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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 23, 1902, Image 3

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SEWS OF TWO CAPITALS.
Ton tinned from First Pace.
cpeclng mines and building railways in the in
terior. These reports are not confirmed from
authentic source, and equally untrust
worthy is the story That the Portuguese Finance
jjjsister is anxious for relief from revenue per
,; x::> by the sale of colonial properties or
privileges. The German Emperor has returned
to tis capital, where both the political and
tie financial situations are clouded with uncer
tainties. Baron yon Thielmann has Intervened
53 the tariff debate with a weighty speech. In
trfclca he forecasts the rejection by the feder
ated governments of the minimum duties on
gjaia and cattle decreed by the Agrarians and
enforced the necessity of covering by increased
taxation the deficit an current revenues amount
ing to R17.500.000l Warnings like these ought
w Influence the faction-rent Reichstag, but
ttere are no signs of enlightened action in
favor of the tariff scheme which will allow the
government .to renew the reciprocity treaties
3£X : year on favorable terms. The government
itself seems to have lost the art of managing
tie numerous groups in the Reichstag. Mean
while depression has increased In the shipping.
aaarißf and iron industries, and the home mar
kets tare relapsed into weakness and stagna
te".
Tie cc.i. crisp weather has Invigorated the
fueeu £' c:.s f :-r? ar.d country houses, and en
tt\ei ■ ' 'ashion to dir-play heavy sables
aa<s squirrel .-oats at the racecourses. Jenkins
was ex ' 'DO Lowther Castle, where the
Gerrr.ar. Emperor enjoyed absolute privacy with
eaaat*. ~ - •" -'•>' German. The King of Portugal
has accer"- ! Invitation* from Lord Iveagh, at
Elved-" rd ABthlrst, a t Didlington,
where ..ave unrestricted facilities for
iHgkterina; b'rds. but there may be diplomatic
business as we".! as duck shooting when he vis
its Lore Lanadowne at Bowood. There have
been la.ye parties at Chatgworth, Cheveley and
nary other places.
la London there have been a score or more
♦alienable weddings and hundreds of theatre
parties. The only change of programme is the
jroduction of -Carrots" at the Lyric Theatre by
forbes Robertson, and the -only fresh an
nouncement of importance is the purchase of
Count Tolstoy's "Resurrection" for the London
gage by Beerbohm Tree, who witnessed It with
delight at the Paris.
The Royal College of Music is producing
1 next week, ar.d there are about twenty
ecccer's ard recitals of minor importance. Sir
-• v'ui't-r is exhibiting Romney's "Mrs
Jordan. Ko'.man Hunt's ••Scapegoat" and Mary
Turners ar.d Constables for charitable purposes.
A ser:es of bright and sunny water colors by
Claude Bpere are shown at the McLean Gai
ler^s and Albert Goodwin's admirers are en
f the fine collection of drawings at
mtnorn gallery to believe that he shares
aamethlnc of Turner's inspiration while imltat-
Izg frankly the style of the great color and im
m painter.
Athenaeum ' reviewer, fatigued by the
of the holiday season, when the book-
F'r.e:- « are overcrowded, charges Captain Ma
har. wtta srrlttns too much. That accusation
waa never Buna; at that most industrious book
wrtter for boys, G. a. Efenty. whose friends
have gathered in force to-day to bury him at
ton Cemetery.
One of the largest genealogies ever under
taken has been partly completed at Oxford In
(fee history of the Smith family. Investigations
have r.ot been carried tack of the fourteenth
ry. although Professor Mahaffy dlscov
ared a record cf a brewer named Smith In a
Petrie paryrus dating two centuries before the
Christian era. I. NT. F
PARIS.
FRENCH TRIBUTES TO THE GENIUS OF
BALZAC.
UNVEILING OF FALGUIERE STATUE THE :
OCCASION— SPLIT IX THE NA
TIONALIST PARTY.
(Special to The New-York Tribune by French Cable.>
(Copyright. 1&0-: Ey The Tribune Association.)
Paris. Nov. 22.— The unveiling of Falguiere's j
statue of Balzac fifty-two years after his death. !
on this wintry, tempestuous day, recalling the
rugged life struggle of the author of "The Human
Comedy." elicits from the foremost writers of the
Parisian press -v and original appreciations.
M. Paul Bourget points out that Balzac was
neither a revolutionary nor a free thinker, but
like Tame held the Revolution In honor. M. |
Bourget cites passages showing how accurately
Balzac foretold the present political state of
France, the legal corruption, the discordant ex
travagance ci the Chamber of Deputies and the
sensational reporting of certain yellow sheets
iir.ocg Paris rsjpapers.
Stanislas Rzewuski, nephew of that charming
■woman whose maiden name was Corr.tesse
RscsiiMlca. afterward Mine. Veline Hanska, and
■ban Balzac loved for nineteen years before it
beran-.e possible for him to marry her, con
tributes to the "Journal" picturesque episodes
cf Balzac's domestic life in his last home In the
house new torn dpwn. but which stood on the
site occupied to-day by the princely mansion of
the Baroness Salomon de Rothschild, within a
etose's threw of the present statue. The "Fi
garo" reveals Balzac, the satirist, and publishes
a quiver full of epigrammatic shafts contributed
to "La. Caricature." In which Balzac wrote that
Alfred de Musset was merely a blond young
nan who chiselled pretty little ivory statues;
that Larr.a.rtine had the secret of weeping In
verse and increasing the sale of handkerchiefs.
and that Chateaubriand's prose was as grand
■hi cold as a cathedral.
The "Gaulois" publishes portraits of a score
of heroines of Balzac's novels, and in a scholarly
article maintains that Balzao was the founder
of the '"femlnlste" school that now dominates all
French fiction, and that Balzac's female charac
ters are more lifelike, more human and more
vibrating than those presented by any writer of
*=y age or country-. The ••Gaulois" gives espe-
AN IMPORTANT TEST.
Your Life May be Prolonged by Applying it.
Do you realize the Importance of the Kidneys
and Bladder? When diseased they make a lot of
trouble — tear down the system and create gravel
(stone In the bladder). Women often suffer from
so-called "female weakness" when their trouble
really lies with the K.dneys and Bladder. Try
this test. Put sorre urine in a tumbler. Let it
stand twenty-four hours. If there is a sediment,
a cloudy or milky appearance, your Kidneys are
*iek. If you are obliged to urinate often, espe
cially during the night; if your urine stains
linen, if you have scalding pains in passing it,
if your back pains you, your Bladder and Kid
neys are diseased, and you should at once take
the greatest of all Kidney medicines. Dr. David
Kennedy's Favorite Remedy. It has cured the
tr.ost distressing cases.
It corrects the bad effects of beer or whiskey,
will cure old and chronic cases of Rheumatism
and Dyspepsia and acts gently yet promptly on
the bowels. Favorite Remedy ie sold at all drug
stores la two sizes. . >oc and $1.00 per bottle.
Trial bottle free. Apply Schoonmaker. druKeist,
40 East 42d St N. T. or mention Sunday Trib
une and address Dr. David Kennedy Corpora
tion. Rondout. S. Y.
Russian Sable Muffs, round and flat, newest
r-ape«.r -ape«. large assortment, $i? 5, $17?- $250, $300.
$500, $650, $750, $900. $1,000, $1,250. $1,500.
pieces. Mantles, Victorines, Capes at corre
sponding prices Articles to order without extra
charge.
NOTE: I do not Ml! iUrkened or blended Ku»«t»n
■flu*, ©Ely the genuine natural color. _
C. C Shayne. Manufacturer, 41st & 4*d bts.,
Bet. B'way and 6th Aye.
clal prominence to Beatrix as the type of th*
modem woman misunderstood by her friends.
and whose Hfe is poisoned by her husband's
brutality. Eugene Grandet. the humble but
heroic victim of paternal avarice, and Pauline
In the "Peau de Chagrin" are among the cth^r
characters selected for texts by the "Gaulois "
which concludes Its appreciation with the
words: "If to-day Paris witnesses the apotheo
sis of the Immortal genius of Balzac it is be
cause he knew how to gath-r ar.d press in his
works^the most beautiful flowers of the female
heart." All the Paris newspapers to-day, each
m its own way. from the fulminating fanaticism
of Drumont, the humanitarian socialism of Jean
Jaures, the quaint old fashioned imperialism of
Paul de <?assasnac, and the redhot anarchism
of Rochefort. pla^e editorial laurel branches or.
Falguiere's massive statue of Balzac, which.
seated with hands clasped over crossed knees in
the triangular open space at the corner of the
Rue Balzac and the Boulevard Hausmann, con
templates the endless procession of the electric
tramways as they flit to and fro from the Arc
de Triomphe to the Optra.
Jules Lemaitre, president of the League of the
Patrie Franchise, has become the -enfant ter
rible" of the French Nationalist party, which is
split, and its leaders and its rank and file are
completely at loggerheads, owing to M. Le
maitre's continued advocacy of the plebiscite
after the DSroulede model and now Edouard
Drumont, founder and captain of the anti-Se
mitic organizations, which hitherto formed the
most cohesive element of Nationalist opposition.
has brought about still further discord in the
party by instituting a violent campaign against
automobilism in every form. The Marquis De
Dion Lucien Millevoye and other Nationalist
chieftains are fervent chauffeur?, consequently
this new outbreak of M. Drumont has raised a
sort of civil war in the party, in the Chamber of
Deputies and outside the Chamber.
M. Drumont, who at least seems to hay? the
courage of his opinions, has founded an anti
automobile league, and in a flaming editorial in
the "Libre Parole" decjarvs that Frenchmen,
and particularly Parisians, must have lost all
ser.?e of shame and of Individual rights to ac
cept the situation imposed upon all foot-going
citizens by the tyranny of the automobile. He
fays that if Frenchmen still had any blood
left in their veir.s they would rise as one man
and hurl Imprecations .it the heads of the
motormen. The speed craze of the rich auto
mobllists, says M. Drumont, is as careless of
the victims that it crushes to death on public
roads as the great corporations, . financial
groups, syndicates and trusts, which give no
heed to victims ruined by gigantic and pitiless
operations.
M. Drumont points out that the inalienable
rights of foot passengers are enforced by
tribunals in the United States even against
billionaires, but not so in France. He a
to all the men. women and children of F
to have pluck and to assert their right to walk
at liberty, which the anti-Semitic apostle in
his grandiloquent but illogical exordium pre
dicts will be torn away from them ny
lican tyranny, just as French citizens have al
ready been deprived of their right to j
their right to send their children to Catholic
schools.
The result of these outburst? of Jules Lemaitre
for a plebiscite and of Edouard Dr
against automobillsm is that the French Na
tionalist party, which Is the French equivalent
of the Boxer party in China, and which f
years has worked so much evil ar.d haa
so much to discredit France at home and
abroad. Is now split up into small but bitt^rly
hostile factions, much to the satisfaction of the
moderate Republicans and thoughtful men of
every political stripe.
The frost, snow and the prospects of an ex
ceptionally cold winter have consfderat
vanced the season In Southern Franc. At Pau
fox and drag hunting have be?un in earnest.
Among the Americana d there are
Mr. and Mrs. Van Rensselaer Thayer, at the
Villa Jouvenier; Mrs. Nellson Potter and her
daughters, at the Villa Bon Accueil; Mr. and
Mrs. Henry Ridgway, Mrs. Kan;-. M;ss Kane,
Miss Cushing, Mr. and Mrs. Livingston, Mr.
and Mrs Georges Thorn, Mr. and Mrs. Delano.
Miss Zimmerman, CharKs Morse, Thomas Bur
gess and Alexand-r Phillips. Mrs. Laurence
and Mr. and Mrs Forbes Morgan have h»gun
their series of weekly dinn- rs, and the merry
round of cosey luncheons, dinners and bridge
parties, sandwiched in between hunting
and tennis. Is in full swing.
Mrs. El!en Gore, the American woman who
was found shot dead in the apartment of M.
Rydzenski, a young Rupsrr. - waa
little known among the Americans here, as sh-=
only arrived in Paris to complete b< r 1
education last August. She was a
and somewhat impress;'. nail'- we
fined and attractive appearance, and the Paris
ian idyl and mutual infatuation of the two
young musicians had only lasted a few weeks.
The opinion of the magistrate conducting the
investigation, of Consul General Gowdy and of
all those who knew the hapless young
is that suicide is the only plausible explanation
of Mrs. Gore's death. C I. B.
SBARRETTI'S APPOIXTMEXT
CONSIDERED A VICTORY FOR THE ANTT
IRELAND FACTION*.
(Special to The New-York Tribune by French Cable.)
(Copyright; 1902: By The Tribune Association.)
Rome, Nov. 22.— The appointment of Monsig
nor Sbarretti as delegate to Canada is consid
ered a victory for the faction opposed to Arch
bishop Ireland, or a weakening of the Vatican's
favor for the latter.. Monsignor Sbarretti when
a delegate to Cuba opposed Archbishop Ireland.
who retorted by having Monsignor Sbarretti.
after being nominated as Delegate to the Phil
ippines, stopped at Washington and the appoint
ment revoked on the ground that he was not
persona grata at Washington. It needed lion
sigr.or Sbarretti's complete removal from the
scene of American affairs to make Archbishop
Ireland's victory complete. Thus it was pro
posed to send him to San Domingo or India, but
the friends of Sbarretti. through strenuous
efforts, obtained his appointment to Canada,
hoping in a few years that he will be trans
ferred to Washington like Falconio.
STATUE OF BALZAC FXTEILED.
MEN OF LETTERS TAKE PART IN THE
CEREMONY IN PARIS.
Paris. Nov. 22.— A statue of Balzac was un
veiled with imposing ceremonies here to- lay in
the preser.es of an assemblage including the
most prominent persons in the literary world.
The statue, which was erected at the intersec
tion of the Rue de Balzac and the Avenue de
Friedland, is of heroic proportions, and repre
sents the author seated in a meditative mood.
Bass-reliefs show scenes from the "Comedie
Huiraine."
Addresses were delivered by M. Herrr.ant.
president of the Society of Men of Letten
M Chaumie. Minister of Instruction and a poem
was read by Albert Lambert. In the course of
his remarks M. Chaumie raid an eloquent trib
ute to the greatness of Balzac, whose fame, he
figures in literature.
> IJ.IMI C. KEYS BETTER
>-iiiah C K-ys. tot many yrars the head of the
flannel department of the H. B. Clafila Company.
* ho his been for two weeks dangerously ill at
S horn* No » West Eighty-nlnth-st.. Improved
his home. »«•«' „..„„ vorJ . tow wlth
SESo&TSSbeiS wUh heart treacle.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. NQYEMBER 23. 1902
FORMING A GREAT CARTEL
AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN IRON AND STEEL
PLANTS COMBINE.
Vienna, Nov. 22.— After several months' ne
gotiations the Austrian and Hungarian iron and
steel industries have succeeded in forming a
combination comprising twenty-three separate
l&hmenta, the capital of which aggregates
170,000,000. The new organization is not a
trust, but a cartel, or combination, under which
each establishment is worked separately, though
all are supervised by a central board, which
regulates the output and fixes prices. This car
tel includes practically every important iron
and steel interest in the dual monarchy, such
as the production of raw iron, bars, plates, rails,
nails and wire. The agreement will be effective
for ten years, expiring on June 13. 1912. The
Austrian and Hungarian cartels are organized
separately but worked jointly. The Austrian
combination has eighteen members and the
Hungarian five.
It is anticipated that this organization will
result in great improvement in the industrial
situation, which just now is exceedingly un
satisfactory, particularly in the engineering,
locomotive and wagon works branches. Of
twenty thousand machinists in Vienna, eight
thousand are reported to have been discharged
recently. The wagon and locomotive works in
other parts of the country are employing only
haif the usual force, and one result of these
conditions is a large increase in emigration,
particularly from the iron districts of Bohemia,
whence hundreds of persons have lately gone to
Cir.ada, Mexico and the Transvaal. The gen
eral situation, however. Is likely to improve
shortly, when extensive public works, including
the construction of canals and railroad bridges,
will be begun. These public works in Austria
will, it is estimated, cost $75,000,000, and In
Hungary (87,500,000.
MINISTER WU'S SUCCESSOR.
NEW CHINESE MINISTER WILL BRING A
STAFF OF SIXTY PERSONS.
Peking. Nov. 22.— Sir Liang Chen Tung, the
new Chinese Minister to the United States,
starts for America to-morrow. He will stop at
n for a fortnight. The minister takes with
him a staff of sixty persons, including several
:' notable rr.en, and many students.
STRIKE SPREADS IX HATJLXA.
TYPESETTERS AND COACHMEN GO OUT.
Havana, Nov. 22 —The typesetters and coach
men of this city went on strike this morning,
and the car conductors and motormen gave no
tice that they will go out this afternoon, thus
tying up traffic generally.
REVOLUTION XOT EXDED.
GENERAL MATOS SAYS HE IS ONLY AWAIT
ING AMMUNITION.
Willemstad, Curacoa, Nov. 22.— General Ma
. tos. the leader of the Venezuelan revolution,
is living In a secluded private house situated a
short distance from Wlllemstad. lie refused
to be seen yesterday, but authorized his secre
tary to make the following statement:
It is a great mistake to believe the Matos
revolution is ended. We have five thousand
men, well armed, in the field. Valley del Tuy is
occupied by the revolutionists and General ito
lando Is loyal. We are awaiting ammunition
;to resume the (Tensive. Within ten days events
of magnitude will awake Venezuela and as
: tonish the world
An expedition left Curagoa on Thursday for
• .a.a.. a .a. It \a un
reporlna; to capt
ore If
PEACE IX COLO M HIA.
ADMIRAL CASEY OFFICIALLY CONFIRMS
THE Ph A.TCHSS
Washington. Nov. 22. -The Navy Department
' twins; oabl* dispatch
from Admiral Casey, dated Panama, to-day.
■r^nce ended to-.iay on board flagship
■ azar and Herrera in sijfn
:ms of peace approved by Perdomo. thus
ettdlng war In Colombia.
TR AX* PORT IXGALLS OX A ROCK.
GENERAL MILES ON BOARD— EXPECTED TO
FLOAT AT HIGH WATER.
Manila, Nov. 22.- The United States transport
Ingalls, with General Miles on board, Btm
' while entering the harbor of Legaspi,
province of Albay. Southeast Luzon, to-day, and
is still aground. She is not in any danger, how
ever. The weather is calm, and it is expected
that the steamer will Boat at the next high tide.
Communication with the shore is maintained.
It" the Ingalls does not Boat at high water relief
will be dispatched to h^r from this city.
BIG GRAPHITE MERGER.
WILKE33ARRE CAPITALISTS ABSORB CA
NADIAN PROPERTY INVOLVING
OUTLAY OF 54.0C0.000.
A big deal in graphite has just been ended,
in which graphite Interests of Canada have been
absorbed by a party of capitalists from Wilkes
barre. Per.n.. who will develop the Canadian
property. The deal involves an outlay of
$4,000,000, and will include the formation of a
company which will establish mills and smelt
ers on the ground and prepare the mineral
for commercial uses.
W. J. Byrne, of Carbondale, Perm.. promoted
the deal, and associated with him were John R.
Powell. Simon Wormser, Edward Mulligan, of
the Second National Bank; Abram Nesbit and
ex-Congressman Morgan B. Williams, all of
Wllkesbarre, who are heavily interested in the
new concern. The property, consisting of five
hundred acres, is Fituated in Greenville, Can.,
midway between Montreal and Quebec. The
new company, which Is known as the Green
ville Graphite Company, will operate under a
charter issued in Maine. It lias absorbed the
old company, known as the Keystone Graphite
Company. The Empire State Trust Company
is trust
The new company will begin operations at
once.
\V. E. Watkir.P, of Carter. Hughes & Dwight.
of No. 9C Broadway, was associated with Mr.
Byrne in floating the company.
IT'S MAD TO HEAD TOO FAST.
a* you may overlook tlie little a<lverti««?-
TUE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS.
TWO HUNDRED OF THEM WILL. BE FILLED AT
OXFORD IN 1&"4
London. Nov. 22.— Before sailing for New-
York on the Cunard Line steamer Campania,
froir Liverpool to-day. Dr. Parkin, who has
been at Oxford for some time arranging for the
admission to the university of the Cecil
Rhodes scholars, said that probably two hun
dred students would have residence at Oxford
in 1904 under Mr. Rhodes's bequest. He be
lieved, he added, that all the provinces and
Canada would eventuall" be included in the
provisions of the bequest. Emperor William.
Mr. Parkin declared, was taking great interest
in the matter and had sent a special commis
sioner to Oxford, and representatives of the
hieheft class of -man students would shortly
join the university.
MRS. GORE'S DEATH.
PARIS POLICE STILL GROPING IN THE
DARK.
Paris, Nov. 22. — The police officials here admit
that they are making no progress toward the
solution of the mysterious death of Mrs. Ellen
Gore, and this fact is strengthening the theory
that the affair was one of accident rather than
of design. This view is so strong, especially
among the members of the Russian colony, that
De Rydzewski's advocate. Deputy Cruppi. to
day announced his intention of applying to the
court on Monday for the provisional release of
the accused. The authorities are likely to re
sist this motion, as they are not yet ready fully
to accept the theory of accident. Consul Gen
eral Gowdy also inclines against the accident
theory, but the American officials will not take
an active part in the prosecution. M. Cruppi's
efforts are due to the interest which the Russian
friends of the accused man have manifested in
him, scores of them having called upon Judge-
Ganneval to testify to his good character. The
callers included the counsellor of the Russian
Embassy, who is acquainted with the prisoner.
Dr. Morlur., who first arrived upon the scene
of the tragedy, has given out a statement Which
strengthens the friends of the accident theory.
He confirms the assertion made by Dr. Socquet
that the ball ranged upward, and concludes
that the tragedy was the natural result of the
ueapon being discharged accidentally by a fall
to the floor. On the other hand, one of the
American officials especially assigned to the
case says his personal inspection of Mrs. Gore's
body showed that the direction of the bullet
was almost parallel with the surface of the
earth, and that the point at which the ball
emerged from the back of the head was hardly
a. half inch higher than the point at which It
entered above the eye. This Lonflicts with the
theory of the French physician, and tends to
strengthen the murder theory.
Letters and telegrams in the possession of the
police show the circun. stances of the meeting on
the day of the tragedy, and exonerate Mrs.
Gore from the suspicions which might arise from
her presence in De Rydzewski's room. One of
the letters shows that she wished to see De
Rydzewskl. Thl3 letter he answered by tele
graph, saying that he was suffering from a
sore throat and that it was impossible for him
to go out. As a result of his inability to leave
his room Mr?. Gore went to him. Some of the
officials contend that the visit was of a business
nature, asserting that Mrs. Gore's remittances
had not been received, and that she went to her
musical friend for temporary assistance. This
theory is apparently borne out by the statement
that a check for *»SU, dtawn to the order of Mrs.
Gore. Is said to have been found oy the police In
De Rydzewski's desk. The existence of this
check, however, Las not been fully established.
owing to the reticence of the police.
Consul General Gowdy has received a cable
message from ;he attorney, Mr. Butler, of Mex
ico City, asking that Mrs. Gore's body be given
kindly burial. The Consul General's quick ac
tion prevented the following of the usual cus
tom of burning unclaimed bodies in lime. He
wrote to the morgue authorities regarding the
matter, and the funeral has been fixed for
day afternoon. The interment will be in the
Boulogne Cemetery. Many artists intend to at
ter.d ihe obsequies.
A cable dispatch has been received by a for
mer friend of Mrs. Gore here from a New-York
lawyer, announcing that the latter has in his
ision a will executed by Mrs. 'lore last De
cember. The details of the instrument, however,
are not given.
The examination of D* Rydzewski will be he.4
as soon as th^ judge shall have he re
port of the expert armorer regarding the course
of the wound.
A ci ige has been received here from
a pror ■ | sr-York la < tracing that
tted last De
ng that the body be held
■ • ?av who is • :lary under
th<e will or what is the amount bequeathed.
San Francisco. Nov. 22.— Mrs. T. B. Dickinson, of
Alameda. Cal. . an aunt of Mrs. Gore, last night
declared that her niece did not commit suicide.
Mrs. Dickinson stated that she was in receipt or
.■■evcral le't^n; from Mrs. Gore mating that L>e
Rydezewskl »as infatuated with her and had
threatened her.
On September 22 Mrs. Gore wrote to Mrs. Dick
inson as follows:
I hear Mr. de Rydezewskl is coming at the «nd of
the wef-k. In a way I am sorry he is to be in Paris
this winter. 1 can see by his letters that he in
tends to take up as much of my time as possible.
I shall take a firm stand and keep him at a dis
tance. I wrote him that 1 arc: here to study seri
ously and that I should b* unable to ice him often,
but ten one might as »•*-:! talk to an avalanche
descending on one. I shall tell my servants thai I
am not at home to him.
STABBED '10 Di: A 111 IX A CAR.
BROOKLYN MAN KILLED BY AN ITALIAN.
WHO HAD TRIPPED OVEB
HIS FEET.
Norris Pike, a boil- 1 No. 133 Coffey
st., Brooklyn, was un hia way horn.- yesterday
afternoon on a crowdi ma oar wt
th car was pas..-:ny Richard-St., Tornado S.m
faleti, an Italian, started Tor the rear platform
on his way out. He tri . et ar.i
without saying a word aimed a blow at hi:n.
Tl.e men clinch- iroke away,
an<l the Italian followed him to the rear of the
car wirh s clasp kr.ilV ,ir..i s"_ibbed him in the
breast. Withdrawing the kr.it>. the Italian fled
from the car down the sart-et.
Pike was carried to a drugstore at Van Brunt
and William sts., where he was laid on the
floor, while a call was sent to the nearest hos
pital for an ambulance. He died, however, in
a few minutes.
Witnesses i,f the murder chased the Italian
after be Bed from the car. and P lUceman John
Hoagland rausr.t him, and locked him up in the
c station.
The murdered man was thirty-live years old.
was an employe ut the Morse Iron \\ .ir^ lie
leaves a widow and a chi
A. F. L. RE-ELECTS GOMPERS.
REPORT OX "GOVERNMENT BY INJUNC
TION" CAUSES DEBATE.
New-Orlear.s. Nov. 22—1 Me American Federation
of Labor to-day elected the foilowicg officers for
the ensuing year. President, Samuel Gompers;
first vice-prt sident. James Duncan, second vtesr
president. John Mitchell, third vice-president,
James O'Connell; fourth vice-president. Max Mor
ris: fifth vice-president, Thomas L Kldd; sixth
vice-president, Dennis A. Hayes, treasurer. John
B. Lennon, and secretary, Frank Morrison. With
out exception they are hotdovers.
The convention was in almost continuous session
from 9 o'clock in the morning until a late hour
at night.
The committee on the executive council's report
declared against "'government by injunction." but
the report contained the following ssntonf
We recognize the authority of the courts to
issue injunctions to prey m the destruction of
property ani violations of law.
This created a decided stir In the convention.
Delegates Fureseth. Agard and Duncan said that
the committee had declared in favor of the very
thing against which in the earlier part of its re
port it had protested. The committee announced
that it would withdraw the objectionable sentence
and the report was then adopted.
THE FUXERA.L OF XELSOX HERSH.
The funeral of Nelson Hersh. Editor of 'The
Sunday World," who was killed in a runaway
accident on Thursday in the Manor Road, near his
home, in West New-Brighton, was held at his home
yesterday afternoon. It was one of the largest
funerals ever held on Staten Island. There were
representatives from nearly every newspaper in
New-York present. The coffin was surrounded by
many floral designs sent from many parts of the
country.
After the services, at which the Rev. A. C. McCrea
officiated, the body was placed in a vault in the
Moravian Cemetery. It will be kept there until a
plot is purchased by the family.
DOX'T TELL YOIH WIFE
hat you see In the narrow columns of The
Sunday Tribune. She mar look and find
something: that la needed, and of course
you'll have to liny- It.
DRY GOODS HOUSE.
The following standard goods are offered at the
LOWEST PRICES IN THIS CITY.
NECESSARIES FOR
THE THANKSGIVING TABLE.
A magnificent assortment (confined exclusively to us) of
inPORTED CHINA,
LIHOGES, AUSTRIAN WARE,
BRIC-A-BRAC. SILVER WARE, KAYSERZINN, &C.
Roast, Soup, Chop and Salad Sets, from . . $3.25 to 931.00 act
Chocolate Jug and Cracker jars, . . . $1.23 each and up
A splendid line of Game, Fish, Ice Cream, Jelly, Olive, Bread and Butter
and Cake Sets, at special prices.
Fancy Iridescent Cocktail and Hock Glasses, . $3.75 and $5.75 doz.
Imported Glass Wine Sets old Dutch des;gas>, . $2.50 to $6.50 set
Special— Cut Glass Tumblers, . . . #2.75 dozen
.Engraved Tumblers, .... 7 ."><•. and 93c dozen
Underpriced Sale of Glass Vases, Unique Shapes and Rich Iridescent
Coloriugs.
Carving Sets, stag handle, . . . 75e. to $9.75 per set
Fine line of Sterling Silver Game and Carving Sets, from
>:j.:tt to $15.00 set
A large assortment of Sterling and Silver Plated Ware, in latest
designs, at 25 per cent less than jewellers prices.
Rogers' plated silver on fine nickel from the following prices to the
highest grades.
Tea Spoons, . 90c. per dozen Soup Ladles. . $1.25 each
Dessert " . $1.«O " " Gravy Ladles , . 45c. "
Table ■ * 1/JS Cream Ladles 3Oc «
Medium Forks, . $1.98 " " "earn j^aaies, . rfoc.
Dessert Forks, . $1.80 « " Berr y Spoons, . 60c. "
Medium Knives. $1.50 v " Sugar Spoons, . 18c. "
Knives, celluloid Butter Knives, . 18c. v
handles, . $2.67 " " Meat Forks, . 35c. •
Nickel plated Nut Sets, . . . . . 18c. per set
Silver plated Nut Sets, .... 25c. and 75c. per set
After months of preparation ths abovi goois, and many others too
numerous to mention, are most pleasingly displayed in our
HANDSOME BASEMENT,
covering a floor space of 15,000 square feet,
Brilliantly Lighted with 600 Electric Lights
and easily accessible by four wide stairways and elevators.
Prompt attention paid to enstomers shopping by mail.
ENTRANCES ON THREE STREETS.
Real Laces.
Duchess, Honiton, Round Point, Point Appliqud,
Venice, Camck-ma-Cross.
Real Lace Handkerchiefs, Scarfs and Fichus.
Neckwear.
New Importation of French Neckpieces.
Flat Ostrich Feather Boas, Muffs to match.
Liberty Silk, Taffeta Silk,
Chiffon and Mouseline de Soie Ruffs,
Trimmed Fur Muffs to match.
Panne Velvet Stole Scarfs, Lace Capes.
Sbtcabwau 06 \C)i& Sfoe&L
Hudson Bay Sable Mutts. $40. $60, $75, $100,
$150. Extra large. $200, $.250. Neck Pieces. Yic
torines. Mantles, Capes at corresponding prices.
NOTE: I do not sell blended or darkened Hudson Bay
Sable, only the genuine natural color.
C C. Shayne. Manufacturer, West -pd St.. near
6th 'we.
HUNTER SHOOTIXG AFFRAY.
IT WAS MURDER. SAYS CONSUL GEN
ERAL MNALLY-SELF-DEFENCE.
SAYS MINISTER HUNTER.
Washington. Nov. 22— The State Department
to-day received reports from Dr. Hunter, Min
ister at Guatemala City, and Consul General
McNally, at the same place, regarding the case
of Godfrey Hunter. Jr.. and Secretary Bailey,
of the American Legation there, who were par
ties to the shooting affray resulting in the death
of William Fitzgerald yesterday. Mr. McNaily's
latest advices, give the affair the aspect of a
shocking and cold blooded murder, making it
appear that Secretary Bailey was a party to the
crime, holding up Fitzgerald with a revolver in
front, while Hunter shot him from behind.
Minister Hunter's statement is a flat contra
diction of this report. He says that his son
Godfrey and Secretary Bailey, while sitting on
a bench in a public park, were attacked by Fitz
gerald, who struck young Hunter and snapped
a pistol, which failed to explode. Hunter there
upon shot and killed him. The existence of a
conspiracy between members of the American
colony, including Consul General McNaliy. is
charged by Dr. Hunter. It is known here that
a bitter personal feud has existed for several
years between Dr. Hunter and Mr. McNally.
The State Department will wait to hear from
the Gautemalan Government before taking ac
tion.
Guatemala City. Guatemala. Nov. 21. — William
A. Fitzgerald, of Grand Rapids. Mich., was shot
and killed to-day by W. Godfrey Hunter, Jr.,
son of the United States Minister. Hunter fired
the shots from behind Fitzgerald, with James G.
Bailey, of Kentucky, secretary of the United
States Legation here, standing by with a drawn
revolver. Both ran away with their revolvers
in hand until arrested. They are now at lib
erty through Minister Hunter claiming im
munity for them. It is asserted that Fitzgerald
had no chance to defend himself, and that he
was an inoffensive man.
The lives of the Hunters and that of Bailey
are threatened by indignant Americans.
EXGLASD BARRED THE WAT.
RBTCSED TO JOrN TN INTERNATIONAL ACTION
AGAINST ANARCHISTS.
London. Nov. 22.— A special dispatch from Brus
sels asserts that the attempt of the Belgian Gov
ernment to secure international action against
anarchists failed, owing to England's refusal to
Join in the movement. The replies received from
the capitals of all the other governments ap
proached on the subject, the dispatch adds, were
favorable, to the plan.
Homer's Furniture
FAMED for its excellence — for its artistic
beauty — tor its exzlusiveness — for its
absolute completeness in all linss — for
its moderate cos:. Advantages which cannot
fail to interest all intending rurniture buyers
who desire the best in style and the best in
value.
D.NING-ROOM FURNITURE. When preparations
for the THANKSGIVING FESTIVAL reveal
necessary additons to Dinin^-Room Furniture
needs, most generous cho cc will be found in our
stock, in single pieces as well as suites, and trt
all the tishonable woods, finishes and designs.
R. J. HOR.NCR <& CO..
Furniture Makers and Importers,
61, 63, 65 West 23d Street.
You are invited to call and inspect at my
Gallery, from Nov. 21 to 23, prior to their
disposal at public sale, the superb collec
tion of
ETCHINGS. ENGRAVINGS
AND*
COLORED MEZZOTINTS.
by Haig, Sadler and others, all in the finest
possible state, as well as original drawings
by
SIR EDWARD BLRNE-JONE3.
These engravings are exhibited tor the pur
pose of giving New York collectors an op
portunity to examine them before placing
their orders for the sale. All orders left
with me will be faithfully executed- Open
evenings from 8 to 10.
MAX WILLIAMS.
297 Fifth Avenue, New Yori.
The Ml« will take place In Philadel
phia, under the management of Stan. V.
[rukeU. at the art ulrtroom of Davis
.v Harvey. 1112 Walnut Street, on De
rent her ad. ith. and sth.
Sell Your Old Furs.
We buy. trade, repair, remodel and sell Fora at wboi*
aale prices. We take old Fun la exchange, far a«w. Bay
direct of the manufacturer and aav« the retailer's pram.
ALASKA FUR CO.. 927 Broadway.
HARRIHAX APPEALS TO STOCKHOLDERS.
HE ASKS THEM TO WITHHOLD THEIR
PROXIES UNTIL THET HEAR FROM
HIM AGAIN.
Edwin Haw ley and E H. Harrtman snimumjS) ta>
the stockholders of the Colorado Pud and Mm
Company that they have been unable to obtain a
-Ist of the stockholders of the company from the
transfer agent of the company in New- York, Ist
Kn ckerbocker Trust Company, and ask that thoy
withhold their proxies from other applicants until
the receipt of further communication, aftsr M<r«*rs
Hawley and Harriman have obtained a cony at th*
list of stockholders. They hao* to get tils Hat not
later than next Monday.
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