OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 23, 1902, Image 10

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1902-11-23/ed-1/seq-10/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 10

10
/s£oM^-~ *^/^J K3&
THE RACETRACK.
HUNTERS CHAMPION CAPTURED BY
WOOLGATHERKR— TWO FA
VORITES WIN
Washington, Nov. 22. — The Hunter's Champion
Steeplechase and a card of other good races drew
to Bennings to-day one of the largest assemblages
"f the meeting- Many people prominent in society
crowded the clubhouse, grandstand and lawn. The
steeplechase was won by 'Woolgatherer in a. hard
<-hase after Duke of Grassland. The Duke got oft
in front and was headed by the winner at the head
of th«? stretch. Joe Leitc-r, Montrlp and Cheval
<i'Or fell in this race, but their riders escaped with
few bruises or a shaki
l.»andie Belle, took the first race, getting off in
front, and never relinquishing the lead. The sec
ond was captured by Star and Garter, from Kose
•<vatfr, after an exciting tini: h, which brought the
stand to its feet. .-■. l. rharometer, in the handi
cap for two-year-old^, received a Kood rule, went
to the front in the last furlong and won handily.
Syrlin made th running in the fifth to th. head
of the stretch, where Lux Lets took the lead, only
»o ':<- r^-aten at the wire by Bonnibert by the short
est kind of head. Scratches reduced the Hnal race
to four starters. Orontas. the favorite, as usual,
was slow to begin, and trailed the leaders for a
mile. Turning into the stretch, he made a grand
run. and won by half a length. Track good. The
summaries:
First race (three-year-olds anj over; seven furlongs) —
Dandle Belle. S>2 (Mil burn). 23 to 1 and !» to I. won;
Tribes Hill, 107 (Martlnt, 3 to 1 and even, second: Ku
clalre. 102 (Minder), '■!■'• to 1, third. Time, 1:2715. fcrden,
Tour, C'ourtenay. ' Lady Potentate. Brunswick, Harricade,
Flara. Lady Welback, Arrah Gowan. The Stewardess and
Provost also ran.
Second race (ma. dm two-year-old*; five and one half
furlonps) — Mar and Garter, 107 (Minder) 1 :•> 1 and 3
to 2 won: Boeewater, J<>7 (Gannon), 12 to 1 md 5 to 1,
eecoiid; Lord Advocate. 113 iLandry). 50 to 1, thiid. Time,
IKWH. Stonewall, Uranium. Allen Fam ■ John Nevln.
•Reckless, Moan! Kisco. Hist, Meddling Mary. Rollcall,
Old Glory. Swift Candle, Oeisha Giri, Whiten, Alham
bra and Klghl Ctom also ran.
Thirl race (Hunters' ("hampion ?teeplecha.«*-; about
three milff) — Wools&tberer. 147 (Gallagher), <> to ."• and
1 to 2. won *I>uke of Grassland. 137 (J. Johnscn>. 3 to 1
and even second; 'Charles O'Malley, ISfi (Mr. nunnelli,
3 to 1. third. Time. «>:l. - i*B. Ji>: loiter. Kate apotsw.vri.
Kalorama, Cheval dOr, T» slight 11 and Montrlp als^o ran.
imlnfl in betting:.
Fourth race (handicap: two-year-old? ; m furlonK^i —
Paccharometor. 103 (Wonderlyj, 4 to 1 and 2 to 1. won;
Tuscan. IIS (Landry''. « to 1 and 0 to 2. second; Cinque
valll. 136 (Martin), 0 to 2. third. Time, 1:14%- Capti
vator, Xevermore. Athlana. Dramatist. Dark Planet,
An. i c. Uiladl Love and Illyria also ran.
Fifth race (one mile and K«> yarutO— ' : T.nli-.-rt, 110
<>larun., 4 to 1 and 8 to :•. won; Lux Casta, 102 (Rice),
12 to 1 and 4 to 1. second; Syrlin. '-12 (Robertson), 4 to
1. third. Tim.;. 1:47. The Huguenot, Harry New and
ExtlnruiEfcer also ran.
Sixth ra«.-e <three-year-oias and upward; one mile and
throe furlongs) — Orontas. 11!' (Blake). 7 to 5 and 2 to 5.
■won; Cofrswell. 103 (Redfern). 2 to 1 and 1 to 2. second;
Circus, 05 (Martin), 5 to 2, third. Time, 2:24. r-olleeian
•lso ran.
WASHINGTON ENTRIES FOR TO-MORROW
First race 'hurdl", nr.f and three— quarter milesi— !'<rn-
I^-.. l^ s ; ConflicUiiß E\-idenoe. l.'.S; Gascar. 152; CoUecian,
■82: Blacksmith. 152: Rapped Cavalier, 138.
Second race <ma!den two-year-olds: tsix- furlongs)-
len Kerres. 112: John N- ■ ■:•■■■. 112: Uarkelmore. 112: White
Ohos-t. 112; Glennevis. 112: Colonsay, 112; Bernard, 112;
Guess. 112: Merry Sport. 112: FUego. 112: Lord Advocate,
112: Ruckles*. 112; Lucky Day, 112; Wheeler 8.. 112;
Mount Klpco, 112.
Third raco (maiJen two-year-olds: cix furlonc?) — Jim
Bock 108 Tlogra l<»; llcall, 109; Blue Grass Girl. 109;
■Bassinlo 109; llaglets. MM; Louise Klston. 109; I>oravale.
i... Retire ]<•■.»■ Bontafr, 109: Lady Knighthood. 109:
Erfia. 10»: Lady 'In ting. 100; Profitable. ■"■*. Anna
HaThaTiay, ioi»; Finebrook, 109: Fortunatus, 1"-'; Lady
Saratj, 109.
Founn :ac* (three-year-olds and upward: on.- mile' —
Eliini 112: Brisk 109; Double Dummy. 10&: Morarnoa,
lift- Paul Clifford. lO.t; Rockey. K»7: Lord Pepper. 107 .
Orail. 104; Reo Damsel. lU4; Ray Paulaker. 104; Senegal
Rad. 104- Auimos-.ity. KM; Trump. 32
Fifth race (-filing: three-year-olds and upward; seven
fttrlonrs)— Maude Gorme 113; Paul Clifford. 114; Demurrer.
113: Candlinc. 113; Echo Dale. 113; Larva, 113: Gu< _-
ll'i- San Anares. 110; Meistereincer. 10S: Ascension, 105;
Valley parse. 105; Red Damsel. 105; Flo Hu?«--li. 105;
Buck Ixnlg%. 105; Alpaca, 105; Carroll P.. MB; The
'"'srxth 1 ?^-*. ihandicap; two-year-olds and upward: r.ne
Sixth race Ibandicap; tw -.-y^ar-'Ms a-,d upw-ara : r.ne
and one-eixteenth miles>— Bonnibert. ',-'' : , o. W hittier,
US Gold Cure. 118- April Fho^r. 116: Paul Clifford. 113:
satire 112; Contend. HO: Himself. 107; Daly, lo.; Jim
Ciark.' 105: Examiner. 96: Uacken^ack, 90: Bit Faust, n.
END OF RACING AT LATONIA.
Cincinnati. Nov. 22.— The racing to-day brought
to a close the fall meeting of the Latonia Jockey
Club and also wound up the seaFon of racing in
the Middle \\>-t. Track sloppy; weather clear
and cool. Summaries:
First race cselllng; six furlong?!— Fleuron, 10S <Pcullv>,
7 to 1 won: The Ulrtit, X© iHoubre). '■< to 1. second;
I'.eorpia Gardner. 87 (Woods), 10 to 1. third. Tim*-. 1:22.
Second ra.»* <?ellinj:; on? and on>-fixu-enth milest — fcHK
'ord 10l (Usdeer). 11 to 5. won; Scorpio, 01 (Woods). 20
t.> 1. second; iiUicie l'.ock, 1«7 (rVamciius), li to l. ibiru.
Tliird rare «handirari- six furlongs) — O'.efiant, 93 (Scully),
T to' 2 won- St. Minor, :•«"> <S. Honneri. ltd 1. second;
Jack Katlin. 'llS <T. Knight), ito I, third. Time. 1:19.
Fourth raf-e (handicap; one and one-eighth miles) —
For.Foluca, 10* (Uadsey), 11 to i, won; Firing Line, 9% (J.
Daly i, 2 to 1. (=»cond; Wyola, i«~> <P. Bonnerj. -■' to 1,
third. Time, 286
Fifth race (s-elling; on« mile^— Little 8..v. 110 <.!. Daly).
4 to 1. won; Mr. K&rmim, !»9 iS. Bonneri, 8 to 1. second;
Kilmore, {* «Lin<i?eyi. 3to 1, third. Time. 1:".1 U.
S*xr.h race isellinp; rlx furlonj;.'.— Jatoh*-!. 105 iJ.
O'Connori. 9 to 2. won; Aratoma. 11l (Gonnley). 9 to 5
«erond: Ros<> of May, 10S •?. Bonnen. 8. to 1. third.
Time. 1:22
RACING IN ENGLAND.
London, Nov. 22.— the Manchester November
race meeting to-day the Kovember Handicap was
won by St. Maclou. St. Mdegonde warn second and
Scullion was third. Fourteen hor«es started.
TO-DAY IS THE DAI.
The regular meeting of the in-iny little
linnlnean houses that have ltargrafns to offer
In their respective linr« WkM place to-day.
Yon will find them tinder the "Little Ad«. of
the People."
ATHLETICS.
HANDICAP TRACK GAMES AT COLUMBIA.
Track athletes of Columbia held their first an
nual fall handicap track games, open to all uni
versity students, on the South Field track yesterday
afternoon. The heavy track made fast time impos
sible. J. A. Taylor, a sophomore, did the best per
formance of the day by running the half mile In
2 minutes and 5 seconds-. L. Leventrltt, C. A. Ful
ton and O. D. Meier did good work for the fresh
men. The summaries:
Putting 16-pound ibot— by P. B. Hughes, p ■-•
■raduat* (i feet), with an aciual put of 33 ft. 6 in.; H.
\V. Albert 'OS College (scratch), tecond, with an actual
put of 34, ft. : In.; H. M. McLlntock. '03 College t 3 feet»,
third, uith an actual put of 31 ft. 2 in.
Throwing 16~pound hammer — Won bi H. I* Pud' n.
■<•:; Law (acnXcfa), with an actual throw of l"!t ft. «5 in.;
H. v. . Albert. '05 Col'eso in feet,, neror.d. with an
actual throw of SI ft. 3's in.: M. D. Feniw. 06 i 'ollege
«!2 f^ct), • rd, with an actual iamw of hi ft. '■' ■ in.
po'.f- vauli — Won by H. M. M ].-.■• .. '03 College
|Ml«tcU, with an actual vault of 10 ft 3'j in.; A. Perry.
•<*; <^ Indies), second, with an actual vault of & Met;
V,-. Newell "O5 Col.tea (!'•> inches), third, with an actual
vault of v feet.
Running high Jump— Won by M. C. llarell. V*} Colletr*
♦6 inches), with an actual Jump of ' ft. 9M in.; T. K.
}>v-:: '*& Science, second, wit)! an actual Jump of 5 ft.
1 in.: H. R. ilcLlntock. '03 College '1 Inch), third, with
an actual jump of 4 ft. 11 in.
On^-hundred-yard dash (handicap! — Won by William
P. S. Baric "4 Colleße (Fcraf!;); .1. It. Thompson. 03
Science (scratch), e*vond; L. I* .•ii!r:M ■<»> Coll«S«
<K-ratch). third. Time, 0:11.
KixM-hundred-oixi-eighty-yard rur. Won by .Tatnrs A.
Tay!i>r. '03 Collece (scratchc 1^ K. X >hl« • . "05 gcleaen
<»• yard*), f«rc<-.n.J; J. K. R. Verflanrk. 'd Collefffl «»i
yard 1 - 1, third. Time, i':«."«.
<>n«-— hun.lred-aiid-twenty-yard low *••■;'. - -Won by .1.
R. Thompson. "o3 Science (scratch); <>. L>. ".; :.r. Jr..
•iw> Bctencc (cctmteb). second; T. H. Ba^ll, 'OS Science
(■cntch). third. Tim*, 0:13%.
Two-ijllp ran-Wnn by Charles A. Pultun. '06 Bdence
«."> s^d/iidis); '.. 1.. Hainmer^l .Utfh, (H > -.1, •>;. (scratrhi,
*<»c»nd; A. J. MacaonaJd, '•'. Si-i»-n<-e tix'nitcl)) third.
Tinu-. 1O:51H
d and-tweoty-yaEd hluii liunJlet-— Won ».y
N. C. Curtis, "05 O-illre* (scratch): i>. B. ' Kri-r. '•<'• «\>l
:«T<> <4 yard?). t^c-, r j : '' i- O'Connell. "(J3 Colle*?':
• crat .-!;), tliird. Tune. o:iy.
l'«>ur-hundt'-d-forty-y.irj run — Won by A. W.-ilz, '<<■<
Si.irn.-e (13 yards): I*. F. K;hk-r i^» yard*), second; W.
F. T!i.innn, '<fl CoU>ffC iV> yards), tl-.ird. Tim.- 0:52 H.
Itunninjr l,n<Hd Ju:ni>— VVc>n by U v l>-v.-ntritt '00
College 'scratch*, with an actual Jump r,f 'M ft «5 In :
T. It. I:uel|. '05 Srienie do Inch eeiund with an
actual Jump of 19 ft. s^ in.; N. c. Curtis, •«, College
ilO in-fcr-.-). third, with an actual Jump of IK ft B*i In
77/ F A.VTOMOBILE
Al TdM'ilill.lST TO P\Y DAMAGKB.
ii ITi Musi ■ . N. J.. Nov. 22.— Robert J.
Dougherty, of this city, in, i Miss Jennie Wines,
of Cranbury, were run down last night by an au-
ISJBJSSMIe. Both were thrown out of the carriage
in which they were ri-in a and hurt. Henry Kn
stgsj. the driver, was arrested and held until the
owners of the automobile, who r>-:--,:.- In N,- -Vorl
;iKr»-<-(j by telephone to pay all damages.
FIVE AUTOMOBI LISTS DISCHARGED.
The five aut-jirioi.i!ipt>: who were arrested in Cen
tral Park on last Saturday, charged with violating
the ordinance requiring all ovnrrs of lior«»lfiJs
earrlsces to diEplay thflr iiiitinls ot: the r«-ar of
th*> l"Vl "V' ,f" :! v were all di?chatr«<l by Magistrate
Mayo in the Yorkville court yesterday. Magistrate
Mayo said he would advise the Corporation Coun
set to bring a civil suit against the defendants.
THE SPEEDWAY.
QUEEN WILKES SHOWS FIXE FORM. DE
FEATING EQUITY AND SWIFT
■With Kingmond. 2/0, out of the way. Qu*»n
Wllkes yesterday attracted the best field of horses
that started in the brushes held under the auspices
of the Road Drivers' A«ociat:on. on the lower
stretch of the Speedway. H< r competitors were
A. E. Perren's Equity, 2:12%, and John F. Cock
erlll's Swift, 2:15%. The former beat her a head
at the fir<=t trial, apparently because of the fail
ure of her owner, E. E. Smathrr?, t-; .jrive hr out
to the end. In the next two 'orusn»s the bay
mare that had beaten all rivals on the road last
spring 1 won with much to spare. That ?h* oould
have made it more than interesting tor Kincmonii,
the horse that defeated her a week ajo, v. - as the
opinion of all horsemen who saw her rinish yester
day.
Mr. Smathers "« chestnut pacer Pph!n> S ';.:<<'.
ae-aln defeated David Lamar's Nathan Straus
546)4, li the lifih of the series of blz weekly
brushes for the pacing championship or the Speed
way. Both horses wrre unsteady, and there was
not one satisfactory test of speed between them.
A NACUiMJ
One of the stars in "Old Glory Bale," which I
either one or the other breaking near the start
each time. Straus easily won the first of three
brushes yesterday, and then Sphinx S. beat him
twice in a jog.
The brushes between the rival trotting and pac-
Ing tf-ams did not materialize. Patrick Ryan's
Algonita and Mattie Lynn Holt being the only pair
of trotters on hand at the appointed hour, and
Isaac A. Hopper's Prince Tell and H«-s*ie- Reid
the only pair of pacers. Each team '"walked over*,;
and received credit for a victory. This Is tln a
fourth victory credited to Mr. Ryan's pair, and
the Road Drivers' Association will recognize them
as the. champion trotting team. Lydell Whitehead's
bay mares Mariou Wllkes and Saratoga Belle
turned up twenty minutes too late to start against
the Ryan team. Th- trotted very fast alone.
Several other brushes were decided In the course
of the afternoon. J. Devereaux's little bay trotting
mare Van Zandt. 2:12, one of the sta.rs of the
Grand Circuit, defeated J. C. Curry's Crescent,
2:13»2. quite handily in two trials of speed. M. C.
Harrison's Axteilo, 2:15. outtrotted Dr. J. F. Moore's
McMillin, 2:17%: L. A. Burkes West WUket 2:133*;
E. K. Smathers's Ida H..!.\\ I, 2:09%. and David
fulmar's Bally Simpson, 2:ll v i. in two brushes, but
he never had more than a length to spare at th«
finish. Ilderim, 2:23^4, a Yonkers trotters, won
easily from Thorn.-!.- F. Russell's Possibility, .1. F.
Cockerill's Miss Hibbard, 2:2«'i,: \V. C. " Floyd-
Jones's Camilla, : i.» „ ;ind Walter Kilpatrick's
Royal Rene. 2:20. Mr. Floyd-Jones's handsome trot
ting mare Miss Fearing, 2:19 V, defeated Thomas B.
Leahy's Santos. -:_:' 4 . H. D. Mix's Silk Lace, 2:lS»i;
M. L. Simons's Irene Taylor, Dr. J. S. Scott's Lady
Alexandria, Morris Jones's Delphia, 2:22 Vi, an.l M.
Llchtwits's Robert Van Wyck. Dr. H. D. GlU's
Jack, 2:12 ! 2 . and K. W. Darrin's Johnny O. were
the winners of the brushes for pacers, the former
defeating Rosalet, 2:124; Redinda. 2:07";: Bell Boy,
2.011 i, and Ogden Smith, while Johnny O. took the
measure of Comet, Maggie Alencon and Miss Min
nie Lynn.
Budd Doble, tl. famous driver of Dexter, 2:l7'i:
Goldsmith Maid, 2:14, and Nancy Hanks, 2:04, was
among the four thousand spectators who saw the
brushes. C. W. Marks, the Chicago horseman who
formerly owned Joo Patch en, 2:01 l 4.; John Shepard,
the Robert Bonner, of Boston, i nd James A. Mur
phy, the former owner of Star Pointer, I:-":"*, wer*
other out-of-town spectators se* n in the crowd
ANACONDA TO BE SOLD.
Anaconda is one of the fastest Of pacers, and a
racehorse of high quality. He is now nine years
old— In his prime— and for six years has been
prominently before the public. His record v..: sc-n
eational when he was a four-year-old. In Cali
fornia and Montana he won ten races in eleven
starts, and finished the season with a record of
2:08*4. He has reduced this record until it now
stands at 2:01* 4 .
Anaconda goes to the highest bidder at Madison
Square Garden, on Friday afternoon. November 2S.
Nearly eleven hundred light harness horses are In
this two weeks' sale.
CRICKET PERCENT I GEB
RECORDS FOR SEASON OF NEW- YORK ASSO
CIATION—A GAME THANKSGIVING DAY.
H. E. Davies, the secretary of the New-York
Cricket Association, has made op the records of his
organization for the season of VMS, but he Is unable
to announoo the champion club of the year. Owing
to the many wet Saturdays and consequent post
ponements of matches, tbe championship schedule
was not ended until Election Day. Th, g ime then
played resulted in a tie for first place between
Essex County and Columbia Oval. Each of these
clubs feels confident of its ability to retain its place
nt the bead of the percentages, and the associa
tion has therefore ordered the. clubs to meet on
Thanksgiving Day. As a neutral ground was de
sired, the Kami- will be played at Paterson.
The Individual scores made In this match will not
count In the averages, so that it can be officially
announced that A. Bunce has won the batsman's
priz" and H. O. Wilkinson th* :-.\> !■ >■ - pi •'.. Tin
record are as follow:
Per
Play<i. Won. Lost Drawn. Cent.
Columbia Oval 12 "• :.' 3 .777
Ks=s«-x Count) '.12 7 '.' ft .777
Brooklyn. Team Y. IS « i* a <.■),>
Branch 8r00k... 12 '.' < ( 500
Patcrsv>n, Team B 12 '' •'■ i .454
Newark 12 :t '•• 3 .333
Manhattan. 21 Eleven ..12 1 ■•' '< .100
•Slsrnlties riot out.
cou unn \thij:tic notes
Columbia' h hockey team candidate* are no
ularly at work In the Columbia gymnasium. The
are i<, in*-- Instructed In stick work and shoot
ing the puck on ■•• gymnasium Boor by \v. Dudftn,
.\tmoni: the candidates are <• (;..-..
K. Benedict, li. M. Bangs. P. B. Bogue, H Duden
Beruuth. D. McKw, J. E Reid, X O'Neil,
C. A. i « ins and T. Wan, -I: m
i b a'u ela • rela; t< ams whicli will .-.. h
pete in a s!»- -i;,! Interclass relay race at the games
of tbi -^'1 Regiment to-morrow evening have been
chosen as follows: '63- < ». M. Bishop, C. K. Scharps,
J. V. Thompson, H. Bteeves, M. \V. Halnes, . nd
W. I" Thoman. substitute; '04 W. P. S. Karle, i;.
1 ». Oppenheimer, R. a. W. Carleton, P. <•■■ ■„,,,!.- ii,
W. P. Lawson, and i. B. it. Verplanck. substitute;
•<J5-^J. a. Taylor, J. Prall. T. K. Buell, A. '•'. Mc-
Donald, L. A. Werner, and T.. A. V.'alz, substitute;
•«; !,. L. Leventritt D. C. Carter, H. C. Feldroan
I). J>. Mulr, Jr.: .1 O. B. Curtis, and .! \. Pried,
substitute.
President Nicholas Murraj Butler hni appointed
M. <;. Bogue, "08, Law, graduuti director of ihc
university baseball außoclation. Bogue wi
four rears coxswain of the 'varsity crow. The
oth.-r graduate directors are J. I> Pell 'W and
W. B. Bymmes. Jr., '98. President Butler hus also
apiiointed <;. T. Klrby, Tt. and I". F. Spies '93 as
KTi«duat< directorx of th« track team.
HLX DAY BICYCLE RIDERS HERE.
Moat of til, foreign teams who are to take part
in the coming six day bicycle race In Madison
Square Garden arrived yesterday morning on the
American Line steamship St. Paul. They were
Emll r-ortii „. ,■ „| Richard Heller, of Rwltacri
land; ; '■ tfl Brenton . -.i loule LTtraeon ... FremN»:
Kmi! Losten ami M. Birarjuin. of Belgium: < v .ni
Kartcr who will rid.- with Goueoltz In the German
B« r « nC ii. te fii ni i. and Blui "- w '" will ride with Buis-
&• Hoffman, a pacemaker, cam* with the
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. NOVEMBER 23. 1902.
YACBTIKG.
RUSHING WORK OX CUP DEFENDER.
ITS KEEL WILL BK RUN MORE THAN A
MONTH EARLIER THAN THAT OT THE
CONSTITUTION OR THE COLUMBIA.
[BT TELriRAriT TO THE TBIBCNB.]
Bristol, R. 1., Nov ?-.— Preparations for running
th^ kad keel for the new Cup defender it Herre
shoff*s had advanced so tar that it
was derided to-day to mould the keel on Tuesday.
Workmen will start the firr-s in the furnaces under
the meitinc- pots on Monday afternoon, md the
lead will be kept hot until early Tuesday morning.
wh"n the heat will he increased until It reaches the
bo'llng point. It will then be run Into th< mould,
which has been shored m> by timbers and a banking
or dirt. About the furnace and melting pot are piles
of lead in pigs to be melted. AJongsidi the mould
-ire also many pigs of lead which are to be thrown
Into the meited lead before it cools in rhe mould.
This method was employed in running the keels of
previous 90-footers. In the brass moulding shop
the bronze keel plate for the new defend?- was
. -:'ir' 1 ..
gins to-morrow ;it Madtson Square Garden
.shaped to-day, and Is reported to be similar to that
of the Constitution. it is In throe sections, with
• . — web flanges.
The running of the lead keel on Tuesday will bo
the earliest that a keel for a Cup defender has
been made at the HerreshofTs shops. As the races
for the America Cup are to be held in August, 1903,
an early start is necessary. The Constitution's
keel was run December 22, 1900. and the Columbia's
on January 24. US9. Men are now at work getting
out the patterns for the various fittings for the
new yacht James Whitman will be ready to true
up the frames by th.- time the stool bulbed angles
arrive here from Phoenix vl Per.n. Th.-> steel
ami metal working force at the shops nas boon
greatly Increased, so that the new yacht will be
ready to launch the first part of April A rood
sized ■■< steam yacht for M. T. Plant will b*
launched from ilerreshofTs north shop early next
week.
CHESS.
LACKER'S TOUR SUCCESSFUL— TWO INTER
ESTING GAMES PLATED AT CHICAGO.
Lasker'a tour of" the United States Is creating a
Btir. His reception at Plttsburg, Chicago, Mil
waukee and other cities in the West has been ex
ceptionally hearty. At Pittsburg he met 11-
Cutcheon, the Inventor of a certain variation In
the French Defence. Two games were played. In
each Laskor won, but he admits that McCutcheon
ought to have been the victor. Among the games
played at Chicago tho following were- interestlns:.
One Is a consultation game, which was cleverly
won by the champion and his aiiics, while In the
other Lasker suffered defeat .it the hands of tin
well known local matador Parks in a simultaneous
exhibition The plays:
RUT LOPEZ.
WHITE. ni^ACK. WHITE. BLACK
Masker Ljj.fc.er
ana ■■ U«s. Allies. and allies. Allies.
1 P— IC 1 V— X 4 10 I- KKt 3 Bx »
'i Kt— !v B 3 Kt— vn 3 [17 x B B— Kt 6
3 15— Xt 5 P QR3 IS rj— Q H Xt- X:,
4 11— H* P— Q3 lOKtlKt *RxKl
5 P— Q 4 Px P ■!•< v x P K— <J .'.
''. Xt x I- H— Q 2 21 Q— H B— Q S
7 Xl > Xt P;Kt •JJ It— Qß3 Q — Q I
v Ca^tles Kt— Bß 23 »— X 4 It x B
0 U— K H-K 2 24 H x !'. (/— K f.
10 P- X S Px P 2.'. P— Q Xt 3 X— -v
11 Rx P Castloß jSiRiF i; k 7
12 U— K Xt 5 n-Q 3 27 P -X R 3 Q B 4
13 11— X 3 K-Kt 28 ft— Q 8 Q— K 5
11 Xt- B 3 P— It 3 28 XxX rh rt«»nna
IS }* — R 4 li— Xt 5
Whlt« — La«k<>r. Saulson. Rhodui and Wllcox.
Ulaok — Johnson, I'edemar.n. Phillip*. I .' H inm».l<» an.l
Btuchtield.
FAI,KRir:Tt COUNTER GAMBIT.
WHITE. BLACK. i WHITE BLACK
Lasker. Parke. r-,~r-r Park*
1 P— K 4 P— K 4 17P-Kl4 Tt— k"
2 !'— K 14 P— Q * ]S P—K Xt 5 B— K 2
5 P x Q !' P—K 5 ■■■ R— Xt 2 Xt x P.
4Kt QB 3 Kt-KBS 20 Px Xt Q— Q 2
5 B— B 4 '-..■•■.; 21 Xt (X 4>—
BP— Q4 PxPep Xt 3 Q— n Bch
[$>* CHftIPS : 22 K— B niQKiP
X Kt— X . Xt-Xt 5 I 23 B X P B x Pch
9 Kt— X 4 P.— 1< 4 24 K— Kt Q. -Xt .'.
lOKKt- KtSKt —R; '25 R Xt 2 r< x R
11 Xt x Q KtxQch ! y.nvn r-k S rh
12PxKt B— KtSch i- ;r « r Qxßch
3.1 K—Q Kt— Q2 28 X— Fl2 X— B
14 P-Q R 3 U-K' 2 »Kt(Kta)—
35 P— Xt 4 B— B 3 r .', (j _ X 7
16 R— R2 Xt— Xt 8 i Resigns
MANHATTAN CHESS CLUB GAMES.
Nearly three rounds have been completed In the
annual championship tournament of the Man
hattan Chess Club. So far Halpern Is the leader,
with three straight wins to bis credit Delmar
and Hanbam follow, with two wins each; Baird and
Schmidt have l l^ points each; Jones, Phillips and
Roetbing have l point earh. and Koch and Kei
danz, U point each. The best game thus far was
played by Delmar against Schmidt on Friday af
ternoon. Delmar won after selecting a strong
leading motive for his game. Schmidt resigned
after forty-five moves. This Interesting *ame la
appended
QCEEN'S PAWN" OPKMNii.
WHITE, BLACK. i WHITE i:!.,VK
:'■ I mar. Schmidt. < r ><•:,. • Schmidt
1 P— Q 4 P Q 4 21 i' X p Q_|l 2 '
2 P— K 3 Xi X H 3 !25 ij—Kt 3 X li
SB — Q3 1- -Q !'■ 4 .-. Xt Q 4 Q— K 3
4F— QB3 Kt-B S 27 Q Xt 2 •< <> •-.
SPxP P— '.. It 4 28 Kt(Q3)— KtSlt— Kt
6 ll— Kt % P— X 4 I2!t R— Qxup
7Kt--i)3 q— h 2 >.::» nn — 117 n — X
«q— rt4 B •.' 2 31 v- K. ."» n—u!.
.•P-QKt« B— K 2 S2KI KI!3 H— P. 3
10 B Kt2 Pasties :..: Xt Xt 5 Q— k« oh
11 IJ x Xt P x It 34 Q—li 2 Q x , i eh
12Q — B 2 p_ EC .-. 35 X « Q M x Xt"
13 Xt Q4- Xt— Xt 5 I.'MPt. It Px P
MP— X It a Kt— k i ISTKt— Q4 i: x v
15 PaMlen — Q ft |3S — rs <> p B IS
WP-K3. P- M 4 I3»P— B 7 R-U 2
17 r Xi: » X l: Xt l4o|j_itsch It— Xt
IS Xt Xi 3 H— !l a Ullt-QS R— Kt 5
19 Kt-Q 2 Xt . B |42 Xt x P P-K «eh
20 Qx Xt I- x P i(3K— X P— « 1
21 It PX P 14 111 - ;4»; 4» Xl — <.} fl P |t ft
22KtzB 2 P~x XK P4P 4 ; «.-, Xt BTch EUalnu
23 Xl B3 Px P
NOTES OF THE CHESS CLUBS
At the regular annual meeting of the Woman's
Chess Club, of New-York, held on November IS, at
its clubroom, Carnegie Hall, the following members
were elected directors for the ensuing year: Miss
fcaiphalel Williams Tyler, Mrs. George L. Whit
man, Miss Eliza Campbell Foot, Mrs Winthron
Parser. Mrs. William Gordon ver Plank VfU«
Emily Somers lialnes. Mi.-..-, Mlna Q. Waterburv
Mrs. George P. Blade and Miss France Peters'
immediately afterward the directors held a meet-
Ing and elected from their own number the officers
of the preceding year, namely, Miss Eliza Camp
bell Foot, president; Mrs. Winthrop Parker vic.'
prBlA-J? 1 ! ,f H Emily Somers Maine.a secretai-v
and Mrs. William Gordon v.-r Plank, treßHurer.
A lottir from (In- s<rr. t.iry of the Brooklyn
Chess Club to the .secrt-tary of Hi, City of London
Chess Cluh accepting the challenge for another
cable matoh for possession of the International Sir
George Newnes trophy. received at Brooklyn a
fortnight a?o. was mailed to London v.-.,. I - '
The contest will be Played In the «prli >-
V* KAi<Kioosf*opir mini OK llA||<;\|\S
may lie found each Sunday In ihf ..|,|,ti e
acts, of the 1Voi»1«»" In the narrow rolamui.
BREAKS COLUMBIA SWIMMING RECORD.
Columbia swimmers yesterday. held the. first of a
series of si i !-raoi tl Ij handicap* races in the tank _
.1. W. Spencer, captain of t.h.- • .!,■. sel a new
record in the 200-foot handicap rare. Starting from
scratch he covered the distance in 3-0 seconds
breaking the former university record of 42 see!
onds. held, by himself. ■ • , . . •. .. l * J t>ec
FOOTBALL.
Continued front second page.
LEHIGH DEFEATS LAFAYETTE.
IT TS THE FIRST TIME THAT THE BROWN
AND WHITE HAS WON FROM THIS
RIVAL. IN FOUR YEARS.
[BY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Easton, Perm., Nov. 22.— For the first time since
IS9B I^ehigh defeated its old-time rival. Lafayette,
in a football game here this afternoon by the score
of 6 to 0. Five thousand people saw the game, but
few, even among the most enthusiastic Lehigh
rooters, expected such a result The Brown and
White team, however, completely outplayed the
Bastonians. and they gained ground through La
fayette's line almost at will in the second half.
Lettish's victory is a feather In the cap of Dr. S. B.
Newton, Lehigh'B coach, who formerly coached
Lafayette and gave the Maroon and White a team
that (defeated Pennsylvania and Cornell and tied
Princeton.
The material at Lepigh this year when Dr. New
ton ook hold w-s green and Inexperienced. Never
theless he turned out a wonderfully clever lot of
players. consklerlnK the dearth of good men to
select from.
in the. first half to-day neither side scon the
ball hr.«=t being In possession of one side and then
of the other. Lafayette did considerable fumbling
and Lehigh was unable to carry the ova! any nearer
to ' Lafayette's goal than the 25-yard line. Captain
Farabaugh tried twice to kick goals from the held
in this half, but missed both attempts. The half
ended without, either side scoring.
In tho second half Lafayette, her line I tin^
weakened and her backs crippled, was forced to re
.-=, rt to punting to advance the ball. After fifteen
minutes of play Raub fumbled on the third down
and Lehigh secured possession of the ball. Brush
finally broke through the Lafayette line between
! rowr and Lamson and ran forty yards tor a
touchdown. Farabaugh kicked the goal. Ltliigh.
6; Lafayette, 0.
After this score Lafayette tried to force, but was
outplayed. Lehigh was advancing the ball toward
Lafayette's goal when the game end.-d. Brown, at
end laved the best same for Lafayette, while
Captain FaraKaugh, Waters and Brush excelled
for !.• high The lineup:
Lafayette. Positions. Lehlg-h.
Thomas T>eft »>ri-1 Herman
Newberry (Hasklns) 1 .. i r tackle LauJt-feld
Trout Ueti guard Water*
Folkner < >ntre Barnard
Frnf.-t : . . lei; it guard Johnson
I^ainfon Rishl tackle Qrea <Ortb)
Brown Right end Brush
Stayer fStltzer) Quarterback l>, .rniu
Work Launtl IWt halfback A. F.trabau)<li
Paul. TJl^-iit hulfbnok Torrey
frammel I : . Butler
Umpire — Whitinp. re ■ ■•:' Rrf*r«e Uorlc*. TTnlver?!ty
of Pennsylvania. Tim* of. halves,— Tliirty- five minutes
enrh.
DARTMOUTH DEFEATS BROWN.
ADMINISTERS SEVERE PUNISHMENT TO HER
OLD RIVAL AT MANCHESTER, N. H .
BY a SCORE OF 12 TO «.
Manchester, N. 11.. Nov. 22.-^Darttr.otith closed
her football season to-day with a victory over
Brown by a score of 12 to 6. It was a fcreat day.
not only for the Dartmouth eleven, but for the
City, this being the first time In its history that a
great colleg contest had ever been held hare.
Both teams began the gams with their best men
in the lineup, Bheehan, Brown's star man, played
until well Into the second half, when he was obliged
to retire. With this exception the Brown team
was believed to be In as good condition as at any
time this year. Dartmouth's strength lay in her
offence, and while it was known that In defensive
work she was a little weak, after holding Brown
In front of her own goal, she was a full match for
the Visitors at every stage of the same.
Dartmouth seemed weak In her defence when the
KHino started and Brown succeeded in carrying the
ball to within two yards of Dartmouth's goal.
Here tho New-Hampshire team showed what it
was made of and held Brown for downs. From this
period on there seemed little doubt that Dartmouth
v.-oulil win. Her backs were invincible and with
th.'lr Rtralgrit, old-fashioned style of football tore
thr«>':^ii th-» Brown line-. Just as they dl i with
Harvard last week, for steady gains. In the first
bnlf I>.v.-tmouth lost the ball ice on downs on
hf-r march through Brown's territory; but Dillon
■cored for Dnrtinomh before the half ended, and
Vaiißhan kicked the goal.
Lynr'h scored for Brown early in the second half
an.l Colter kicked goal, tyini? the score. Dart
mouth ralllo.l and had the remainder of the half
••- own way. She made another touchdown and
froal and then succeeded in holding: off her oppo
nents until the irame closed. Lineup:
Dartmouth. Todltlons. • ■ Itrown.
Bullock t*tt <mi<2 ~ Bchwtnn
Pns»t Left tackle Webb
Oilman I/*?* B'Ji.rJ Shaw
A. K. Smith ':■'!" - Colter
dough Right ruard Cobb
ru.cr- (captain)...... Klght tackle Sheehan (Siivaite)
Farmer Flight •■" 1 Rush
wi»h:im quarterback Crowell
Dillon (Patterton) t*ft irbaek Barry (captain)
Vuur! :if Itlitlit hnlfb.ick L#ynch (Chase)
Foster tKn'.blr") Fullback Hamilton
Frr.re—Vxr: mouth. 12: Brown, ft. Touchdown*— Dillon,
KriU>fc-e. lAtirh. Goals from ichdowns — Vanghhan i 2).
(•olter. Keferee — Oorbln. of Yale. Umpire H. I* Da.l
man. of Worcester Technlfal. Tln-.ek-epers — P.. D.
Hlan<slne. of Brown; Dr. Bol— r. of Dartmouth. IJnes
men — \\ . B. Thompson and James Clifford. Tlm« —
Thirty-fly* n-.lnu« haJv<«». Attendanc*— 10.0f»>.
NEW-YORK UNIVERSITY. IS; UNION, 0.
HOME UNIVERSITY WINS ITS LAST GAME
OF SEASON ON OHIO FIELD.
In the final came of the season New- York de
feated Union on Ohio Field by a ««core of 18 to 0.
Captain Connelly of New- York University opened
the m* by punting to Union's 5-yard line. And
erson got the ball and made ten yards. Union
tried end plays, but was forced to punt. Gunlac
punted poorly and Lane returned the ball seven
yards. Rellly. Tuthill and Campbell made fair
gams, and New-York received five yards on offside
play. Tuthill fumbled and Union gained] thirty
yards on a fake play. New- York got the ball on
downs and Rellly was pushed through fifteen
yards. The ball was fumbled on Union's 2">-yard
line. Union punted.' Tuthill made a 75-yard kick,
and Reilly tackled the Union man where he stood.
Union punted to her own 30-yard line.
Connelly failed on a kick. The ball was kept in
motion, neither side beinjr favored for some time.
Finally Reilly carried it over from Union's 15-yard
line. Connelly kicked a goal. Lorenz and Reilly
made continuous gains alter the kickoff, and in a
few minutes Lane had the ball over the line. Con
nelly kicked goal. After three more plays the
first half ended, with the score, New-York, 12;
Union. 0.
In the second half Tuthill was succeeded by
Draper, and Campbell by MacDowell. Union
kicked off. Rorke carried the ball fifteen yards.
Draper and MacDowell made small gains around
the ends. Connelly kicked forty yards.
Union now took a brace and ran th« ball back
thirty yards. New-York held well and Lorem
broke through the line and downed Qrlswold for a
lon. Draper gained on an end play. MacDowell
got the bill and made a speedy run of seventy
yards, aided by a splendid interference, making a
touchdown. The goal was kicked by Connelly.
Union kicked to Reilly. Draper made seven yards.
Union got the ball on New-York's 15-yard' Una.
New-York held for downs, and the game was
called on account of darkness. Lineup and sum
mary:
New-York- Position. n:..n
Ltrplncott - Right end Olinstead
Lorens . Right tackle Holies
C anally Right guard Dann
'• Centre Mil ler
Mane Left guard Willis
Reilly I ..-ft tackle Cleft-horn
Connell Left <n.l Clark
Tuthill l#ft halfback Grtswold
Lan (Cambell) Fullback Culnac
MacDowell Rl«ht halfback AiH.Tson
Rorke Quarterback .-h<-rrill
Touchdowns— Rellty. I.aiie, MacDowell. Goals — Con
nelly, 3. Referee — Mi T!i<.rrr\ o< Columbia, I'mHrt —
Mr. Robertson, of Williams. Time of balvei Thlrtj- five
and thirty minutes.
MANHATTAN. 6: LAUREATE A. C. 6.
tnv teieiuui-h t.) tiik TaisuNC]
Troy, N. V., Nov. 22.— At the home grounds of
the Laureate Athletic Club was played to-day a
most Interesting contest. For the la,st few weeks
both teams had practised hard and earnestly for
the fray, but the superior condition of the visitors
told in the first part of the game. The Manhattan
team had been encouraged by the return of O'Hara
In the line, and on this account the men felt very
confident. Coach Smith had been drilling th.- men
In line plays. the working of whlili was much
i.,-, led and effectively shown In the game to-daj
Tin' tremendoua line rushes of tb»- visitors could
not I- withstood, and i!i.->. soon discovered a weak
point In tha borne team The touchdown wad
made for Manhattan by ('otter, after ■■> hard run
while Lynd made the <»>•■ for Laureate.* O'Hara
kicked goal for Manhattan, wbil.- Qlute failed for
tin- I'.oin. team. Th, feature ■>!' li.- came v.ms the
hurdling by Mulltnu.

SOUTH ORANOK HUH) S. h.m.i. WINS
Orange. N. J., Nov. 22 (Special).— The South
Orange High School eleven. by defeating the l',u
erson High Bdhool team on the grounds of the
South Orange Field Club this morning, obtained
the right to claim the championship pennant iln
thf Northern V". ••'-.■, InterscholnsUc Leoeun
The Stn.tlt • tr.ii. ;'•' players «•«.,.. th*. gam.- hy the
wore of '.> to "On rhankßalving Dny morning
the champions will play th. Orange High School
team at South Orange. •
On the Centre-at. grounds. South Orange, in thet
same league, this morning th« Orange High School
won from the Passaic High School by the score
of S3 to 0.
VIRGINIA TURNED THE TABLES.
BETTING WAS AGAINST THE TEAM. BUT
NEVERTHELESS IT OVERWHELMED
THE INDIANS.
Nortolk, Va., Nov. 88.- The Carlisle Indians met
defeat at the hands of the University of Virginia
team to-day. The result was a gratifying surprise
to the Virginians 1 most enthusiastic admirers.
Although the betting was .=. to 1 that Virginia
would be defeated and even money that she would
not score, the University boys beat Carlisle by a
score of 6to o. Virgin!! made Cm the first half.
and failed to score in the second, when Carlisle
scored 0. The lineup:
«'arlisle. Positions. " -■"■•
BraJ!< ;■ Rii end Brotiston
Exendlbe Hi.eht tac kla Council
Lubo Ristht guard Spates
Sannook <>ntre Isa>-hman
Phillips Left guard Houston
Wulle (Bowman) Let! tackle Johnson
Beaver .....Left and Daniel
Yarlick Kitfht halfback >' ■•"
Parker Left halfback Prit.hard
Sheldon Quarterback Poiard
Will am? Fullback Harris
HOLY CROSS, 22; BOSTON COLLEGE. O.
Boston, Nov. 22.— H01y Cross proved too much
for Boston College this afternoon, outplaying it at
every point, and winning the game by a score of
23 to 0 before two thousand enthusiastic spectators^
at the South End grounds.
O'Connor, Gray and Spring were the Man of
Holy Cross, the former potting up an oxreilent
game. He was in every play. and. in running with
the ball, nearly always made a gain of fifteen to
twenty yard O'Connor's place kicking was the
feature of the gam* Out of three trials at this
difficult feat be made two pretty goals.
I'KXN FRESHMEN. 18; CORNELL FRESH
• MEN 3.
[si ci cjrapb i • rm rnsi >:.. i
Phi idelphla, Nov. 22. — Pennsylvania's freshmen
I i-.iia triumphed over the tir^-r year men
from Cornell In the annuni game on Fi
Field thit afternoon by the score oJ U to ■"■. Penn
sylvania's tii^t score came short] coss
tneni of play. Cornell braced bp after inia
and }usl '.'.tor*' the whistle .-«.>untU-d :.ir the
close of tbe first half, got possession oJ the ball
n< ir Pennsylvania's goal on a bad fumb] I
rushed it over The try .it goal failed.
d half was full of misplays and bad
fumbles <>i\ the part of both teams. Pennslvania
near the end, however, pulled h. r ■
ai .1 scored I •
ILLINOIS, 17; NORTHWESTERN •
Chicago, Nov. 22.— The University of Illtee -
Kill team wiped out last year's defeat bare to
day by downing the Northwi item University team
by a score of 17 to ft. All m Ism ii
the second half, bat hard luck and Baird*s szcellent
kicking kept the final count as low as It was. North
western was k>;i>i {in the defensive throughout the
game, hut played desperately to the end.
Held to a 0 to •■ score in the Bret half, the Illinois
men became desperate in tbe se< ond half, and
piled up three touchdowns In npl<l succ
Cook converted two of these touchdowns mto goal*
and ran the total to 17 points.
RESULTS OF OTHER GAMES.
At Clinton, N. T. — Hamilton Colle<e. 42: Roch»st«r O.
At Atlania. Oa. — University of TV.unessee, 10; Georui*
School of Technology, *>.
At Washington— Georgetown. 55; Y. M. C. A., 0.
At Baltimore — Hopkins. 17; Maryland Agricult
ural College, o.
At Swart hmore — 9warthm:.re. 22: Haverford O.
At Lewlsburff, Penu. — Uucknell, 17; Baltimore Medi
cal CDllego, 5.
At AnnapoljN — Naval Plebes. 10: Tome Institute. O.
At Anp Arbor — Michigan, S3; Oberlin. 0.
a; Ar.napolls — John's. 18; Western Maryland, 11.
At ifTalo— M&sten Park High School. 27; Elml i High
School, t>.
At ltnmswlck, Urn — Bowdota Freshmen, 10; Sopho
mores. .'..
At Cleveland — Cm Scientific School, 40; HHI-I
tx .- (Tiffin >. >>
.v Ne»-Erur.swick — Tlutser*, 6: Stevens, ft
At Cedar Kaplds— Cnrr.fll (Vales*. 3-V Ctoe College. <>.
At Delaware — Ohio Btate, 17. Ohio Wesleyaa, 14.
fWRsF 4YD CARRIACF NOTES.
Jamaa W. Renwick. the carriage builder of West
Korty-sixth-st.. has Just delivered to J. Gouraud
a superbly finished body brake. Among its many
features it is close coupled, making it liicht of
draupht. Mr. Ren wick says that the demand for
broughams, victorias and other seasonable car
riages has been phenomenal in the last week.
Charles T. Proctor's Lady Proctor was one of
the winners In the dealers' class last Friday. Mr.
Proctor has many fine teams at hla stable. Noa,
IB and 223 West Fifty-eighth-st.
James Emslie, of the Weehawken Stock Yards,
Hoboken, reports good business In the last week
in heavy draught horses to New-York contractor*
ami brewers, also a number of sales of delivery
horses to express companies and drygoods houses.
Mr. Emslie always has on hand two hundred head
or more of heavy and medium weight horses, which
ho will show to prospective purchasers.
CORD METER DEMANDS JURY TRIA
FOR THIS REASON HIS HEARING FOR AXr-
LEGED AUTOMOBILE SPEEDING
WAS POSTPONED.
Hicksvllle, Long Island, Nov. 22.— The case of
Cord Meyer, the wealthy politician, who la accused
of having violated the law relating to the speed at
which automobiles may be run, was timed on the
Jericho road one day last week ':■>- officials of th*
District Attorney's office, and It Is alleged that his
automobile was found to be making faster time
than the law allows. He was not arrested, but was
informed to appear before Judge Remaem last Mon
day. The hearing, however, was put off until to
day.
There was another postponement to-day, as Mr
Meyer demanded a trial by Jury, and the case was
adjourned until December 13. Mr. Meyer was ac
companied to court by his two young sons and h:s
counsel. Mr. Steinert. He denies that his automo
bile was exceeding the speed limit set by law at the
time it was stopped by the deputies. His country
home is at Great Neck.
wnr r D HAVE NEW ERICSSON BTATUB.
SWEDISH AMERICAN SOCIETY ASKS PERMISSION
TO SUBSTITUTE A L.\RGE ON' AT
THE BATTERT.
The Swedish-American Society yesterday applied
to the Municipal Art Commission for permission
to take down the statue of John Ericsson at the
Battery an.l put in its place a larger and more.
artistic statue of the famous inventor. The present
location Is not a desirable one. in the judgment
of the countrymen of the Monitor projector, and if
a new statue is erected they want It placed north
of the one now standing. The matter will come
before the Art Commission on Tuesday.
ITS LEGALITY DOUBTFUL, says KITES.
BUT QUESTION OF MAKING CITY PRINTING BEAR
UNION LABEL. HAS NOT BEEN FT'I.I.Y
ADJUDICATED.
Corporation Counsel Rives advises the Law Com
mittee of the Board of Aldermen that it would be
of doubtful legality to compel the printing of the
union label on all 'printed matter paid for by the
city. Last summer Typographical Union No. •>
bent a request to the aldermen for an ordinance
requiring tin- printing of the union label on all
printed stationery paid for by the city.
The l.:tw Committee of the board at Its meeting
yesterday discussed Mr. Rlves's opinion, together
with the propriety of report favorably on ,i reso
lution suri. as desired by the printers. The Cor
poration Counsel says that the question ins never
been fully adjudicated, but such compulsory use
of i,,. union label, where the city is compelled to
award contracts to the lowest bidders, would be of
doubtful legality.
STAMFORD CHURCH CALLS NEWARK MAX
IT IS VOTED FURTHER TO OFFER A SALAIIT OF
$3,500 TO THE REV. rOttD O. OTTMAN.
Stamford, Conn., Nov. 22 (Special).— The congrega
tion of the i'rst Presbyterian Church of this -ity
has unanimously ••„-. u> .\,.- , i a i-atl t ., the i;...,
Kuril C. OttnVfin* of Newark, N. .1 11. li , - i.»-en
pastor of a Newark church for seventeen >curs.
and this has been the only charge be has had sitno
iii- graduation from the Princeton Theological Sem
inary in :sm>.
Tii.- raniiiies of .i number of prominent .New-
York bu?<ln«xH in t. art' ,i,. .■■■>. of tin- I'r.-stn-
rian ch%iroh li>-r«\ ami for twenty-sevw \f«rs the
R«-v. R. i\ 11. Vail has been its' tiast..r. l|, re
signed lust ruling, but is situ living here" La*l
wvek lie sold his beautiful colonial home here and
will mov«- with his family to New- York to reside
It was voted by the church to pay the new pastor
a salary of 9S.SM ■ year.
/ \n;i( Whs VISITS' ;// is Isl.wn.
.Senator Charles T. Kmr banks, of Indlann. accom
panied by a (tart] from the New-York Women's
Republican Club, visited. Kills Island yesterday
morning. Th» visitors w»r« shown through the
Sporting ©oobg.
||f% MINUTES'
|U exercise
FOR BUSY MEN
Snaldlnx's Athletic Library. \o. t«l
1 #% ° E w T_§
Ig% CENT s
! H ml A Complete Course of
SaJ *« Physical Education
By Luther GulicK. M. D.
r>r Giriick has na-l- ;i lif.. study of physical edue*.
tiun. an-1 thc-e fx-rci^-s ar* me result of years at a
penen.-o. in which, their sucve^s has been thorouihi^
d?mon-trated. The come i« .nvide-1 into five pan»~
frre work iwlrhoui apparatu.-). eftest weg'-ts dunh
t*U?. wan.l? and Indim clubs. Each individual movll
ment l« Ulnatmtod by a fnn page half-tone ct\
photosraph erpeclaUr posed for this work with Vs.
compri? on the opposite pas* in lanje readible ****
compris-.pR m the af-'greeare nearly 2iii> oae.i '„,
ln.-tru.tion. r-nflertnj? it th>, largest ani most Mnwlek
work ft its kir>.i ever published. >- u ™Pi«t»
PRICE TEN CENTS
For »a!» by all newsdealers and
A. Q. SPALDING & BROS.
tas-isi ) TWO / 2» 31 33
Nassau Street < STOKES ) "West 42d Street
Send for a copy of Spaldlntr'a Athletic Goods
Catalogue— free by mall.
ijorsca anb (Carnages.
LARGEST ANI> MOST ATTH UU Or
LIGHT HARNESS HORSES
IN" FHE HISTORI
- -rr.r.D. higher cl.\ss. gp.eatkr qualit?.
BETTER ERF" DING TUAX EVER BEFORE OFFERED.
10«9 HORSES. ALL FULLY DESCRIEED IN OliD
GLORI CATAtOO.
FASI6-TIPTON CO., madison fq. garden.
rAblu-llrlun bli., new york city.
YAM TASSELL & KEARXEY.
130 and 132 East 13th St.,
123. 125, 127, 129 East 12th St-
CARRIAGE REPOSITORY.
Finest display tn New Tork of Carriages of th» hifie*
trade and moit fashionable <!eslsns.
BROLOHA.MS. OMNIBUSES. VICTORIAS.
STATION WAGONS, WAGONETTES, TRAPS
T^EHT HANDSOME cress matched teatrt. "'-7 «E*
>_, .«orr«:- sound and kind: « years eld, 1* hand*; e<o«
action: fearless of ci:y sights. oi> Ea=-. Kt^.-st.
Flutty Furs, Black Lynx the most beautifcl
Boas, extra loner, $65, $75, $i«>. Medium, $25 to
$-0. CoQarettes, $15, S^o. $^5- MnfiFsi correct
styles, $25, $35. $40. Extra largre. $;a C. C
Shajne, Manufacturer, 124 & 126 West -i St
building by Commissioner Williams, who explained
the details of the work. While Senator Fairbanks'*
visit was informal and unofficial, it afforded thi
commissioner an opportunity personally to F o '^
out the need for extensive improvements sa "
changes. For these he has asked the Treasury
Department to obtain a considerable approprtanw
at the n^xt p-=>sf!on of Congress.
MILITARY AUTOMOBILES.
TESTS OF AUTOMATIC WAGONS FOB
CARRYING ARMY STOKES
Both in Europe and in America the use of auto
mobiles for two distinct classes of work has be?"
contemplated by military authorities. Light &*<
vehicles for command - officers and mesaenS*-"*
will unquestionably prove a feature of army evz*
ment In the next few years. Tha transports*;
of stores— food, clothing and ammunition— is s l^
an essential accompaniment to an army's progr?s>
It is necessary to have power of some fci"-i | ?
move light artillery over highways and reasbnaW
smooth farming country. Freight carrUge and tOT
hauling of Held guns by steam or gas esgiaes is a
possibility which is now under consideration ra
foreign countries, if not In the United Stat«*
A set of tests has Just bee.i completed at ± id9T '
shot. England, which shows how the military n»=»
over there is working. The results have been fcept
quiet, but some of the conditions, of the experi
ment are known. Four heavy traction sagaM*
such as are used to drag circus parapheroaW
about the country or run thrashing machines, too^
part In the trial. Two of these were hat a ) [*
called lorries, or freight trucks, and were built t»
Thorneycroft. the famous water tube boiler de
signer. One of the requirements was that the ve
hicles should cover 3iw miles of road near Alder
shot, and another was that they should carry tiair
own fuel for the who.. distance. One hauling en
gine and one lorry burned oil of the graJ* x^
by the Shell Transport (Steamship) Corapanj.
Is .i heavy Quid, with a lui,ti "flash point. *^\,
indicates that it does not evolve explosive a ±*
moderate temperatures. . », a atn.
All four of these machines were d™'*! 1 ?*-. 3 }??™-
It is announced, though, thai th<> tlsh iJf?h tat
m, nt will order another set ot testjvin w^ v l^
"Internal combustion": system will be WWWJS
This explodes tbe rapoi of gasolene or . atomizea
petroleum in a cylinder in a way to make it ™ ot
form Hi. work of steam. Tin- «as engine OO»wj
need to stop, as does a steam traction engag
every twelve or fifteen miles, for watt »r. ana
therefore more iti.iep.inl.-tit. In the next «.«^ '
the load which th.- lorries will carry will be *«*££
ri\>- ions. irrespectiTe of fuel ami tn.-tr own *« I >»"
Th. burden will probably be divided up among m
"trailers." , Klt , •].
(iermany is following England's -x.imp!?. dvi •>-
cohol . used for fuel, instead of oil.
I i n\ SECTICUT CAI CLFB.
IT HAS BEEN ORGANISED AT STAMFORI> *&*
WILL. GIVE A SHOW LATER.
Stamford. Conn.. Nov. 22 *Special>.-The first »nd
only cat club in th.- State was organised in tru
city this we«a There are twenty-one members.
and thy nain.- of the urgi nization is the C 0^""
cut Cat ''lii.' The officers are: President, iir*
Homer S. •'ummlnsis; vioe-presidents. Miss A. •*■
Marks. Mrs. K. Hops Norton. Mrs. Edward J^
Brady. Mi- I. A. Youngs secretary. Dr. i<ra ,
Abbott '• >*»* W. C. Hoyt; executive CMU^"
Iw! \',- Edward J. Brady. Miss K. D. Frrg.is°».
.Mrs. William X. Trr.vh-. A. R. Mart. -,# s
kh. mem^rshlp rc-1! contains the names o» .
numb of p«r»ona prominent in Connecticut so c»
circles. It is the purpose of the organizaUcn
encourage the breeding of fine fellr.es. A ally
is being arranKed to take plaos ber« tbU **«•»•

xml | txt