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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 24, 1902, Image 2

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COBiiENITES ANXIOUS.
OPPOSE BRITISH RATIFICATION OF THE
BRUSSELS CONVENTION.
FUGAR STATISTICS FOR PARLIAMENT TO
CONSIDER— NEWS or LONDON.
<Sr*rial to The ■•*■ Yerk Tribune by French Cable.)
(Copyright; IJ«'-: By The Tribune. Arsociation.)
London, Nov. 24. 1 a. m.— The House of Com
mons win to-day be asked to accept a resolu
tion committing it to a ratification of the Brus
sels convention abolishing sugar bounties. The
resolution Is regarded with not a little anxiety
by those ■).•> hold to the fiscal principles under
which England built up her commercial pros
perity. The convention was signed last March
Ijy delt-gates •!. ■:!. Great Britain, Germany,
France, Austria. I'aly. Spain. Sweden, Belgium
and Holland. Its object Is twofold— on the
or..- hand to equalize conditions of competition
between beet and cane sugar and on the other
band to promote the consumption of sugar. So
far as England la concerned, the principal de
sire was to afford some encouragement to the
sugar industry in the Weal Indies. The Minis
terial resolution, which will be moved by Ger
ald Ea!!our. president of the Board of Trade,
will meet with strong opposition from the Rad
ical party. There is little doubt, however, that
It will be can led by a very substantial major
ity. The Liberal leaden argue that the con
vention will deprive the House of Commons of
part of its-- control over the taxation of the coun
try and that the nation may find Itself involved
In & tariff war with tome of its beet customers.
Jt is pointed out by a committee of the Cobden
<*!ub that the consumption of sugar In the
United Kingdom amounts to 1.700.000 tons.
The total production of the West Indies is
240,000 tons, of which only (£.OOO tons come to
"his country. it is hardly businesslike, the
« ommittee urges, to take measures to raise the
price of the 1.700,000 tons which is consumed
here Jn order to benefit the producers of 46.000
tons sent from the West Indies. Sir "William
Harcourt is expected to take a prominent part
in to-day's debate.
Further details which have reached her* from
Berlin with regard to the death of Herr Krupp
»how that the well known Iron king had suf
f t*-<\ from an affection of the hoart for several
years, and the nervous excitement produced by
the libellous attacks on him by a socialistic
par' l '' in Berlin was, no doubt, a contributory
cause of his death. Tn pome quarters it Is ru
mored that Herr Krupp had committed suicide,
although there Is nothing to give color to such
belief, except the allegation that he desired to
avoid exposure. As against this supposition It
1c a fact that Herr Krupp was making the
necessary preparations for a full rebuttal of the
«-har»res brought against him. The Kaiser sent a
< haracteristic telegram of condolence to th»
■widow.
The Japanese troops in garrison at Shanghai
have left there for home. The German garrison
has received orders to prepare to evacuate the
place.
Thr American demand for English coal is not
v>i over. Inquiries, chiefly for unscreened
»t»am coal, which have b*>en circulating in the
Kaweaatle market for a week past, have re
sulted in business to the extent of twenty
thousand tons for this nnd next month's chip*
mem. Tonnage to carry fourteen thousand
tans of this quantity was chartered on the same
market r.n Saturday's steamers, the Monte
negro. Kensington an.i I'atrla having all been
fixed for Boston at a very low freight, six shil
lings. The figure is the lowest that has been
«rcept<vi Fin^-e the American demand set in. and
it is no' doubt an important factor In securing
;he orders. Assuming' that the coal is Northum
berland unscreened steam, then, With the
freight six shillings, it can be delivered In Bos
ton at from sixteen shillings to sixteen shillings
Fispence a ton. Including the shilling tax. This
It a mm h lower price than the same coal could
have been shipped for during the rush last
month. It is expected In Newcastle th.-it the
business ill continue until the American mines
get into full working ord"r and Fupply begins
to approximate demand. 1. N*. F.
MAJOR ROSS IV/V.v \OBEL PHIZ
iIEWAKD OF HIS RESEARCHES IN CONNEC
TION WITH MALARIA.
London. Nov. 23.— 1t Is stated that Major Rose,
the principal of the Liverpool School of Tropical
Medicine, will be award, d the Nobel malaria re
search prize of 115,000. Major Boss conducted
several expeditions into the mosquito breeding
districts of West Africa.
t*n<ler the terms of the will of Alfred Nobel, the
Swedish tncmeer and chemist, who flrcT applied
r!tro-gl>crrir.p. dynamite and blasting gelatine as
esptastvs agents and who died In »".. {2.000,000 of
hie fortune of £0,000,000 .... , left as a fund to pro
vide prizes for the advancement of adence. The
Interest on the T2.00C.000 was divided into five an
nual prize*?, to be. awarded to persons making the
most lmr^>rtant discoveries in physics, chemistry
physiology or medicine.
COXCESSIOXS TO C(li\\ PRIDE.
UNITED STATES WILL NOT INSIST ON TWO
IMPORTANT POINTS.
Havana, Nov. 23.— The first meeting between
<;«?neral Bliss, who is here to arrange with the
<'üban Government a basis of agreement for a
commercial treaty between Cuba and the United
States, and the Cuban officials will be held next
Tuesday. The general tone of the Cuban press
favors Cuba's entering Into a treaty arrange
ment with the United States and the getting of
the best possible terms for Cuba. It is under
stood that although General Bliss will not dis-
CUSS with the government's representatives any
thing but a commercial treaty, he will intimate
to President Palma that the United States win
not lnslft upon a coaling station at Havana, or
the ownership of the isle of Pines: and it is be
lieved that if the United States concedes these
two points a long step will have been taken
toward facilitating satisfactory commercial ar
rangements.
FIGBTISG WHITE SLAVE TRAFFIC.
Vienna, Nov. -With the approval ttf the Min
ister of the Interior, the Austrian League to com
bat the white slave traffic will establish branches
in ail the important towns and frontier stations
f'f Austria, and take active means to suppress the
traffic.
London. Nov. 24.— A dispatch to "The Daily
Chronicle" from Brussels announces that a man
named FUette. aliax Vinette, a naturalized Amerl
< an. has been sentenced to two years' Imprisonment
for taking part In the white clave traffic.
Gf^ 1 plaNv&
In conformity to their annual custom
Steinway & Sons this day place on
exhibition in their warcrooms in the
WINDSOR ARCADE,
Fifth Avenue and 46th Street,
Twelve Pianos in Art-Cases
After original designs as specimens
of their decorative work. Among
these arc several instruments spe
cially ordered and exhibited by
permission of their owner*.
ADMIRAL CASEY,PEACEMAKEF
GRATITUDE FOR HIS IMPORTANT WORK
AT PANAMA.
Panama, Nov. 23.-"The Star and Herald*
Fays that at the conference on board the Wis
consin a distinguished son of Uncle San. Rear
Admiral Silas Casey, acted as a mediator and
peacemaker, which conduct, it remarks, reflects
great credit on a nation whose motives for doing
good are too frequently disparaged. •
Admiral Casey In a brilliant speech extended
to the negotiators his heartfelt good wishes,
highly praising them for their good judgment
and patriotism and their arrangement of such
an extremely delicate matter. General Cobas,
chief of Minister of State Perdomo's staff, who
spoke in very good English, made an eloquent
reply to this speech, and In the name Colom
bia thanked the gallant admiral for the hospi
tality and attention the negotiators had re
ceived on board his flagship, and also for his
generous intervention In the arrangement to
brine about peace in that zone of Colombian
territory.
It is said that the impassioned patriotic utter
ance? of General Oobaa brought tears to the
eyes of General Herrera.
Troops are already being sent away. Nearly
one thousand men will leave Panama to-night
for Barranqullla. A, soon as the Jf*^"" 0
gunboat Padllla arrives here the troops in t£
Cauca Province will be Bent to Buenaventura.
on the Bay of Choco. »,„»•• « r -
General Herrera and bis ser ™ tar '? n h * o * £.
rived at Aqua Dulee, accompanied by » *°;*\ r
ment commissioner bringing the news_ of the
conclusion of peace to the gunboat Bogota in
order to prevent a fight with the Pad ilia should
they meet General Salazar. Governor or
PanamT . haa set all the political prisoners at
11 V commander of the British cruiser Phaeton
offered General Salazar to ™ . n ' ca tt t * th->
news of the treaty of peace to Captain Manna
duke. the commander of the Bogota The offer
was accepted and the Phaeton sailed lnst night.
- .. _,„- I , synopsis of the treaty of pcare
Wteeonsm on ITrMay between Oeneral "*r -
»„,«> of Panama.: o«wral Vaeques and „,ner ai
Oohms chief of General Perdomo> staff. re**eaent
ing the government, and Generals Lucas and C.i
lallero "and Colonel EuseWe Morale^ replanting
General Herrera. director of the smites of r a a
ami Panama: or the treaty declares that the
The first article "f the treaty declares 'hat th-
Colombian Government will immediately reestab
lish public order throughout the whole «W*>JJ
excepting In place, where there are evolutionary
forces unwilling to accept the treaty. Th« second
article guarantees liberty for all poMtl-sl prisoners
excepting those who are unwilling to accept the
treaty The third provider thai war taw and
extraordinary contributions shall be discontinued.
The fourth promises ample amnesty ami guarantee!.
safety of person n«d property of those who have
been engaged In the revolution! The fifth fixes the
Judicial power to decide cases of revolutionists ac
cused of common crimes. The sixth declares that
the treaty embraces all revolutionist force* within
or without the republic that wish to accept Its
urn,. The seventh declares that, as it is the
wi«>h of the President and the whole nation, once
public order la restored elections will take place
for members of Congress, the government agree fig
to see that tho«e *l«cted take their places lawfully.
This clause, name, certain questions which will be
proposed for the consideration of Congress, as fol
lows: The Panama Canal negotiations. Ihe re
forms presented to Congr-w In 1«W by President
Marroqubi. and fh« reform of the currency sys
tem, the amount received from canal contracts to
be used as a basis for amortization.
The eighth article provides that the armlM «f the
provinces of Cauca and Panama shall recognize th*>
authority of the government. as shall also all those.
Wishing to sec«re the benefit of the term* of the
treaty. Tho ninth provides that th* revolutionists
Bhall'turn over to the government all tho war ele
ments belonging to the armies of Cauca and Pan*
ama Including their fleet, particularly the. gunboat
Padilla Under the tenth article all the revolution
ist war elements, etc., will be turned over by com
missions appointed by General Herrera to govern
ment commissions at Ban Carlos. Ague. Dulce.
Chltre. Montijo, Son» and Pedremii. In Panama,
and Tumaco, narrancoas, San Pablo and Qulbdo.
in Ca ca This provision shall take *n> ( -t Imme
diately the treaty Is approved, and the time for the
transf-r shall not exceed twenty days In the Pan
ama Province and forty In the Province nt < sum.
In the eleventh article the government agrees to
aid members of th« revolutionist army of lower
rank to return to their homes; the revolutionary
officer* will be transported by government boat*.
According to the twelfth clause, the chiefs and
officers of the revolutionary army will i»- aiinwerj
to keep their swords, revolvers, baggage and flags,
but they must return all government flags in their
possession and turn over to the government officers
the swords captured at Arur Dulce. Tampons will
be issued wherever a delivery of arms takes place.
The government. in the thirteenth article, of the
treaty, promises to take, care Of all wounded and
nick members of the revolutionary army, as well
us of their own soldiers, and provides for the Issu
ance to them of passports as soon an they ohall
have regained their health, and as provided for In
the preceding article. Under the fourteenth article
the treaty must be approved by Generals Perdomo
and Herrera.
The treaty was made on board the Wisconsin, at
a point very near where the Chilian Line steamer
Lautaro (which was seized by General Alban) was
sunk in a. naval battle between the Insurgent and
government fleets, last January. Hear Admiral
Casey. U. B. N . helped considerably in getting the
commissioners to come to an agreement. The ne
gotiations are now nearly at an end. In the course
of the conference General Hcrrcra's representative
announced his desire that liberal government
should be established at Panama and Bantander,
with thirty representatives in Congress and a grant
of SSu.ijOO in gold, but these demands were with
drawn when th.- government representatives re
fused to consider such terms.
VARGAS SANTOS PLEASED.
HOPES NOW THE LIBERALS IN COLOMBIA
WILL GET FAIR TREATMENT
San Jose, Costa Rica. Nov. 2fl.— General Var
gas Santos, the military director of the Colom
bian revolution, has sent the following message
to General Herrera on the occasion of the signa
ture of the treaty Of peace at Panama: "Let us
congratulate ourselves. I have full confidence
in you. May this solemn act establish a true
republic." .
In an interview General Santos said: "My
hopes have been realized regarding: the termina
tion of the war If the solemn treaties Insure the
rights of the Liberals as citizens of my country.
I am satisfied that the hard lesson that has been
received by the Liberals and the Conservatives
in the fighting of the last thirty-seven months
will never be forgotten. We are not seeking
government offices, but only want the due rep
resentation of our party In Congress and in the
municipalities, and a respect for private prop
erty. There is a need of organizing a fair Ju
dicial power and to make the liberty of the press
effective. We want to have the right to educate
our children according to our wishes, and we
demand honesty in the management of the pub
lic treasury, which, bo far, has been at. the dis
posal of privileged families, resulting in the re
ducing of the majority of the people to poverty.
When I have received a copy of the peace treaty
I shall decide as to my future movements. 1
have received many congratulatory telegrams."
General Santos shows remarkable energy con
sidering his advanced age. seventy-two years.
ERIE VEX WANT HIGHER WAGES.
DECLARE THAT THE PENNSYLVANIA ESPE
CIALLY PAYS MORE-PRESIDENT UN
DERWOOD KNOWS OK NO DIS
SATISFACTION
For some time the employes of the Erie Railroad
have been complaining that their wages are not so
high as the wages of the men on some of the
other railroads, the Pennsylvania Railroad being
specifically mentioned. It was sal. l yesterday that
several meetings have been held and that a list of
grievances is being prepared. Some time ago a
committee, accompanied by Assistant Chief Wilson
Of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, called
at the offices of the company in this city and had
a conference with the officials of tho company.
President Underwood of the Erie Railroad f«aid
last night that h* knew of no dissatisfaction among
the men. No complaints had been received.
"AH the. men are under contract," he continued,
"and they know that If they have any reasonable
complaint or grievance. It will be co'nKldered. I
know or no trouble at present, and If flier, was
any I would know of it. I believe."
Regarding the vlFtt of the committee of the fire
nv-n he said that this visit was a yearly one and
was a friendly visit. The men come to the com
pany .2 vc r y . year to talk ° ver luatl<?r- connected
with the trlM.
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. MONDAY. NOVEMBER :M. 11)02.
KRUPP NOT A SUICIDE.
ABUNDANT. TESTIMONY THAT HIS
DEATH WAS NATURAL.
VAST SCHEMES OF THE DEAD GUNMAKER
TO BENEFIT HIS WORKMEN AT ESSEN.
Berlin, Nov. 23.— The first assumption that
Herr Krupp, the great gunmaker, whose death
was recorded yesterday, committed suicide, Is
yielding to precise and abundant testimony to
the contrary. Professor Blnswanger, a physi
cian of the first reputation, was in the apart
ment adjoining Herr Krupp's sleeping room
when he was stricken down on Saturday morn
ing:, and Dr. Pahl, Ilerr Krupp's family doctor,
was also in the house. They summoned several
other physicians of some celebrity, and it is re
garded as being beyond belief that all of them
should have connived at a concealment of the
cause of death, which they ascribe to a stroke of
apoplexy. Induced, they add unofficially, by
mental excitement from which the deceased was
suffering.
Herr Krupp's medical history for several
years past indicates that he was in delicate
health. He was asthmatic, had a weak heart,
and was subject to fainting spells. He fell to
the ground unconscious while In Genoa several
years ago, and again while at dinner in a hotel
here eighteen months ago. He had been warned
to avoid overfatifrue and worn. He was at Ham
burg on Thursday last, and at the Hamburger
Hof it was observed that he was In a highly
wrought state and scarcely in control of him
self. His condition accounted for the presence
of two physicians in the house at the time of
his death, one of them being Professor Blns
w anger.
Mrs. Krupp was sent or from Jena. She is
suffering from a nervous malady, but was
brought to Essen in a special train, arriving
there this morning. The funeral has been fixed
for Wednesday. Chancellor Buelow. all the
minister* and a great number of other officials,
following the example of the Kmperor. have
telegraphed their condolences to the widow.
Herr Krupp leaves two daughters, who are at
school on«- named Barbara, aged seventeen,
and the second named Bertha, fifteen years
old.
IWr Krupp's favorite study was to think out
schemes for Improving the wellbelng of the
lower classes, which he applltd practicallly to
what are called "labor colonies." He assented,
seemingly, to moat socialistic principle*, except
that he held tight to the wage system, a lug
that the wage earners were not yet sufficiently
developed or pelf-controlled to regulate for
themselves a Just system of division of profits.
It is mentioned as an odd chance that a man
ho applied social reform idi-.a. in so extensive
a way should have been crushed by a Social
><■>•■„ ocratlc newspaper, which, however, re
garded his measures to ameliorate the condition
of the laborers as not touching the question of
economic injustice.
Herr Krupp's father started the system of
modern dwellings for the workinginen as a mat
ter of expediency, and Htrr Krupp himself ap
pears to have developed them from conviction
an.i in accordance with his Ideals. Tie owned
5,460 dwellings, each, to whatever group It be
longed, being constructed with variations In
the architecture to avoid monotony. Each
house had a front yard. In whl^h were bits of
ornamental gardening; the outside coloring and.
the interior decorations gave a certain aesthetic
unity, while there was plenty of space and
light.
Herr Krupp had a.;-. a variety of Institutions,
some of them rather singular, such as "bach
elors' bones" and "widowers' retreats." Hr
sides convalescent hoppltAls an>l the regulation
orphanages, he had a pension fund for his em
ployes amounting to $4,125,000 He contributed
last year, as required by the law. (372.000 to
the National Insurance Fund, and gave vol
untarily $4,080.00) to ..the;- insurance funds.
Notwithstanding his benevolent Interests in
the laborers, he was an autocrat In the, manage
ment of his concerns. Hi -.ran almost unknown
by sight to his workmen, and rarely visited thi
works or even his offices. He spent s»-\.-riit
months every year »n the Inland of Capri, and
managed his gunworli rolling mills, iron mines
and shipyards by letters and telegrams.
T'nllke his father. Herr Krupp look no Inter
est in the technical side of his business, yet In
fifteen years he morn than doubled th* fortune
hi Inherited, since their foundation the Essen
factories have turned out 41.000 pieces of artll
:• ry. Herr Krupp resented bring railed the
'Cannon King." and lie said that half of ,-ill the
output of his works whs civilising products,
such as railway and merchant ship material and
structural steel.
RIOT BTARTR 7V 1 WSIC HALL.
A?fn-MILITART BOKQB RESENTED BY
FRENCH OFFICERS
Tours. France. Nov. 23. — A violent riot broke
out this evening In the Alcazar Music Hall In
this city owing to the singing of anti-military
songs by one of the performers. A party of
officers belonging to the garrison of Tours who,
dressed In mufti, were occupying th>-- stalls,
hissed the songs, while the public In the gallery
applauded and threw tntHJ-Mien at the officers,
wounding several among them. The occupants
of the galleries then Invaded the floor of the
hall, where a free fight ensued until the police
cleared the building. An anti-military demon
stration in th*' streets followed, a crowd escort*
ing the singer, the cause of all the trouble,
home, and singing revolutionary songs The
rioters attempted to mob all the officers they met
on the way, but a squad of police and infantry
succeeded In protecting the officers, and order
was finally restored, although the streets are
Ftill being patrolled by troops.
YO 777 1-YA'N' FOR DOfLL YET
CENTRAL FEDERATED UNION WANTS TO
BEE IF HIS ACTIONS SUIT HIS WORKS.
The Central Federated Union had a visit yester
day from Alderman Doxill, of the. Xlth Assembly
District, who came to assure the Central Federated
Union that he would stand by that body In its ef
forta to get the labor clauses Inserted In the Penn
sylvania tunnel contract. Before be spoke, a letter
from him to the Central Federated Union, asking
that body to have aa many members present as
possible at the hearing on the Pennsylvania tunnel
franchise on Wednesday, In the chamber of the
Board of Aldermen, to assist him In preventing
the passage of the franchise until the road agreed
to the labor clause, was read. He was convinced
that the Pennsylvania road would introduce the
Italian padrone system in the tunnel work if this
clause was not In the franchise.
Alderman Doull'l address was. In substance, the
same an his letter.
In reply to the question if Charles F. Murphy,
leader of Tammany Hall, had Instructed the Tam
many aldermen to vote for th« franchise a« it v.as,
he replied: "It is a lie. The members can vote as
they like.'!
Some one proponed a vote of thanks for the alder
ma:] but all the delegates were not prepared for
tills.
"He will be deserving of thanks when the whole
matter is ended If he la as sincere as he appears to
be," said Delegate Fltigerrvld. "Walt until then
and he'll get all th« glory that is necessary."
Delegates were Instructed to see that their re
spective unions sent men to represent them at the
franchise hearing, and to protest against the con
tract being signed without the labor clauses.
WELCOME FOR THE RET. J. J. DOUGHERTY.
A reception, and entertainment will be given by
the one thousand five hundred children at th« home
of Mount Lorelto, Pleasant Plains, to-day to wel
come home the Right Re.v. John J. Dougherty, who
ha* returned from a trip abroad. Invitations to
Archbishop Farley and many prominent clergy
have been issued by Mother Superior Catherine In
churgc of the institution.
J?EW STEAMER SIBERIA ARRIVES.
The new steamer Siberia, one of the largest ves
seta ever built In America, reached this port to-day
direct from the yards ,if her hull.lrri* nt Newport
News, She Is Intended for the transpacific passen
ger trade between s.»n Francisco »nd Hong Kong
by way of Yokohama. Nagasaki and ShnnßhaT
Her contract speed Is cljrluee.n knots, hut. with her
IS.'"*" horsepower It Is expected that she will be
able to make twenty Unots casllj. - .
To Care ■ Cold in One Day-
Take tv«atlv« Hromo Quinine Tablets. MI d'-uisiftU
rafund th* money If ii faiig to cure. E. W. Grove's
■Lcn&lur* uon each bo*. 29a
EXCHANGE RISES A T MA NIL A .
BUSINESS SUFFERING FROM THE FALL
IX SILVER.
Manila, Nov. 211.— Silver has suffered a further
decline In value. The government has issued a
proclamation making the official rate 260 for
100 gold; the former rate was 230.
The possibility of the adoption by the Strait*
Settlements of a gold standard and the reports
current that Mexico is about to abandon the sil
ver standard have greatly weakened the Indian
and Asiatic silver market. Large quantities of
Mexican silver are coming here from China, as
it Is believed that much gold Is being circulated
here on account of government expenditures.
The fact that American trade is going to
China and the losses In sliver are seriously af
fecting the Insular Treasury and business in
terests generally. The rapidly changing rates
embarrass the business houses, making it al
most impossible to fix prices. The native offi
cials are beginning to petition for the payment
of their salaries in gold, and the demand for a
fixed stable currency is universal.
The Secretary of Finance says: "There is
nothing to indicate a more hopeful future for
the currency question. It will probably be as
bad as now if not worse until Congress acts
and gives us a stable currency."
The government has increased the constabu
lary force in the island of Leyte. and has or
dered a careful investigation of the condition
and genera! situation there. The law making
highway robbery a capital crime has been
translated int.-. the various dialects of the
islands, and the constabulary is circulating;
copies of the law throughout the districts in
fested by ladroneism. The government is de
sirous of warning the bandits before taking ad
vantage of the new law. ■.»«..«
The cholera is spreading among the • >> ' f>r ' >
towns on the west coast of Mindanao, and tnei
is much destitution among the people. Quaran
tine increases the suffering by stopping work
and the movement of supplies, General Daws
has telegraphed to General Sumner directing
the distribution of food supplies to the suffer*™
in the infected and quarantined towns.
The disease is again disappearing from this
city.
MEXICO DISTURBED BY FALL IN SILVER.
MAT FORCE THE' REPUBLIC TO PLACE IT
PELF ON GOLD BASIS.
Mexico City. Nov. 23.— The heavy advance in
the gold premium has caused great excitement
in financial find business circle*. The premium
has been rising all week, and has reached 171.
It id generally conceded that a gold standard
cannot long be delayed, us silver fluctuates In
value so rapidly that It cannot he relied on a* a
basil" of currency. The present rise, it Is be
lieved probably will he followed by a reaction
but on all hands it Is thought that a new and
permanent level has been established.
TRANSPORT I NO ALLS FLOATED.
CAPTAIN BRUOIRE WAS TRYING TO TAKE
A SHORT CUT INTO LEOASPI HARBOR.
Manila. Nov. 2:l.— The United States transport
Ingalls. with General Miles and par.y on board,
which struck on a reef while entering th^ har
bor of Legaspl. Luzon, Saturday, floated at hhlh
tide the same day, and will arrive here next
Monday. The vessel struck on a coral reef
while going at a speed of nine knots. The shock
raised the shir» two feet along Its entire length.
Captain Umpire has explained that he was
trying to save twenty minutes by running
through the charted channel between th«! reefs
In th" centre of the Gulf of Albay. In a straight
lin* for Legaspl, Instead of following the usual
channel. A Spanish vessel, which was asked to
giv« assistance, aakod 100.000 Mexican riuNars
as salvage, but these terms ere declined. Cap
tain Brngir« pumped out the. vessel's water bal
last und *he floated without aid.
It Is believed thai th« Ingalls is undamaged.
"FRIARS WILL STAY." SAYS CHAPELLE.
ARCHBISHOP ASSERTS FREE MASON? AND
PHEACHEfta COSTER OPPOSITION.
Con«-<*rnlnK Honsignor Chapelle'i protracted visit
to Rome, about which ii*- •- In* been much com
men! In th<* public print.-, a correspondent in that
city, who professes to speak *.vlth authority, has
this to pay:
Thr< Archbishop hii!i!""lf Informs in* that the pi n
clpal reason of bis presence her* i« connected with
bit own dtoi • (New-Orleans) ami dficc.itf.in. H<
does not however, hesitate to express hi* views
nb'.ut tlin ■tous questions of th<-< Philippine*,
lie has hud ample opportunity to aoqulr*' a thor
ougti knowledge of the*.-, for he has studied then
on th- ground and In an official capacity. His views
are Interesting Ju»l now, since the. l!»>t few weeks
have .•»..-. a recrudescence of the agitation relative
to the l>anl*hmnt or th« continued presence of th
friars In th* archipelago On this point the Arch
bishop Is very clear. The friars will stay In the
Philippine*. The nclt.uion against them has been
"rigged" by th- Free Masons In the Philippine*
.-ii •! by the preachers In the ri>if.».i States;. Mon
slgnor Chapelle says emphatically thai he know*
from personal examination thai the charges against
them «.r« mostly false, and, when not false, grosMy
exaggerated He said that in the three year* and
a half that th« American* have been In the Islands
not ■ single friar has been convicted of disloyalty
to th» American Government, nhli-> over fifty of
th.- native priests, who have found such (apparent)
favor under the new regime have been condemned
for political offences.
With regard to the noiwesnlons Of the friars, while
these were originally described na b.-ttiK enormous.
Monnlgnor Chapella remark* that, now thttt their
purchase has been decided upon the American
Government professes to regard them as worthless
"except for political pur pones." Worthless or not.
they were administered by the friars In ;i most i"
neflcent way. The rents were moderate, and
amounted to only about S. - per rent of their capital
value They were devoted largely to the support
of schools, seminaries and charitable Institution*
There »ire in the Philippines to-day, says his urnre,
many private companies, each of which owns more
property In the islands than all the religious orders
combined.
Finally. Monstgnor rhapella In justly Indignant
at th. way the Interests of <'ath<-i|j>. education have
been sacriflced In th« Islands. Granting that if
whs necessary to Introduce the American school
system Into the new possessions, it was certainly
unnecessary to send seven Protestants ami many
of them rabidly anti-Catholic to every Pathetic
among the superintendent!:. inspectors and teachers
Appointed by the Ignited States Government to re
organize the education system. These statements
have been dented, but the statistics are there to
prove them. Arehblshon Chapeile will remain In
Home until the • nd of November
WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY FOR FtftBERXEX
STATIONS v it. l. BE ESTABLISHED IN N'EWFOCN'D
AND LABRADOR TO IIKI.P THEM.
[iiT TEi.Er.uArn to tub TntHNi: )
St. John's, K. F.. Nov. It— lf the experiment*
now being carried on by Mr. Marconi In Tape
Breton are successful, stations with iii* wireless
apparatus will be established at Caps Race and
Cap* Pine, on the southern seaboard of Newfound
land, and at Cape Bauld, on Belle Isle Strait, to aM
steamert and fishermen In traversing the danger
sono along the Newfoundland coast. The system
will also be extended to Labrador for use by the
fishing fleet during th* summer season,
An arrangement to this effect was reached In
London some time ago. The Labrador service will
be a great boon to the fishermen, about twenty
thousand of whom visit that peninsula every sum'
mer In Quest of cod. The severity of the weather is
such, especially in winter, that no telegraph wirei
can bo maintained there.
TO EXPEL UNDESIRABLE FOREIGNERS.
Buenos Ayrea, Nov. Is.— The Senate and Chamber
have pns.se. i n •►ill which authorizes the expulsion
of undesirable foreigners.
TORTURING BULGARIAN PEASANTS.
Constantinople. Nov. 23.— According to advices
from Monastir, eighty-seven miles weal of Su
loniCS, the Turks are Inflicting terrible tortures on
Bulgarian peasants In order to extort confessions
which may lead to the discovery of revolutionary
bands.
/. |V/i run the STATE ri/i'A'.
Southampton. Long lelacd, Nov. 23.— The land
which the State Park Commission has recom
mended near this village fur the proposed Mate
purk. comprises a tract of about seven Ihnasaaii
acres, situated to the wet and northwest of thin
village. This i- nearly all forest land, nnd Includes
several fresh water ponds of considerable area, and
bat a large frontage on Peeoalc Eaj. a< well as
many brooks running through it. it Is In all re
dpeCU well adapted to the purposes to which It is
proposed to d*VOt« It All the property owner? In
terest"! have signified their willingness t.i sell their
lands to the State at a reasonable figure.
Waltham Watches.
" Put a girdle round
about the world."
"The Perfected American Watch/ an illustrated book
of interesting information about patches, TVtll be sent
free upon request.
American Watiham Watch Company,
Walfham, Mass.
The selection of Hangings, Carpets and Draperies should be the work of an ex
pert in order to secure thoroughly pleasing and artistic effects. Our Depart
ment of
INTERIOR "DECORATION
has unequalled facilities for taking entire charge of the decoration of refined
homes. We execute the most artistic and elaborate schemes, submitting
sketches in color to suit individual tastes.
Broadway % m Street
vo rroHT n\ gorf mystery.
SCENE OF HER DEATH TO BE RE-ENACTED
IN THE RUSSIAN'S ROOM.
' Part;", Nov. 23.— The Investigation Into the cir
cumstances el Mrs. Gore's death has made no
progress during the last forty-eight hours, and
will probably remain at a standstill until Tues
day. the day tlxcd by the investigating magis
trate for the examination of witnesses* and the
formality of the -reconstruction of the scene."
which will take place In the room in which the
tragedy occurred and la th* presence of I>e Ryd
■ewski. The latter will be closely cross-examined,
and it Is expected that the scene will be re-en
acted an exactly as possible.
M. Bertillon, the expert erlmlnologist. will to
morrow photograph and make a diagram of the
room. He is Ktudying the case with a view to
the ruing trial because, even though the mag
istrate may adopt the theory of an accident, It
will be necessary to try De Rydzewekt on the
charge of committing homicide by imprudence,
and he hi liable to be mulcted in damages for
the benefit Of Mrs. Gore's heirs should any ap
pear.
Meanwhile, it la evident that strong efforts
are being nu»d<s to influence public opinion in
favor of IV Rydz-wpki. The newspapers, with
hardly an exception, adopt the view of a pure
accident, and manifest much sympathy for D«
Rydzewskt. Interview? with his Russian friends
are published, in which they speak of him in
the highest terms and dwell upon the gentleness
of his character. Thus, the councillor of the
Kusslnn Embassy, who has alone been admitted
to *e<» De Rydsewvkl 'In the infirmary of the
prison to which he «M transferred on ac
count of a throat trouble. Is quoted as saying:
• De Rydzewnkl is much more affected by the
frlirhtful death Of his friend than by what has
happened to himself. His attitude i« that of an
Innocent man who does not doubt that th" truth
■.rill soon be proclaimed."
MKS. GORE'S OHIO RELATIVES
Cleveland Nor. tt-Mrn Helen Stogdltl Oore.
who met a tragic death ha Part*. France. Wedaea
.iay .is former » resident, of this city. With
her, mother and brothers «he lived on Broadway.
i,-" I ,-• . ■ i Her Cleveland
Ravenna relative, li.iv. ha.l numerooe *""
KlbtflnVnyo. which she had e*l
.lon for the Russian Dt RydaeasM.
WHALES WASHED ASHORE.
TOOTHLESS. FAR FROM HOME. SLAIN BY
STEAMSHIP. THEY ARE VIEWED
BY HOLIDAY CROWD.
fur Tr.t.rr.n.\rn to the rail nk.l
Atlantic City. N. J.. Nov. 23.— This morning
two rare mammals of the deep were washed
ashore at Forkrd River, on the Jersey coast
They were two « hales, commonly known is the
"eviction" variety, having no teeth. The larger
measured seventy feet in length, was thirty
feet in circumference, and weighs about tea
tons. Its cnlf. or the baby whale, was eighteen
feet long. They ha.l alternate ribs of black and
white hide, and hud evidently been dead for
urine days Their carcasses lie near the life
Bavins station, and during the day were viewed
by hundreds of people. Captain David L. Tar
nell of the lit"" guard*, holds the theory that
the Whales were killed by no mo passing steamer.
They are very rare In this latitude, anil had
evidently wandered far from their usual haunts.
SHOT \'EAR HEART It) ACCIDEST.
PHILIPPINE SO!,DIKRS OWN PISTOL
WOUNDfI HIM— HE WILL PROBABLY DIE.
Klmer. N. .'.. Nov. 2.1 (Special).— la ■ peculiar ae
ciO<»rit last night Thomas C. Murphy, a Philippine
«oldler and an athlete, was probably fatally hurt.
He h.id played basketball with the Elmer team
against Cohanzick, of Bridgeton. and aft« the
game had pone to Handle's restaurant for luncheon.
Taking off his overcoat he laid It on a stool If side
him. and in Bom« manner a pistol that was hi one
of his pockets was Git* ttarc*d. The bullet struck
him Just over the heart, and he fell with a groan
to tii. floor. He received prompt medical at'«nttun.
but has he.Mi in a serious condition all day, and
internal hemorrhage is feared.
■inH\ DILLOS 111
the IRIbU LEADRH nneoMEs sick BVPDEXL.T
WHILE DRIVING.
Chicago, Nov. U. John Dillon, the lri«l-. leader,
who came to Chicago to address ■ meeting here
to-night In celebration of the Manchester martyrs'
anniversary, was taken suddenly in to-day, and
was unable to appeal ..t th«. meeting. While driv
ing to-day Mr. Dillon suffered a chin. which was
followed by it high fever, und to-nisht hl« temper
ature is 104. The attending physician cave out
the Information that while Mr. Dillon i«» not seri
ously ill. ho will be confined to hla room for sev
eral days.
There was great disappointment among the audi
ence which (ill. the Auditorium, when it was an
nounced that Mr. Dillon was not able to address
(he meeting. The meeting, which was held under
the auspices of the United Irish Hocletles of Cook
• 'aunty, was a success financially, nearly $KM)CO
being secured for the Irish cause.
ANNOUNCEMENT.
The Corn Exchange Bank
Twenty-eighth Street Branch,
Located on the corner of Broadway snd
Twenty-eighth Street, will
Open on November 24th, 1902.
%P^MJ M LtJll
3LACK or GREEN
Always gives uniform and
satisfactory results, be
cause quality, flavor and
taste are right. Its great
er strength as compared
with other teas makes it
more economical, the tea
pot requiring only half as
much.
CEYLON TEA
Always uniformly excellent
HALF POUND, 30c. ALL GROCERS.
SEID FOR FREE SAMPLE PACKAGE
St KM AN BROS..
Hudson and North Hoore Streets, N. Y. City.
ESTABLISHED 1 0. 1838.
Knox Hats
ALWAYS THE STANDARD
17
17% 17%
Seventeen Per Cent—
It rounds easy— but
rust stop a. moment
and Consider tuhat it
means to increase
your business more
than one-sixth in one
year.
The
Tribune's
INCREASED
17%
During the Vast yeaf
17% 17%
17%

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