Yale boys then
•warmed down Chapel-st. In a mob % tearing
down speculators' signboards and booths, while
the owners Bed to safety. The police interfered
with the further carrying on <>f the game, but
the speculators were thoroughly taught their
lesson
A prominent business man was mistaken for
a speculator and was chased two blocks before
he had a chance to explain that h«- was not in
the ticket business.
Most Of the tickets taken were- on the Harvard
side of the Held, and were obtained In Boston
by the speculators. A few tickets on the Yale
Fide of th* field were found, however, and as
every ticket bears the name of the student t.
whom it was Issued, it is expected that there
will be interesting developments In view of the
fact that the football management, some time
ago, threatened to publish tlr* names of stu
dents whose tickets were found In the hands
of speculators.
DISASTER IX BLACK SEA?
UNCONFIRMED REPORT OF A STEAMER
FOUNDERING.
Vienna. Nov. 20.— A Bucharest newspaper pub
lishes an unconfirmed report that the eteamer
Bosnia, belonging to the Florio and Rubatttno
company, loaded with cereals, has foundered in
a gale in the Black Sea. off Sullna. at the mouth
of the Danube. One hundred and fifty persons
are reported to have perished.
BRIARCL.IFF MILK-PERFECTION OF PURE,
wholesome nourishment for infant and invalid.
• Advu
STRUBEL TRIES SUICIDE
HE MAKES A DOUBLE ATTKMPT WITH
HANDKERCHIEF AND PISTOL.
HB HAD CONTFKSSEn TO HAVINO WBTTTBN
ANP BENT THE NIHZUBTIC THREAT
BNJNG LKTTKRS.
After Br-tho Btrubei imprisoned on a charge
of writing threatening letters to prominent men.
had been examined by Chief Murphy of the Jer
sey City Police Department late yesterday after
noon, he. was left alone In one room of the
chief's suite at H»;idquarters while the chief
stepped into another. When the chief re-entered
he caught the prisoner twisting a handkerchief,
and, on being questioned. Strubel admitted he
had thought of killing himself.
When Strubel was led back to a cell he was
in charge of Patrolman Lurvey. Strubel ap
parently wanted to talk, and Lurvey allowed
him to do so. Lurvey leaned against the cell
door and Strubel stood facing it on the tnner
side. Lurvey s position was such that the re
volver in his right hip pocket was exposed.
Btrube| reached oat and got hold of the butt.
He had the hand going through the bars before
Lurvey could catch it. A short struggle fol
lowed, and Lurvey dragged the prisoner's arm
ihrough. and by threatening to break the arm
caused fVtruhel to let go of the revolver. Btru
bei waa then removed to another cell, where he
canaot h.-trni himself, and everything he could
possibly use was t.iken from him.
•hi'-f Murphy earlier In the afternoon had ■ talk
with Strubel. and the young man confessed that he
was the author of the threatening letters sent to
J Plerpont M rgan and Russell Sage and other
wralthv New-Yorkers, and also of the letters sent
to cippel Rubens and A H Van OJen, wealthy
wholesale grocera in Jersey City. Btrubei says he
wrote ten letters In all, expecting that at least
onr f)f the recipients would he "silly enough" to
send him the money asked for
The tettera were written while Btrubei w.-is stop
ping at i Bailors' boarding bouse at No. 12< Gar
den-st., Hoboken. He ir little more than a hoy.
and ba admitted to Chief Murphy that he had
hear.! his father, who Is chief of police in on»- of
tbe baroug-ha or Hamburg, telling how money had
1 by meana of threatening loiters, in
which the writer alleged be was a bloodthirsty
nihilist. Btrubel tir.-,i of working in ships' galleys
•k, .-n-'i decided to do a little writing on his
own account and sre how it worked. He is peni
tent. «nd talk--.! unreservedly tr, Chief Murphy of
hii .-..-tinn since he decided to play the role of
nihilist. Of the ten letters some were written on
November l ami others on November 4.
He selected the names Indiscriminately from a
directory. As»k«'.l how he 1 t tainted with
Becker. ■• > waa arrested in the General Post
offlce In this c!t> on Thursday afternoon of last
wick. Str-;b«-! replied:
"At th» houv at No. 128 Garden-st.. Hoboken.""
'Have you ever seen any of the men to whom
you wrote 'h« letterst"
"No."
Stru!»-1 said that bo did not receive any money
from the man to whom '■ wrote, but that there
"may have bai Rome money In the letter received
by Becker In the New-York Postomce." He ad
mitted that he had written a letter to Captain
Titus after the arrest of Becker stating that
Becker was "not the man." When asked why he
had written this letter Strubel evaded a direct
reply, but said that when he met Becker in the
sailors' boarding bouse in Hoboken he askad him
to go to the New-York Poßtofttce and a.«k for let-
U-rs. intlrruttlne: t hat Becker would receive a share
3r t*u. Wri*ji*V > -' ■- -: -
gtrub*] wan snratgnad before Judge Murphy, In
the Second Criminal Court. Jersey City, yesterday
morning, and formally committed for trial on the
charge of attempting to obtain money under false
pretences. After his arraignment Btrubei was placed
In line with a number of other men, Bnd Detec
tive Sergeant Samuel R. Davis, of Manhattan,
Identified him as a man who had been seen In the
General Po.stolllce in Jersey City inquiring for let
ters for C. C. Morton. Of the three men arrested
with Btrubei two were released Jacob Qanbetx
and I'r'i: Seeher. The third man. Frederick Becker,
of No. 152 Greenwich-sl . Manhattan, Is being held,
as Chief Murphy says he may prove to be a rela
tive of the man under arrest In Jersey City
TERRIBLY Htß\Fl> BY 2M» VOLTS
AN EMPLOYE FN EDIBON PLANT HAS
CLOTHING ToRN INTO BHRKDS IN
AWFUL EXPERIENCE
< icorgf Wolf, twenty-seven years old. of No.
."4 Bright-st . Jersey City, lies In the New-Tork
Hospital hovering between life and death, as the
result of one of the most peculiar and painful
accidents that ever happened In the Edison elec
trical plant In this city. According t» the em
- of the Edison plant, in West Twenty
sixth-st.. two thousand volts of electricity t .
through the body of Wolf. The clothing that
)i. wore 'it the time of th>- accident was al
moß< entirely torn from his body.
About 7 p. in. yesterday Wolf, wtth a number
of other m»-n. was working about thf Kdison
plant, at No. 47 WVst Twenty-sixth-st. Wolf
was busy Insulating some exposed wire**. Sud
denly there was a blinding flash at the point
where Wolf was working, and h^ fell to the
floor apparently lifeless.
Wolf'p fellow workers were too frightened to
giv>- him any assistance, and it was not until
Policeman Lawless, of th>> West Thirtl.-th-st.
station, who had l"»-n Summoned, ran into the
place, that Wolf was dragged away from the
sizzling, burning wire. The clothing hnd been
torn in shreds from his body. It was explained
that a short circuit had been effected on the
wire on which Wolf was working, and that it
bad burned out
\ 1 1 • ■i" h<' had dragged th<- man out of further
danger, Policeman Lawless summoned an am
bulance from the New-Tork Hospital [>r. Lee
responded. Without moving Wolf from the
power house. I >r. !.<••• buniedls swathed the al
most denuded body of the Injured man m cotton,
and then hurried him to the hospital.
At the hospital later it was said that Wolf was
seriousl) burned, a,nd thai only slight hopes
were entertain, dof his recovery. It was said at
the EdlSon plant in W.-st Tw -iity-sixth-st last
ni^lit that at least two thousand volts of ele<
triclty had passed through the Injured man's
body.
SCRIMMAGE l\ THE COMMONS.
MEMBERS RACING TO OFFER EDUCATION
AMENDMENTS.
London. Nov. 20. The completion of the com
mittee stage of the Education bill in the House
of Commons to-night was the occasion of a
curious scene. On what was thought to be the
final division being taken, a knot of members
came racing into the House in order to be
the first to hand in amendments for the report
stage of the bill, the foremost being Lord Hugh
Cecil and Sir Charles Dilke. Hats rolled on the
floor and one member fell down in the scrim
mage. It then appeared that there was still
another division to be taken, when the same
scene was repeated. Sir Charles Dilke, an old
athlete, beating many of the younger men In
the race.
The clerks at the tabie were almost over
whelmed by the mass of amendment papers,
■which will afford Premier Balfour a fine oppor
tunity for the "guillotine" process.
FOUR 34-HOl'R TRAINS TO CHICAGO,
in addition to the 20-hour train and three slower
trains daily, has given the. New-York Central the
title of "The connecting line between the East and
West."— Advt.
PRESIDENT SPEEDING NORTH
BRIEF STOPS MADE AT KNOXVTLLE.
TENS'., AND ASHEVILI/E. N. C.
Knoxvllle. Term., Nov. 2«>— President Roose
velt's special train, which passed through Chat
tanooga at 0 a. m.. reached here at 1 o'clock
this afternoon, and the President and his party
were welcomed at the Southern passenger sta
tion by several hundred persons. One of the
first to greet President Roosevelt was Mrs.
Elizabeth Anderson, of this city, sister of Gov
ernor Brodle of Arizona Territory. Governor
Brodie was lieutenant colonel of the Rough
Riders when the President was colonel. He
was much gratified at meeting her. and spoke
feelingly of his army association with Gov
ernor Brodie. The stop here was only five min
utes, just long enough to change engines. The
train is scheduled to reach Ashevllle, X. C.
at 5:10 o'clock, where a five minute stop will he
made. It will reach Washington at 8 o'clock
Friday morning.
Asheville. X C , Nov. -_»0 President Roose
velt's special train arrived here at rt:lu to nlfht
and left fifteen minutes later. The F'resident
made no forma! speech, but shook hands with
a numhor Of citizens.
Superintendent Loyal] of the Asheville divis
ion or" the Southern Railway tool chares of the
train from Asheville to Salisbury, and unusual
precautions were taken to insure » saf» trip
over the mountains.
The President's homeward journey to-day was
without special incident. The ride across the
mountains over the Southern Railway was made
In fast time. Th« train stopped only to change
crews and engines. Its coming wats generally
unheralded, but there was a small crowd at al
most every station. Several times the tn»in
was cheered as it swept by. At Chattanooga
the President received a telegram from Newport,
Tt-nn.. saying that the school children would
turn out to >.— him. By his direction the train
was slowed down when that place was reached.
About two hundred little ones with flags in
their hands were lined n\t along the track. The
President stood on the rear platform and waved
his hand and hat to them.
At Stevenson, Ala., early this morning about
fifty children gathered around his ear and
begged the porter to let them see the President.
The President had Just got up, heard their cries,
and, rather than disappoint the little ones. he
stepped to the door in his stocking feet and
said "Good morning." Just as the train drew
out of Ooltewah Junction, where a stop was
made for water, a tall, rawboned mountaineer
engaged the President in conversation. The
Tennesseean remarked that the bean in Mis
sissippi had proved too wild for the President.
"Perhaps they were Democratic bears, and took
to the woods upon my arrival," replied the
President, smiling.
VOTE TO CALL OFF BOYCOTT.
MAJORITY OF SCHENECTADY TRADES
UNIONS CONDEMN AGITATORS*
EMBARGO.
Peheneetady, N. Y. Nov. 2O. — The machinery
builders' section of the Trades Assembly, rep
resenting at least two-thirds of the local trades
union men, met to-night, and by a practically
unanimous rote decided that «he assembly at
Its next meeting should raise the boycott against
the Bchenectady Railway Company. The ma
chinery builders' section includes thirty -one
unions and involves every iron trades union in
the city, having within its membership every
roan employed in the- Oerrera! ■tartHs sm<s tin?
American Locomotive Works. Th- are sixty
one unions in the Trades Assembly, and this
action by a majority practically guarantees that
the boycott will be declared off on next Wednes
day night. The typographical union met to
night and also condemned the boycott.
The promoters were buoyed up with hope to
day by the report that the Albany ration
of Labor had declared itself in sympathy with
th« boycott, and that the Troy division of the
Amalgamated Association of Street Railway
Employes would refuse to allow Schenectady
cars to be operated in Troy, but later reports
dashed their hopes to the ground. The con
servative element pointed out th.it there is noth
ing tangible in the expression of sympathy on
the part of the Albany federation, and that the
continued refusal of the Albany United Traction
employes to interfere blocked all hope for help
from that quarter. The Troy division of the
Amalgamated Street Railway Employes will not
meet until next Wednesday, and the assertions
of the radical element there that the Troy men
will take a hand are not borne out by statements
made by a number of the rank and file, who say
that they have no cause for interference. The
leaders of the Troy Central Federation of La
bor, which also meets next Wednesday night,
state that that body will take, no action in the
matter. The federation at its last meeting
passed a resolution saying that If members of
trades unions wished to Join the militia there
was no reason why they should not do so.
The Citizens' Club, formed by representative
Scheneetady people on Wednesday night to
protect the city against unjust demands on the
part of the labor unions, is preparing plans,
but the seventy members, both business and
professional men. absolutely refuse to state
what will be done. They represent practically
the sentiment of the entire city, and even the
radical labor leaders state that a mistake has
been made W. F. Martin, a member of the
Trades Assembly press committee, said to-night
that a mistake had been made, and that the
original promoters realize it as fully as the
public. "A mistake has been made, and we are
willing to correct it," he said.
BOAKT) REJECTS UNION'S APPEAL.
Saratoga, N I Nov. -■' (BpeciaD The Saratoga
Typographical Union formallj requested tba Sara
toga County Board ol Supervisors thai the union
label be used on the annual report and other ottctal
proceeding*, bat the application will hardly ba
granted. The question was submitted to a special
committee, wh^s.- report will probably be adopted
to-morros "r Monday, it is and rotood tint the
report will be to the effect that the Sii^ •
could not conscientiously recommend any action by
the board that would In any way affect 'he ri«ht
,>f the board to award the printing to th*- lowest
bidder.
<7»'OH7> CHASES NEGRO IX STREET.
HE HAD QUARRELLED WITH MOTORMAN
AND CONDUCTOR. AND HAD CUT THE
LATTER'S HEAD. IT IS SAID.
Policeman Boyle, of the East One-hundred-and
twenty-fixth-st. station, broke through a mob of
people hunting a colored man at Lexington-ave.
and One-hundred-and-twenty-sixth-st. yesterday
afternoon, and, driving the crowd away, took the
man to the station. The crowd had shouted "Kill
him! " and "Lynch him!" but had not captured the
negro. He Is Andrew Bernard, twenty-six years
old. of No 144 West Nineteenth-st.
Bernard had ridden on a trolley car from The
Bronx to Eighth-aye. and One-hundred-and-thirty
fiftii-st. He then wanted a transfer to the elevated
road for an additional three cents, but says the
conductor. Henry Benjamin, of No. 4.171 Third
ave refused the transfer, and struck him over the
head with the switebbar. following him along the
street. He took the gwitihbar away and hit the
conductor over the head, cutting him. The motor
man. Anthony Coleman. tried to help Benjamin,
but could not get the switchbar away from the
negro until he said he jrould let go If they prom
ised not to hit him. He says that as soon as they
gut the bar they hit nim over the head with It, anil
he ran.
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN
A competent ladies' maid renders her services to
lady patrons of the Pennsylvania Special en rout*
between New- York and Chicago.— Ad vt.
PRICE THREE CENTS
TEN MONTHS INDER LOW
/?. FULTON CUTTING SUMS UP
THE RESULTS,
GIVES FACTS AND FIGURES SHOWING
IMPROVEMENTS IN EVERY DEPART
MENT— APPEALS FOR SI'PPORT
FOR CITIZENS UNION.
R. Fulton Cutting, chairman of the Citizens
Union, last night Issued ■ • fully prepared ad
dress to the public, setting forth in a succinct
manner some of th- more important accom
plishments of the Low administration. The re
sults of ten months of government are reviewed.
In beginning. Mr Cutting says-
It Is 'rue the effort to solve the awful problem
of the Police Department has thus far i!sappoJn%#«i
popular expectation, and so exclusively has atten
tion been concentrated Mpon that department that
the very notable achievements of the others have
been lost sight of. A brief summary of what haa
been actually accomplished, as learned by the union
from the departments, will measurably indicate
the capacity and the integrity of our officials.
Mr Cutting gives a brief chapter to all of the
large departments. Some of his principal pclnts
are as follows
LAW DEPARTMENT.
In ten months this department has collected twi™
as much in arrears from tax dodgers as luring
the entire four years of th- preceding administra
tion (s••':..■<: vs. $1.V..316>. The amount collected by
this bureau equals the salary list of the entire de
partment for the whole year.
Penalties for violations of law and city ordinances
have been collected in a sum more than double
that received during the same period last year.
Judgments obtained against the city have aggre
gated JSU.iWi less than in the first ten months of
1901, and judgments in the city's favor Jl3.<"»»> more.
POLICE DEPARTMENT.
The reorganization of this department is steadily
progressing; in ten months two captains and sixty
five patrolmen have been dismissed from the force,
sixty-seven men in all. against an average of thir
ty-one for the previous four years; two inspectors,
seven tains and two sergeants have been re
tired. ■■:•■'■ after long years of honorable service
and some of them for the "benefit of their health."
Seven of these were awaiting trial on charges. On
November 1 the force had the full quota allowed,
by law. tor the first time since January 1, 1598.
It now numbers 7,fa men.
BOARD OF EDUCATION.
Seven new inHinnimii have heen opened, and
five others will be ready for use -■•for*- the end of
the year, furnishing accommodations for 17.2* 1 *) pu
pils. New buildings to be completed in 1903 will
provide 32.iW additional sittings- contracts for
buildings which will seat 30.000 more will be let
before January 1. 1903, Forty-three buildings and
rooms have been rented, providing accommodations
for 4/JSO children, many of tht-st? for kindergartens.
The department is able ti> claim that substantialiy
all children over six years |>J age are provided, for.
Competitive examination has been made the sole,
avenue of promotion, and. so far as possible, "in
fluence"' has been eliminated in the appointment of
teachers. In addition to the annual appropriation
for current expenses, which amounted this year to
over £J>.tK)o.oO«>. the largest sum eve. set apart for
education purposes, the department secured from
the Board of Estimate and Apportionment a bond
Issue of $B.*«*>.oiJ<\ of which approxim itely J2.oort.tVO
was set aside for sites and &000.000 for buildings.
HEALTH DEPARTMENT.
The Commissioner promptly removed 15 per cent
of the employes, ana gets more and better work
out of the remaiiitit-r than the. entire force had
hitherto accomplished.
Contagious diseases have been effectively handled
by disinfecting and renovating every building used.
The construction of a new scarlet fever hospital
will 1»- begun shortly: money has been appropriated
and plans have. been made. Ambulance stations
and disinfecting plants have been established In
O.ueeris and Richmond. Fines collected from sellers
of impure milk convicted in the Court •>£ General
Sessions have increas.-d 300 per cent, an evidence
of the criminal laxity of the preceding administra
tion.
The children in the public schools have been
thoroughly inspected for contagious diseases es
pecially of the e»s. less than two-'hird3 of the
number of medical inspectors having done ten
times the work. Lodging houses and mercantile
establishments are being vigorously .nspected and
abuses corrected. The total appropriations last
year were Jl.in.t!^ .V) and the total for this year U
41. 131. 5G1 S>. <>r a decrease for this year of £§£2065
Th.» death rate has reached the lowest point ever
• hown for this city.
STREET CLEANING
With approximately the same force and an in
creased area t.« operate, the department has ma
terially increased the actual work of s!re«-t ciear.in<~
an.l collecting, as compared with thr prece,ii n ™
administration. It has increased the property ,7(
the city by a considerable acreage of laid rilled i-i
with ashes and rubbish at Hikers Island, valued
at *J.; ■••
WATER. GAS AND rWCTTT.
Many water meters were found to have km
tampered with and t.. be registering hut a small
portion of the water used. These error* have been
corrected and the receipts of the department have
increase,! $7>^.4ti. K> in ten months, partly by ar
rearages which the late administration « baa not
collected from favored individuals.
PARKS. MANHATTAN AND RICHMOND.
With an appropriation of K-.ITS less than in 1301
not only have ait the parks maintained in former
years been cared for in a manner that reflects credit
on the present administration, but in addition a
playground and children's farm garden in De Witt
Clinton Park, a temporary recreation and breath-
Ing .place in Thomas Jefferson Park and two Im
proved parks in Richmond County have been main
tained. The force baa been reduced and the men
made to work.
BROOKLYN PARKS.
The sites acquired under previous administra
tions and left practically untouched are betes vig
orously develoiwd and improved. Seaside Fark a*
th. Ocean Parkway, has bt-en left unimproved "for
twenty-Ove years. The commissioner in forty
three working days, at a cost of about J3>.?w>. re
claimed this tract and made it a popular resort
which baa been frequented by vast multitudes of
people every clear day since its opening. High
land Park adjoining Ridsewood Reservoir, the
only available breathing place of the vast East
New-York section, has heen laid out. and will br»
completed early next season. Ocean Parkway has
b<?en reconstructed the entire distance to Coney
Island.
THE BRONX PARKS.
At the beginning of the year the commissioner
found that many parks acquired as long as four
teen years ago had remained without improvement.
and he so directed his efforts that nearly every
one of these spaces has lieen made available for
public pleasure. \ new departure has been the
erection in Pelham Bay Park of a bathing station
containing forty bathhouses, which Is understood to
be but the commencement of a general system to
bring the splendid bathing faciliiies of trie Sound
shor« within the reach of the residents of the bor
oughs of Manhattan and The Bronx.
. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC CHARTTTESL
All consumptive patients from all city Institu
tions have been put into a hospital for consump
tives only, opened on Blnckwells Island in Jan
uary last, where special care and extra diet have
yielded remarkably favorahle results. The pa
tients anil Inmates of all Institutions are better and
more liberally fed. Better bread is row being made
by the city cheaper than that provided by contract
A" plentiful supply of clothing and bedding haa
been provided for all inmates. - .-,. .
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION.
The penitentiaries, workhouses, city and district
prisons and many other department buildings
found In bad condition in January have been com
pletely repaired and renovated Work on the Tombs
prison, which was to have been completed in Jan
uary. m* and was practically at a standstill in
January. 1902. has been pushed, and the building
will soon be tit to accommodate prisoners. The im
provement and enlarging of Hiker's Island, which
had been neglected for two years, was resumed.
TENEMENT HOUSE DEPARTMENT.
The new law tenement houses have proved them
selves to be successful from the point of view of
both the landlord and the tenant. Plans for 519
new buildings, costing over J15.000.000, have been
filed from January 1 to November 1 cf the cur
rent year, of which 197 are in Manhattan and The
Bronx and 2ZI In the other boroughs. More than
1.2W old tenements have been altered in conformity
with the law.
FIRE DEPARTMENT.
Since January 1 no promotions have been made
except for merit. A number of efficient men who
had been passed over have obtained a Justly earned
promotion. Political assessment of members of the
department at election time has been prohibited.
The overcrowding of theatres has been corrected.
A conspiracy In the repair shop to defraud the city
by accepting Inferior materials from the contractors
was detected, and the chief of construction and
several foremen implicated with him have been
THE LADIES 1 MAID
On the Pennsylvania Special Is a much apptwefcasaal
feature in the equipment of this popular ttsaaa.
— Adrt

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