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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, August 14, 1904, Image 12

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OPEN SHOP CLTiMATOM.
WEEK'S GRACE TO UNIONS.
Building Trades Not Locked Out
Must Also Declare Themselves.
Tbeurh the officers of the 3uildinff Trades Em
ployers' Association wou!3 not Kay directly yester
day that tho open sfeaai would follow the refusal
of the unions now or: strike to return their men
to work, an ultimatum to these unions which was
made public jesterday contained the open shop
threat. The ultimatum g!ves the unions whoso
members are on strike and szainst which the
lockout has been declared to August 22 to declare
the strikes off. with the threat that If they fall
to do so the contractors will proceed to fill their
places. The unions which have no strikes and
H»rß:nst which no lockout has been declared have
also be»n told to confer through their represents.
live-s with the members of the employers' asso
ciation this week and state exactly what stand
they will take In cate the terms of the ultimatum
are rejected. ■ ■« *
The ultimatum of the employes is contained in
the following circular sent to the members of th«
Kmployers' Association, who told their employers
of its terms:
New-York. August 13.
To the Members.
At a meeting; of the board of governors held
August 12. the following resolution was unanimous
ly adopted, and the members are hereby notified
to govern themselves accordingly:
Whereas. Th« unions that struck on the Trinity
Building: and on the work of the members of the
'Rulidlnr Trade.* Employers' Association on the sub
"way. In violation of their existing; agreements and
of the general arbitration plan, have refused to
return to work: and.
. Whereas. These organizations were locked out
to compel a compliance with the terms of said
agreements, which has resulted in a cessation of
work In said tradee that, if continues, will seri
ously Interfere with and ultimately cause a stop
page of work In many trades not now affected.
* nd cripple and discourage the building industry:
Therefore, be it
Resolved, That If the unions now on strike do
not return to work on the jobs ••:; which they
have etruck. on or before rhe morning of August
— the members of this association shall proceed
■with such mechanics as will agree to work under
the conditions of employment as they existed on
. Avpust 1. and governed by aforementioned agree
ment*. WILLIAM K. FERTIG.
Secretary.
The unions which are locked out because of the
»>tiikes and to which the ultimatum applies are the
'.Amalgamated Painters' Society. New-Tork District
■Council Brotherhood of Carpenters, Electrical
Workers' Union, Mosaic and Encaustic Tile Layers*
.'Union, Plumbers and Gasfltters' Union. Operative
Plasterers' Society, Tar. Felt and Waterproof
"vTorkers and Wood. Wire and Metal Lathers'
"Union. There are twenty-five unions under the
■ erbitratlon agreement which have not been locked
•eat, but which will be required to state what action
they will take If the unions affected by the ulti
matum do not declare their strikes off. In case of
their refusal to work with men employed In place
«*f. the strikers, then a general open shop fight
'■would appear to be Ine\ ltaMe, and the greatest
lii.bor •war thin city has yet seen would take place.
Lewis J. Harding, chairman of the press com
mittee of the board of governors, after making
'public the ultimatum to the unions, last evening
was atked if it meant an open shop declaration.
"The unions," he said, "have a week to think
ever the matter. and I am. In hopes that they will
««-26 to their senses before a week and declare the
strikes off. If the open shop declaration is forced
on- us the responsibility will be with the unions.
"We do not want the open shop. TEe lockout will
never be declared off until the unions observe the
terms of the arbitration agreement."
"How long do you propose to keep up the lock
out?" he was asked
"It will not he kept up Indefinitely," he said.
"Our contractors will go right on with the work.
"We will hire men individually, under the arbitra
tion agreement, us we did last year, and form
tie.il afterward Into unions.
"And if the utior.a not concerned In the present
lookout re/use to work with them? "
THE BIGGEST FIOKT YET.
"Ti.en we will have a bigger fight on hand, ■ the
hlggcet we have yet hnd. That's all."
Mr. Harding «-oui>l commit himself to no positive
t-talement that an open shop policy was the al
ternative if the ultHra-iurr. was ignored. He would
not explain the ultimatum, merely saying that it
ppoke tor itself.
'^an you eecute all the carpenters you want
exctpt under the open shop plan?*' he was asked.
"It. would be hard to get 4.UCO carpenters under
any other method." he ccnt>.iued. "But that is
for the future. The unions nave a week to think,
and many things may happen In the mean time.
I expect that if ac open shop fight comes it will
be the unions that will be to blame."
Mr. Herding said that as far as non-union men
were concerned, there was an article in the ar
bitration agreement which allowed contractors, in
case the union could not furnish enough me
chanics, to hire non-union men who would after
ward join the union If they were found competent.
3n reference to the suit of the Building Trades
Alliance in the courts to test the legality of the
arbitration agreement, he said:
The suit referred to is considered a joke fay
our member*. They accuse us of restraint of
trade. We, certainly are an organisation in re
straint of trading with robbing delegates We
have probably restrained owners and contractors
from trading with these agitators to the extent
of several hundred thousand dollars during- the
last year. Our books and everything we have
In the. way of agreement, contracts, constitutions
said co forth, and so forth, are open for Inspection
»t any time to any one. except workmen on
strikes or walking delegates. We have nothing to
■hide, have no secrets, and are willing to have the
'question decided as to whether or not we are In
restraint of trade or a trust In any sense
If the union is honest in this matter it may also
siav# decided for it whether or not a union is a
trust In restraint of trade, and a trial of this
kind would certainly Interest every one employing
organized labor. **
James J. Daly, president of the Tile Layers
Hat- Cheng,
Ltao- Yang,
Che-Foo,
Si'Mu-Cheng f
Wei-Hai-Wei,
Wu-Chcnv.
THE above are being men
tioned in the daily reports
of the movements of the Rus
sians and Japanese.
Do you know where they are,
and do you desire to see how
General Kuroki is hemming in
General Kuropatkin ?
Send 5 Cents for The
New- York
Tribune
War Map
The best one yet published,
which shows in detail the field
of operations.
Union, who Is the techuical '-omplainant In the
suit, said :
There •will be no more strikes ordered by us
until the case comes up. AH we want now Is to
get the employers' association into the courts.
WTlmb i-rank Adams Acer, the attorney for Daly
and the Buildlns Trades' Alliar.ce. was seen, he
said that when he received an order in court to
examine the books and minutes of the employers'
association the question under consideration would
be the validity of th'_- arbitration agreement.
"If the arbitration agreement Is valid." he said,
"then we will insist that the lockout be declared
off. if It !s invalid, we will sue for Us annulment."
«_
COTTON REPORT ON SEPTEMBER 2.
"Washington. Aug. 13.— Owing to the fact That
Saturday. September S, has been declared a holiday
by a large number of the commercial organizations
of the country, and that Monday. September 5, Is
a legal holiday, the September cotton report of the
Bureau of Statistics of the Agricultural Depart
meat will be issued at 1:15 p. m. on Friday. Sep
tember 2. Instead of at nooii on the third or t::e
monlh, as is usual.
COFFEE CROP DAMAGED BY FROST.
Rio Janeiro, Aug. SL-Invcstigation confirms the
re-port that severe frosts In the coffee regions
kayo considerably damaged the crops.
EUROPE'S SUGAR BEET CROP SHORT.
Glasgow, Au^. 13.— Tho sugar merchant here
have received notice that the German statistician,
Ucht, estimates that twins to the drouth the Con
tinental sugar beet crop will be 30 to -•'■ per cent
lower thsn that of I'JOJ.
ANOTHER CUT IN STEERAGE RATES.
London, Aug. U.— A dispatch from Liverpool says
the American Line announces that, beginning on
Monday. th« tteerago rate to Philadelphia will be
s7 50. instes«d of $10. This reduction caused consid
erable consternation among the lines not in the
combination, but it is not likely that they will uu
anything at present to combat it.
TILDEN HOME NOW A SANATORIUM.
The country seat of the late Samuel J. Tildcn at
Lake Mahopac has been sold to the American Re
sort Company and will be conducted as a sanato
rium on lines of the rest cure In connection with
th.» Oppenhelmer Institute of this city. The prop
erty Includes about ten acres and is on an eleva
tion of 1 •■■.' feet. The home is of granite and
has a solarium, ballroom and roof garden. The
sale price is said to have been $225,000. Dr. W. S.
Watson, formerly of Pelham Manor, is th« gen
eral superintendent and manager.
GERMAN COAL COMPANIES COMBINE.
Berlin, Aug. U. — An agreement has been reached
for consolidation of the Ge-lsenkirchen Coal Com
pany and the Schalker Coal and Iron Company,
both of Gelsenkirchen. Westphalia, on a basis of
one sharo of the Schalker Company for two and
one-half shares of the Gplsenklrchen Company's
stock. The latter Ja the largest coal company In
Germany, having a capital of $17,500,000. Its allot
ment in the coal syndicate is 7,u00,000 tons a year.
The Schalker company's capital is r.'.SSO.Ouo. and its
debentures $2,700,000. It runs six blasting furnaces,
besides Hteel mills, and owns iron and rroal mines.
Its shares have for some years been the highest
priced iron stocks on the German market, being;
quoted to-day at 53 The agreement is subject to
ratification by the stockholders of both companies.
COAL MINERS ACCEPT WAGE CUT.
Plttsburg. Kan.. Aug. 13.— The coal miners of
Kansas, Indian Territory. Arkansas. Texas and a
part of Missouri have voted in favor of accepting
the operators' wage proposition. The vote was
canvas sod here to-day by the board appointed for
the purpose, and announced to-night, in three dis
tricts. Nos. 14, 21 and 23. it showed a majority of
4U*4 votes for the proposition.
The proposition Is for a reduction of 6 per cent
In -wages and affects 50,000 men.
INCORPORATED AT ALBANY.
Albany, Aug. 13.— The incorporations filed to-day
with the Secretary of State were:
American Oil Engine Company of York- cap
ital. $250.00C>; directors. Newton Adams H. il.
Swan and J. R. Westerfleld. of New-York City
The Fenn Contracting Company, of New-York
capital, $100,000; directors. E. W. Fenn, C K. Moore
and .J. F. Lynch, of New- York.
The Silver Fissure Mining Company, of New-
York; capital llSu.'.m . directors. Howard WUl< of
White Plains; A. W. Cochrane, of New-York City
and H. H. Annstead. Jr., of Uutte, Moat.
BUSINESS TROUBLES.
lloirlo Goodman has been appointed receiver in supple
numary proceeding for JOSEPH R. MARQt'I TTE Jr
In a suit brought by Thomas Janes, a. Judgment creditor."
SATISFIED JUDGMENTS.
The first name is that of the debtor, the second
that of the creditor and date when Judgment was
filed:
Barnard Collere— J L. Weils and another corn -
mlseloners; July 6, 1904 >„,
McDonald . John IJ — H Marshall; June 27 {&* SIS
Same— T C Home; June 27. lUO4 .' " n
JUDGMENTS.
The following Judgments were died yesterday, the
first name being that of the debtor:
I'-aldwin. Bobeti J— A Plaut and another ... 104-
Pmtt. Thomas H— H d Kld * ",-
Wallls, Marie W and Edwin A— Q \Y HaxrlsW r>-r>
Yohn. Charles Q; Jacob Klelnn-.&n and lie»»>'( *
Yohn — Chatham National iiauk... g 744
m
PETITIONS IN BANKRUPTCY.
The following petitions were filed yesterday with the
clerk of the United Slates District Court:
ISAAC COLEMAN. nalesman, xO.x 0 . 620 Fecond-ave. ■ Ha
blUUcs. U.2.H.. no assets. Principal creditor. th« New-
Tork Use ln»uraac« Company, secured by hypothecated
CIiOADWAY TRIMMED HAT COMPANY. Schedule,
filed showing debts of $8,875; no assets. Principal credit
ors. Bennett A Lowenthal. No. 3 Broadway $1 "77- j
Kilter. No. 123 Weal hwnilrsil sirtsentti'sLl
COULD NOT HOLD STOWAWAYS.
Magistrate Tells Steamboat Men to Sue Boys
for the Bides They Stole.
Clerks in the Jefferson Market court t ere puz
zled yesterday when they were asked to prepare
cliarges against five young stowaways who were
arrested at Pier No. 46, North River, when they
came off the Troy Line boat Saratoga. One clerk
.'i? c « t *' v " y an hou T hll "' i "g through law books
to find some grounds on which he could make a
charge against the boys. Finally he gave it uS
and went over to Magistrate Ommen. P
,v. C^.'J.' 1 "i™ 6 U ' 3is °»"der]y conduct," he said "as
they did not create any disturbance. They «tole a
eon*' •■ l BUr *' bUt l ' a "' l " ilk( ' " " ra: " J lar-
SSS^^^-rESS 6 ?^^ of "-mboat
The boys said they had come to New-York to
find work. They gave their names as Herbert
Troval. James Kenny, L. Dakloff. C. Duryea ;md
B) Ivester.
HOME NEWS.
NEW-YORK CITY.
The Thomas J. Clarke Association of the IXth
Assembly District will bold its first annual ex
cursion and clambake on Wednesday « Pleasure
Bay. on the Shrewsbury River.
Announcement Is made of a new landing of the
Iron Steamboat Company. The boats will leave
Onc-hundred-and-twenty-nlnth-st.. North River at
9:40, 10:10. 11:40 a. m.; 12:40 and 7:*o p. m.
OFFERINGS AT THE STORES.
BURNHAM & PHILLIPS, Koo. 119 and & Na»
eau-et., open their first autumn exhibit to-morrow
Liftum^ wooUen^ SOrtmCnt ° f EnCllfih and Scot^
LE BOUTIIXIER BROTHERS, In West Twenty
third-st are advf rtising their new white waists, of
which they have a varied assortment.
THE STERLING PIANO COMPANY, Brooklyn,
calls attention to Its grand and baby grand pianos
that are now selling at greatly reduced prices.
ABRAHAM & STI.AUS. of Brooklyn, are selling
women's rummer outer garments at liberal reduc
tions from regular prices. They are also offering
HptciaJ Inducements in suit cases, veilings and
neckwear.
A. D. MATTHEWS' SONS, of Brooklyn, will
distribute free to-morrow fifteen thousand cans of
Llbby. McNeHl & Llbby'.i concentrated soupy one
with every 50-cent purchase in the basement.
ARNOLD. CONSTABLE & CO.. in Broadway and
Nineteenth-st., call attention to their list of neck
wear, laces, gloves and fancy novelties.
STERN BROTHERS. In West Twenty-thlrd-st
will sell to-morrpw the remainder of their women's
summer dresses. They are advertising so . rain
proof garments, washable waists, misses' anil girls'
apparel, underwear, housekeeping linen and boys'
summer clothing. vu * a
£.. H. MACY & CO., Broadway and Sixth-are ,
are continuing their sales of furniture und allied
line?. They are also offering an extensive lot of
black and colored dress goods Their china and
cut glass lie, too. crescnta it. varied attraction
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. SUNDAY. AUGUST U. 1904.
SIGNS OF PROSPERITY.
Heavy Buying by Retail Merchants
from All Over.
The week just closed has witnessed heavy buying
on the part of the army of retail merchants who
are now fathered In New-York from all parti of
the United States. All of those ho have ar
rived thus far this year have bought liberally, and
they bring encouraging news regarding conditions
in their localities. The letters received by the
large jobbing houses here show that, as large as the
Bales have been in the week just closed, the pros
pects are that those of the coming week will ex
ceed them. The demand has been especially large
from the South, where th.' high price of cotton ha*
placed a large amount of money In circulation, but
the orders from the Middle and Western States aro
also large, compared with the preceding year.
The crop prospects are generally good, and two
agricultural classes are prosperous, so that the
n-.erchants know that there will be a good consum
ing demand. The improvement in collections has
been noticeable In all fines the last two years, and
It la not confining Itself to any one section of the
country. Some of the mortgagee on farms wWcn
have existed for bo long th it the holders i>r:i.-ti<-aii>
regarded the farms as belonging to them nave been
raised.
ADVANCE IN U. S. STEEL.
Rumors That Differences of Billet Manufact
urers Have Been Settled.
a sharp advance in United States Steel preferred
stock yesterday to •■■■'-. from • ■■"■-.. Friday's close,
caused rumors In Wall Street that the war between
the steel billet manufacturers would be settled at an
early date. One unconfirmed report was that the
Steel Corporation had agreed to take over the
Youngstown plant of the Republic Iron and Steel
Company, which* is said to have cut the pool price
for billets. it was said that President Thompson.
of the company, had gone to Saratoga to confer
with John W. Gates.

INCREASING TRADE WITH CUBA.
Railroad and steamship companies are preparing
for the transportation of a large amount of mer
chandise to Cuba. This trade has been rapidly
growing, and it has now reached such magnitude
that its Importance has attracted the attention of
transportation companies, which see in the encour
agement of this traffic a way to Increase their
revenues Several of the large railroad companies
are making efforts to bring the matter to the at
tention of the merchants of all classes who could
Increase their business with Cuba through system
atic effort, and the result is likely to be that the
growth of this trade will be even more rapid in tin
future. Merchants of this country are receiving
assistance in the encouragement of the Cuban trade
from the Americana who are now living there and
who have considerable capital invested in the cul
tivation of sugar, tobacco and other products of
the Island. _
A BIG ORDER FOR PIPE.
The National Tube Company has secured an order
for IuQ.OOO tons of pipe, which will be delivered In
th« Kansas oil fields. This is th.. largest order for
piping which has been placed for pome time. With
the resumption of operations at the various plants
which are now taking their regular summer vaca
tions it la expected that there will I •■ an Increased
domestic demand for piping, steel and steel prod
ucts.
■ a
BIG PAYMENTS TO HOMESTEAD MEN.
Plttsburg, Aug. 13.— Over J125.000 was paid out in
wages to-day to the employes of the Homestead
Steel Works and the Howard Axle Works of tho
Carnegie Steel Company at Homestead, for three
Weeks' work. This Is the largest amount of :nonc*y
paid out for wages for a similar period In years.
All the mills at Homestead, except two. aro run
ning full Jay and night '
THE STATE OF TRADE.
Buffalo, \.k is — ru >i i: dull. CORN' only »t«uly:
No 2 >.■■:,<• <s<>^c: No 2. DOHc OATS rmny: No 2
white. 37'^©3i«i»<3; No 2 mixed. 3i\ t r. Oanal frv! l-.:«
steady.
Chicago. A .g 13. — The leading futures ranged as fol
lows:
Wheat. No. 2: Opening. Without. Lnvnl. Cl->»lne.
Sepfber (old). $1 02 11034 I! 01", *1 «-.••»
K«-pt'trr (new) I 00 <t ; •-■-, 1 ...• . i •«' 1 •• '.
rveember OS* U •*"♦», 1 OH, Jf.i S/U r ,
May \ t*)*.U 1 ol'» 1 o.l't 1 <«>■>« I nJ : »
Corn. No. 2:
Amsu.! .'C
Srptfmhor .... i.~ii.Vt'4 r>-'i» t .13 *W»
December .... SU'.OSo 1 ] r>l', DOM *il l i**3l>«
Oats. Nc. 2: -,
*>;>temb«r .... ••.:v t U.U» 24', XT, 83%
l>??mber :USBS4\ 33S9&*'« 3«S 3«*
May 3HH63U»i J7H MS .TCVtjaiili
Mets pork, [•»•' hbl:
Pej>t»mber $11 .-,7', Bit SB ill 374 111 «0
October .. It el 11 ;:. it '-"• 11 7"
I*rd. ;,. • |«a rb:
September . ... ' i so n so « 7T'-, ti 7"'»
October .1 <, 6 V" •. -.- ■■ -. ,
■hart rib*, iti 100 rt»:
September 7 H- - 4"', 7 AT-, : II
October 7 42., ;|b 7 t&i 7K>
Cu*!i quotation* were a* fulluwe: KI-<>irii flim; irinuir
P«tmu. 14 7iHjH:. »trati'fct». |4 unit* \A); »prlns jmt
• ■; -t*. I 4 7O8M2O; itralght*. 14 VHtt* 7o: b«krri>-, *Me
«3 7i». WHEAT. No S *!.-r!n«. tl |O««1 iw- N.> ft. J».^ i»
1105; No 3 .•• ! >l '•! ■„(}i i:.i. COJIN. Nu i. M(,c; No 2
yellow. &4'4c; OATS. Ko U. BJe; Nr> 2 whltf. a4\«i!.V;
No 3 whit*. ;!4Sti3.V; |IVK, No i\ 7»«71c: iki.i:v,
r-Kxl feeding. 4<k-; fair io choice nialtinit. *>U4Gc; \-\.w
i'P. No J. *1 17. No 1 NortiiweHern. *1 U4M.;
TIMOTHY SKED. prtma. f2 fc; CLOVER, conlrurt itra.ie.
»12i.; MESS PORK, per iM. JlltH^JllCJ. LAN i.r
100 n>. »tt7O®i(J72'j CUT meats, ihort rib*. iIJm
tgs"fit I 7 s "^»3*7 CO; short elaar el.les iU.xed>. $.»«s?< S3;
» HIM. l.asln „f }j| K h wlncx. |1 is. On the Vroduce
Kzcbansv: BUTTER— •Market wan firm: cr«-amerl.-». Vi'j
J;"i»c: dairies. l2iil.V. K(J(;.S steady; ut murk, canes In
cluded. 18017' CHEESE btcady. 7%ffßUc
Duluth. Auk. U.— WHEAT— No 1. SSc; No Z B>s-; Sei>
tembfr, juoii; December, use.
Milwaukee. Aw i:i— WHEAT- No l Northern. $1 10;
No 2 Northern. $1 OO'ail OS new, tt«ptembei II «»>*i hltl.
SXSIT 1 *? '• ''*''■ BARLEY— No 2, We; numplr*. XJiiU-.
' <>ii.N -No 3, :,:, September, 63V» asked.
Mini: '- a ' n " l! *' Au «"- 13 — Clo»«: WHEAT— feptemlwr.
« ?,VV- f v mlx ' r ' 8*%«00c; May. *1 <»■». No I bard.
*1 l". -N'> i .N..rth>-rn. |1 Oil; No 3 Northern. $1 O«^.
l'hl!ade!|)iila. Au«. UL— WHEAT steady; contru.t
ft t: Au *-' Ust . " l - | iil»M</i<-. COUN. »ic hiKher; Aucust.
OK'ifrKK:. "ATS xtrady; No 2 white, natural. .<■;. . |„
Clipped. •»'•■-■ iU'TTKit »tea.ly; extra Western <iran.
«r>'. l*r; <xtra nearby print*. 20c. BOOH Urn nearby
".;;!•■. ' *•■• at mark; Wentern firsts, IMJSOc. a» mark.
«HJ.!.hl-. Jlrrn; ralr ilemand; New -York full ere*m«
choice to fancy, K'»^H%, C ; Nf-w-YorU full creamii. fair t.i
too.l. 7HtfV. «f(JAIW-Henned Btron« COTTON un •
™nf TALJjow llrm but ■! il< i. city prims In
tierces, 4\c; cx»untr>', prime. In bbls, *'-■-. do dark. *< ■;
caktii. Be. 1;.. „,.,,„ Flour. '■>.■" bbli and .".:;;!. It. in
jacks; wheat. 13.000 bußh; corn. I . X) bush; oat 10.500
tmsh. Khlr^ments— Wheat. 12.000 bush; corn, W.OOU buch;
oats, 25.W10 bush »
Ht. I^juls, Aar. 13.— Close.— WHEAT— No 2 red cash
elevator, UH?»c; September, M%ei embei }l («> . • No
- hard. Ot>4c«jjl ot>H. COItN— No 2 cash. Me; Septem-
Mr, 824 ■. December, i- = c. OATS— No *- cash. B3e;
BepUmber. Me; December, :.\\. . No 2 white. 85033 He.
NAVAL STORES.
The undertone of th» market for spirits ttttpeotiaa was
steady, with prices unchanged S nd demand fairly good.
ItOHln was steady but quiet. Tar r-.-mulncd ill. We
quote:
SPIRITS TUBPBNTINE Oil and machine 1. 11- Mi*
C.»<s%c.
TAR Pine and oil bbis, $4 K;?IU «JO.
ROSIN— Common to ro.kl itralned $2 HO; X, $290 X,
$1; i:. 1806; 11. $3 IO<?U3 1.'.; I. S3 45O»:« 50: K. UOOO
J. 19.>; M. J4 2(lQ»12r»; N, $425014 30; W (J, JtT'."ji>>
and W W. ?T.©|s 10.
STOCK ON HAND.
rt"«ln 20,(«:t bbls
Spirits turpentine '.c' 2 bbU
Tar 2,734 bbli
Savannah, Aujr. 13.— TL'ItPKNTINK Mini. 51% c; re
<•<■!•,<-. M.i bbis; tales. 231; exports, D2fl ROSIN iirm; re
• -ilr'fi, «.607 l. hi-, ml.-. l.btM); exports. 3.777. Quoted:
A. B. ■• $2 30; i>. $-.--{5. i: t2 40; F. *2 4.'»; <;. $. 5O; H.
»- '". I. *■"..•<■». K. 130 ft; M. $3 •«;,, N. »4; W O. $136
W V.". V 4 »J.
Charleston. Aur. i:; TURPENTINE firm. 63c DOKIN
firm. Quoted: A. Ti. ■'. $2 90; d >" ■■:. ■ i: XiV V *":!">•
<:. $2 4D; H. 12 60; 1. $3 10; K. S3 35; M, $3 65; N. $3 >.» :
•\V rj, M OS; v- W. $4 40. *^ '
Wilmington. Aiisj. IS.— SPIRITS TI RPENTINB firm.
6z%0 bid; rereipu, S3 bbU. ROBIN firm. $2 89 l>ld- >■•■
ceipts. IKS bhli TAR linn. $1 70. receipt*. lit |,l,|--
CRUDE TUKPENTINE arm. $2 20, $3 7.'. and $4; receipts,
I>S bbls.
I^ndon, '■"■■ IS.— TURPENTINE— Spirits. 41- lid.
KOri lN— American, strained. 28s 3d; fine. Hi M
LIVE STOCK MARKETS BY TELEGRAPH.
Chicago, Aug. 13— CATTUC !:.••:: 2fiO head; mar
ket nominal; go -i to prime *tetrs. $:.'«$«; poor to medium,
$4*<S-liiO; stock-era and feeders. |28M; cows. $1 230|4;
heifer*, $23i54 75; eannrra, $1 l's.'r,sj 40; hull*. (2054;
cnlves, $2 :,<■■, i-, Texas fed rteern. $.1 Mi«?s4 no- Western
ste.eri>. $.'t .'•"••s; to. MOOS— Receipts, 7,W)«» hPar; market I
tiSlOc lower; mixed am! butchers-. Jj o."> v *."• 3.".- kimi i to,
?» < Ji"',?^ ta , vy - '" I WSS»JJ r..u^h heavy, $4 feQOtt 10; llcht.
$6 2O«M6«; bu.l: of sale... $j l&gs3 80. SHEEP— BeWIpU,
•_• 000 bead; market steady J wort to choice weth»>ri . $3 HOffl
fl _!., -fait to choice mixed. $2 76C?3 60; native tamtw,
$J /.,*!»«.
rtacinnatl. Aujt. 13.— HOGS loner; butchers' S3 .IOC
$:. .'!5; common, tt T.',«J,'i. CATTI.K steady; fair to K ood
•hipping $4 2.-41 J5 : common. $^Jis2 50. SHISEP steudy. $1
6*3 7.'.. LAMBS steady. S3OSOM
East Buffalo, Aug. CATTLE -Receipts. Co bead; ,
•■' '" . a , r ; ., llk: lower: prime steers. *5 4n».5.-, 00: uhlpplng, '
$4 CV(.'S'. 15; Imtchers". J.i :«,.,.v., heifers, $3 13&<l 40-
K»0«S3W); bu;ia, J'J.v^t;!. "lookers and Jeeder?
S2 sO</$3 .... stock heirem. |2 25012 73. VKALS— Receipts,
2.m» bead; dull and SBC lower. $.V<r»>" 25. HOCJS— Receipt*.
4,200 Bead; active; Yorkers 80100 higher; others ■tMdy:
heavy. SftSOftfSOO: mixed. Ss«ji<«*sj«; Yorkers. |5 50fl
$.1 7ft; plus, S.". ♦i.'.7s.'i 75; roughs. *.»r.<i4s4 70- s*uks S-t 7M»
$4 28; dalHes. $5 lO©*s 50. SHEEP AND LAMB 1t,,
celpts. 3.000 head: Rood" lambs steady; common dull
limbs, $4®srt2.%- yearlings. $4 50©»; wether* SI 258
$4 50; ewe», $3 BOsMI 18; sheep, mixed. $2*»4
Kansas City. Aug. 13.— CATTLE— Receipts. 700 hoßd
market unchanged; choice export and dressed beer steers.
$Miss.£«M i s s.£« : ™c fair to good. S3 7fiiKSs; Western fed steers.
$.". 753J525: itoekeri and" feeders. $2 .v>«S4 »)■ ijouthei-i
steers. 22 509(4; Southern cow«. $1 ft" B*3 I!.". native rai
$175®?4: native heifers. $2 60® $4 75; bulls. S3 2&043 V
calve«. *2 603*4 75; receipts for the week. SU.BOO head
1100S — Receipts, R.OOO head; market Be hlirber: top. $5 1»'
bulk of bales. $4 03$$5 OS- heavy. $4 H.'.»*s; packers $4 «3
096 05: Mrs and I'xhts $4 75«55 10; receipts for :la
week, 87,600 head. BHEKP— Rscclpts, none; market nom
inally steady: native Umbs. $4056; native wethers. *.i vr,(
$1 S-. native ewe*. $3413 75; Western lambs. »««$;;
Western yearlincs, $3 T,*it* M: Western sheep, l 2 50^«4
rtOCfcttrf and f-cderM, t" 500*8 25. '
TRADE IN CHICAGO.
tBY TELEGRAPH TO THE TRIBUNE.]
Chicago, Aug. 13.— There Is such a thing as being
overcautious. Almost to a man, advices were sent
out by the brokers last night and this morning
to go slow in bulling wheat over U. and customer*
were told » not to get caught holding high priced
futures. The only mistake- In the matter was one
of Judgment of a thing which Is hard to judge cor
rectly—the condition of the spring wheat crop fol
lowing the rust blight of the last two weeks. Events
to-day make It look as though the Northwest were
not to get off with light crop damage. The mes
sages this morning renewed the worst sort of claims
about rust damage and gave a very gloomy out
look for the Red River wheat fields. The latest
reports from the fields simply made the trade turn
again to the buying side after the first hour. Weak
ness In wheat at the opening was due In part to the
lower price on the Minneapolis curb. This, with
the generally cautious feeling in the trade, caused
a volume of selling at once. The price took a
down turn of about lc for all months— new Septem
ber off to n. December to 99c. May to 00% on
first trades. This was the bottom for the day. St.
Louis houses, led by Spencer, began heavy buying.
Bhoru have learned to go in quick on breaks, and
they bought. The fresh crop reports the wheat
trade had to consider started a lot of buying by
pit traders, who saw a chance for a speculative
turn. From $1 the new September price firmed at
once to 1100 k. and on tho buying of the next hour
went to !iu. ! ,; the December price made a 2-cent
recovery to $iol. The May price made more than
2 ceiita rebound to *1 U3. \Y heat futures closed with
moderate net decline for the day at fiViV* old.
aw-'-i seders new September, DecemDer »%. May
*101; S . 'Hie May was the exception, closing ,kc
better than Friday. , . •■ .„„
There was an opening break m *orn. partly due
to a lot of Belling, which appeared to De led by
cash and receiving Interests, One big concern
made bias for half a million corn over three West
ern States, on basis or sue it country stations, and
reported acceptances on 62.U00 bushels, r'rom senna
of the drouth sections in this and other States
came reports of corn "firing" bauly. The recov
ery in wheat had some influence, m corn later.
Tue September com price broke from 53^ic to OSO
first trades. December C^Vic to 50Vtc, May s>ViC or
about '■■■■ under last ntgat for all months. The
Southwest bought on tne dip. Spencer's house
bought May corn. The buying for May was on a
goou scale, and the market for that month made
lc rebound to uO'/.c. The September rally was to
t3? 4 c, December to 51V. nearly lc over the low
point. Corn futures became ii regular In the last
hour. September weakened to I'i^c at the close.
December, after selling at ol^tc, closed at dl^c.
May v.. at 50% Cat tne top, and closed at SOV2C
The estimate of 98 cars for Monday continue
the claim of light Western offerings. Follow
ing the tendency of the other markets, there was
some selling pressure on oats at the start. Prices
yielded from Friday's close only Me for cany
months, and 'f,.- for May. There appeared to be
resting orders for the oats on the uly. Bartlett
brokers bought for September. The trade got bull
ish and bid prices up briskly for all months. At
S4',ic Buckley tilled the crowd with September.
Logan brokers sold for May. The September price
had a dip to 33% c, and a recovery to 34V*c. De
cember sold U%c, and up to 3M«Ot»%c. May
moved up from '•<,',■■ to 37Vi»c. Local receipts wero
SS3 cars. Last prices for oats futures were little
changed from Friday. September, 33% c; Decem
ber, 34 ' t e; May. 3G ; Vu3(>"ic. The estimate for Mon
day is 331 cars.
There was a new feature in the provision trade.
concentrated buying of May pork on a scale which
gave the whole list some strength. Hurlburt-War
i.ii had buying orders lor 0.000 barrels on January
contracts. The price lor this month was advanced
IXjc. and closed at tUto. Pork for other month*
dosed 10c higher, at »ll»*o; September. Jll 70. Lard
had better support, and closed at I'M- to 124 c gains.
September. %H 87'^; October. *> We? s6 92V=. Ribs rest
ed as before, at $7 4., for both months named. Hogs
are • mated at 25.00U for Monday, and 125,000 Jo r
next week.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
.'■•unrine 5:07 1 Sunset 7:<i2:Moon rtses 9:<)SlKoon'i «i» •
HIGH WATER.
AM— Sandy Hoik B i" Go* Island 10:05' Hell Gat« 11:58
I'M— Saniy Hook 10:12|OoV Islam! ZS H«U G*te 12:1S
. INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-PAY.
VmmL Krom. Lin*.
' .%!..:. .t.i. «-.■!-<■ lUrUiJ ic. ' .rust < .Booth
•kUracaa Trmlda.l. August 0 Trinidad
•<;rrtrank- Southampton. Au«ust « America
'Hamburg Hum uric, \urujt 4. .Hamburg-Am.
Columbia t;iu>Ko» . Aurust 6 Anchor
!tlM>ll!!Kl:am<irangi»>t. M >aels, August S.Aut. *N. Z.
lroqui.it* Jackaonvtil*. August 11 Clyde
*"lty u{ i'oiumblu. . ..Savannah. Aug U" Savannah
MONDAY. AUGUST 13.
•Caracas Porto Cktello. August 5 r«,i d
St. Andrew Antwrrf. Auitu»t 1 Phi»nlx
itasi«j».... «;ilra!!ar. August 1.......
l!"!ua Naples, Au«u.l . Kabr*
M..i. t-. ..::: 1t..; t. : :a;:.. Augunt tl Hull Am
HI Had <«alve*iiin. August 0 Morgan
l'iotcu» NtW-Orteana. August 10 Uallory
tpk-suay. AL'acsT ia
•Kionprlnx Wl!heini.Hr««nirn. AuKU.it S N a LJord
Mrsabtt Lundon. August « At-Trans
KtnlunJ. Antwrrp. August 0 . . iltil Star
Armenian Mvervuol. August « White Star
Munij"lUn.. OUugoW Aug .-• Allan-Stain
f..iri-ji. --> Unmeti, August 8 ...Si Lloytl
Ht-'llian i'rim-e Naplea, July 31 !'rii;.«
Langford.> <:tt;raltar, August 2
•Ilrlnji mall.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
MONDAY. AUGUST 13.
Vessel
Vrmit'l. For. Llr.*. Mail closes. null*.
Baa.!. Itrnill. liuulh
Ygkobajna. Harber '
Munrw, Nurfulk. OKI Dumlnlon - 8:00 \> m
TUESDAY. AUGUST 16.
Kaiser Wm ilcr Grusse. nun. N'GL 0:30 a m 10:00 a in
No^rdam. KutterJam. Hullun<i-Am 7:3Uam 10:00 it m
l'rtnz Adalbert. Naples. Humburg-Am.. 0:30 a m tt:«oam
FtanJrla. Inaxuu. Allan »:3n a m 1^:00 m
Alluin.'a. Colon, l'anama U:3Vam 13:00 m
J'rin-.- Ull'.rm 111, Huykl. !• \V I Id.* a m 1:00pm
San Marcos. Oalvi-flun. Mill -ry ::;in> |i
JrrxjuolH. Charleston, dyd* - — 3:oOpm
Ilamlltutt. .Vorfolk. Old Dominion - - 3:00 p in
llty of V:i>-,)n. Pavannuh. Ocean Ss Co .Vim m
SHIPPING NEWS.
Port of New-York, Saturday. Aug. 13, 1904.
AHUIVaU).
Steamer Ktrurla, fHr). Warr, Liverpool August 6 an.l
QUAenatowa 7. to the I'unaru men hi Company. I*td,
irllh ~~>'- cabin and 0-47 gt*tr>sa pauengers. mail* anil
r-i'lse.
.stianit-r ••in- (Br), Haddock, Liverpool August 5. an.]
tiurt-rmtuwn «. to th» Whlta si. r Line, wttii 4M cabin
un.l 77^ Fte«-ra«e passengers anil mdse. Arrived at th«
liar at <:."■'■ it in.
Steanifr Dltimant (tler>. Sohleemllcli. Hamburg July
2H. nn.l Shield! 30. to Philip Kuprocht. In ballast. Ar
rival at tti<- liar at 6:30 a m.
Hteamer Iji Tnuralno 'I'm. Kajolle. Havre August 6. to
the ('<>ini>acnte GctitTiile Transatlanttqua. with -.;:• cabin
anrt :i7O Biciragf passt-ngcra, mulls and indue. Arrived
ut in.' Bar at v 4;; a m.
Steamer Monterey, Smith. Vera s"ruz August 4, l'ro
gr^Ho tl nu;l Huvana t». to Jamca X Ward a Co. with f>B
pasyniiti-ra. malls and nlm Arrived at the Har at 4 a in.
Steamer JSl.tnvileld (Brl Curt la Caleta Uuena June 28,
Junan July 1. Montevideo 18 mil St Lucia August 5. Io
W it Orace, with nltruto or soda. Arrived at the Bar at
-4 :.i<i [> in.
Steam r Xiajrara. O*Keer«i, Tampleo August 4 and
Havana '.), to James 1. Ward & '". with 3 passenger*
an i mdse. Arrived at the „r at 4:50 am.
Steamer EEtona (lir), <uni.ll. Havana August 0, to
Norton A Bon, In ballast. Arrived at the Bar at 0:30 pm.
Steal) Orizaba, llyrne, Ct«nfuegoa August 4. SantlaK"
<; and .">:.-■ .hi :>. to Janata 13 Ward ft Co, with 4O pa*
(eneera, malls .in.! mds«. Arrived at the Bar at 4:3- a in.
Hteaxner El Mar. Jacobs. Culvcston August 6, to th»
Southern Pacific Company, with mdse. Left Quarantine
hi i, US v in.
Steamei Lansing, Crowley, Tort Arthur. Tex. August
it, to the Standard Oil Company, with oil. Left Quaran
tine at 7:113 ■ m. ■
Stesuner City of Macoa, Ask Ins, Savannah Augunt 10,
to tin- Ocean Steamship Company with passengers an.l
mdae lx-ft tiiiHruntlne at 0:20 am.
Steamer Jamestown. Catherine, Newport News and
Norfolk, to th« Old Dominion Steamship Company, with
jias.«^nn<TH and m<lH<\ I --ft Quarantine at 2:53 p m.
Steamer Ooldaboro. Swain, Philadelphia, to William
r 'I;.:.- & Co, '.Mil in !.-.,• Passed In Bandy Hook, at
8:30 p m.
Bteamer Hindoo (Br), Webster, Boston August 12. to
Banderaon & Son, with ndae. Arrived at the Bar at
;.:."'i |i '.i
Bandy Hook. N I. Auqr IS, 9:30 p - Wind southeast;
light bn . ■■■<■ . cloudy,
BAILED.
StPiimera l'alrl<:la (Ger>. for Hambursr via Dover; Mm .
nfajmlls (Hr), London; (Ethiopia IBr), Glasgow; Campania
<Hn. Liverpool; Philadelphia, Southampton via Plymouth
and Cherbourg; Zealand <Hr), Antwerp \lu Dover; Trini
dad (Br), Hamilton. Bermuda; Pitaeeaa Alice (Ger).
Bremen . i.i Plymouth and Cherbourg; Ponce. San Juan;
'Maracalltn. Munuull.n nnd Curacoa; Mexico Havana;
K'inß Uaakon tNor), PHleys Island; Bibtrla (O«r), Klnjtsu
ton and Savanilla; Qlulla (Aunt), Naples. Venice and
Trieste; Grenada (Br), Grenada and Trinidad; Hamilton.
Norfolk and Newport News: I >l;tui;i:it (Ger), Philadelphia;
Leander !Nor). itay wit^. N !•'; V'eroantea iH^l^). Monte-
Video. Hucnob Ay re*, etc; i"; Alba, (lalveston; El Dla
New-Orleat)S; Cartb. Wilmington, N C, and Georgetown.
H C; Arapahoe, Charleston and JackaoaTtUe; nty of
Memphis, Savannah; Aldjfate ■:ir), Montevideo. Buenos
Ayrea, etc: CherapeaUe, l!altlmore; San Jaclnto. Key
Wtn and Ualvtston.
MOVEMENTS OF STEAMERS.
FOREIGN POUTS.
Liverpool. Aug 18— Sailed, Ktuumer Lucanla (15r). Watt
New-York.
Southampton, Auk IS— Sailed, steamer New- York Rob
erts. New York via Cherbourg (and passed ' Hurst
i ajttle I :Sfi i> m).
Scllly, auk- 13, 8:33 a m— Paused, steamer St I'uul
Pauitow, New-York for Plymouth, Cherbourg and
Southampton.
QueemUown. auk 13. I- 1 .:!;, J. m— .Sailed, steamer Arat.lo
(Mr), llanscm (from Liverpool), New-York. Arrived
«:03 a m. bteamer iV.tlc (Br). Lindsay. New-York for
Liverpool land proceeded).
Brew Heuil. Aug 13 7:50 a m— Passed, nteamer Urnbrla
(Or), Stephens, New York for Liverpool
Hamburg, Aug 11— Balled, steamer Helioe (Ocr). Jansaen,
N. v. York.
Ortmen, Aus 13. •"« p m— Sailed, steamer Frledrlch der
Grosse (Ger). Lionel. New-York via Cherbourg.
Antwerp. Auk 13— Sailed, steamer VaderUnd (Dele).
KholT. New-York
Cherbours, Aug 13. « p m— Sailed, steamer New-Tork.
Roberta, from Southampton for New-York.
Havre, A<:i: 13. ll> a m— Sailed, steamer La Lorraine
"Kri, Al'\. New- York.
Boulogne. tug 12. « p m -Palled, steamer Ulllcber (Per).
Kopff, from Hamburg fur New-York.
Slianitha!. Auk 13 — Arrived (previously), steamer B*Uden
(Rr). Butler. New-York via Singapore.,
Ofbraitar. Aug- 13— Passetl steamer lndmwii.il (Pr), Hill,
Nevv-Y'jrk. f^r Aden, Hi t>l re and Yokohama.
Stem Brothers ■■. .-
To-morrow, the remainder of their
Women's Summer Dresses
Of Organdies, Lawns, $< efN 1O SA
Linen and Duck, at O.DU, IZ..DU
Former prices $1 i.so to 35.00
White Pique Skirts, Reduced from $5-95 at $2.65
Women's Rainproof Garments
In Tan, Oxford and Olive, plaited backs 50 pa fl *> •!?
with fancy collars or capes and belts, O-«-?U f lA,. J D
Formerly $12. and §19.50
Of Gloria Silk, in all colors, loose $1/1 *75
or fitted backs with belts, Real value $19.75 ■l' 4 J-../O
Washable Waists
Lawn, trimmed oeC $1 1? 1 £.r\
with embroidery, OO , * L 2D f 11 .©V
Persian Lawn, trimmed with 5^ *\zz -3 f\s J gA
embroidery and laces, "\*.VC>, O.VO,
. Women's Bathing Suits $ - « . „ -- n
of Mohair. 3 <■»•/%/, 4.75, 5.50
Misses' & Girls' Apparel
at Extraordinary Reductions
MISSES* SUITS, a variety of styles, in cheviots, voiles.
mixtures and silk. Blouse, Coat. Frock* and ci^ cr\ */t crt it. rrv
Frills and Shirt Waist Models, *IJ.JU, W,JU, lO.>J
Heretofore $19.00 to 30.00
MISSES' WALKING SKIRTS, plain cheviots and _
mannish mixtures, Value $5.97 to 7.00 ".75, 4.95
GIRLS' SAILOR AND RUSSIAN DRESSES, blue, brown
and red serge and mixtures, o to 14 years, Value $7.50 *^»95
GIRLS' CLOTH AND SILK REEFERS, a~sW •- « «*-
Box Style, 6to 12 years, Vjlue $?.00 to 7.00 $2.35. 4.95
Women's Summer Underwear
Gauze Ribbed Lisle Thread Vests, O^C
plain tops or fancy crochet trimmed. Value 43c ~>O
Light-weight Gauze Mercerized Lisle Swiss A*J C
Ribbed Vests, hand-crochet trimming. Value 7; c
Fine Silk Mixed Swiss Ribbed Vests, — r-y;
with hand-crochet trimming. Value 05c OV
Plain Gauze China Silk Vests. j-^ q^»
embroidered and lace trimmed. Value $4.25 J&»QD
Housekeeping Linens
at Unusually Low Prices
LINEN SHEETS, large size, 53.95, 5.25 Pr.
LINEN pillow CASES, 2 2 / i l x 56 inches, 75c, $1.15 Pr.
bed spreads, large size Crochet, 95c, Marseilles, $1.95 *
TABLE CLOTHS, 8X a 51.70, 8 X 10. 52.15, S X 12, 52.60
napkins, to match, 20 inches, $1.75 Doz. 24 inches, 52.50
i. 500 YDS. BLEACHED DAMASKS, 75% C
72 inches wide, Value $1.00 ' *^ >*"•
Boys' Summer Clothing :,."
X 7 ASH ABLE RUSSIAN & SAILOR SUITS, Q c ■
Stripes, Plain White, Tan Linen and Crashes ZfDC
Formerly §1.93 to §2.95
FINEST GRADE RUSSIAN, SAILOR & NORFOLK SUITS,
of Imported Galateas, Linens, Pimm and French Flannels, *. « —
•'Buster Brown" or Sailor Goßai Styles, ' 1»O J
Formerly $;.Q> to $5.00
ALL-WOOL RUSSIAN & SAILOR SUITS, %
Serges, Cheviots and Homespuns, Formerly $>0O to $6.QS 5 2.9J
FINE GRADE **X & E" AND "STAR" BLOUSES,
All desirable styles and fabrics. Formerly OQC to Q^C 4oC
CHILDREN'S IMPORTED STRAW HATS.
Formerly $1.45 to $5.0.=;. 4oc. 93c
WASHABLE BLOOMER & KNEE TROUSERS.
Linens, Crashes. Duck and Khaki. Formerly bQC to Q^C 45C
West Twenty-third Street
Amusements. I Amusements.
KiTITS"
URO.\DVTAV * UTII ST. < ONTIM PERFORMAXCE. E. V. ALBEC. OaaV 3««t
Alwuyn th» Beat Show la Tow
WM. H. PASCOB. I M.MB. >f^\POKKSKI. I TOM LEWIS and 4 BARD BBOTHEBS.
nelen Mar WU.ov A- Co. FRANCES tiERARD. «*AM I. KYAN. 30— '.BEAT ACTS— 3»
JOHN 1». v it r.itr. ! Italian _tkio. I Ellsworth * rt. i prices tic. * ioc. _
I
ACADEMY OF MUSIC *££««.
E. Q. Gllmore & Eiissas Tompkln» Manager*
i.A-r — «— TIMES..
EDWARD MORGAN
IN HALL OAINE-S PLAY.
The Eternal City.
1... beat & Co.. Managers.
Prices. -.'.I 60. "5. I.W. Mats. Wed, & Sat., 2. Eve.. 3:13.
I KA.T A
MONDAY EVE.; AUG. SKI
Klrke La Shelle's special production of
CHECKERS
By Henry M. Blossoaa, Jr. KEATS ON SALE.
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN ROOF
WEBER anil IU Sirs PRODUCTION.
PAR. IS TONIGHT
BY GRAND SUNDAY
JVTI&HT CONCERT
ADMISSION CO CENTS.
PIUMHKRSTEIN'S. 4.M St.. BTWSSI * ■th a-..
ARADISE ROOFUARDENS
Tn nioht Pewll. Mysterious Face: Bpadonl. CA.
10-ulgnl Chas. T. AUlrl.-h. othe. Good Seata •■■
TO-MOIUtOW EN'Ii'.MAUKI.F.K. the Automatic
NIGHT. Wonder; Pewit. Mysterious race;
Spadonl, 11,11 * Sylvani. The Oleason*. Chas. T. Aid
rich Willy Zimmerman aril other*. ••PARSIKALJA."
with Josephine Sa.bel A Eleanor Falk.
MAJESTIC ISLE
B*wayan«Ui St. I_V^ a— .1— _ '
XBSBS* 23d S P C F
11 C. WHITNEY'S \*J I I V^ La
A PIQUANT Ml'SH'Al. MIXTURE.
HEAT SALE OPENS TO-MOKRO%V.
•»> A CS**-, Ac. B-'gs & H&u Mat.*l.So.
UCSI B^GSiXS \V .-,! May Matin, -.SI.OO.
3SL*% i THE SPAN OF LIFE.
WEST END THBATRE. 123th-st.. Sth-ave.
WtOI C.NU l-rlees 2.VWV I^.-1.00.
REOPENS NEXT >\iv mi.hi, ah;, to.
TWO LITTLE SAILOR BOYS.
' \ DVEB riSSMENTS and subscriptions for The Trlbun*
A received al their Cptqwn '•!;:-■
NO. i.ilM UKOA&WAT.
Advertisements will Ks recetrcd at t.u» frllowtns branch
i ofnci-s at rccular office mtes until 8 o clock p. m.. viz.:
234 mli iv . ». c. cor. ::U-»t. : IM ot».-ave.. ' '■■ li«h-»t.;
US East Mti H. ; 237 Weal 434-etS between «tl» and .stn
eves,; SC3 West lSith-et.; 1.33^ M avi . between Tilth an.l
77th st». ; I. (KM 3d-ave, near Clst>st.: 1.70s ldtave.. near
I «9th si.: 157 v:ast rj6tti »••• 73rt Tie.nont-ave.; '1W» :M •
1 aye near 41»t-«».- «V| 3.1 a.- . T« Christopher- si.
lliuukl.n N. V.— -' Court •> . 218 Cbu? -«t. HHMHSBSH
laerial g/\r dens , gg
ZK'JSi* A Littls of Everything <%£?
Ws& unlit ijuerrero. the Great B«ek
hoot TO-N fiHT rs n n iai paris v^
ROOF IU-.MUIII nauken & Vannerson. Ned
AND NEXT WEEK. j Wayburn's Gtrls. otb»ra.
NEW YORK THEATHF E^ TIT IN ss GG A T 3:^xT.
J A Merry Musical M.lgg». M A ; |> AXP Mpß|gY.M pß|gY.
HERALD SO. thk.vtrt:. asthSt. nrß-w
nCsiALU OU. OPENS NEXT THl'sWBA*.
HAH UKRNARU In (with Original 0».
THE GIRL FROM KAYSI V£&~
/-\ A D D I OW THEATRE. Ssrh St.. "'j^'Sl
With Leo Dt'rlchstaln's Nsw Comedy.
MILITARY MAD. SiS^
PASTOR'S 3211"
WON COMEDY 4. « TO I , IMl B «o3:
Ke«lf o r,l »nl Wlb h«ter. nK< iVw H fw"»
PATt HK> .net < I IKTON. AttVXllS an.l MH \
TllK WOODWARD*, ™y )S V?iI?V
LKKOY unit MAI.BV. VKKIO * V 1..,\ ct
THE \4T.\«.K.\l*H. and a^ extra attraction
VIMMIX tutA W.tVNI~
B~OSTOCK'S a^V- ! «SB
MARVEIXOt'S HIT! ._ rß ßa*-
KOB3KT MTHERsIiiN AN" HIS *'-.L.«* v -
TION OF EDUCATED^f£^fl___— —
co^IGASIHQ ; PIFF, PAFF. PGUP
MANHATTAN BEACH I SILVER SLIPPER
Pain's Spectacle- DEC
and GRAND FIREWORKS
« uiLDsia > lIitEWOKKS TO-MOKROV>__>^L..
r\nr a am • wokwts ■**>« in rt% !^ 1
D R fc A M c— .«• ----c: I**1 **
permanent expo»l«<>^
I AND Bathlns. 23c.
L*/AI^L/ rrr* Vaudeville. A.tot»steaJ^
LUNA PARK $^M
P It. T.
■••.ORTOINAI.OF AU.OPE.U S^aamMS»l« n ''^
l-n«<ju«ll-d by ihe world ot Imitators— Ask your

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