OCR Interpretation


New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 24, 1902, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1902-11-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

V OL LX11...K 0 - 50,462.
CONSECRATED WITH FOMP.
ARCHBISHOP TTKHON CONDUCTS CERE
MONT AT RUSSIAN CHURCH.
AMBASSADOR CASSINI. BISHOP GRAFTON.
MAYOR LOW. DR. HTTNTINGTON AND
MA NT OTHERS ATTEND TH"E IM
PRESSIVE SERVICE.
The new Ru«sian Orthodox Chuch of St. Nich
olas, at No. 15 East Xlnety-seventh-st, was
consecrated yesterday morning with an the
pomp customary with the Russian church.
Nearly all the Russian officials, and many
clergymen of the East were present. Several
clergymen from the Western States also came
here for the ceremony. Archbishop Ttkhon. of
Ean Francisco, who arrived In the city Wednes
day, dedicated the church.
Clad in his vestments Archbishop Tikhon en
tered the church at 10 o'clock, and proceeded to
the sanctuary. According to the rites, every
one, except those physically afflicted, must stand
gaming the service. Archbishop Tlkhon does not
speak English, and the entire service was In
Russian. The clergy performed the rite of bless
ing the water, and. fully vested, greeted with
the cross the entrance Into the church of Aroh
bishop Tikhon. while hymns weTe sung.
The Archbishop prayed in front of the sanctu
ary. and after blessing the people, proceeded to
the dais, where he was clothed with the episco
pal vestments by the clergy. Preceded by the
Archbishop all the clergy entered the sanct
uary v. rule prayers and psalms were sung. The
table of the altar was fastened to Its place,
sprinkled with holy water, rose water and wine.
anointed with holy chrism, and the first cov
ering was put or it and bound fast with a cord.
The second covering wac then put on, on which.
afterward, were placed the antiminis, the taber
nacle, the Book of Gospels and the cross.
ARCHBISHOP CENSES THE CHURCH.
Preceded by the deacon, carrying an unllghted
taper, the Archbishop censed the altar and the
church, accompanied by the priests. One of the
, latter sprinkled the inner walls with, holy water.
while another anointed them with chrism. Re
turning to the sanctuary, the Archbishop light
ed fro:.: the censer a taper, from which the other
tapers -were lighted. He and the clergy then
went in procession outside the church, re
turning to the chief door of the temple. Out
side the door the Archbishop exclaimed. "Lift
up your heads. O ye gates, and the King of
Glory shall come in." The choir asked, "Who
is this King of Glory?" and with the exclama
tion, 'The Lord of Hosts, He Is the King of
Glory*" the Archbishop entered the temple and
laid the holy antiminis on the altar. A prayer
for the founders of the temnle "was then read.
All the clergy assembled In the. middle of the
church, and the blessing by the Archbishop with
the cross, on all four Fides of the temple, took
place. The deacon Intoned a brief litany, con
taining petitions for all present, the choir re
sponding- to each petition. "Lord, have mercy."
After the benediction. "Long life" was pro
claimed to the Imperial house of Russia, the
President of th* United States, the Most Holy
Synod, Archbishop Tikhon, the founders and
parishioners of the church, and all the people.
"Eternal Memory" was proclaimed to dead bene
fa-tore. Then followed the liturgy of St. John
Chrysostom.
Archbishop Tfkhon decorated th» priests for
the work they had done. The vestment and
mitre worn by the Archbishop were made of sil
ver, and the vestments of the. clergy were em
broidered in gold.
THE PEOPLE KISS THE CROSS.
After the service Archbishop Tikhon held the
crops and tn<? people passed by and kissed the
cross and his hand.
BISHOP GRAFTON TAKES PART.
Bishop Grafton, of the Episcopal diocese of
Fond-du-Lac. Wis.. attended the service in full
episcopal vestments. At the time of the con
pfcration of Bishop Coadjutor Weller, which
was perhaps the most elaborate service ever
Feen In the Episcopal Church In this country,
considerable comment was caused by the pres
ence and participation of representatives of the
Polish and Russian churches. Bishop Grafton
attended the service yesterday to return the
compliment paid by the Russian Church. The
Rev Dr. William R. Huntingdon, rector of
Grace Church, also sat within the sanctuary.
He wore th» conventional clerical street suit of
black.
Count Casslni. the Russian Ambassador, and
Nicholas Ladygensky. the Consul General, the
guests of honor, stood at the extreme left of the
altar throughout th* ceremony. With Count
Cassinl were the Countess Cassini, Mile. Dcs
Planques. of Paris; Alexander Pavloff, Russian
Ambassador to Corea; Theodore Hansen. first
Secretary of the Russian Embassy, Washington;
P. Rugedestvinsky. second secretary, Wash
ington; M. Rudokoff, A J. Rutkovsky, Baron
Fenzen and Baron Bchllppenbaeh, attaches of
the Russian Embassy; II Strure, Russian Con-
Mil to Canada; K. Karaaoff and Charles Peter
eon, vice-consuls at New-York, and M. Tucker.
vice-ronsul. Philadelphia.
ls also attended by Mayor Low
and a number of other municipal officials, who
Fat in one of th* first rows of seats. The Mayor
Immediately afu-r the eetcmony called on the
Archbishop in the rectory.
Among the clergymen present at the ceremony
were Archbishop Alexis . Hatovitzky, rector of the
chorea; the Rev. Ellas Zotikoff. assistant rector;
Archimandrite Anotoly, president of the Mis
sionary College at Minneapolis; Archimandrite
Raphael, rector of the Byro Arabian Church, of
Brooklyn; Archpriest Alexis Toth. of Wllkes
barre, Perm.; the Rev. Messrs. R. Turkevlch, of
Bridgeport, Conn.; Ptolomy Timchenkoff. of An
sonia. Conn.; John Kochuroff. of Chicago; Alex
ander Femolorsky. of Philadelphia; Elias Klo
potosky. of Old Forge, Perm.; W. Kalueff Buff.
Jason Kagnowdge. of Cleveland, Ohio; Tikhon
Bostovsky. of Troy, N. V.: Anthony Doroscheek,
of Paaaalc. N. J.; Joannisky. of Oseeola Mills.
P«-nn ; Theodore Buketoff, of Shepton, Perm.,
find Toan Redzielnitzky. of Pittsburg.
After the service luncheon was served in the.
rectory for the clergy, members of the embassy
and invited guests.
COSSACKS IN UNIFORM.
Ten Cossacks from Buffalo Bill's Wild West
Show were conspicuous in th" church. They
wore costumes with orange and white coats,
and white and black astrachan hats. Members
Bf Greek and Assyrian societies were present.
*ith flags of their societies.
Archbishop Tikhon is the head of the Russian
Church in North America, and the Aleutian Isl
ands. He was accompanied here and assisted
in yesterday's ceremonies by the Rev. Llya, the
bishop and deacon.
It is understood that the Archbishop's resi
dence may be moved to New- York In a short
time. This is the first Russian church to be
I'Uilt in New- York. It was modelled after the
■rchea In St. Petersburg, at the request of the
' z; r, who gave a large sum toward its erection.
The church cost $140,000. The marble altar
from fit. Petersburg has not arrived, and a tem
porary one was built for the service yesterday.
« was decorated with chrysanthemums and
♦^•rgrtens and palms were placed around it.
These decorations were given by Charles Crane.
• Chicago. The seven crosses on the church
•»P"e»ent the seven sacraments. Red brick were
PALL MALL LONDON CIGARETTES.
■p*clally r^cmmeniitd to titl. iii.n who are ac
£U«to!Ti«d to Brooking the finest blends of choice
»'»rklsb tobacco— Advt
chiefly used, and the outside decorations are of
terra cotta and white sandstone.
Over five hundred people were gathered at
yesterday's service, and forty policemen were
stationed at the church. This was done chiefly
to guard the members of the embassy.
RICH MEN IN RACE OF GIFTS
PrTTFRURG REAPS THE BENEFIT OF
FRICK-OARNEGIE QUARREL.
THE FORMER TO OIVE A TJNTVERSITT
WHICH WILL, DWARF THE LETTER'S
POLYTECHXICAX, SCHOOL.
[BT TBLBOHAPH TO TUB TBIBCKE.]
Plttsburg. Nov. 23— According to a statement
issued this afternoon by a close friend of H. C.
Frick. the latter will give Pittsburg a university
that will throw a deep shadow over the poly
technical school Andrew Carnegie purposes to
give to this city. The man who gave out the
statement refuses to permit his name to be used,
but he is so close to Mr. Frlck that there is no
doubt of the authenticity of the information.
The gift grew out of the bitter enmity existing
between Mr. Carnegie and Mr. Frlck since the
latter left the Carnegie Steel Company, In con
sequence of a quarrel with Mr. Carnegie. That
quarrel marked the neginnlng of a series of ef
forts by Mr. Frlck to belittle Mr. Carnegie.
Rome years ago Mr. Carnegie built what was
then the finest office building in Pittsburg. Af
ter the quarrel Mr. Frick bought property all
around It. and hns Just finished the Frlck
Building, which towers above the Carnegie
Building and makes it look like a pygmy.
Directly across the street ne will soon begin to
build a large hotel.
Some time ago Mr. Frick purchased from the
Schenley estate sixteen acres of ground di
rectly opposite the Carnegie Institute-. There
ware rumors then that he would give Pittsburg
an Institution that would surpass the Carnegie
Institute. No sooner had Mr. Carnegie heard
the story than he offered the city the Polytech
nic School. That was some months ago, but
the affair hung fire until last week, because of
the city's not being able to select a site. Last
week a 6lte was secured. Now comes the an
nouncement that Mr. Frlck wUI again outstrip
his former partner.
According to the man who gave out the state
ment to-day, Mr. Frlck will not only pay for
the buildings, but will give the ground on which
they will stand, and will then set $2,500,000
aside as an endowment fund, and more if neces
sary. It has always been one of Mr. Carnegie's
rules to stipulate that the city shall furnish
the site for buildings he gives, and pay for their
maintenance.
Mr. Carnegie gave $5,000,000 for the technical
school, and in a speech that be made when h«
was last here said that he would give as much
more ns was necessary. But the plot that the city
has secured for the school would not hold more
buildings than have already be*-n provided for.
The site is not the one which Mr. < 'arnegie pre
ferred. He wanted ■ site in the Schenley es
tate, almost adjoining the plot which Mr. Frtck
ha? acquired. The latter's sit^ is as large as the
on« purchased by the city for the techniral
school and there is almost unlimited space ad-
Joining, on some of which Mr. Frick already
has options. According to the statement made
to-day, no matter what amount of money Mr.
Carnegie spends on his buildings. Mr. Frick will
double it He has several architects at work
on the plans for the buildings.
GRA ND TR UNK \S BIG PROJECT
TO BUILD A NEW TRANSCONTINENTAL
RAILWAY THROUGH PANADA.
Montreal. Quebec. Xov 23. — Canada, is to have
a second railway extending from ocean »o o<-ean.
The announcement was made to-day by Charles
M. Hay?, second vice-president and centra! man
aper of th* Grand Trunk Railway. The con
struction Of the new line will be hegrun as pnnn
as the necessary legislation r an be obtained
from the Canadian Parliament. Th» Grand
Trunk will be behind the new road and will
operate ft, but. as in the case of the Grand
Trunk linr-s wr-st of the Detroit Riv-r. It will b»
constructed under a separate corporate nnme -
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
The new line, according to Mr Hays's statement,
•will have a mileage of about three thousand
miles, and the construction, including equip
ment. stations, bridges, phips find other facil
ities, will Involve an expenditure of from $7r>,
000.000 to $100,000,000. According to the pres
ent arranpement, the new system will run
through thnt portion of Northern Ontario known
as New-Ontario, starting from North Ray, or
Gravenhurst, Ontario, and extending through
Manitoba, th» Northwest Territories and Hritith
Columbia to Butte Inl^t. or Port Simpson, r. c ,
a? may later be determined upon.
The lln<- will be nf th<» mopr modern and up to
date character, having in view especially low
grades. long tangents, st^l bridges and heavy
rails, as well as ample station facilities and
equipment for the handling of freight and pas
senger traffic.
"No one." said Mr Hays, "who has been
studying the wonderful developments that have
taken place in the Northwesi during the last few
years, can fail to be deeply Impressed witb the
growth of that extensive and rich territory, and
our directors) feel that, in view of the apparent
need of additional railway facilities and in or
der tr, guarantee to the present Grand Trunk
system direct connection with that very impor
t-in growing section of Canada, the only
wis.- policy Is to tak" active steps toward this
The building of this transcontinental route
naH been under consideration by the Grand
Trunk directorate for pome time, but it was only
during Mr Hays's recent visit to England that
It was decided to carry out the project at as
early a date as possible.
THE POPE RECEIVES CANADIANS.
TELLS A.RCHBIBHOP BKUCHE« UK WTLL
WAIT TO SEE HIM THREE
TEARS HENCE.
Rome. N"v 2Sw — The Pope to-day gave a fare
well audience to Archbishop Kruchesi. of Mon
treal, in the Pontiffs private apartment. His
holiness afterward went to the throne room,
where Monslgnor Bruchesi presented to him all
the Canadians now in Rome, numbering sixty,
including several Prctestants from the provinces
Of Ontario and Quebec. The Pope said he was
delighted to see the Canadians, and gave his
benediction to them all. On leaving Archbishop
Hru. hesi said. "I hope to see your holiness on
my next visit to Rome, three years hence." The
Pope promptly replied. "I will wait for you."
The decision of the Propaganda regarding the
appointment of a new Archbishop of Chicago, to
fill the vacancy caused by the death of Arch-
Mahon Fe< han has been postponed, principally
on account of objections received from several
American bishops concerning the doctrines held
by Hlshup Bpaldin*. It has now been decided
that the question shall be discussed at the meet
ing of the Propaganda on December 15 Bishop
Spaldins; continues to be considered the most
likely candidate for the post.
WHEN THE SNOW FLIES.
.•.,,■.- California "as the crow flies"— direct —
X 'the^Cxur^ Oolo.n Stat* Limited Rock Isl
and Route. Tickets, tal Broadway.-Advu
NEW-YORK. MONDAY. NOVEMBER 24, 1902. -TWELVE PAGES.-* T* e !S»i2ew
SCENES AT THE DEDICATION OF TH E NFTW ORTHODOX RUSSIAN CHURCH
VENEZUELA'S CASE STATED
MINISTER BAR ALT REVIEWS THE TROU
BLES WITn ENGLAND ATCD ****"
Caracas. Nov. 23.— Discussing Venezuela's for
eign relations, 1 >r. ! ' i!». Minister of
the interior, s;iid in an interview:
"Toward the United Btatea Venezuela en
tertains the kindliest feelings of friendship, and
shr- rfmnnh'TP with gratitude the attitude of
the pr^nt republic in th>- past. Venezuela is
determined, so fir as she tp concerned, that
nothing shall occur to disturb ia the slightest
df-preo the understanding with the
American Legation ntnl the. friendly relations
between the two countries Venezuela has
nothing to complain of regarding t»u- way In
which the various unimportant questions have
been treated, and. except for some pending
questions, her foreign relations have been of a
cordial character. The English Government nt
Trinidad published a few days' a«o an official
decree declaring the blockade of the Orinoco
null and void. If there Is anj pli when the
blockade is effective it Is th>^ Orinoco, for, be
sides the land defences, we have maintained Bev
eral gunboats, which have efficientlj performed
there all the duties appertaining to a blockade.
"The English, too, are Inconsistent, for while
one Journal at Trinidad publishes the decree de
daring the blockade to be Ineffective. 'The
Mirror.' another publication, insists thai Vene
zuela is loyally fulfilling her international duty
in this respect The British Bloop of war Fan
tome entered the Orinoco without permission,
and Presideni Castro has directed a protest
against this Infringement on in sov
ereignty. It has been recognized that the prin
cipal foreißn ships shall ask permission to en
ter the mouth of the river, and we cannot un
derstand the disregard of this rule A similar
protest has been sent repardin^ the action of
the German warship Panther, which also en
tered the Orinoco without permission.
"Another act which has provoked astonish
ment is the hoisting of the British Rag on the
Island of Patos. Venezuela's rißht to this Island
cannot be questioned; geographically, histor
ically and politically It is Venezuelan territory.
"With the island of Trinidad., It was recognized
as forming part of the old Spanish colony by
the Treaty of Amiens. Trinidad was ceded to
Great Britain, bui Patos Island remained, and
was recognized as an Integral part of Venezuela.
The English claim to Patoa Island was based
on the ad of the former Spanish Governor.
which was not recognized by Spain. If further
evidence of Venezuela's rights are needed, the
fact that th" Island is situated scarcely three
mileß from the Venezuelan mainland, while it is
ten miles from Trinidad, is sufficient. Thr- im
pregnability of Venezuela's position is shown by
the facility with which we have replied to every
argument In support of the British contention
advanced by the minisir-r of that country. Patos
Island Is Venezuelan, and must remain so."
KeßardlnK the relations between Venezuela
and (icrmany. the minister said:
"Germany has never Riven Venezuela any in
timation of its purpose to enforce the collection
of its pending claims. President Castro has no
Intention of evading a Just obligation contracted
by the Rovernment, but. on the contrary, will
meet it loyally. At th<- same time, he cannot be
expected to permit any action infringing the
rights and dignity of the Kovernment."
EVACUATION OF SHANGHAI.
WITHDRAWAL OF FOREION GARRISONS BE
GINS.
Shanghai. Nov. 23. — The evacuation of this
city by the foreign garrisons has begun, the
Japanese being the first to withdraw their
troops.
LORD KITCHENER AT ADEN.
Aden, Arabia, Nov. 23.— Lord Kitchener has ar
rived here, on his way to India, and has conferred
with the commandant. General Maitland. concern-
Ing the campaign which Is proceeding against the
Mullah In Somallland.
NO NEED TO DELAY BUSINESS.
Stock reports and an official stenographer much
appreciated features of the Pennsylvania Special.—
AdvU
VTEW OF 1 TVCK SAWCTTJARY.
RKCEIVTNtJ THE OrtlHTB.
GERMANY
STURGIS NOT TO RESIGN.
HAP NO THOUGHT OF LEAVING FIRE
-' DBKWtTMESrr CROTvER DECISION
THIS WEEK
Thomas Sturgis. Commissioner of the Fire
Department, paid last night at his home, No. 138
East Thirty-sixth st . that the report printed in
one of the newspapers yesterday that he had
handed his resignation to Mayor Low was un
true. His relations with the Mayor were most
cordial, he assorted, and he had no intention of
resigning his office, nor had Mr. Low requested
or Intimated in any way that he give up his
office. He said he would probably make public
a decision about the charges against Chief
Croker about the middle of this week. He
emphasised in various ways that he Intended to
continue in his office, referring:, for Instance, to
his plans for the framing of bills for the im
provement -of his department to be presented at
the coming session of the legislature. The legis
lative measures which he has under considera
tion are in no way the result of the Croker case,
nor are they in the slightest degree related to it.
The impression that Chief Croker will be dis
missed from the Fire Department by Commis
sioner stir seemed to gain strength yester
day in the minds of many persons .'. ho profess
to be in touch with the trend of administrative
affairs.
"Since I accepted the office which T now hold
T hav< had from time to time a numbei of talks
with Mayor Low regarding the affairs of my
■• id tin Commissioner, "bu( us to
whether we have ever spoken of tl
Chief Croker 1 miist beg to refer you to Mayor
Low. l think it is t"->r him to mswer thai quea
tion.
In the last three months t have noi spoken
t" any report* i about the trial of Chief Croker
My lips "ii this subject have I n closed As a
ludiclal ofHcei f have had to assume this atti
tui i > • So far only one side has been heard, and
that is the defendant's, through bis counsel It
seems that some pap< from the begin
ning pr- fudged this matter. Counsel for tli>-> dc -
fenda.nl could criticise me or some phase of the
subject from daj to day, but owing to my posi
tion 1 could make no reply
"The process of rend< vinn a verdict In the rass
is a simple one. The verdict may simply be
placed ">n the records of th« department, or an
explanatory note may be recorded with it. all >f
which are matters executed within the depart
ment "
Mr. Stnrgls declined to saj anything which
might Indicate what were his views regarding
the ca~", and what might be the verdict. As
to t lv' attitude of th« Corporation Counsel's
office toward the case he had this to saj
•The records of the Corporation Counsel's
office will show you that that office thinks that
thf method of conducting the case has been as
fair as could lie. that the delays asked by the
defendant's counsel have been granted and that
members of the department were told thai they
had a ri^ht to visit thief Croker and to testify
in his favor."
"Has .>x-Ftre Commissioner Sheffield been
identified with the Croker case in any way?"
was ask*d.
"No more than you have," Commissioner stur
gis replied. He added that neither had ex-Cap
tain Clifford had anything to do with the case.
Commissioner Sturgis then spoke of the steps
he was considering to bring about the enact
ment of certain measures he had in mind for
the Improvement of the department. "Last
year." snid he, "I succeeded In obtaining for th*
fireboats in the waters of the harbor the same
right of 'way as the fire companies have on
land."
According to a report printed yesterday Will-
THE EVERY-DAT TRAIN TO CALIFORNIA.
The electric lighted "Overland Limited. " leaves
Chicago S:00 P. M.. via Chicago and North-West
ern. Lnion Pacific and Southern Pacific Railways.
Offices: 461. 287 and 349 Broadway.— Advt.
BRIARCLIFF MILK HAS NO EQUAL IN
Quality. Delivered direct to consumer.— AdvU
lam Cullen Bryant, of Brooklyn, was believed
to be slated to succeeded Commissioner Sturglß
If the latter resigned his office. Mr. Bryant
said yesterday that all he knew about the sub
ject he had learned by reading the report.
SETTLEMENT OUTLOOK BAD
THK INDEPENDENTS DEMAND LOWER
FREIGHT RATES.
CONFERENCE TO-MORROW WITH COAL
ROAD PRESIDENTS. Fl'T THEY ARE EX
PECTED TO REFVSE CONCESSIONS.
[BT TBT-KGRAPH TO THE THIBrN't. 1
Scranton. Perm.. Nov. 23.— 1t is beginning to
look here as though the ten day recess of the
Strike Arbitration Commission would he for
naught. The independent operators refuse to
Join in the amicable adiustment proposition, and
public- sentiment hereabouts is behind them In
their Insurgency. The Independent operators
sell their coal at the breakers for rt. r > cents out
of each dollar the coal brings at tidewater.
Their profit is limited to this one source, while
the companies which both carry and mine coal
make a profit on the coal and a profit also on
the hauling, and they can make up a part, at
least, of any increase in the miners' wages by
an increase in the freight rates, which will fall
on the independent operators.
The Independents declare that they will not
consent to any concession to the miners unless
the carrier operators come to their relief with
better freight rates. On Tuesday a committee
of nine of the most prominent of the Independent
operators will go to New -York to see the coal
presidents about a reduction. The committee
will oonslst of J. L. Coke, of Plttston, and W. L.
Connell, C. D. Simpson, J. L. Crawford. Dr. J. N.
Rice. Joseph J. Jermyn. E. B Sturges. H. C.
Reynolds and W. W. Watson, of this city.
They will ask the coal road presidents for
concessions in freight rates which will enable
them to meet the Increase in wages which the
big companies' proposed concessions to the
miners will entail. The big companies are ex
pected to say that they cannot cut into their
earnings with a double edged sword, and the In
dependents will, therefore, return and declare
that the hearings by the commission must pro
ceed and that they will not subscribe to an ad
justment. If the big companies insist on engi
neering the Independents out of court, they are
prepared to recognize the United Mine Workers
and .leal directly with President Mitchell. They
decided on their course last night at a secret
meeting here, at which twenty-eight individual
operators wen r r °***nt. Th--y will meet again
when the committee of nine returns from New-
York.
The miners are working hnrd to induce the
Independents t<> join In th^ plan for a settle
ment, but so far have met with no success. Un
daunted, however, they have arranged for a con
ference to-morrow between their chief counsel.
Clarence S Dwrrow, and the chief counsel of the
independents. Ira H. Burns. Mr. Burns agreed
,to the conference) but said that it could avail
nothing, as his party would take no action until
after the coal road presidents had been con
sulted.
The independent operators now mine 15 per
cent of the anthracite produced. They are
eighty in number, and all except two ar-» fr-»e
from entangling alliances.
Unless something unexpected comes of Tues
day's meeting in New-York it is believed h»re
that the arbitration commission, when it re ts
semhies ,-in December 3, will resume wh°rc it Wt
off with the taking of testimony.
AXOTHER PYXAHITIXU OITRAGE.
FRONT BLOWN OUT OF SALOON OF MAN
WHOSE SONS WORKED DURING
THE STRIKE.
Mahanoy City. Perm., Nov. 23.— The most de
structive dynamiting outrage that has occurred
in the coal regions since the strike hegan was
perpetrated here at 5 o'clock this morning. The
front part of the saloon of Christopher Port
land was Mown rose the street and th« ad
joining buildings wrre badly wrecked. Win
dows were broken in every house in the square
Portland and the other members of his family
were sleeping on the third floor, and escaped
without serious injury, though all were thrown
from their beds. Portland's two sons are non
union men. and worked during the strike.
COAI TO TIDE OVER COLD SNAP.
it was learned yesterday that on account of the
com snap the large coal dealers would try to-day
to lft all those who have ordered coal have a tittle
to keep their fires going until they c;m Ret larger
quantities. Dealers say that they expect naviga
tion of the Great Lakes will be closed in a week,
and a good deal of the coal now coins; to the West
will come her) to swell the shipments already
arriving A cold wave just now. they say. while
it might cause some suffering at the first, would
hasten this situation.
A largre number of new ....
of the sort coal ordinoncc in factories by persons
who, it la alleged, can get enough of the small
steam sizes >t anthracite will he investigated by
the inspectors of the Board of Health to-day. The
ordinance will be enforced in all cases where the
complaints are well founded.
Daniel S. Jacobs, chairman of the miners' defence
committee of the Central Federated Union, an
nounced yesterday that its final meet to wind up
its affairs would be held next Friday. All the
money In hand after paying expenses of printing,
etc., will be turned over to the anthracite mine
workers, and the final report or" the committee will
be made .to the Central Federated Union next
Sunday.
FREIGHT TJEC'P RELIEVED.
NEARLY FIFTT THOUSAND CARS MOVED
IN AND OUT OF PITTSBURG.
Pittsburg;, Nov. 23. After thlrty-sfai hours of
unceasing labor on the | atly .me
nu nt>'ii forces of men and engineers, the Penn
sylvania Railroad system has made a com
.paratlve clearing up of its congested terminals.
The ear movement breaks all records for a
similar time. It is estimated that by 5 ■
■ row morning 929 trains, constating of
!■« >.ui_T» cars, will have been moved in and out
of Pittsburg, as follows: Pennsylvania Knil
road, _!M train?. 14.700 cars; Fort Wayne, 1811
trains. :t.<MH» cars; i'an Handle, -l-~> trains, 11.-
023 cars; Baltimore and Ohio, 90 trains. 4,500
cars; Pittsburg am) Lake Brie, 120 trains. 6,000
cars. The estimated tonnage is 1.7361500
On the Bfonongahela divisions of the Penn
sylvania, the section that was almost cum
pletely paralysed bjp the congestion, a vast num
t>.T of cars have \>*^n moved. These < ars were
chiefly ladt-n with c>ke and coal for points weal
of this city. They were hauled out in trains of
from sixty- five to eighty can each, and at the
same tune empty cars were hauie.i up to the
mines and coke ovens for loading. The almost
entire tieup of the Mast furnaces and steel mills
of the Hhcnang" and Mahoning valleys com
pelled traffic managers to Rive preference, as far
as possible, to thr- movement Of the c la.-
fr»i<ht upon which a continuance of the opera
tion of th.- industrial Dlants depeada.
In the yards of the Pittsburg and Lak^ Erie
and the Baltimore and Ohio similar work was
accomplished. As these roads were not in as
bad shape as the Pennsylvania yards, their ter
minal:-; are comparatively close to normal con
ditions to-nlpht.
The number of accidents to trainmen during
th* day was high. This is attribu:>-.l to the
fact that a large number of new men were en
gaged to ni! out shunting crews in the yards.
Before •> o'clock eisrht men were reported taken
to the West Perm Hospital to be treated fur in
juries of varying degrees of severity
When croup comes suddenly, a life may be lost
before you can go for the doctor. Give Dr. D
Jayne's Expectorant. It almost Invariably curea.—
Advt.
PRICE THREE CENTS.
PROGKAMME FOR CONGRESS
PRESIDENT IN CONFERENCTC WTTH RE
PUBLICAN LEADERS.
ANXIOUS THAT GENERAL AND EFFECTCVB
PLAN OF LEGISLATION BE READT
FOR COMING SESSION.
[BT TFXKGRAPH TO THE TTHBrNK.I
Washington. Nov. 23.-- President Roosevelt la
endeavoring to bring about an agreement of the
Republican leaders In Congress on a general
programme of legislation to be carried out at
the coming session. This is the principal object
of the conference which began Immediately
after the President's return from Mississippi,
and which will be continued for the next few
days as the leaders continue to arrive. The
President Is anxious to have the opinion of as
many as possible of the leaders in Congress as
to the amount of work that can be expected at
the coming session, and also as to the advisa
bility of calling an extra session of the LVITIth
Congress if it is found to be impossible to get
through with the most pressing work this
winter.
The President's talks with Senators and Rep
resentatives cover all the Important questions
that will come before Congress. Including trusts,
the tariff. Cuban reciprocity and the isthmian
canal. As between tariff revision and trust
regulation the latter is regarded as most press-
Ing, and the President is anxious to have legis
lation enacted this winter, if possible. There la
no disposition to go any further with tariff re
vision this winter than to provide for the for
mation of a plan of revision either by an Inde
pendent commission or by authorizing the Sen
ate Committee on Finance and the re-elected
members of the House Committee on Ways and
Means to take the subject up In the long recess
next summer. The latter plan Is recommended
by many of the Republican leaders.
The President will be gratified if the Republi
cans in Congress can be united on a conservative
but effective plan of trust legislation, so as to
assure its enactment before March 4. There la
no foundation for reports which represent Presi
dent Roosevelt as advocating anti-trust legisla
tion of such a radical character that some of
the members of hie Cabinet are arrayed in op
position to him and to those of the Cabinet who
agree with him. There are, of course, shades of
difference of opinion in the Cabinet as to the
details of the plan which the President is out
lining in his message, but there is nothing like
a split, as has been represented. The President's
plan, based on Attorney General Kn<>x's Pitts
burg speech, proposes so to amend the Sherman
law as to make it more effective, and also to
make it reach certain cases which, under the
decisions of the Supreme Court, cannot now be
covered by it. It is conservative, and will have
the support of all the members of the Cabinet.
The President's consultations with the Repub
lican leaders began on Friday, when he saw-
Senators Lodge, of Massachusetts; Burrows, of
Michigan, and Scott, of West Virginia. Senator
Bpooner, of Wisconsin, one of those specially
invited by the President, was at the Whit*
House this evening, and had a long talk with
President Roosevelt. He is i one of the men
whose, advice is of great value on many topics,
including Cuban reciprocity, the isthmian canal
and trust legislation. Speaker Henderson and
Senator Allison, of lowa, arrived in Washing
ton to-night, and will see the President to-mor
row. Others who will call at the White House
tomorrow are Senator Fairbanks, of Indiana;
Representative Cannon, of Illinois, and Repre
sentative Babcock. of Wisconsin.
THE SESSION TOO SHORT.
SENATOR JONES AND REPRESENTATIVE
LANDIS AGREE THAT THERE WILL
BE NO TARIFF OR TRUST
LEGISLATION. $k\^
[by ilianmtM to the tribune.]
Washington. Nov. 23.— From, opposite sides nt the
political fence two surprisingly similar opinions of
the probable results th* next session of Congress
will accomplish in regard to tariff revision and
trust legislation were expressed to-day by Senator
Jon^s. of Arkansas, and Representative Landis. of
Indiana. The Republican point of view was «*
pressed by Mr Landis in the following fashion:
I believe that there will be no trust or tariff leg
islation in th» approaching session. We shall have.
our hands full in passing the regular appropriation
bills and clearing up the Ida and ends of legis
lation already on the boards. It is almost a legis
lative impossibility to take up any great new
question or piece of legislation and do anything
with it in a short session of Congress. Thi* IB
true in the matter of trusts.
Now In the case of tariff. I believe that Is alto
gether too great a problem for the short session
also. In not a believer in the sacredness of any
tariff schedule, or. for that matter, of any law.
But it seems to me that if some of the schedules
of the present law are revised, it will he a move
which will be wise, more as » means of meeting
what li said to he the popular demand for revision
than a move made necessary by any actual trad*
or commercial condition which needs remedying.
It is acknowledged that our present condition of
commercial prosperity was brought about by the
Dlngley tariff. in Indiana at present it Is almost
Impossible to get workmen enough in any line o?
industry. Farmers had to nay in cents a shock for
harvesting their corn, and I man can cut fifty
Shorks In a day. I"be railroads of the country are
Vina.) car? short to hanile the traffic. Th»
wages of the worker? have gon-» up in every line.
and there i? plenty of work for every one. Why.
in my State, the servant stirl question is becoming
one of the treat problems: th<* cirls are migrating
to the factories, where they make more money.
Indiana is a network of trolleys, yet. were it pos
sible to eet laborers, rails, ties and cars, many
new lines would be constructed. ' t>el!«»re we have
then outgrown the ten year ranic danger.
A much less rose colored view of the situation
was taken by Senator Jones, who agreed with Mr.
Landis. however, in the opinion that ther« would
be no tariff or trust legislation. Senator Jones's
comments were somewhat tinged with cynicism. in
explaining th-» probable inaction of Congress on
these points. lie said:
Trusts and tariff wen widely talked about aa
needing attention at the hands of Congress during
th.- campaign Election is over now. and with, it
the necessity of talking about them. You will
find when we come together that it wttTb* found
that the session is too short to attempt ■thing
in the way of legislation for either the trusts or
the tariff. " It will be «aW that we'should wait for
the next Congress, which will have ample time to
consider these questions. In th. matter of trust
legislation President Roosevelt will outline in his
message what he wishes done in the way of
«trent;thenim: the Sherman Anti-Trust law. Then
bills will 1 ••• intrMuced which will be declared to
meet the President's idei. ere will be a division
of opinion over the various bills, and in the end
nothing will he .lone. Thus the matter will go
over to the next Cor.sress. and by that time pub
lic; attention will be fixed in a different direction,
and there will be no necessity for trust legislation.
Just about the same proceedings will occur in the
matter of tariff revision.
ELEPHAXTS /.V V AMtCK.
OWNERS MAY BE SUED BY WOMEN WHO
WERE KNOCKED DOWN.
Lockhart Brothers, who own a troup of per
forming elephants, which gave a show last week
at Proctor's Theatre, Newark, are likely. It is
said, to be made defendants in several damage
suits. in consequence of the elephants going on
a rampage on Saturday night. The elephants
were leaving the theatre, when a dog sprang
from a wagon and barked at them. One of them
started across Park Place. Newark, trumpeting
wildly. This caused the whole herd to stam
pede after it.
In their flight the big animals knocked down
several women, but did not trample any of
them. Their garments were torn and soiled,
however, on the muddy pavement, and they suf
fered somewhat from shock. They threaten to
make the Lockharts pay for the damage and
embarrassment they sustained. There was
great excitement before the elephants were
finally rounded up and taken away by the
Lockharts and their assistants.
LETTERS MAT BE DICTATED
to the Official Stenographer on the Pennsylvania
Soecial. the 20-hour train to Chicago.— Advt.

xml | txt