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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 23, 1902, Image 30

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GATHERING PECAN NUTS HAS CAUSED MANY A RASH CUMBER TO MISS ALL THE JOYS OF THANKSGIVING.
TIIK (JATIIERING OF PECANS
BOW THE NUTS GIiOW— ADVENTUROUS
YOUNG WOMAN SAID TO USE AIRSHIP
IN GETTING THOSE AT ENDS
OF LIMBS.
The < ity man who cracks his Jokes as he
cracks his pecans at the end of a Jolly, old
fashioned Thanksgiving dinner is not apt to
reflect on how many men's bones have been
cracked in picking those nuts for him.
The pecan tree, which is h species of hickory,
grows along the Mississippi Valley to the height
of from one to two hundred feet, and through
the obstinacy of its hickory nature it bears its
best nuts on the very tips of its lofty branches.
The work of gathering this skyscrapinsj crop,
therefore, is much in the same class as that of
tt. i pie Jack who gilds crosses on the tops of
church spires.
To get the pecan one is compelled to climb the
tall trunk and then scale the limbs nearly to
tin ir fragile end*;. A shaking of the branches
from a convenient perch on the lower boughs
again shows the obstinacy of the pecan. The
harvester must pound the tightly bunched clus-
Wrs with a long pole as lustily as a New-York
policeman would club a Fourth of July crowd,
ii order to bring the nuts down.
.Many a man lias had a .-> rious fall by ventur
ing too far in the pecan tree. Exasperated by
Ihe tenacity with which a cluster of nuts clings
lo the branches high over bis head he has gone
a little too high, only to feel the tough wood
under him at last snap asunder. Experienced
pickers accordingly are willing to let many a
bushel of the choicest pecans alone rather than
bmpt fate too far.
The dangers of the pecan business have stimu
lated a Texas girl to pick these nuts from a
Dying machine, according u> a wonderful story
has come out of the Lone Star State.
Lii mice Bardlne is the girl's name, and •'The
I'hicago Tribune," in telling of her achievement,
rays:
Peeling confident that pecans would command
b. good price, she quietly leased every pecan
» rove and forest of any value in the Colorado
\ alley Of Texas.
When buyers appeared In the country, start
ling the ranchers by offering to engage pecans
at l\<t cents a pound, those who make a busi
ness of gathering the nuts were astounded to
discover that a young girl had cornered the crop,
so far as this particular region was concerned.
Pecan nut gatherers often leave from >'_■«» to
J.Vi worth of pecans in the tops of the tall
trees. Few boys can be found who dare to
Itscend to such dizzy heights. Miss Bard de
termined to harvest the crop an. "I will have
Jh..se big pecans In the lops of the trees if I
have to go aft( them in a balloon," she Bald.
She employed a competent mechanic to make
kn airship In accordance with a design that she
I. ad drawn. The (irst experiment was made at
Granite Shoals, on the Colorado River, where
there, is a large forest of the tallest pecan trees
In Texas.
The fearless girl, armed with a long thrashing
pole, stepped into the basket, and when her as
sistants, ho v.- re ho! ling tin- anchor rope.
announced that they were ready, the Blgnal was
given and the airship rose, swaying and jerkins
to the tops of the trees. The m- who held the
anchor rope had taken a half hitch around a
small oak. and they found thai they i ould easily
control Its ascent.
Pleased with the success of the venture, the
smiling aeronaut shouted, as she thru her
thrasher among the heavily laden branches of
a tall tree: "Now I will .-.end you a shower of
gold.*'
The big pec-ins fairly rained upon the grass
below. In the course of a few minutes the
ground was covered with pecans that were
worth from 8 to 10 cents a pound.
The first gatherers of pecans simply used to
cut a tree down and then strip off the nut from
its ; rostrate branches. The legislatures of those
States along the Mississippi Valley from Illinois
to Texas, where the pecan thrives best, finally
ok alarm and pas ed stringent laws prohibit-
Ing such wanton destruction. Texas at the
present time produces the bulk of the pecan crop
of the United States, and there the Industry
has now been put on a scientific basis.
A species of pecan was selected which com
bined the maximum of meat with the minimum
of shell, and this variety was grafted on the
old trees. One of the largest pecan nurseries,
where the young buds of the paper shell species
are grown, Is that of E. E. Rislen, at San Saba,
Tex., where the Colorado and San Saba rivers
Join. This country is rich in native pecan trees,
which love an alluvial soil, with a river near
enough to run their roots into its bed.
Mr. Rlsien also took many old trees in hand,
cut off their scraggy branches, and then budded
his new species on the strong young shoots.
This species, known as the "Mother Tree." pro
duces two pounds of meat for every three
pounds of nuts. Mr. Rlsien Bt ill Bathers his
crop by hand, and believes the old way is bet
ter than that described in the story of the girl
and her Hying machine. While enjoying steady
crops from old trees which have been grafted
over, Mr. Risien is planting new nut orchards
where the nuts can be reached at a convenient
height from the ground.
77//: WORM TURNED.
He loved h^r devotedly. He was also bowlegged.
Poth facts cave him pain at times.
He passed It by with a rueful nmll<\ when she
m< rrlly said that his affliction gave him such an
ar<:h look, and that, after all, he was a pretty
good sort wh'-n you Rot on to his curves. He bore
It patiently when she referred to his walk as par
enthetical progress. Hut he rebelled and broke
the engagement when she called her pet dug
through the wicket formal by his legs.
"I may not be so overly ornamental," said he.
"lut 1 emphatically object to being made useful bo
unseasonably early In the jjamel"— (Smart Set.
NEW-YORK TRIBUNE ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT.
DARINC CLIMBERS, BIT THE BEST PECANS <>N THE TREE ARE STILL FAH
ABOVE THEM.
TURKEY FOR PRESIDENT
WESTKKLY PR< DUCT SAID TO BE THE
FINEST IN THE COUNTRY.
Th*" little 'own of VVeßterly, R 1 . han
tatlon
V. • • •
Let !:■ ■ re fatt. : ed any
• Khod

prr-.wn In nthei , iris of th.- country, but th->
•' . : .'. ' ; i believed to be
NOT SO DARING, BUT BOUND TO GET THE BEST NUTS IF HK HAS TO
SAW THE TALLEST LIMJ'.S OFF.
cause i partly by the climate and partly by the
way In which they are fed.
Th.? Rhode Islander does not try to stall the
bird merely to see how much it will weigh, but
with corn feeds different kin. of herbs, as well
as bread crumbs and other cooked food. If the
bill of far" is given In the right proportions,
when Thanksgiving time comes the turkey is in
condition to satisfy the most fastidious epicure.
For a number of years the pick of the Bocks
around Westerly has been sent to th.- Whit---
House, and the President's eh* f usually prepares
it for the President's Thanksgiving dinner in
preference to the contributions from other parts
of the country, although sometimes the express
man will bring a dozen or a score of turkeys to
the Executive Mansion in the days just preced
ing Thanksgiving:.
Perhaps the strongest competitor which West
erly has Is a town near Lancaster, Perm., which
also prides itself on its turkeys, some of which
tip the scales at nearly forty pounds when
killed. Last year, however. Pennsylvania cam*
In second best, the President dining off a Rhode
Island turkey, raised by Horace Vose, one of th»
experts in the industry in New-England. Mr.
Vose hopes to come oft* the winner this year, urn
he says he has a bird ready for the chopping
block which Is superior to the one sent last
year.
A GKKAT PIPE COLLECTION.
SPECIMENS OF NEARLY EVERT KIND
OWNED BY DR. EDWARD PRENTIS.
OF NEW-LONDON.
Some men can live without learning, moit
without books, few without cooks, and nearly
as few without pipes or cigars. Tobacco In
some form, preferably the pipe, has been th«
consolation and companion of millions of men
since first the we d was brought to their ken.
In examining the pipes in the collection at
Dr. Edward Prentis, of New-London, there is
ample corroboration of this. Dr. Prentis'-s leis
ure moments are spent in pursuit of his hobby
or in studying local history. He Is a member
of the Sons of the American Revolution and
has recently contributed a valuable monograph
on the local history of New-London. The doc
tor's home in Uuntington j s surmounted by
a tower, and there he has his den. The room
Is octagonal and hardwood finishetl-
The walls are decorated wi*h more than four
hundred and fifty pipes, which Dr. Prentis has
collected in fifteen years* devotion to his fad.
How it began the doctor cannot tell, for it was
not until lens after his friends began to send
pipe after pipe to add to his own that hi wtke
up to the fact that he was a collector; tiien
the habit was rooted and he would nut have
broken it if he could.
It has been the soon • of much personal pleas
ure {nd healthy diversion from an arduous
and • x.i ling profession, and it has served not
only to give pleasure to h'rn. but to his frieriiia.
It has led him to take an interest in matters
which otherwise he would not ha. cared for,
and it has given him an insight into the ways,
the manners ar.d the pipes of men of all dims,
conditions and colors, and uniatentiona'tly the
doctor is becoming a tirst-class ethnologist and
archa'olngist.
No two of his pipes are alike. All have a
meaning, save the upper row, which is merely a
decorative rini.sh.
Many have I* en !•< ■ i; i. ■ by Dr. Prentis him
self, but they are few in comparison with the
number huh his frier.ds have sent to him
from all quarters of the globe, lie has pipes
from Alaska, some that are in no other collec
tion, from India. Japan, China, Egypt, Syria,
Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, N .'
way, Spain. Holland, Belgium, France. Kr.si.ir.d,
Ireland. Italy, Turkey, Jerusalem. Nubia. Lap
land, Malta. Madeira. San Domins'.', Porto Rico,
the Philippines. Satnca. British Cuurr.bia. Can
ada. Brazil, Peru. Mexico, llayti, Corea, Cape
Breton, the yueen Charlotte Islands, from th«
heart of Africa, and in the neighborhood of Vic
t >ri;i Nyanza. :-::.:■ . Kanirondo and Use^a
anil from Hungary and Nova Scotia.
There -re the elaborate water pipes of China,
Malta and India; the rude stone bowl of the
pre-Columr.us Indian; the chibouque of Turkey,
with its suggestion of <lave and master; the
carved and hieroglyph adorned piece of bone ©r
ivory of Alaska; the awe-ins;>iri:ic: slate of ihe
llaida Indians oF the Queen Charlotte Islands;
the Lpplandti's solace; the comfort of the sav
age of Central Africa; the soul steeping, dainty,
destructive pipe of t!~. ? Chinese; the luxurious,
sensuous one of the Indian in the nargileh or
the hookah; the beautifully wrought one from
Peking; the companion of the liberty L«vi:igr
Corean; the artistic friend of the Sicilian moun
taineer; the dainty creations of Japan; the Ha
waiian idea of ■ pipe; the bit of the "Oulii""
Country in the bog oak of Ireland; the piece of
lava from Vesuvius, made by man to afford him
comfort; and hideous idols and scrpcntlike
things and embodied hate and cruelty in the
Indians' tomahawk, arid many others. Th'-re
are pipes without stems, and stems that seem
to be no pipes, an«l the various forms that fancy
has taken for expression in fre:i!;s. canes, big
pieces of wood, sections of sewer pipe, umbrel
las, hats, teeth, fans. skti!!s-so many that only
a catalogue could do justice to the variety.
The freak pipes and oddities, though valued by
the doctor for the skill and ingenuity displayed
In their making, do not find the place in ni^ es
teem that is held by those distinctively express-
Ing race, character, time and condition.
One of these is a tomahawk pipe, found on
the battlefield of Wounded Knee on December
29, MM It Is an interesting specimen of Indian
art. It is in three sections, made from a pe
culiar red stone that is found in Missouri that
is called catlinite. It is polished smoothly, and
the sections are joined. The union si the middle
joint is decorated witli a lead design, and there
is beading somewhat like the Colonial finish
wrought In the es*l» »z the stem. Th* toma-

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