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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 25, 1902, Image 1

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YouV ou LXII N°- 20,463.
BLOCK SUSPICIOUS JOB.
ARMORY SIT/:, ASSESSED AT
$5,500, JUMPS TO $56,000.
I/,r \M- WELLS HAVE COURTS PRE-
W.NT PURCHASE <>X TROOP c
PLOT CHARGES OF AT
TEMPTEH RBIBERY.
Chnrpfs of corninticn In connection with the
purchas-- <f :.n armory site for Tr<<op C, of
Brooklyn. h:-v«- been made to the Mayor. The
Corpora tii'-i Counsel's nflice and the Tax De
partment ;m- a good deal exercised over dls
coveri- s made In connection v. it:, condemna
tion proce^diegs l-sim under the Van Wyck
administration for acquiring a Bite for an
armory f ir tv- Brooklyn cavalry organization.
It looks as :f trickery wes resorted to to hove
the city p:iy $SIJ.tXM) for ,t site in Bedford-aye..
betwern President and Union sts.. Brooklyn.
That ■■ now assessed at <• hi Th- property
h?.F a frontage of :il»-.ut two hundred et, but
BedfoT'i-ave] at thai point has not yet Keen cnt
through.
It is alleged that '"1.'..'.' i I was offered to an offi
cer of Troop C to push along the ■■ mnation
of th^ Bedford-ave^ Fit", and was refused by
him, and also that $*2.r»00 was offered to a mem
ber of the Armory Board t<> h--»!p the alleged
Fteal through. Lastly. It is alleged that a mem
ber of the Armory Board is financially inter
ested In a firm which held an option on the pro
posed armory site.
The alleged steal was stopped in a dramatic
fashion in the Mayor's office only a few day?
apo President Wells of th* Tax Board and
one of his assistants, a veteran in the tax office,
callei on the Mayor, and the Tax Commission
ers' assistant said:
"Mr. Mayor, this Troop C armory proceeding
is a [need steal. The site is not worth one
half what the commission says. It is assessed
for only f&SOG "
"But you are too late." replied the Mayor,
"the Law Department has just informed me,
and here is the letter (taking it out of a
pigeonhole), that the Armory Board passed a
resolution last summer approving the findings
of the commission. Their action vests in the
city, under the new charter, the title to the site
four months after the passage of the resolution."
DISCOVERY MADE IN TIME.
"The Armory Board never passed such a reso
lution." said the tax clerk.
"Here is the certification, or statement, from
Assistant Corporation Counsel Coombs that the
action was taken." said the Mayor. »Then fol
lowed a quick investigation, and Mr. Coombs, of
the Brooklyn department, soon sent the Mayor
word that he. Coombs, had been mistaken, and
that the Armory Board had not passed the reso
lution. The discovery was made on the Satur
day before the Monday on which the advertising
to close the whole proceeding was scheduled to
begin.
Thereafter the Mayor took a lively interest in
the Troop C armory case and discovered that
Assistant Corporation Counsel Jerome W.
Coombs, of the Brooklyn Law Department, had
been deceived into certifying a proceeding- that
Is characterized in the Tax Department as a
$40,000 Job. Mr. Coombs assisted' in revealing
the merits of the transaction and on his motion
the "Supreme Court has ordered a discontinu
ance of the entire condemnation proceeding,
with a stipulation that the property owners
shan be reimbursed to the extent of cash dis
bursements actually made or obligations "honor
ably Incurred."
As nearly as co lid be learned last night, after
the Law Department had closed for the day, the
facts are substantially as follows:
On December 31. 1901, the last day of the
Van Wyck administration, Desmond Dunne,
John Pyburn «nd William McLaughlln, were
appointed a commission by the Supreme Court
to do their part in condemnation proceedings for
the acquirement of a Troop C armory site. Mr.
Dunne is an advertising agent. John Pyburn
was Doe a police commissioner in Brooklyn,
nr.ri MeLaughlin is a relative of "Boss" Mc-
Lsqgnlln. The commission set to work to deter
mine th" value of the armory site. The guards
men grew impatient over delays, and urged
ppeerjy action by the commission and city offi
cials. At first the legal features of the pro
ceedings were left in the hands of Assistant Cor
poration Counsel Harris, but later they were
transferred to the Brooklyn department, and
Intrusted to Assistant Corporation Counsel
Jerome. W. Coombs. A member of Mr. Coombs's
family Is seriously ill, and he was not able to
go deeply into the case when seen last night at
his me, No. 113 Montague-Bt., Brooklyn, by a
Tribur.% reporter.
STATEMENT OF MR. COOMBS.
"No sooner wan the Troop C armory case
turned over to me," said Mr. Coombs, "than
great pressure was brought to bear to have the
matter expedited. The troopers are In the old
34th Regiment Armory, in North Portland-aye.,
find they need better quarters. lat once began
to push matters. Last summer I was informed
that the Armory Board had formally acted on
th» 2te question. I called up the office of Mr
Harris, the assistant in the Manhattan office
In charge of condemnations, and asked if the
Armory Board had acted favorably on the site.
A clerk said Mr. Harris was on his vacation,
hut that I was correctly informed; that is, the
Armory Board had approved the site. Under
th*- charter the city must pay interest on a
Pite four months after the necessary resolution
acquiring such a site is passed. 1 then tried to
get the report of the commissioners, but there
were delays. Finally, after the advertisement
•as prepared for 'The City Record,* 1 found
that the commission had signed a report In fa
vor of paying (43,600 for the proposed site. As
this wbf ■.)•<•• what the ground was worth, I
was astonished and began to investigate. Then
the report of the commission was withdrawn
find a new report, signed only by Pyburn and
McLaughlln. was substituted. This raised the
award for the site to |56.000. Mr. Dunne had
stood out against the .<4;!.»"i ( award, and he
«oiji^ not sign the substitute report, because,
«* he informed me. he thought it excessive. I
«rr>lif-d to the court to have the whole proceed
ing discontinued. The court has Just granted
the necessary order, with the stipulation that
property owners and others posses claims
against the city on account of the proceedings
shall be reimbursed only to the extent of cash
actually disbursed or obligations honorably In
curred. I an Bree to say that the entire pro
ceeding Is full of peculiar features."
Among the allegations now being Investigated
is one that a real estate dealer offered a tax
oftV-ial $2£oo to "keep bis mouth shut" and let
the deal go through th< Armory Board.
S ')'K LIGHTS ON THE PROCEEDINGS.
The condemnation proceedings abound in in
i«?sting ■de lights. The site tentatively se
ixted for the armory building was at one time
»*ld on an option by McNulty & Fitzgerald.
They sold it to J. H. Rugglea. who in turn sold
it to Charles Cooper. Mr Cooper and Captain
Char!*-8 I. Debevolse. of Troop C. had a con-
S-.-l y*stprday with Mayor Low, James L.
*«** y^.j Chzr)mz V Foraes. members of U*«
UNITED STATES MINIBTER SQUIERS'S RESIDENCE, WITH CARRIAGE IN FRONT,
Armory Board. It is understood Mr. Cooper
was ready with a proposition t<> the hoard to
Bel] the Bedford-aye. Bite at a greatly reduced
figure— a merely nominal prim, it w.is said. The
conference came to naught.
Captain Debevoise of Troop C vai at the
North Portland-pve. armory last night when
seen by a Tribune re] orter.
"No." the captain, somewhat hesitatingly,
"it is nol true that sl.'.."hn> was offered to me to
use my influence in favor of th<- Bedford-aye
Flt*». I have heard many rumors of money being
used in connection with securing a site for our
ry, but no one approached me with a cor
rupt proposition. It Ls a matter of record that,
under the last administration, when the r "
was first talked of, I went I efore the Armory
Board and said that I would not have anything
to do with the Bedford-aye. Bite so long as the
land was hold by a certain real estate man, now
dead. The result of my attitude thon was that
the prop! rty soon changed hands I was with
Mr. Cooper to-day when we saw members of the
Armory Board. I fear that the Bedford-aye
pit" will have to he abandoned. When we picked
out that site two years ago we thought our
troubles were pretty near over, hut it Beemfl
now that they have only fairly begun. While
I do n^t believe that the city should pay more
for a site than it is worth in the selling mar
ket, still I think it ought to be willing to pay
as much as $srt.<W> for a desirable site. Inas
much as the site for Squadron A's armory is
worth nearer $1 .«)<iO.Oi>o than $80,000."
NOT RECOGNIZING ADDICKS.
REAPPOINT.MENT OF DELAWARE DIS
TRICT ATTORNEY EXPLAINED AT
THE WHITE HOUSE.
Waphinßton, Nov. 21.— The following state
ment was given out at the White House this
afternoon:
On his return to 'Washington the President
found that Pome misapprehension existed as to
the reappointment of the United States Attorney
for Delaware, and authorised the following
statement regarding it:
"Mr. Byrne was originally appointed United
States Attorney for Delaware by President M«*-
Kinley. President Roosevelt knew him person
ally. In the opinion <>f the President, he h;«d
rendered excellent service for the public good
In nit/re than <>ne direction, and he had been a
Htanch supporter of the President when he ran
for Governor and afterward. He was reported
by the Department of Justi'-o as a tit and com
petent district attorney, and the President bad
entire confident- in his ability and Integrity.
He accepted the nomination for Congress. Other
district attorneys and marshals had accepted
such nominations without being requested to re
sign, but, in view of the factional fight in I>«-Ia
ware. the President thought that Mr. Hyrne
should resign, which be accordingly did. When
the election was over the President rr appointed
him without having given him the slightest pre
vious indication that such was his Intention. H«
would have been reappolnted without regard to
the circumstances under which he ran or the
faction with which he was allied."
District Attorney Fyrne belongs to the Addickp
faction in Delaware and the Presidents action In
reappolnting him has been criticised In some quar
ters as a recognition of that faction, and as show-
In*? an Intention on the part of the President to
allow A.idicks to control the federal patronage of
Delaware
MAYOR BRADLEY RESIGNS.
AT THF BAME TIME IK OFFERS TO RKLI,
SHORE FRONT PROPERTY TO AS
i;ii;v PARK for jino.nnn
Anbury Park. N. J, Nov. 24 —It now looks an
if Asbuty Park would own its beach front be
fore the nf.v year. Mayor James A. Bradley
tendered Ills resignation at to-night's session of
the common Council. Mr. Bradley owns the
valuable Chore front property, and it was nece P
sary for him to resign before the municipality
could el"** a bargain with him for his holding
With tb<- resignation came a tender from the
"Founder." through a legal representative, to
dispose of his beach, pavilions, fishing pier.
board walk, bath houses, riparian rights and his
extensive sewer system for ?150,000. and with
no restrictions attached to the proposed trans
fer. David Harvey, who represented Mr. Brad
1, v said the offer was made in good faith, and
Henry C Wlnsor. a close friend, said the
"Founder- would sign the deeds in two weeks
if the aldermen meant business. Alderman Kirk
bride favored accepting the offer at once The
sewer system alone, h^ said, was worth 170.000.
and the other property, exclusive of the famous
board walk, was worth the price asked for the
whole business
Alderman Keator. the prime mover in the
scheme to eject Mr. Bradley from the beach,
which he asserts already belongs to the people,
said he would gladly agree to accept Mr. Brad
ley', offer provided he would Include In the
transfer his rights to Heal. Sunset and Wesley
lakes and 'h- little parks surrounding them, as
well SS other parks situated about the
resort Mr Bradley's lawyer intimated that he
would no dOUbt, be only too glad to Include
these holdings In th, deal. The aldermen, in
order m give Mr. Bradley an opportunity to do
so. laid the resignation and transfer proposition
over for a week.
[iX'b^u Suw Yorx'Ud Oucag-Advu
NEW-YORK. TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 25. 1902. -FOURTEEN PAGES -^TbSRnKASS^
SCENES IX HAVANA AND PERSONS WHO FIGURED IN THE RIOTS.
H. O. SQTTTERS.
TTnited States Minister to Cuba.
roxriLTATTox rx i relax n
BPBBCHES MY THE EARL OF nrm.EV ANT>
MR. REDMOND ATTRACT ATTENTION.
London, Nov. 24 Speeches which were ■]•
livered to-day by the Karl of Dudley, th<- ds«
Lord Lieutenant for Ireland, and by John Red
mond, the Irish leader, have aroused much com
ment as striking ;■ more hopeful note of con
ciliation in thr- [rish question.
The Karl of Dudley, accompanied by the
countess, was making an offli^al visit to n- ■:
fast, and in replj to the speeches delivered at
ills reception he declared that he had corns to
Ireland with t: ■ plrii of impartial in
quiry that animated Mr. Chamberlain In going
to Bouth Afri L Tlie Irish Viceroy, (■
ing then to deal with the land question as th<>
crux of th>- lri>h problem, suggested thai a
p.-rt of round table conference of representa
tives of the landlords, tenants and other in
tfi»sts in Ireland should be held, to endeavor ! f >
arrive at a mutual v ng and possibly
son..' tch/nne for t;.. good of Ireland »i»d thr
Increasi happiness I
While Lor.! Dudley was speaking I
John Redmond was making in equally i
tory speech nt a demonstration of the I.
branches of the Irish League at the suburb
of Bermondsey ll» was Intensely gratified, he
paid, to Bnd on returning from th*» United E
that the political situation In Ireland was
I than he had known it for twenty-five
years. While all rumors of Irish "deals" with
were untrue, the political situa
tion in Ireland had undergone an extraordinary
and radical change, and he believed that no
English minister since the union ha.<l ha>! such
a chance as the Irish Becretary, Georg< Wynd
ham, now had. The time had arrived, as 11 '!:■!
in every struggle, when the combatants were
grown tired of the contest, and were taking
counsel as to whether it could not he brought
to a satisfactory end.
For the iitst time in Irish history, the majorit)
of the landlords were speaking words of £•'"■!
sense, conciliation and reason. The tenants
were united, and a moderate and quite limited
• the Imperial credit would enable a settle
ment of the land question to be brought about
At the same time, concluded Mr Redmond, this
would nol affect the aspirations of the
people for home rule, and be warned the go\
ernment that if last session's Land bin were
reintroduced the Irish members would "tight
it line by line "
"The Daily News," In connection with the
speech made by the Earl of Dudley, publishes
.: report that the government intends to deal
with the relations <>f I>ni>ii:i castle to the Irish
administration, and that it is considering a
project which is not dissimilar to Colonial Sec
retary Chamberlain's original plan of national
councils.
BTURGIB LOSES OPERA CASK
MAURICE GJRAU'S CONTENTION CTPHEL.D
MANY STAND AT FIRST NICJHT.
The decision of the Eighth District Court, dis
missing the suit brought by Fire Commissioner
Sturgls against Maurice Grau, the proprietor of
the Metropolitan Opera House, to recover penal
ties for allowing persons to stand back of the
orchestra seats In the opera house, on the
ground that the foyer was a passageway, was
yesterday confirmed by the Appellate Terra of
the Supreme Court by a majority of two to one.
JuFtice Mac Lean dissented from the opinions
expressed by his colleagues. Justices Freedman
and Blanchard
Fire Commissioner Pturgis alleged that 311
persons were found standing in the foyer one
night when his officials visited th*> opera house.
Pome of them sat down against the wall during
the Interval between the acts, and Commis
sioner Sturgis contended that the blocking up
of the passage was a danger to the public in the
case of lire.
Mr. Grau asserted that the law had not been
violated by him. and said thai the space in the
foyer was not a passageway within the mean-
Ing of the charter, at there had been seats there
formerly which had been removed, and where
standing room was allowed
Justice Mac Lean, in referring to the provision
of the charter, said that when Mr. Grau re
moved the seats be voluntarily conceded the
space occupied by them, and made that space
h passageway
Last night the place behind the brass railing,
formerly rilled with chairs, was emptied of them,
while persons standing packed the space back to
the entrance. Throughout the house, even m
the gallery, persons standing were in full force.
HUNTER NOT TO BE PROSECUTED.
SLAYERS OF FITZGERALD WILL NOT BK
TRIED UNLESS THE GUATEMALAN
GOVERNMENT ACTS.
Washington. Nov. 24.— Nothing has been heard
here from the Guatemalan government respecting
the killing of William Fitzgerald by Godfrey
Hunter, Jr.. last Friday, In Guatemala City. It
Is Raid at the State Department that nothing can
be done by this government toward prosecuting
Hunter, and therefore it appears that unless the
Guatemalan government chooses to act the guilty
persons will -scape trial.
BRIARCLIFF CREAM— THE MOST DELICIOUS
and nourishing. A breakfast luxury.— Advt-
TOMAS ESTRADA PALMA.
President of Cuba.
PRESIDENT PALMAS OFFICIAL RESIDENCE! IX HAVANA.
BLOW FORTHREE PLATOONS
PARTRIDGE MOBILIZES THREE HTJN
DBED AND POETT-EIGHT RESERVES
IN NINETY MINUTES.
UNDER SYSTEM PATROLMEN WANT TT TOOK
SEVERAL HOURS Ti > GET ONE. HUN
DRED AND NINETT-ONE TO
PARK-AYE.
The order "Send re.«=erves to the Grand Central
Palace!" went over thi- police wires to twenty
six police stations In Manhattan at 3:06 p. m.
yesterday. It surprise,! th.- police ,-<t all th.- sta
tions, from Leonard-st. to One-hundred-and
twenty-sizth-st. It had been sent out by Police
Commissioner Partridge at the suggestion of
Deputy Commissioner Piper, and when the bells
were being rung for turning out the reserves
the two officials, with Inspector Cortrtght,
walked Into th* Qrand Central Palace at Forty
f< urth-.it. and Lexhagton-ave.
About four minutes later a squad of police,
a roundsman, arrived at the palace
■>n a dead run. They had come from the sta
tion in Ba d they were as
hed when they were told to march upstairs
to the Mg hall and wail th'-re. Next came a
squad from East Thim -tlfth-st .. then one from
West Thirtleth-st., then one from West Porty
•h-st., and then one from East Sixt]
enth-st. Later the reserves from stations
further uptown and further downtown arrived.
came In patrol wagons, some by trolley
cats and some by the elevate* trains. Some had
roundsmen and some hail not. Two of the
squads were headed bj sergeants. The only
captain to appear was Captain Lantry. of East
Fifty-flrst'Stt., who arrived an hour later than
the squad from his station. It was about 4:30
p. m. when the squad from West One-hundrcd
twenty-flfth-st. arrived
The mobilization created surprise which was
nol restricted to the bine. -oats, a great crowd
gathered and asked questions. ■•What can be
the matter?" was "ii the tongues of thousands
Expectations of a raid on Canfleld's were rife
Borne thought wholesale raids on poolrooms had
been planned. Thoughts of some disaster
troubled many. Th ■ arriving police thought
something dreadful had happened when they
reached Forty-fourth st and saw the crowds,
but they were mystified when they got the word
to enter the hall and wait further orders.
When the reserves were lined up In the hall
for inspection and told to return to their sta
tions, us they had been summoned merely to
ascertain how many men could be got together
at short notice. It dawned on most of them that
they had helped to demonstrate the superiority
of the two platoon system over the three platoon
system, which they had clamored for, and
which had been tried in Commissioner Murphy's
time. Many of them looked extremely crest
fallen as they left the building. They had
counted noses in the hall and had found that
34S men had answered the call in nn hour and
thirty minutes. They remembered that under
the three platoon system it had taken several
hours to get 101 police.men to the Murray Mill
Hotel when it was partly wrecked by a dyna
mite explosion In Park-aye. at Forty-flrst-st.
Commissioner Partridge abolished the three <
platopn system because he was convinced that
it was robbing the city of efficient patrol ser
vice at night. That fact had been demonstrated
in several ways. He was of the opinion, also,
that the three platoon system had not provided ]
proper reserves. Yesterday's trial, which was :
made partly to enable Captain Piper to take
observations and make plans for Increasing the
speed of calling out police. reserves, was made
also to enable the Commissioner to compare the
numbers of the police responding to the call
with the numbers that responded to the disas
ter in Park-aye. at Forty-flrst-st. Late in the
afternoon the Commissioner said.
I ordered the mobilization of the reserves of
twenty-six precincts this afternoon, to gain In- '
formation as to their efficiency. I wanted to . ••• '
what portion of the reserves would respond to an !
emergency call, and how many would not respond i
and the reasons why. It la understood, of course
that some portion of the reserve is sick, in court |
or absent on leave, and it Is also understood that !
one or two men will always be retained at the .sta- I
tion for house duty. ;
I selected the Fifth. Sixth. '. Seventh, Eighth. I
Ninth. Tenth, Eleventh. Twelfth, Thirteenth, Four- !
teenth, Fifteenth. Sixteenth. Seventeenth. Elgh- j
• nth Nineteenth. Twentieth. Twenty-first. Twen
ty-second. Twenty-fourth. Twenty-fifth. Twenty
sixth, Twenty-eighth. Twenty-ninth. Thirtieth. i
Thirty-first and Thirty-second precincts for this ;
mobilization, because these were the precincts j
whose reserves were called to the subway explosion j
at Forty-first-st. and Park-aye on January 27,
and I desired to compare the results obtained in !
January last, under the three platoon system, with !
those attained to-day, under the two platoon sys- |
tern. The calls were sent out without any previous
warning to the precincts. I designated the Grand !
Central Palace as the rendezvous, as that was the ;
nearest place to the point where the explosion oc- !
curred.
On January 27 6 sergeants, 1C roundsmen and 169 j
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN.
A competent ladies" maid renders her services to
lady patrons of the Pennsylvania Special en routs
between New-York and Chicago.— Advt.
patrolman, or a total of 191, responded, and to-day
1 captain. 2 sergeants, 17 roundsmen and 318 patrol
men, or a total ol 34\ reported.
Captain Piper noted that some of the police
men who answered the call for reserves yester
day had long night sticks, while others had only
"billies." He intends to have a regulation in
force soon by which the police answering the
call at any hour of the day or night will be
prepared for business with the most effective
club. Pome of the captains probably will be
railed to the Central Office to-day to explain
why they or their sergeants did not answer the
call. Captain Piper said that at the time of
the explosion in Ma ilson Square on election
night Inspector Brooks had a thousand police
men in the square. He thought that probably
was the largest force of police ever called to
maintain order in a similar area in thr city.
IGLESIAS QUITS; COSTA RICA.
XX PRESIDENTS LIFE HADE UNBEARABLE
AT SAN JOSE.
Pan Jose. Costa Rica. Nov. -J4.— Rafael Ik
leslas, former President of Costa Rica, sailed
last night for New-Orlea.ns. Only the members
of his family knew of his departure
Since the revolutionary outbreak here last
May his life has b«t-:i made unbearable. He has
been subjected to abuse in the press and has
been continually watched by the police.
Th© revolution referred to above was a military
affair organised by a cabal of officers who opposed
the election by Congress of tne present President,
Esuulval. and declared -<- President Demetrlo IgJe
stas, then Minister of War and a. brother of the
outgoing President Rafr.el Iplesias. The latter,
however, was reported at the time to have vigor
ously opposed the conspiracy, and to have repressed
the uprising with considerable vigor, and a gold
medal was voted to him by the Costa FUcan Con-
Krtssi for his service.
PRINCE Cl Pin NEARLY DROWNED.
SQUALL CAPSIZES TH? TACHT IN HONOLULU
HARBOR— RESCUED BT A LAUNCH.
Honolulu, Nov 18, vis San Francisco, Nov.
-t (Special). Prince Cupid, who was recently
to Congress, had a very narrow
escape from drowning in Honolulu Harbor yes
terday. Though the wind had been strong and
the sea heavy for several days, the Prince and
a party started for Pearl Harbor In his yacht
the Princess He is an accomplished yachts
man, but .-». squall struck the boat, and she cap
sized. All the occupants were thrown into the
water, but managed to crawl up on the over
turned yacht. Th>y were seen from the Myrtle
Hoat Club house, and a launch rescued theni.
DECLINE RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS.
ACTION of STUDENTS AT THK HANOVE
RIAN UNIVKRSITY.
Vienna, Nov 21 -A special dispatch from
Gftttlngen, Prussia, says the students of the
famous Hanoverian University have decided not
to accept ary of the scholarships founded j.\
Cecil Rhodes.
TO FACILITATE ITALIAN EMIGRATION.
NBW r.INF OF BTEA3NOUI TO PLY PHTWKBN PA If
BRUO AND tOSm oKi.KANs
Rome. Nov. '_'i. The Italian General Naviga
tion Company will establish at the beginning of
the new year .i service of mail steamers from
Palermo to New-Orleans in order to facilitate
the emigration of Sicilians to the Southern
States.
WIRELESS TELEGRAPH FOR JAMAICA.
Kingston. Jamaica. Nov. 24.--A hill has been pre
pared for Introduction In the local legislature next
year providing for the erection of wireless tele
graph stations here.
DEADLY »' RRICANE l\ ARGENTINA.
Buenos Ayres. Nov. 24. A hurricane ha 3 swept
( ,\.r San trhano. Province of Santa Fe. A hun
.lre.l houses were destroyed, five persona were
killed, a number were injured and railroad and
telegraphic communication was interrupted.
SAT WO EFFORT WAS MADE TO SAVE HIM.
A man. supposed to be chauricey Wilson, an iron
moulder, jumped from the ferryboat Alaska, of the
Greenpolnt-Twenty-thlrd-st. Ferry, on the 6 o'clock
trip from here yesterday. He wad drowned and
his body was not recovered. It is declared that the
captain and deckhands did not stop the boat and
made no effort to rescue the man. though he floated
(or some seconds.
He was surrounded by about two hundred men
and women when he suddenly pulled off his coat
and shouted:
"Goodby. everybody.
Then he jumped on the rail and into the water.
The people shouted, but several passengers say
that no attention was paid by the pilot to their
shouts, and that the deckhands made no effort to
save the man. though he could be seen floating on
the water.
THE LADIES' MAID
Or. th«« Pennsylvania Special i 3<» much appreciated
feature in the equipment of this popular train.
— Advi
Pi: ICE THREE CENTS
CUBAN RIOTERS KILLED.
FIGHTING IN THE STREETS
OF HAVANA.
TWO STRIKERS DF.AP AND EIGHTY
TWO HBOFU IN.IIRKD-CRDER
KKSTORED.
f»T CABLE IV THE TMBTCB.]
(Copyright. 1902: By Th» Tribune As.«<v«>ition.»
Havana. Nov. '24.— Th«» strike assumed a more
serious aspect this morning. Repeated clashes
occurred between the police and the strikers, in
which the former use.l revolvers, and the latter
stones and knives. Two strikers were killed and
eighty or more wounded A lieutenant of police
was probably mortally wounded, and several of
the police were wounded slightly.
This mornirg ■ crowd of forty or fifty per
sons, mostly negroes, marched down Oblspo-st.
toward the palace, yelling "Death to the Presi
dent!" but they Were dispersal by the police
before th-»y reached the palace square.
It is alleged that the Spaniards are urging th»
strike on In the hope of bringing the United
States Government back to Cuba. Some Span
lards admitted as much to The Tribune cor
respondent. They say they are able to stand
the strike many months, and will not give up.
President Palma. speaking of talk of impend
ing anarchy, said to The Tribune correspondent
this evening
"You can tell The Tribune that we will amply
protect all foreign property. The police have
done so until 9 o'clock this morning, when As
cars of the Havana Electric Company were
stopped by strikers. Wher. I heard of foreign In
terests being damaged 1 called the Secretary of
the Government and placed matters in his
charge, as the Mayor evidently could, not keep
order."
The President said fb.it detachments of Rur il
Guards ard artillery will be >• M »h
gas and electric plants, the « sJSSWSSks an'l
with the streetcars, and all foreign property
protected. In his opinion, there wosM I
any further disorder
A meeting of strikers was held to-night at !<"»
o'clock, at which the speakers were OesjsrsjSl
Maximo Gomes, Julio Sanguilly, Quimin Bai:
dera and ftnr SSI md Juan fl— lWllS Ooniez
and Senator Cisneros. It is known that general
linmcz will recommend the strikers Is return
to work, and it is believed his counsel will pre
vail and that the worst is over
After President Palma ordered the police f >
protect the cars, the police fired at the strikers
who attempted to stop the cars.
general Rodriguez, chief at the Rural Guards,
is patrolling the streets to-night with his troops.
All the theatres are closed to-night.
Among those whom the strikers put out of the
cars, it is reported, was the German Consul.
An American boy who refused to leave the CSjsj
and claimed AmerUan citizenship was thrown
out of a window unhurt.
SECRETARY TAMAYO RESIGNS.
HELD BY THE PUBLIC RESPONSIBLE FOR
THE STRIKE.
Havana, Nov. — Seftor Tamayo has resigned
his office as Secretary of Government, but Presi
dent Palma will not accept his resignation until
the strike has been settled. The public blames
Tamayo for his active part in the strike, and
says that he and the Mayor are responsible
for to-day's riots, as he has openly expressed
sympathy with the strikers. At a political meet
ing on Wednesday, at which Seflor Tamayo was
chairman, he indorsed the action of the strikers.
STREETCAR MEN REFUSED TO STRIKE.
AND THE RIOT RAGED ABOUT THE CARS
—CLERKS AND COOKS STRUCK.
Havana. Nov. 24. — As the result of conflicts
of a serious character between the police ami
the men on strike here to-day two strikers
are dead and eighty-two other persons are
wounded. Five of the latter, one being a lieu
tenant of police, whose throat was cut by a
striker, have Injuries of a serious nature. Eight
other policemen are wounded.
The police had the rioters well under control
this evening, hut every precaution is being
taken to prevent a further outbreak of disorder
to-night, and all the police and Rural Guards
In the suburbs have been summoned to con
centrate in Havana.
The strike, which it first only concerned th»
cignr workers, became genera! this mornins; b>
the calling out of all trades In sympathy with
the cigarmakers. All the trade* psspM
their doors this morning, clerks, cooks and nsj|
class of workmen having obeyed the command
of the unions except the motormen and conduc
tors of the electric cars, who refused to join In
the general strike.
Trouble began early In the morning by th»
holding up of the electric cars by the strikers,
whose wrath was naturally directed against the
street railroad employes. Several cars were held
up and stoned in the outskirts of the city, and
the passengers were compelled to walk into
Havana, among these being the British and
German ministers. Several cars were wrecked
and some motormen and conductors were In
jured during these occurrences. The carmen,
however, continued running their cars until lft
o'clock, when Superintendent Greenwood ordered
a suspension of traffic. The employes were
willing to remain at work, but the officers of the
company, in order to protect the property,
deemed it wise to suspend the service. Mr
Greenwood had asked for protection from the
Civil Governor, but the authorities were unable
to protect the public vehicles. A mob of strikers
drove the men on the Western Railroad from
the trains during the mornlns.
The Mayor of Havana and th*» Secretary of
Government. Diego Tamayo. had. during the
past week, openly sympathized with the
strikers, and had given orders to the police not
to use force in dispersing the crowds, and.
under these conditions, the police were unable
to cope with the strikers. The situation was
approaching a critical point at noon, serious
disorders having taken place in front of the
palace itself. in which a police officer named
Mass and a number of policemen and strikers
received Injuries, when President Palma sent
word to the Mayor that unless the city authori
ties could preserve order and protect the rail
road company the State would Intervene. The
Mayor then took drastic measures and issued
an edict prohibiting crowds from gathering in
the streets and authorizing the Chief of Police
to kill If such action should be necessary to
preserve order.
A similar show of force- early in the morn
ing would undoubtedly have prevented the
trouble, but now the strikers had become em
boldened, and frequent clashes between them
and the police occurred in all parts of the city.
The police were obliged to charge a mob of
rioters at the slaughter house, and several
among the latter were injured. The vigorous
attitude of the police now made itself felt, and
traffic on the car lines, which had been sus
pended for a brief period, was resumed, and
was continued from this time forth with only
occasional Interruption. Most of the injuries*
ALONG THE HISTORIC HUDSON RIVER
run the tracks of the New York Central. Too can
enjoy the beauties of the American Rhine if jtf(s»
travel by the Central.— Advt

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