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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 22, 1902, Image 2

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put Dr. Roberts on the stand again and read
£oiTK» extracts from his book which the oper
ators AM not mention. He brought out that the
boak was not written in favor of trades union
ism, but to tell of the conditions about the
nines, a number of paragraphs were read to
•how that while the standard price for a car of
< oal has not changed, the prices of accessory
work, such as cutting rock, standing timber
and b.-.iiin^ water, all have been decreased.
Dr. Roberta reaffirmed his statement that "the
operators are uncompromisingly hostile to the
formation of unions; they have their agents
busily engaged sowing tares among the wheat.
In each local there are spies who report to the
foreman all the business transacted."
H* 1 presented a novel view of hie ideas on
< hild labor, suggesting that the American chil
dren, when they reach the age of ten or twelve
years, Ret tired of reading* books, and want to
begin to work with tools. There should be. he
thought, technical schools established, where
boys could be taught to work with tools and the
girls could be taught branches of domestic sci
ence.
Of the boycott Dr. Robert said that he be
lieved in the cape quoted, the streetcar strike,
«t man had a right to walk If he did not want
to ride.
"But do you think he would have a right to
«=top me riding if I desired?" asked Judge Gray.
' I do not." said Dr. Roberta. "That would be
interfering with a mnn« personal rights."
In the cross-examination Dr. Roberts admit
t»"l that when he said he found the miners'
! early wages to average from ?4(K) to $4."»0, and
the laborers' wages from $373 to $423. he had
taken th. wages earned in 1000. which was a
poor ■ ear. and before the 10 per cent increase
"as granted. Mr. Hops, for the Delaware,
l.a<ka«anna and Western, stated that the year
ly average of earnings of men employed by his
■ nmpany last year was $<J2B.
At the end at Dr. Robertas testimony Mr.
T>»rrow said that the mine workers would like
«ii adjournment for a short period in order to
prepare for the submission of figures showing
the rates of wages. The operators had. he said,
consented to allow the mine workers to ex
amine their reports, which are now being pre
pared to present to the commission, showing
the r ate of wages, and the mine workers desired
time to have their experts go over the figures.
"The commission will be glad to co-operate
In that." said Judge Gray. "The testimony has
been most interesting to the commission, but it
has not yet borne directly on the questions at
Issue. The commission desires to assist in any
way it ran the effort to shorten th« time of
the investigation, not to lessen Its own labors.
but because a conclusion is so much desired by
each party. It desires to avoid needless testi
mony, generalization an'! useless detail. It was
s'iegc.«ted in Washington thai the attorneys tor
raeh side work together In preparing the docu
mentary evidence."
It was agreed to adjourn until to-morrow to
eive th* attorneys time to consult as to the
: •ngth of an adjournment desired. The opera-
Tor* desire a week or ten days.- They Fay that
the work requires much tim» and labor.
John T. Lenahan. attorney for th* non-union
W3rkers, gave notice thai he wanted to cross
examine I>r. Roberts regarding certain matters
relating to the non-union workers. It was
srree thai he should do so to-morrow.
HOLD ISC BACK OX AXTHRACITE.
r.T'MORS CONTINUE THAT DEALERS ARE
TRYING TO UNLOAD THEIR SOFT
COAL ON THE PUBLIC".
The Health Department inspectors are Investigat
■ 1 report? that some of the coal dealers in th«
«- i ; ;. are refusing to handle anthracite < oal of the
•mall «tfan. ataes: that fuch coal i.= being sent te
i' • i-ity in large quantities and la becoming a drug
In the market, and that soft coal is being used for
f.t»am p-iT-p 1 by many concerns which could pet
plenty of j>ea and buckwheat coal. It was said
that buckwheat coal was offered as low as V- a
ton yesterday, but dealers were refusing to buy
it. while they were pretending that they could not
jet any anthracite coal and were selling soft coal
at $S To and J5 a ton. It was said that the dealers
»md laM in supplies or sort coal at high prices
while th» anthracite strike was in progress and
want?d to dispose of them before handling an
thracite of steam sizes.
A representative of one of the washerle.s said
yesterday that h«> had been unable to pell a larg<?
< nnsirnment of buckwheat coal, although he quoted
it at J3 25 a ton when soft coal was selling at $5 75
a ton. an*! the buckwheat was much better for
»tea.m purposes than the soft coal. In the last few
days, he said, he had sent hundreds of letters to
coal dealers and had kept his telephone hot mak
ing offers to sell the buckwheat coal, but he could
find no dealer who wanted it.
It was asserted yesterday that the Eric Railroad
•ras stocking steam size anthracite at Colberg be
cause there was no sale for It in the New- York
sachet. Out hundred and fifty carp had been
unloaded There within a few days, it was snid.
and the shipments of the steam coal eastward had
been materially lessened.
Some dealers explain the demand for «oft .-on!
by saying that many of the furnace* in New-York
ore not adapted for the use of small size anthra
cite, but many of the large hotels and factories
that UFed buckwheat coal before the strike are still
burning soft coal.
*\othi:b iiorsk show.
Kasl (Iranßr. \. J., mill bold Its annual
horse uliow at the Kant Onn«r Rldinft and
Drivlns C'lnb nrtt wrrk. Urirriptlan aid
phot*« in 10-morrow'i Trilnin*-.
ALBAXY VEX WIU. VO7" H ELI*.
THEY ARE PRACTICALLY A UNIT AGAINST
STRIKING TO AID SCHENEC
TADY BOYCOTT.
Albany. Nov. -No attempt baa heen made yet
h;. the unions connected with the local Federation
of 7.r,L.<-!r to approve that body's action In indors
ing the boycott placed by the Sehenertady Trades
AtseaaMr on the Schenectady Railway Company.
An ofticf-r of the local ■' \ : a* '• "' the Amal
gaanated Association of Street Railway Employes
>-Bid to-day that there Is little likelihood of any
further action belnc taken by his organization,
fnder the terms of the agreement existing between
the union and the traction company a strike, cannot
b» ordered until after !»ix days' notice has been
glv«n to the company. The Albany men are prac
tically a unit again-st any proposition to strike be
cause of the present Bchenectady trouble.
Sch*nectady. N. V.. Xov. 21. — One more union met
10-night and added its name to the Ion? list of
tho«e' thai have decided to cast their votes in the
Trades Assembly In favor of calling off the boycott
'against the Schenectady Railway Company. Elec
• tries! Workers' t'nion No. 2.',.'. with a membership
«>' about one hundred and fifty men. prepared a
resolution condemning the boycott and instructing
its delegates to the Trades Assembly to vote, to
remove it.
! Next Wednesday night, if the delegates from the
unions roanprisinc the machinery builders' section
'•' the Trades Assembly, carry oui th« action ap
proved at last night's meeting, the boycott will
be lifted.
LEAVE* ALL BUT TJ TO CHURCH
THAT GOES To TESTATORS DAUGHTER, WHO.
WILL. SATS. TREATED HIM r\L>--TlFfi.i.v
By the terms of his will. Bled for probate in the
Surrogate's office yesterday. John Podmore, who
died U*t September, cuts ofT Ma only daughter.
Rachel Cbeeawman. with a b«4|ueal of $".. In his
will Mr. Podmore declares that he does not wish
his daughter to share in the estate because of
her undutiful treatment of him. The residue of the
eptate Is bequeathed to St. Monica's Church, In
J»«*venty-nlnih-st. The value of the estate is not
known.
Theodore B. Starr
Diamond Merchant,
Jeweler and Silversmith,
MADISON SQUARE WEST
Between 25th and 26th Streets.
Established 1882.
15 years on John St. as Starr & Marcus
25 years as above.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
No connection with any other
house In this line of business.
BOERS TREATED HUMANELY
SECRETARY^ CHAMBERLAINS 'ANSWER
TO THEIR APPEAL TO FOREIGNERS.
LORD CURZON AND THE NINTH LANCERS
MRS. PENRI'DDOCKE'S CONVICTION.
(Special to The N«w-Torfc Tribune b. Fr»ncli Cable. i
(Copyright; 1902: r.- The Tribune Association.)
London, Nov. 22, 1 a. m.— Mr. Chamberlain
had an easy case in taking up the ill judged
appeal of the Boer generals to the civilised world,
and naturally presented the British side with
lucidity and force. His correspondence with
General Botha, published in detail in a Parlia
mentary paper, presents evidence of the humane
treatment of the Boer families in the concen
tration camps and magnanimity in dealing with
a vanquished enemy. He naturally resented the
misleading statements made by the Boer gen
erals in their anti-British appeal to ' foreigner?.
General Botha's replies were conciliatory, rather
than apologetic, and did not break the force
of Mr. Chamberlain's powerful, if temperate,
presentation of the case. The correspondence
shows that the Boer generals welcomed the an
nouncement of Mr. Chamberlain's mission to
South Africa, and offered to co-operate with him
in effecting the reconciliation of the races. The
correspondence is read here with satisfaction.
Englishmen have felt that they have never had
sufficient credit for conducting the war with a
degree of humanity unparalleled in history and
making the most generous peace ever known.
The Boer generals, or. rather. Dr. LejrdS, who
misled them, has enabled Mr. Chamberlain to
emphasize these facts.
The energies of the House of Commons were
yesterday devoted to the consideration of th*
case of the s>th Lancers. The affair has been
for days past the sole topic In military clubs.
A native cook was found near the lines of the
lancers at Slalkot, in India, dying from injuries
inflicted by unknown assailant*, whom the vic
tim declared to be men Of the regiment. In
quiries failed to detect the guilty persons. Lord
Curzon was appealed to, with th*- result that
the regiment, which is one of the crack corps
of the British army, whs publicly branded for
hiving concealed criminals, while ail leave of
officers and men was stopped. Lord George
Hamilton had a difficult task in Justifying the
action of the Indian Viceroy, but he rose most
adequately to the demands of the occasion, and
when he gat down the sympathy of the House
was almost entirely with the government. Lord
Carson, he pointed out. ha.' 1 from the time he
took up the office in India exercised the whole
of his great power and Influence In impressing
upon his countrymen that it was their duty to
investigate outrages of this kind with the ut
most promptitude, and with just as sincere a
desire to bring home justice to the. culprits as
if a white man had been assaulted.
Fashionable attire again mad-" the ordinarily
gloomy <>id Bailey bright yesterday. Society
WORK it crowded Into court in order to bear the
defence of Mrs. Penruddocke, the Wiltshire
irsagi^tratcs wife, against the extraordinary
charge of systematically maltreating her littl<
daughter Connie. Mrs. Penruddocke vigorouflv
asserted that there was not a single word of
truth in any allegation that had been tntd"
by her own child. and she was corroborated by
several witnesses. She said Connie bad always
been untruthful. Charles Penruddocke g;tve evi
dence in defence of his wife, but he admitted
that his memory \m\h not always good. Th't
jury found the prisoner guilty of ill treatim nt
add occasioning actual bodily harm, but nor
guilty of causing unnecessary guttering and in-
Jury to health. The Jury considered the conduct
of the prisoner's husband desrrvlng of severe
censure. The greatest Indignation has been ex
pressed because Mtb. Penruddorke was fined the
comparatively trifling rum of £00. I. N. F.
MORLEY EULOGIZES MR. CHAMBERLAIN.
JUS REMARKS BRIXG FORTH SIGNS OF DIS
APPROVAL FBOM HIS HEARERS.
London, Nov. 21. — John Bforley, addressing Ihe
National Liberal Club to-night, predicted that
the day of triumph for the Liberal party was
not so remote as some people expected. There
was no doubt that on the question of the Kdu
cation bill the government would triumph over
the opposition, but some victories; we r p more
COStljr than defeat, and no wor.-e day's work was
ever done than when legislation was passed
which divided the country into two great riv;il
< amps of Church and Dissent
Passing to the Irish question. Mi. ttorley sai<l
that Ireland would be the skeleton for a long
time to i onie at many Liberal feasts. Me be
lieved that the present coolness oil the part of
the Liberals toward the Irish members \\a^ un
reasonable, and he warned political skaters
agalnHt being tempted In a moment of «xa^
Deration to go sliding on thin ice. The govern*
ment'p new Irish Land bill, he thought, would
offer a bonus to th<- landlords, and the policy
of the government would be i, ri .- of pottering
plus coercion.
In conclusion, the Liberal leader expressed his
approval of Mr. Chamberlain's visit to South
Africa. No man. he S; ,IJ. was mor»- fit to tak.
up the task, and the South African people
would realise that if Mr. chamberlain refused
to concede exorbitant demands they might be
quite sun- that no one else would grant them
Ho always believed that if Mr. Chamberlain
could have met Mr. Krliger at the Bloemfon
tein conference they would have arrived -it ai
understanding and avoided the war
Mr. Morleys references to Colonial Secretary
< hamberlain brought forth sign* of . on«|.Jerable
disapproval from hl» hearers.
VISSINO BOER n \i,s
MR. CHAMBERLAIN ASKS GENERAL BOTHA
TO HELP LOCATE MONEY SENT
TO EUROPE.
London. Nov. 2L— A Parliamentary paper relating
to the Boer generals' appeal to the. world was
published tills afternoon. In a letter to General
Botha. Colonial Secretary Chamberlain protests
against the "exaggerations in the appeal" and the
"incorrect impressions conveyed thereby," and
point* out that In addition to the gift of iIS.OCO.aV)
for th. relief of the Boers. Great Britain had bee
spending $] .(.00,000 monthly since th* clone, of the
war in maintaining the burgher camps an organi
zations to enable the people to return to their
home*. Mr. Chamberlain al?o suggests that large,
aunts were remitted by the Transvaal to Europe
during the war: nays that there must be a large
balance thereof remaining, and Invite.* General
Botha's co-operation In finding the persona to whom
the money was intrusted and In recovering the
balance, which, be says. Great Britain Is prepared
to add to the sums already provided for the relief
Of the burghers.
General Botha, It. reply, says that until Mr.
Chamberlain mad* his speech of November 5 he
understood that the $U),<)oO,nnn was partial com
pensation for war losses. If he had known that It
was solely for the relief or destitution th. appeal
In such form would not have been Issued. The
general declares he is quite unaware that any
sums were remitted to Europe, us alleged, and
that if such sums exist he would he very glad
to see them devoted to the objects mentioned. He
concludes with a congratulatory reference to Mi
Chamberlain's approaching trip to South Africa
and an expression of hi* wish that the controversy
regarding the past should bo ended, and that both
sides address themselves entirely to the necessi
ties of the present and future.
YILJOKX COMING OVER TO LECTURE.
HE SAYS PEACE IN SOUTH AFRICA DE
PENDS ON THE BRITISH.
London, Nov. 21.— The American Line steamer
Ft. r<ouis, which sails from Southampton to
morrow for New-York, will take among her pas
sengers General Viljoen, the former Boer com
mander.
The general, who Is going on a. three months'
lecture tour in the United States, said to th*
NEW-YQiffc HAXLY TRIBUNE, SATURDAY. XOVEMBER 2Z 1902.
correspondent of The Associated Press. "The
South Africans have lost heart and hope,
and peace depends entirely upon the British.
My commando, now idle, and in which were
once included many sood Americans, offered
itself in L"iU Roberts for service against the
Mad Mullah in Pomaliland. and I would have
commanded it, but Lord Roberta declined the
offer with thank*. 1 ana doubtful a.« to the out
come of Colonial Secretary Chamberlain's visit
to South Africa."
With regard to a letter written by Sir Evelyn
Wood, the former adjutant general of the Brit
ish army on Mr. Kriiger's hook of memoirs. In
which the British general alleged that the Boer
President slept in his clothes an.l did not wash
himself which rendered proximity to him un
pleasant. General Viljoen characterized the
statements as ungentlemanly, uncalled for and
untrue.
MR. CHAMBERLAIN AT WINDSOR.
London, Nov. 21.— Colonial Secretary Cham
berlain, accompanied by Mrs. Chamberlain, went
to Windsor to-night on a farewell visit to King
Edward prior to their departure for South
Africa.
Mr. Chamberlain, on his outward' journey. in
tends to spend a few days at Cairo and Mom
basa, and make a trip on the Uganda Railway.
THE DEATH OF MRS. GORE.
PUBLIC OPINION IN PARIS AGAINST THE
RUSSIAN BARYTONE.
A FLIRTATION THEORY BASED ON THE DIF
FERENCE IN SLAVONIC AND AMER
ICAN TEMPERAMENTS.
x (Special to The New-York Tribune by French Cabl».)
(Copyright; 1902: By Th* Tribune Association.)
Paris, Nov. 21.- The trend of opinion in regard
to the death of Mrs. Thomas S. Gore is decided
ly unfavorable to the Russian barytone, and it
is a mistake to suppose that Consul General
Gowdy supports the theory of suicide. A woman
who had known Mr*. (Jnrc states that she was a
hard working:, serious young woman, in very
straitened financial circumstances, and she can
not admit it to be a case of suicide in the Rus
sian barytone's room and with his revolver. A
possible explanation preferred by almost all the
Americans here, especially by the female mem
bers of the American colony, is thai it Is a strik
ing illustration of the difference of the Slavonic
and the American temperament In regard to
flirtations*, a Slavonian, ilk- the Russian bary
tone, Insisting In deadly earnest on logical con
clusions, whereas an American under similar cir
cumstances would, with more flexible adaptabil
ity, acknowledge that a flirtation ended all. The
indications are that the impulsive earnestness
of the young Russian barytone, checked by the
Spartan refusal of the young American woman.
who supposed all along that she was merely In
dulging in a harmless llirtution. at* If with one
of her own countrymen, drove him temporarily
■ ■ra.z>. and in this Mate he killed the object of
his passion. In any ease, a psychological prob
{era Is presented, with conflicting Slavonian and
Anglo-Saxon temperaments, which seems likely
to furnish data for the ultra modern school of
writers of fiction. ( ' • I- B.
MRS. GORE A CALIFORNIA*.
ANTECEDENTS OF THE YOUNG AMERICAN
WOMAN ESTABLISHED BY FRIENDS.
(V.y The AmoelatM Pr*»» I
Paris, Nov. 21.— The tragic death of th«» young
American artist. Mi BJller Ore. continues to
occupy lh« attention of the police an.l the start of
the American consulate. Th« developments at the
mystery were followed with eager Interest by the
public to-day, and brought forward many who ' '1
known Mr». Oore here and In America, and from
them her antecedents were fully established It
Was developed also that she had been a pupil <>f
the composer Mosskowskl. while De Rrasewskl
whs a pupil of Jean Lassalle, the barytone <>t lbs
Grand OpeV;i.
The. Prefect of Polio* designated Oastlnne Ren
net an • x;.. armorer, to .«tudy th* areapea ami
wound, tor the purpose of determining the poral
billty of suicide.
Although many friends of Mrs. Core railed on
Mr. Gowdy. none claimed the body, and Ist* In the
day he cabled to her attorney, Mr. Butler. of
Mexico City, asking as to Its disposition.
The mont circumstantial account of Mrs. Gore
was furnished by Vincent Toledo, director of a
leading piano establishment in the Avenue da
I'Opera. He says Mrs. Gore wai introduced to him
by letters from musical friends of New-York. She
appeared to him most charming and vivacious ami
devoted to music She received nil of her mall at
a private address. She travelled In the early sum
mer over Europe, and took lessons In Vienna from
a leading master. Returning last August, *ha
asked to bo recommended to a master of the high
est rank. Mosskowskl was chosen. She studied
with great ardor and took part In a. number of
musicals. Last Tuesday she accepted an invitation
to the opera from M. Toledo for last night, and li"
was horrified on going for her to find her dead.
Mosskowski said: "I cannot believe Mrs. Gore,
baa committed suicide. She, wu- of the happiest
disposition, l never saw the leu-t evidence of mel
ancholy. She was deeply Interested In her work
ami gave much promise as a musician. It was bei
purpose, after completing her musical education, to
return to America. She Inquired <■' me recently if l
thought she would mnk«* an excellent professional.
She had taken lessons of me every Tuesday since
October i" Last Tuesday i received a. note from
her, saying she was suffering from Indisposition. I
did not know anything of her private life."
Th.- family of Dr. liuttner an American dentist
lit the Rue de la Paix, furnished details of the ante
cedents of Mrs. Gore. They had been Intimate
with the family in Mexico, but did not know her
here. They Hay her maiden name, was Sinclair and
that she lived In California, where she met anil
wag married to Mr. Gore, from Hrltlnh Columbia.
They removed to Mexico City and became wealthy
through land speculations. They built Gore Court,
a large apartment house, and moved In good BO
ciety. Domestic difficulties led to a separation, but
no divorce, und she began travelling to perfect her
musical education. Mr. Butler managed her Mexico
property, which was equally divided between Mr.
Gore and hist wife. This was of considerable value
and yielded her a steady Income.
De Rydsewskl continues In confinement. The po
lice, decline to admit ills friends to see him pending
inquiries. M. Laaaalle has undertaken to champion
bit pupil's Interests, and has designated two lead-
Ing lawyers to defend him. I*assalle says the mur
der theory is untenable, as De Rydsewski Is of a
tender, sympathetic (Imposition. The barytone ex
pected to prepare the latter for a part In one of
Rubinstein's operas for early production in St.
Petersburg.
De Ryrtzewski and his brother brought Mrs. Gore
to Lassalle recently. She discussed her musical
ambitions, and was vivacious, charming and en
thusiastic over music.
"The Journal" states that Dr. Roquet's report on
the autopsy of the dead woman establishes that
the bullet entered her head from below and passed
upward, thus supporting Rydzewnki> Ktory that
the accident was due to the fall of the revolver.
MRS. GORE'S LIFE HERE WAS QUIET.
Mrs. Ellen Gore was known in New-York as a
musical student. She lived until July lit a
boarding house -'it No. 111! Madlson-ave., where
she was known as a quiet, unassuming woman.
She did not go out much except to her lessons,
and her acquaintance seemed to be limited to
those she met In the pursuit of her studies.
Not much is known of her at the Madison-aye.
house, or of her antecedents, as she was not
given to talking; about her affairs. It watt
known she had been married, but had separated
from her husband, and th Impression prevailed
that she had been wealthy, but had met With
reverses. Frederic M. Verniorckeh, an artist,
who has a studio at No. r»."» West Thirty-third
«l.. knew Mrs. Gore well, having sailed with her
on th" Friesland last July. He said that Mrs.
Gore had obtained a divorce before she left, and
that Mr. Gore bad gone on the stage. ' ]),.
seemed to think Mrs. Gore had a large estate In
Mexico, whither she was in the habit of going.
Mr. Vermoroken says she was a musician of
considerable ability. He thinks that Thomas B.
Gore, the husband. Is at present with some
opera company in the West.
Mrs. Gore's only relative, so far as can be
ascertained, if an aunt living near Pasadena
Cal.
THE CAPITAL OF VKUMONT.
Hnrlliinlon, VI.. lina of recent > en r« become
the- mottt Important city or thai common
wealth, and effort i» now hetnit made' to
have the capital removed from Mnntprller
to Darlington. IliMory of the movement.
Tilth appropriate Illustration*, in to-mor
row* Tribune.
ADOPTS SOCIALIST IDEA.
GERMAN GOVERNMENT PROPOSES PEN
SIONS ror: widows and orphans.
SUGGESTION TO THE REICHSTAG TO MEET
DEFICITS BT A TAX ON BEER
AND TOBACCO.
Berlin. Nov. 21.— 1n the Reichstag this after
noon the Secretary of the Treasury, Baron yon
Thielmann, announced that the deficit in the
Imperial budget for 1808 was estimated to be
$37,500,000. The budget, he added, would be
submitted in two or three weeks. The deficit
lor 1902 was $14,7fK>.000. It would not do, the
Secretary said, to be always providing for defi
cits by loans, nor could the contributions of the
federated states be Increased. Nevertheless, it
was probable the states would ultimately have
to bear the deficit What ought to be done was
to Increase the Imperial revenues so as to bal
ance the expenditures. Looking around for suit
able objects for Increased taxation, he saw beer
and tobacco, and he begged the members of the
House to keep these in view while thinking how
to balance the budget Baron von" Thielmann
;ii-o Intimated that the government Intended a.«
soon as practicable to propped pensions fbi
widows and orphans. Me was quite unable to
pay how much Buch pensions jyould be an ex
tension of the sen-- insurance laws «nd treas
ury burdens, but the suggestion was made that
.*_'."> a person yearly wan innuffiVient. Assum-
Ing thai |50 was enough for the pensions of
widows and orphans, It would take $40,000,000
Tt "as Impossible '" say how much the govern
ment tariff bill would yield, but a mere me
chanical estimate, based on the present Im
port*, showed the customs receipts would in
crease $1X),JiOO,OOO. The supporters of the corn
mission'." tariff schedule* thought n total of
$125,000,000 would be derived. Secretary yon
Thielmann mentioned considerations that re
duce,! the estimate largely.
The Secretary's hint thai the government was
meditating pensions for widows and orphans
causeS a stir among the members, because It la
one of the things the Socialists advocate. The
deficit is the result of the financial depression,
which still affei-ts almost every form of bust
ness, limiting the purchasing power of every
class, while there have been no large failures
recently, various symptoms appear of continued
bard times. At the Krupp works 50.000 laborers
have had their time reduced two hours daily,
and some departments are shutting down each
week. The iron syndicates are reorganizing,
and prices recently were again cut. The num
ber of unemployed persons, according to the
municipal censuses, Is barely fewer than a year
ago.
Secretaries of Finance before tills have
thought of levying fresh contributions <>n beer
and tobacco, which now ha\e exceptionally tow
duties, the tobacco Import dues being one-third
those , : the United States. The beer dii'-p itre
also belov those of other countries. The empire
collects no I i 'as. that heretofore being lefl
to the several states, whose rates vary The
principal reason which has deterred Ihi laying
of Hii imperial tax on beer m is that it would
disturb the relations with Bavaria, which rettea
;i great <i • ■ :< l on its beer tax, which Is still low
enough to permit Bavaria u> sell largely to out
side states. Has. nia has always pointed •>,]{
that if the empire taxed beer it would lujtir.-
Bavaria more than the othei states, trmt it
would not be fair play, and that it would Im
pair Bavaria's regard for the imperial ti*>. The
additions of beer and tobacco taxes are certain
to be highly unpopular
VENEZI ELA PROTESTS.
ENTRY OP A BRITISH VESSEL INTO THE
ORINOCO INFRINGES HER SOV
EREIGNTY.
Caracas, Nov. 21. The Venesoelan Govern
ment has energetically protested against th»
entering the Orinoco River by tbe British .sloop
Kantnme, previously Riven in a Port of Spain
dispatch of November 19 a.s the British cruiser
Phaeton, without permission, which, It claims,
wa.s an infringement of Venezuelan sovereignty.
The government press, continues to attack Great
Britain.
Lorenzo Guevara, with his principal .subor
dinates, himself one of the moat psondnent Hg-
UreS among the revolutionists, surrendered to
day at Rio Chico. Miranda Province, sixty miles
from Caracas, \\ith six hundred men armed
with Mausers and 45.000 rounds of ammunition
The government declares that it is ■ further evi
dence of the disintegration of the revolution.
I'OPI: JOKES AROf T His HEALTH
TELLS PILGRIMS THAT His TIME HAS NOT
"i ET l OME.
Rome. Nov. .I.— At ■ reception of n\e hundred
Pledmonteße. pilgrims this morning the Pope Jocu
larly referred to '.he unfounded rumors yesterday
of his Indisposition, adding:
My time has not yet come. We nave many
things to accomplish before death."
A number of Americans wen- received In special
audience by the Pope in the Biittine Chapel Inelud
ing Mi. and Mrs. Harry Rluck, of Chicago 1 Mi
am] Mrs. Clans, Mr. and Mrs. Francis anil Mr ,n.i
Mrs. Btrausser or Pennsylvania: ,1 TV* Shaw "" .!
Mis- H. Buckley, of Ban Francisco; Mr and Mr-
Con way and son.-, of Dayton, Ohio: Miss Ensev
and Miss Campbell, of Denver Col.: Mrs IS
Matneld and daughter, of Los Angeles <■•«! "mil
Miss YounK. of Kvunston. 111. The Pont 'intake
cordially to each of them and gave them his hand
to kiss.
itCSSIAy RAILWAY To PERSIAy BORDER.
London, Nov. 21.— it Is announced that the con
struction of the Russian railroad from Erivan ( a "
town <>f Russia. 115 miles from Tiflia), to the Per
elan frontier/will be begun at the beginning of 1903.
— •
DEATH OF MRS. LANGTBrg VOTtIKR.
London, Nov. 21.— Mrs. 1„■ Breton, the mother of
Mrs. Langry (Mrs. Dfl Bathe>, the aetmw died this
morning at her residence, on the Island of Jersey.'
y£* /yj/ J?J This signature Uon OTery box ot the gsnuin*
& strjCWmj** _- Laxative Bromo-Quiniiie t..,-.
<T£ *^V> vTT*» *•«>« remedy that cum • cold In on« d*j-.
In the selection of
Wedding & Holiday Gifts
nothing is more appropriate than
STERLING SILVER
and the large and increasing assortment made by
Reed & Barton offers exceptional advantages.
In variety and price can be found a wide
range af selection, and standard patterns
may be matched and duplicated at any time.
REED & BARTON
Founded 1834Q
41 Union Square ««»<« 6 Maiden Lane.
Modern Comforts of Bachelorho
If the title of aa interesting article telling how the conditions sarronading
a life of " Single Blessedness " hire hnprored. Ales two appropriate
Thanksgiving stories, entitled
A Tropical Thanksgiving aw When the Turkey Bun
APPEARING IN THE SATURDAY ISSUE OF
(Bit I beithto fogt
Order from you* newsdealer.
3 CeiltS. an P d 5AU.rdJy O CCU
cents. and saturdiy O
PEACE SIGNED AT PANAMA
SUCCESS CROWNS TTIE CONFERENCE ON
THE WISCONSIN.
Panama, Nov. 21.— Consul General Gudger has
just landed from the Wisconsin at I o'clock this
afternoon, bringing the news that it treaty of
peace has T>e<?n signed this afternoon by th»
revolutionary general Herrera. and the govern
ment commissioners.
Rear Admiral Casey "ill ?=ai-: to-morrow.
The principal points in the treaty .if peace
which has been signed now by Minister of State
Perdomo, specifies that General Hen-era shall
hand over to the jtov»rnment the entire revolu
tionary fleet, consisting of tho mm boat* Padflla,
Darien, Oaetan atul Boyaca. All the war ele
menta <^f ih. Insurgent armies in the prortnees
of Cauca and Panama ;«nd the arms and am
munition captured at Agu.i Dulce ire aiao to be
surrendered The government pay the son)
necessary to return the soldiers of the revolu
tion to their homes
one- peace lias been declared, lh< Colombian
Congress "ill decide regarding the laws for the
Panama Canal and the election, an<i also the
paper money Questions, As this is the wish of
the President and of the whole n.ition.
MiytSTER POWELL MAKES i DEM AX D.
DOMINICAN GOVERNMENT MUST SETTLE AMERI
CAN CLAIMS AT ONCE.
San Domingo. Nov. i'L— United States Min
ister Powell had a long interview to-day with
the Minister of Foreign Affairs regarding
the claims of the San Domingo Improvement
Company, of New-York, which asserts that it
has been unjustly deprived of certain valuable
franchises conferred upon it by the Dominican
Government, and demands an immediate set
tlement of the mutter.
SUSPECT SOT J/lff:. Hi MBERT.
Lisbon, Portugal, Nov. 21.- A woman was arrest
ed here to-dny on suspicion that she was Mate.
Frederick Humbert, who, with her husband, la
wanted by the ponce of Paris in connection with
th- Crawford case frauds.
it was established that she was not Mme. Hum
bert, and she lias consequently been released.
•run riii'iu'ii vs. THK statk.
There have l»een reoent Indications of an
ImprndiiiK ••tinnuc la the policy of . 1. ,- Holy
See v«li loli denotcn the abandonment of ll«
. ■iiiim to temporal power. In to-morrow"*
Trtbunr.
COLUMBIA SOPHOMORES U7.V RUSH.
Columbia sophomores had a strenuous battle with
the freshmen yesterday at South Field, In their
annual cane rush. The sophomores on. bavin?
seventeen hand to fourteen on the cane when tin
final count was taken. The freshmen, however,
found fault with the count, and doubtless other
battles r'or supremacy will £.«• held.
The trouble yesterday arose through the efforts
on Tuesday of the rival classes to paint their
numerals on the fence that Incloses South Field,
By consent, a formal battle was postponed until
yesterday. The two bands >' men, earn. Heventy
tive strong, faced one another, the upper class aaati
formed a ring, and the contestants rushed to
Kether. every man trying to get a hand on the cane.
The groups fought for right minutes. Then the
upper class men stepped in to t»Ke th. score. Th->
combatants were loath 10 separate, and the funlor^
and seniors nad to do some lighting on their own
account.
TO OBDBB ARMOR I'LITF! FOR JAI'AX.
Seattle. Nov. Jl.-StadH. chief constructing en
gineer of the Japanese Navy. acromTMnled by M.
Matsuka and <J. Htguchl, chiefs of the naval con
struction bureau of Japan, arrived here last night
on the Toea Maru. and will proceed to-day to Pltts
hurjr. where they will pluee orders for armor plat*
They win spend mane time In th. East, inspectlnc
American method* of shipbuilding.
LEMAIRE& T
PAR 1 5
It is quality that has made the
name Leoialre famous. Mm that
this name, spelled L E-M-A-I-B-E
(as at>ove). is on the end and around
the eye piece of every Opera and
Field Glass you buy: otherwise you
will bay worthless Imitations.
For sal* by a!! responsible .I#*>r»
AboutTH&NKSGiVING TURKEYS
Buy Direct of the Wholesalers and SaTi
All Middlemen"* Profits.
KEENEY'S
51 Pearl St., near Broad St., N.I.
OFFER EXCTSTIOKEAXAX FOTt
TURKEYS.
KM I.TI'.V AND GAME AT RETAIU
I?HST (lI'AUTT- LOWBST PRICE*
Orders calleU C^r and a»Uv«red dally In X*w-Torlt »>""*■
Ijrtl »r!.l Statin lsiar..J
FREE OF CHARGE.
Shipping Is all part* of Iha .-juntrv. M.xll orders .»
ceiv« prompt an.i assi service. Our "Li« •'- 5| * r: '
I'r.»lnc«»" aenl upon rv-iuest. _
RSTAOUSHKI> 1»T. TELEFIIoNf X* BROAD.
Eddy Refrigerators
Our itandard for quarter of * i»nturr-
THE "WILKE
Porcelain Lined Refrigerators
The perfection of c!«arsltfie?4 and economy
]ewis sponger,
130 an.l VIZ Writ «-d Street, unit
t:i» Went -MM S»tre*«. "**** 1 ork.
Dinwm 11 SMi \' aaa .• anaswai _
ESTABLISHED A. 0. 183!.
Knox Hats
ALWAYS THi; STANDARD.
ESTABLISHED f«6*.
POP CORN WHISKY
99 00 PURE.
Light years old, full quarts, $1.50.
It is the only Whisky of the kind.
N. equals its high standard of purity
Sold by Druggists and Wine Dealer.*.
Send for Descriptive Circular.^j
FRANK G. TILLIDUE * CO.. Cincinnati. •
nHPI.OYJ!K\T FOR WOITES.
Th» Charity Orciml«i*«i«i» *<»HetT *••
opened r» new llelil of employment « •» ■*■-
lined and edorated women. It »*■ • » ar *
corps of worker*, who tM«^Miar«tr «H«- •r»*^
ration for charity, and nee that tb*-> OOP1 _
from people who art de»ervlnij •< •*•'*'
nnoe. A day's irork of one •! «■*•• »■•!"*"
torn, In 1 i-morron 1 Tribune, •

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