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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, November 11, 1904, Image 12

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POOLROOMS WIDE OPEN
For I? MOXTHS' FREEDOM.
IAU Restraint Seems Removed. Non-
Election Is Over.
True to their announcement made come dayu
before Election Day. the poolroom kings have
-sjtnoe Wednesday morning opened many new
rooms In various parts of the city. Unless the
police disturb them quickly and efficiently they
: I to make this city a gambler's paradise
this winter. In the next four months they ex
pect to take thousands and thousands of dol
lars away from the gambling public. Then
will move on. to return after the next
•lection.
A Tribune reporter yesterday visited many
gambling rooms, and he «aw on every hand
signs that resembled conditions almost aa bad
as In the days when Ilk hard Croker held his
sway. In Weet Broadway, from Rector-st. to
Park Place, there are ten poolrooms doing a big
business. In the Bowery, from Chatham Square
to Hou«ton-st.. there are just as many pool
rooms, and in the lower Jiast Side east of the
Bowery, there Is. according to a number of
poolroom frequenters, about one poolroom to
•very five blocks. Most of these are old places
reopened.
In the last *ew years the poolroom kings have
conducted their business without undue ostenta
tion employing well appearing, smooth talking
young men to canvass the big business sections,
and these runner* even entered some of the
choice residential districts In quest of prey.
Many poolrooms were also opened in the down
town skyscrapers, and most of the rooms were
attractive and in charge of men of mild man
ners. Robbing the public with "kid gloves"
•was a term often used by some of the "runners"
<ot the rooms In speaking about their business.
Under this system, however, money did not
pour fast enough Into the strong boxts of tha
poolroom eyndicatea. and as a result the move
ment toward a return to old methods Is now well
under way.
One of the bigrgest poolrooms In this city in
-full operation is on the south side of Forty-flrst
«t-. between Fourth and Madison avts., not
many doors west of the westerly entrance to
the Murray Hill Hotel. This room, on account
of Its proximity to the Murray Hill, the Man
hattan and the <irand Union hotels and the
Grand Central Station, is a menace to the safety
of the thousands of persons who ride or walk
through this busy hotel and railroad centre,
■Just at the time of day when the throngs bound
toward the Grand Central Station are biggest
the frequenters of the room leave the room and
iningie with the hardworking throngs of men
end women homeward bound. This room has
"b^n in operation wine months, and the num
r-»r of its patrons is growing daily larger. As,
vet there arc no signs that the place is being
watched by the polite, who seem utterly obliv
ious of Its beine.
The place Is ready for unexpected visits from
the police. Three floors led to the room where
beta are taken, and a bis stove In the centre
-of the room is kept constantly burning, po that
In cam of a raid all evidence may be quickly
destroyed Entrance is pained only by cards
signed by one at the watchers.
In Forty-seeond-st., near Third-aye., If an
other lip "poolroom, but the frequenters there
ere r.f In tie better class than In the Forty-flrst
fit. place
Two of the big rooms recently opened in the
Fixth-ave. section are in Twenty-eiphth-s=t.,
near Sixth-aye., and In Thlrteenth-st.. between
Fifth and Sixth avea. In the Bowery large
rooms are now in full blast near Rlvtngton-st.,
near Grand-st. and near Canal-«t The Bowery
room? are the worst type of poolrooms in the
city. Mostly "r.ldtirr.e players" are among their
patrons. Not only are bets on horse racing
taken in them, but every popular gambling
pam*» is played there. Koulett*. faro, and even
•"lightning" policy, aro some of the game?. No
Vft on the gambling games decided by hand is
refused. Penny players are welcome. These
rooms are in Congressman Sullivan's bailiwick.
Some other Ms; rooms are in Ctrand-Kt., near
Elizabeth: In One-hundrfd-and-tenth-st., near
Madlson-ave.. and in Forty-fourth-st.. near
Sixth-aye.
NEGROES TO TRY WHITE FOR MURDER.
Five Are on the Jury in Case of a Wealthy
Texan.
CnV TELEGRAPH TO TKT TRIBrNK.I
Houston, Tex.. Nov. 10.— The case of W. T. Eld
ridge. formerly general manager of the Cane Belt
Railroad, and a wealthy men. went to trial to-day
at Richmond. The jury has five negroes- on it. the.
State and the defence having exhausted their per
emptory challenges before the KM special venire
men summoned had been exhausted. Eldridee Is
charged with the murder of Captain William Duno
vant. who was one of the best known residents of
thin part of the country, the killing growing out of
trnrineps differences. Dunovant had made Kldridge
hi* right hand man for a long time, but afterward
accused him of trying to get the better of him and
making threats.
•WILL SET TJP SUBMARINES ABROAD.
Constructor of Lake Boats Will Follow Them
to Russia, It Is Said.
FBT TBUmUn TO THE TRIBUNE. I
»wport Mbsjs. Va.. Nov. 10.— E. L. Peacock, who
liss been here for several months superintending the
construction of the fire submarine boats built and
building at the shipyards for the I>ak*> Torpedo Boat
Company. of Bridge-port, Conn., left here to-night to
follow up the two submarine boats which were taken
from the shipyard by the barge Kennebec about a
«nor.th ago. Fifteen expert machinist* accompany
him.
At Hamburg the sections of the boats were
shipped overland to Russia, it Is said, and Mr.
Peacock. It Is thought, goes to the Czar's country
to superintend the rebuilding.
ALEXANDER J. HO WELL DEAD.
Laid Out Central Park Under Andrew H.
Green's Direction.
Alexander J. Howell, one of the oldest feid best
known contractors in this city, died on Wednesday
at his horn' . No. 49 W«St Eighty-ninth-st., at the
ape of seventy-two. The funeral, which will be
private, will bs ht-id at his home at 2 p. in. to-day.
Mr. Howell was one of the oldest residents of the
eld Ninth Ward. He was the first contractor to use
' t | -jglngr trucks In the transportation of boilers.
One of the greatest tasks that he ever accom
plished m the laying out of Central Park und.-r
the direction of the !«it<* Andrew EL <»rt-en. 11.
aJso furnished the concrete and masonry lor the
pedestal of the Statue of Liberty on Bedloe'a
it-land, and was the builder of the original fea
•wall around th« j Battery.
Mr. Howell was a mt-ml.t r of the Patrta Club.
For many years be iras a < ■•iiimur.i. ant of the
Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church. His wife and
one son. John K. Howill, survive him.
LEGGING MAKERS' FIRST STRIKE.
The first strike ordered by th* ljogging Makers'
t'nlon. which has been organized recently, took
piece yesterday at the factory of BesMßwasser &
Co , No. 440 <}ra!i<l-st., where on* hundred and fifty
women r mployi d in making lrggitigH for the army
und navy quite work. The strike Is against a re
duction of wa?( ■. and to f-nforc-e the elsrht-hour
■workday. The leader of the strike Is Secretary
Mlchueleon. of the United Hebrew Trades, who says
he will write to tin. Sfcr«-tary of War. the Secre
tary of the Navy and President Roosevelt. "It
may or may not do pood to take this course." he
•aifl. "but the United State* government ought to
be a pood j.ay master. Fat these women are paid
much less than women employed on th*- same kind
of work for plain citizens."
BURGLARS GET $2,000 IN BANK.
Rochester. Nov. 10.— Burglars some time between
3 and i a. m. to-day Mt-w optn the safe in the bank
of Brlscoe &. Topper, of Churchvlllo, and secured
about 12,000. The robbery was reported at 9 o'clock
this morning. Three men with a top buggy were
•sen driving In the direction of Itrw Ue ilei soon
alter the explosion In the bank was heard. Brlsooe
& Tupper are nn-mbers of the Banker*' Protective
Association. Frr.rti frequent robberies In this sec
tion of this State it is belle vtd that an nixed
lbi*f 1* it work.
TELLS OF SIMPLE LIFE.
The Rev. Mr. Wagner Relates lloxv
He Came to Write Book.
In an unusually interesting lecture at Carnegie
Hall last night the Rev. Charles Wagner told the
story of his book. "The Simple Life." Notwith
standing the bad weather the hall was filled with
an enthusiastic audience. He referred to the kind
of English he was about to speak, saying he had
studied the Kngllsh language only a short while
ago to tell the American people of simplicity: and
that if any "accidents" occurred it would not be
by premeditation. He snid.
It is an old rd an awful error in this world, that
others have to think tor us. If we are thirsty do
we not have to cot to the spring and come per
sonal contact with the water we srrk. L/*t the chil
dren be children. That li the flirt rule of sim
plicity the first rule of the simple life. Let them
learn from the stars and the fields and the Bowers
that there is an endless world: an endless life.
Let them listen to the inward voice and hear what
God speaks to them. Let the children be children.
The «inffin»: birds can tell the children of men the
mn«t Important story of life: stories that no
teacher can teach them. Thru was my lirst school
Of simplicity and of simple life.
1 was horn in Alsace I remember the Franoo-
Pruasian War. that rent th»- peaceful country Into
two TiartS. My mother was a Frenchwoman ana
my father was a German. 1 felt that I could not go
to either country after the war. I thoi.*ht .much
on this awful condition, and finally aaid: "Cannot
I love the whole divine gospel?" and he voice
within snid. "Yes. you can! For a while I as
the iron between the .ledge and the ami. I suf
fered and I fought. There is a time that e\ery
voiitiK man and woman needs hammering
' You are nskine me now if you can have the sim
ple life in this great city, when- the people live in
Skyscrapers. I say ye : Simplicity is not a matter
of one, two or ten stories. It does not consist Of
wooden shoes. It is not In the cloth. Simplicitj
is In the heart. Simplicity must begin with suffer
ire All the Rood in the world began In suffering.
' i have been to Philadelphia and I saw the pictures
there, of your groat statesmen. Washington. Benja
min Franklin and Lincoln. I have read your history
and I know that way down at the depth of America.
the greatest government of the age. lie? simplicity.
Speaking of how he came to write "The Simple
Life." Dr. Wagner told in detail how he, had <=poke:i
nt a wedding in Paris, and a publisher who was
present asked him to write a book on the lines of
the address at the wedding.
■I did not mean to write a book." said Dr. Wag
ner. "I had no idea of such a thing. I had the
bcok In myself without knowing It."
The lecturer told of his visit with President Roose
velt and of his great regard for the Presidents
wide intelligence and wonderful statesmanship.
Speaking of the President's opinion of "The Simple
Life." Dr. Wagner said:
"Mr. Roosevelt read my book and thought it was
nice."
STEEL PRICE REVISION.
Associations to Meet Here Next
Week — Rise Expected.
Plttsnurp. Nov. 10.— All the associations con
trolling the prices of steel are to meet in New-
York next Tuesday, and continue in session un
til the whole list of prices has been revised to
suit the conditions which have arisen in the
iron and steel markets. The associations which
are included In those to meet next week are the
billet, bar. rail, structural, plate, wire and
others. It is not expected that the meeting
will end before the latter part of the week.
The prospects are that the scale of prices de
termined on next week will be those that will
rule -until well into fhe first Quarter of the com
ing year and it Is fairly certain that prices will
be advanced in most of the lines. The price of
billets it is thought by the well informed, will
be Increased to $2L The pr< sent price Is i?l9 50,
PittsburK.
WANTS NO TWO PLATOONS.
Chief Croker Opposes Si/stem — Ex
periment To Be Made Soon.
Members of the Fire Department were much in
terested yesterday In a report that Fire Commis
sioner Hayes Is about to test the two platoon sys
tem, wish the i«Je;i of adopting it. The members of
the department have been urging the adoption of
the two platoon system for some time, and their
demand has been I licked by politicians, although
Chief Croker and others who have studied the sub
ject strongly oppose It, r.nj declare that it would
mean B considerable expense to the city with no
adequate return.
Deputy Fire Commissioner Thomas W. Churchill
said t-> a Tribune reporter last night:
I have heard nothing about any Intention on the
part of the Commissioner to test the two platoon
system on a battalion within a few day?. I do
know however, that Commissioner Hayes has made
a definite promise to give the system a trial with
the idea of adopting it generally, and only a f< W
days ago he told me thai be Intended to keep his
promise. I do not think that any date h:is yet hc.-ri
decided upon or any battalion on which to matte
the U st 5..-lected.
Asked whether Chief Croker's opposition to the
system would have any effect upon the Commis
sioner's promise. Mr. Churchill replied:
No effect at all. If the Commissioner means to
carry out B reform he will do it, despite anybody's
opposlti- !.
Fire chief Croker was exceedingly angry when
the eubject was broached to him last night.
"I won't discuss it." be shouted. "I don't know
anything about the Commissioner's intention, hut I
want to say that I'm oppose,] to the ten platoon
system now as I always have been. It would be to
the worsrinterests of t!»- department and the pub
lic to adi.pt it. I fought the mntt.-r at Albany be
fore the legislature a rfs ln >' views are well known.
Chief Croker's manner Indicated that there ha«
been friction betwee n himself and Commissioner
Hayes over the subject.
WELCOME DR. M'AFEE.
Well Known Men Greet New Pastor
at Dr. Cuyler's Old Church
Tbe Rev. Dr. Cl^land Boyd McAffee. the new
pastor Of the- Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian
Church, Brooklyn, and Mrs. McAfee were welcomed
to the city in a public reception last night. A
social hour in the church parlors was follower] by
speaking in the auditorium, which was crowded.
John N. Beach presided, and introduced ;u< the
first speaker the Rev. Dr. Theodore L. Cuyler, the
first pastor "f the church, who greeted Dr. McAfee
in a characteristic speech.
The Rev. Dr. David <sregK, the second pastor of
the church, spoke of the pulpit and church as
among the most powerful in the nation.
Dr. <Jreg(j said that be hnd ii solution for the
"downtown church." such as he said the Lafayette
Avenue Church was. His Idea is that each mem
ber who is able give his pew to the church and
endow it with, say. $3,000. Thus, if one hundred
men give einple endowments the church would
hri\e one hundred free pews arid an endowment
of 1300.000, which would enable it to keep its doors
open to the people without means.
Oscar B. Straus, former United States Minister
to Turkey, spoke of religious liberty and charity.
Others who spoke were D. W. McWilliams. the
Rev. Dr. David J. BurreU, pastor of Marble Col
lepiate Church, Manhattan: the Rev. Dr. Charles
Cuthbert Hall president of the Union Theological
Seminary, and Borough President Littleton.
NEW STREET SIGNS CEUSADE.
Organizations to Meet To-night to Give
Movement Fresh Impetus.
The crusade for a comprehensive system of
street signs in this city, which certain public
spirited organizations have been waging for some
time. is to receive a fresh Impetus. A meeting will
be held to-night In Room No. 28. of the Bar Asso
ciation, at which there will be present representa
tives of •.!■;" vlesl End Association, the City Club,
the Municipal Art Society, the Merchants' Asso
ciation, the Hoard of Trade, the Harlem Board of
Commerce, the Independent Club of the XXlst As
sembly District and the Washington Heights and
other associations.
"The object of this meeting will he to determine
on a plan of campaign which will resuli in the
proper si n:j.K of the city." said John L. Hr.nv.-r of
No. MR (Vest Bnd-ave yesterday "It is likely that
a fp<-eial committee will be appointed to take up th«
matter with President Ahearn and other city „,,
thorities. We expect to be able t., show that th
cay is si..-n<iing from »)5,<-yi to $20,000 :i year irl
the maintenance of lighted signs, whan unbreakable
signs could be used at no cost to the citj for
Unhung-. That the city !f most poorly signed any
on- v.ho travels abOUl tho ,M,y ran tell you. ft Is
a. shami that such streets M went v-tiii'rd-st. and
Fcurth-ave and Lexington-ave. and Tbirty-fourtb
81 ■ should be absolutely without Bij;ns. Th. ■ ar«
only ; samples, for all over the city signs are miss-
NEW- YORK DAILY TRIBUNE. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 11. 1004.
URGE SIXTH-AYE. TIRE.
Merchants Against Opposition .of
Surface Lines.
The land work of the New-York and New-Jersey
Railroad Company, which Is building parallel tun
nels from Murtonst.. Manhattan, to the Jersey
shore. is being done slowly, because the company
is awaiting action on its application before the
Rapid Transit Commission to extend Its tunnel
from its original Manhattan terminal site to West
Tenth-st.. thence through West IVnth-st. to Sixth
ave. and up Sixth-aye. to Thirty -third-st. The New-
York City Railway Company is opposed to the grant
ing of a franchise to the tunnel company to have its
terminal at Thirty-third-st. and Sixth aye.. on the
ground that an extension of the tunnel as pro
posed would practically lessen the value of its
franchise rights in Sixth-aye. from Tenth to Thir
ty third St.. as many of the persons who would
use the extension of the tunnel would otherwise
ride on the surface lines.
This opposition to the application has caused
many property owners, persons having business
interests in central Sixth-aye.. and others to take
vigorous action to show that they are in favor of
the application, and think the proposed extension
of the tunnel is a public necessity. The following
letter, which explains Itself, has been sent to Presi
dent Orr of the Rapid Trajislt Commission:
1 have the honor to transmit herewith copy of
preamble and resolutions adopted this day by the
Board of directors of the Retail Dry Goods Asso
ciation of the City of New-York, in reference to
the application of the New-York and Jersey Rail
road Company for permission to extend the tun
nels of that company under Sixth-aye. to Thlrty
third-st.
J respectfully request that the committee ap
pointed by this association be given an opportunity
to be heard on said application, if a hearing be
given on the objection of the New- York City Rail
way Company.
I nm, sir, with preat respect.
Very truly yours.
C. L. GRAFF. Secretary.
The preamble and resolutions adopted are as fol
lows:
Whereas. The New- York and Jersey Railroad
Company has liled with the Board of Rapid Tran
mi Railroad Commissioners of the City of New-
York an application for the right to extend the
tunnels of said company under West Tenth-st. and
Bixth-ave. to Thirty-tnuU-st. ; and
Whereas, Said company has agreed to locate such
tunnels at such depth as- to leave the first twenty
feet below the surface of Sixth-aye. open for future
subway uses; and
Whereas. This association believes that the, ex
tenslon of said tunnels as proposed will be of in
calculable value to the commercial and business
Interests of New-York City, and of great comfort
and utility to its people, and to all the people of the
United States who have to cross the Hudson River
to reach Manhattan Island, and that said tunnels
alld said extension are an improvement imperatively
demanded by modern progress and present necessi
ties: and
Whereas, The New-York City Railway Company
has Hied with the Board of Rapid Transit Railroad
Commissioners an "objection to said extension
upon grounds which, in the opinion of this asso
ciation, are inimical to the best interests of the
people of New-York and of the great business in
terests which will be benefited by said extension;
and
Whereas, The members of this association nlono
represent an aggregate Investment in real estate
and business Interests In the. city of New-York,
directly affected by the extension in question, of
inr,jv> than (100,000,000, and are. therefore vitally
concerned In the development in Question; therefore,
Resolved, That tills association does hereby ex
press its earnest approval of the application of the
New-York and Jersey Railroad Company and re
'•; • ctfully petitions the Board of Rapid Transit Rail
road Commissioners to speedily prant the same.
Resolved, That this association condemns the
attitude of the New- York City Railway Company
as a simple plea for a continuation of their monop
oly, regardless of the welfare of the people, and
to the detriment of the business interests of New-
York, and therefore entitled to no consideration at
the hands of the municipal authorities.
Resolved, That the secretary of this association
be instructed to transmit a copy of these resolutions
to the Honorable Board of Rapid Transit Railroad
commissioners, and to request that this association
be permitted to be heard if a hearing be i,'iven to
th> New-York City Railway Company and that
M< ssrs. Samuel Adams, of Adams Dry Goods Com
pany: M. Friedsam, of B. Altman & Co.- A J
Oarnmeyer; J. S. Ehrich. of Enrich Bros ' j'h
Bauland, of The Fourteenth Street Store- X P
Hatch, of Lord ft Taylor: I^idor Straus, of r' h
Macy A Co.] AVUiiam J. McCreery, of J. McCreery
W ("':( "' : Tr n: !m .'"• Strange, of H. O'Neill & Co.;
VI . R. U. Martin, of Rogers, Pe*>t & Co • B j
dref. nnut. of 6iegel-Cpoper Company; Henry SieWel'
of Simpson-Crawford Company; Isaac Stern of
Stern Bros., and Andrew Saks, of Saks & Co. be
hearing ! ° represent this association at iaid
NEW- YORK WOMAN THOUGHT INSANE.
Mrs. W. A. Applegate Taken to Hospital in
St. Louis.
[by telegraph to tht: tribune.]
St. Louis. Nov. 10. -Mrs. W. A. Applegate. of New-
York, wife of a well known merchant, is nt the
City Hospital, supposed to be mentally deranged.
Mrs. Applegate, -Miss E. M. Cooper, of New-York.
and Mrs. Maybeck, Mrs. Applegate'p cousin, came
to Pt. Louis :: week ago. On Sunday Mrs. Applegat©
and Mrs. Maybeck auarrelled violently. Miss Cooper
did not know- the cause, but finally separated the.
women, persuading Mrs. Maybeck to leave Mrs.
Applepate's room.
Last night Mis. Applegate declared to Miss Coop
er that sh<-- would not stay at the hotel any longer.
Mi.-s Cooper asked her where she was going. She
said she did not know Miss Cooper accompanied
her. Mrs. Applegate went to the Union Station and
began walking hack and forth through the Midway.
She declared she intended to remain there all night.
Miss Cooper appealed to a policeman, who took
Mrs. Applepate to the hospital.
DOUBLE MURDER AT STATION.
Sheriff and His Friend Shot by Brother of
Man Killed the Day Before.
[BY TEI.EOKAPH TO THE TKIRINE.)
rluntington, W. Va., Nov. 10.— The shooting to
death last night of Constable "Will" Jackson liy
Policeman Ellliott on th.* streets of Montgomery
wh.s followed to-day by the murder of Sheriff
Daniels, one of the State's best known Republican
politicians, and John Rood, n weaJthy citizen of
Payette County. The murder of both thes«» men
occurred at the Cincinnati and Ohio station at
Montgomery, and v.as witnessed by passengers on
the New-York express. ,
Sheriff D:in!e!s was asked to come to Montgomery'
from his home at Payette in order to keep down a
riot which was brewing. No sooner had the Sheriff
stepped from the truln at the station than Frank
Jackson, a brother of the man murdered last night,
pulled a revolver and shot the Sheriff to death.
Rood attempted to prevent the tragedy, when
Jackson killed him also. Jackson then made his
escape to the mountains near by. Hundreds, of
people ure in search for him, and he will be strung
up if caught.
More killings, the result of last night's and to
day's tragedies, am certain.
DOLBEER WILL CASE HEARING.
Waldorf Housekeeper Denies Testimony Al
leged to Have Been Given to Coroner.
Attempts to show that wtiness>»B examined by
Coroner Scholer declared that Miss Bertha Polneer
was insane or suffering from melancholia when she
Jumped from the Waldorf again failed yesterday at
the hearing In the Dolheer will case. Mrs. 1.. C. A.
McClurg, housekeeper at the Waldorf, was the prin
cipal witness. She denied that Miss Warren. Miss
I'iolbeer's companion, had told Detective, Sullivan
that she "was apprehensive for Miss Polbe*-r's
safety." Neither had she told Sullivan that Miss
Dolbeer had complained of pains In her head.
Mis* Warren ha/1 not told Coroner Scholer that
Miss Dolbeer "had been crazy for two or three
years." The. word crazy was not used. Miss War
ren did not say that a Paris doctor told her Miss
Dolbeer would be likely to commit some rash act.
MJsh Warren had not told Coroner Scholer that
Miss Dolbeer had Jumped out of the window. No
one said anything about Miss Dolbeer being of un
sound mind or suffering from melancholia.
There was a •tttle. spat between I.uke O'Reilly,
counsel for the contestants, and Commissioner Leo
over questions to the witness.
The witness said Coroner Scholer had not asked
If Miss Dolbeer was crazy. He asked if Miss Dol
beer bad not been treated for neurasthenia. Coro
ner Beholer i us. rested neurasthenia, not Miss War
ren Mis« Warren had merely sa id Miss Dolbaer
bad not felt well white abroad and had consulted a
physician.
Counsel brought out th» fact that the dr>or of
room No. 321. the room which Miss I>olbe««r first oc
cupied, was almost directly opposite the two win
dows on th( airshaft, through one of which Mis*
Dolbeer fell or lumped. Subsequently Mi*.* Dol
beer j nd SiOss Warren changed from Nos. 920 and
:..; to Nos. 923 and 824, further down the ball and
away from the alrshafl. it is asserted by the
< mtestanta thai Miss Warren moved to the second
sun.- because she feared the proximity of the titst
suite to the window on the shaft micht tempt
Miss Dol!;eer to Jurr.p out.
SECURITIES CONTINUE ACTIVE.
MAJORITY OF LEABmNG ISSUES ENJOY SET GAINS.
Pacific Mail and Kansas and Texas Issues Features Money Hates Un
—Sterling Higher.
Closing prices yesterday of the principal active
securities and net changes from Wednesday's
quotations wer»:
STOCK 9.
Am.M Copper... 7374 ■+- HI National Lead... 24 : i — M
Am C & F 20' i +. * : Nut of Mcx pf . . . 41 -f *
Am K« pref 36% + KIM T Central 138.i — Vi
Am l^co-notlvs. ?OV* — > 4 NVO A- \V 43 — —
Am Malting pf. 22% — H Norf & West 74* + %
Am Sm«ltin(f. . • "5 1 * + H North Amer U«H 4- »i
Am Sugar 146 H + '« Pacific Mall 46 +6
At Top & 8 T. .•««% + H FVnn R It 13fl — v»
do pref 1*3% Peo Gas of Chi. .11014, — !4! 4
B«!t A; 0hi0... 90W + '* PreFd»d Steel Car 34 — H
Brooklyn R T. . «7^ — '4 Headline 76H — H
Canadian Par. 12ft —Ti do lit pref.... 87* —'i
Chic O W«t... 23' i — H Rock Inland .•»»*
Ches A Ohio 45H + *i ! do pref 74 Vi -r2
C M & St P 172** — S'Ry Steel SprtnK. 30 — U
Chic & N W...198 1 Rep I A Steol . . 16* — V.
Col V & 1 43* i - H i do pref tS3U — •»
Col & South 23% + M Rubber Goods... 23 i
do 2(1 pref. . . . V>K St U&SF 2d pf «7h + v i
Consol Gas 217?. — '• St L. 8 W 24 4- V
Corn Products.. 20 I do pref 51 4- %
Del * Hudson. I*7 +t% i Slo*s-*h Steel... fll 'i 4-4
Erie 40' i — '% Southern Ry 35H -t- **
do Ist pref... 73 — •<» Southern Pac «5 -r \fc '
do 2d pref fl4'4 + % Term C & 1 74 4-4H
Gen Electric 177't 4- Vi T St L, * TV . . . 30H
Inter Paper 19* — *4. Texas ft Par... 36 + V*
Jowa Cent 294 — '» Union Pacific .. 112V4 — H
Illinois Central. 144 — >* V S leather 134 + 4
Kan City S 29« i +141 do pref 924 •
Louis & Nash.. 139 U 8 Steel 2f1?6 — 4
Manhattan 163 4- \\ do pref X6 l * 4- "•»
Met Sec 80*4 4- Vi Va-Car C -.30 4-1
Met Street Ry..l22'i + V* ! Wabaah 234 4- U
Mcx Central 20 4-1 J do pref 44 7 * ■
MRP4SSM.9I West Un Tel 61 1-*1 -* — 4
M X & T 36* t24J Wheel & L. E... 104 — 4
do pref 62«t 4-3'»!Wls Cent 23 4-4
Missouri Pac...106»i 4- * i do pref 45% — »i
•Ex dividend.
BOND 6.
AT& SPr 45.102H — 4 Mcx C 2d Inc... 164 4- 4
Atlantic C L, 4s fl<?4 — 4 M X & T ext 5s 1034 4- 4
BA O (Sold 48.103' ii 4- 4 Oregon 8 L. 4*. .1044 — 4
C of Oa 6b 1114 — 4 Perm con 34a. . .1024 4-4
Chen 4 O 4Vj5..107»i 4-1 Heading gen 4a. 102 4- *'
C B & Q 4s. . . 004 4-HSL.IMJfeK i*. 04H 4- «i
C R I*P RR 4s 7S*» 4- «4 BL.& S F r*>f 4s SS4 4- 4
do col t r.g 004 4- VS I* 3 W con 4e « 4- '•*
Con Gas deb 68.18S 4- 4 ; South Pac 4.'... 054 4- S
<'cn»ol Tob 45.. SOU 4-I%'T'n Pac con 4»,112 — l i
Dis Sec C ss. .. 754 — 4 VSK & I deb Bs l*>Vi 4- V 4
GB&Wd B» 20 4-2 Wabash deb Bs. 67 4- l i
Kan CSo 3». .. 72 4- * West Md 4b.... R9Vi 4- «,
Mcx Ccn Ist Ino 22% — V* Wls Cent gen 4» 02 » 4- H
STOCK MARKET OPERATIONS.
While the volume of trading in yesterday's
stock market did not equal the record of the
preceding day, transactions were heavy, never
theless, amounting: to over I.HOCMXM) shares on a
movement of values that exhibited great Irreg
ularity. In many Issues marked Improvement
was reported In trfe early dealings, while In the
second hour of trading- and in the first part of
the afternoon the Improvement was lost In
jart, owing to the enormous offerings by peo
ple who were anxious to convert their paper
profits into cash. An Instance of this tendency
was presented by Southern Pacific, which moved
up over a point and then lost its gain on heavy
sales by Fome of the most active traders and
commission houses in the Street. London was
an active factor in Southern Pacific, taking
large amounts of the stock, while substantial
purchases for foreign interest were reported in
all of the international shares, including the
Missouri. Kansas and Texas issues, which en
joyed marked Improvement in the eariy trading,
the preferred advancing 4 J 4 points and the com
mon 2, as compared with Wednesday's final
quotations. The movement in tho so-called
"Katy" issues reflected buying by the Dutch
Interests in the property, who are now In actual
control of the road. Earnings of this com
pany have shown remarkable Improvement in
the last few months, and as the territory cov
ered by the company's lines is enjoying record
breaking Industrial prosperity It is safe to pre
dict further material expansion. In trafflo re
ceipts, with the promise of a dividend on the
preferred stock next year. Erie and Reading
were heavily sold, and as a consequence their
early quotations showed declines from the pre
ceding day, while the character of the Helling
encouraged the belief in well informed specu
lative quarters that the recent heavy buyers of
these issues were taking advantage of the up
ward movement to give some one else a chance
to take their holdings. The advance in Erie and
Reading in the last few months has not been
accompanied by developments that have added
real value to the stocks, and. based on their
prospects as permanent investments, there is no
good reason to buy the shares at present prices.
And the aame may be said of United States Steel
common.
In the United States Steel issues the demand
was active, but there was no great change in
prices, as the offerings were heavy enough to
prevent an Important upward movement, the
common after a Phort period of strength sell
ing under Wednesdays last price and closing
at a net loss of % per cent. The preferred
ended the day at a net gain of Vi per cent. Not
withstanding remarkably heavy realizing sales,
the market exhibited great firmness in the last
hour dealings, while in the final trading the
tendency throughout the list was in the direction
of higher prices, the Improvement in many
shares being large enough to offset declines
which were recorded in the midday transactions.
Among the so-called specialties. Pacific Mall
enjoyed a sharp advance on dealings amounting
to a large total There were no news develop
ments accounting for the strength In this issue,
but careful buyers bought the stock on the ex
cellent theory that the company's earnings will
bo largely increased In the course of the next
few years through the expansion of the Pacific
Ocean trade, with the promise of still larger
gains in revenue after the completion of the
Panama Canal. The Gould stocks were in good
demand throughout the day; also Pennsylvania,
Mexican Central. People's Gas, Southern Rail
way, Union Pacific and St. Paul. Commission
houses were well supplied with buying orders,
and there appeared to be no lack of enthusiasm
on the part of the public, while professional
Wall Street traders exercised their time "hon
ored" privilege of circulating a mass of misin
formation regarding various properties for the
purpose of attracting an active outside interest
in securities.
Call money ruled at 2*i per cent, while there
was no material change in quotations for time
funds. Sterling exchange was higher, and as
a consequence talk of gold exports was heard
in foreign banking circles, although opinion did
not favor the idea that further large shipments
of the metal would be made. Money market
conditions doubtless will attract considerable at
tention In the rest of the year, owing to specu
lative activity in securities, the increase in the
demand for funds for mercantile expansion, the
probable withdrawal by the federal Treasury
of a certain amount of government deposits and
the financing of the Japanese loan and require
ments of various railway companies. Money
doubtless will become more active, and hlght-r
rates may be looked for, but at present ther'- la
no rea.sori to look forward to disturbance in the
market.
THE DAY'S OPERATIONS IN BONDs""
GOVERNMENT BONDS.— Market steady Final
quotations follow:
Hid. Asked. | Bid A (•Veil
U.S. "-'.-. 1 930. r«g ltM4 100 ! U.S. 4*. 1907. .011 .Iwii, 106%
I • .-. 2a.1930.c0u.104H I" 6 IS. «•, 1v2.Vreg.1304 ISI
U.S. 11W8.re8.1044 105 US. 4» lli2.Vi-0u.1304 181
U.S. 3(i.lW)S,cou.l(»4>i 105 Philippine 4* low —
U.S 3« lJ«f«,sml.l<»44 — Dint of C. 3-«5«. P.-.i _
U.S. 48.U..T7.r«-s-.H*l l * 10<mi
RAILROAD BONDS.— strong and active.
Total rains amounted In ,par value to J12,430.5.n>,
nxainßt H4.NMK on Wednesday. The heaviest
dealings were '" the Atchtaon. Atlantic Coast I..in«
is. Central of Gtorfrla Be, Cb«upeal|e miij Ohio
4143. Chicago. BurlinßK'n aid Qulncy -la. Chicago.
Rock Island and Pacitlc Railroad 4s and collateral
trust is. Erie general is. Green Bay and Western
debenture Ba. Kansas City Southern 3s. Mexican
Central 4s, first and second income*, Missouri,
Kansas and Texas extension ss, Oregon Short Line
♦s. Pennsylvania convertible ;; l *s. Reading general
4s, St. Louis. Iron Mountain and Southern 4s, St.
I^ouls and San Francisco refunding 4s. St. I»ui3
Southwestern consolidated 4s. Southern Pacific 4s.
Union Paclilc convertible 4s and Wabash debenture
Bs. Consolidated Gas debenture 6s. Consolidated
Tobacco 4s. United States Realty and Improve
ment debenture os and United States Steel os were
also active.
SALES AT THE STOCK EXCHANGE.
BONDS.
600 V 3 3« Reg 1908- I !'••"•' Mcx OS* l«t Inc. 22* i
1018 4 12(HK) Jo 2<J Inc 16^
43500 Jap Loan CMS. . $**» 3r-000 M SI P 4 8 S M
71800 do 9<>\ l«t Con 4« Ob 1 ;
b2sou do &<>*« 2000 Mo K& T Ist •Js.lo2 I*1 '*
46000 RorC 6s Ctff.. lei ,'."OO do 101'S
1000 Am HA L. 6». . . M\< 10000 do I'd 4* M
I<W> Am Spirits 6«. . . 94 ; 2OUO do «»4
10000 Am fob tts Ctfs.lO.S 47000 do 86
13<*l0O do : 108' i 51000 do Ext 6s 103
105000 do 1081* 5000 do )«»';
t\3<Hid do 108 V 2.-000 do 103 V,
462000 do IO'i»|llrt«1M X 4 Tot T51.1W
2MOOO do ICSV K.OOO do 1O«S
5000 do 108% I 10000 do lf>«H
6UOOO do I<)S» 4 s<>oom do W*\.
20000 do 4s Ctfs M\\ 8000 Mo P Ist Col 55..105",
50(«IO do •«** 10*100 do 10SV,
05000 do 87 i 1000 do Trust 5s If* 1 *
t)HHN> do 67'-i - r >"00 Mut Fuel C,a» 8u.104
S71')00 do 87H| 10000 Nas El*c R R 4s. *Wi
20U000 do B7V 4000 do S»S
421000 do 88 | 10000 N of M Ist Con 4s SO
150000 do *»«, 4000 do WH4
78000 do «fi<4 2000 Nst Starch C* 70
75000 do 67%! floo<> do '•l^
21000 do «7Hi 5000 N V Cent L S Col
lllKfOO do n% 3V4s 01
401<H)i> do «7H' 9000 do l*>\
«500<> do H7 1 * 73000 do 90^
V»XH> Va 6s BBr Cttm. "Hi 3^K» dr. 80%
30<J<) Ann Ar Ist 45... 97 ! .WOO do Re* "8%
1000 A T * S F AdJ | 4«iOO NYC* St I. 4a.K>4>»
4(1 92'» 7'iTiO do 104
3000 do Htpd W t l 1000 do 105
.T>oo do Gen 4« 108% 5000 N YG & E I. II
«<<'") do Kf2S' i r si 94%.
40000 At Coast 4».. 88*4 24<M>'> Norf & W Con *B.ieo*i
10000 do OPIj 1 3000 do PC & C 43. '■•'■'■:
1600 B ,i- O GoM 45.. 103 10800 Nor Pac G>>n BS.. 7.'.
l'<" x> do 108^ •>"">' flo 75 v;
1000 do 10.Vi,l 43000 do 1W
•JOOtt do U); t u. lt>iV» do Keg ■ 7.1' j
r^Mi do Prior 3Hs.. fa\\ 4000 do Prior 4s MB
7000 do Swn SHa. .. 92>4 500 da I-***
1000 do 92 1000 do 105
1000 Ilkln P.ap Tr 4s. SS ' r,i)ti<) O R & X CM 4s.I«V»W
3000 do 84% 6000 do 104
MOO Cent Firan'-h 4». . »5V f i 16000 Or« Sh L. 45.520F.104>*
11" ■» eof Ga Con 6s. .112 MM do . I<M< 4
1""" do 111^152000 do IMS
l'»«> do 3d 1nc .... fir.:.. 22000 do TH 1 *;
8000 do 63 i 50110 do Ist 6* 1 2.V
8000 Cent Par- Otd 4J.102 I 2f*o do lft Con ■■...IIS
4<h«. C & o iron 65...11»H ' n.»X)O Perm Cnnvt SHa-lOXH
5000 .In Gen •»';* . .lOtlN I 1"'"00O Reading Gen 45..101»*
20000 do lort-\ 5000 do 101«
117000 do 106V41 ii»*VV do ]01%
I<KX)O do 107 ! 21000 do 1i»l"-s
16000 do 107»i ! TOM la 102
I"" 1 "' do lO7H 48000 do J C Col 45... MU
Mjc')Ot> do V<'\, l<XtOi> do WP»
10000 dc 1O7*« : 20<l0 Rio Q V." Ist 45 .. 100
I'tOO do R & A Ist j 200»> SI J&fl I Ist... 83
4s 102H! 15000 St L, & I Mt Ref
6>-iX>O CI!»QJt4i..W ! 4a IH
21tKK> do t»H 1 3000 do • »4H
c:iiw> do U9>; TOOO do 84>-4
127000 do m: WOO do 84S
276000 do W-i Q2ofWi st L * 8 F Ref 4s 88
3000 do Den Dlv 45.i01 |30.>i0 do S7H
10<i0(>O CR I * P Gen I 1000 £,-, «7",
4s 105VUHIQ0 do SS
l«2<100 do nR 4s TO»4 ! 10000 do -- ,
•BrtfHl do 7*V \i>M St T, Swn Ist 4-.. 87*,
25000 do . 18%( 10000 do Con 49 . . SIS
BMB do 7«SI 1U«"iO do . . . Kl^
330000 <;o 711 ! 10000 do S3
40000 da 19% 4000 Pt L South 15t... 109
«o<x> do TMI 3000 Sp V& X E 4s. . 1"m
W>oO do 78\l 1 000 do 101H
50i>i0 do 7«H! 12000 SAAA P4l <!>»»,
22tv» do 78\ j 2000 do . M
4f»V> do Cl Tr 85... W I 2OOi> p» a h AT. Gold 4s. 80S
2.V*Oi> do OOUjI -[(WOO Bo Pac Cl Tr 4s. .P4
27*>w» d.-. 01 I 10<K> do M>i
3000 do »1 >•» 1 25000 do 8.1
2000 do 91 Hi f«-«V» do f>3H
10000 do 9!>»! 1000 do 9.v 4
IOihTO do 80UI 300i> do 05-,
ir,o»<O Chic Ter Tr 4s. . *3 ! r.f.o do 84* 4
I^ooo Col * So Ist 45.. 89 I 4000 South Ry Ist ."!■-. 11*'-*
23000 Col F A I Court I S"X»J Tex £ Pac 2d 94H
Ctfs Rl\' .-.000 do 041,
1000 do Gen 5s lot I 7.V>00 T'n Ry London Us. {mv,
30000 Col Mid Ist 4a... »WV 3900 Union Pac lat 4s.in.li;
1000 do •*■:*% : 3000 do 105
?0000 do M*4 10000 do 106
5000 do e&KlCBOOO do Convt 4e 112%
10<»W Con Gas Peb Rs.lß« 112000 do 112%
10000 do 18TH I*3ooo do „112S
41iV>i> do IPS tSS.«OA.I do 112H
150000 Con Tob 4e 70H 1 20000 do 112H
200<> do 70'ilrJV>0»> do 113
■0000 do 79V 13000 do 112S
1000.1 do 70 132«>n0 do 112'{
N>o<«» do 7S»S .•»•■><■>•> do Ill*
20(100 do 7fiV IBIViOO rlr» 111%,
41-""-)4 1 -""-) do Tt» 5i l 20fV,0 do 111"»
280000 do R0 ! 9f;.XHli do Ilt ,
r,soo(0 do Sft^llMflflO do 112
538000 do ROM 12000 I" R R of S F 4s
34.M »» do «0%l 1 2OF. -.*4
27100i> do BOH lfionn do 86
12fiO<\> do SO ' 1.-iOOO r S n A Imp Deb
««000 do 80"* ls* 9>VU,
CMnn do SOi 4 ' 70000 do »1
2000 do P.e* 79 19A600 do »O
I'.IOoO DM Bee Cor 55. . 7« ! ii>oi> do .. . .... I** 1 !
l.wtOO do 75% j .•52000 v S Steel S F ss. 57%
IMN do 7341 1030rv> An HTM
;r..-. do 7t> I i<w» do . . «71 t
IOiV) do 75-V 101000 ,l-> 87%
won Erie Con 4« 101Ul3«*<vio do 87*4
5000 do Gen 4s «»H! TOO do R^ir «7S
20000 do 89 I 2000 VRyofStl. P43 S3
2.V>00 do 8»-; I .If 0O do «7«4
1000 do Perm CT 4s 93H 1 ,^ooo Wabash Ist 5s 117\i
60000 do 93»;| U>oo do 117
3000 do P3H 1000 do 117H
P»H¥» F* P M Con fls.lll Mfiooo d.» 2d 11l
2000 Ft W & D C Ist.lH>U'«4ooo do Peb B «7
14<K>o Or Bay Deb 8. .. 19 125000 do Kji;
21000 do 19V 6On« do <W%
1000 do 20 1 401100 do .; «7t;
ROrto HA T C Is* 6s .113H135000 do KJ\
,'>n(V> lowa C«nt Re' 4s 8S I i4ocmo do «7tl
340011 Kan City So 3s. . 72 I 3.*00« i do «7»;
10000 Klnits Co El 4«i 93 I 147000 do «7»i
IPiXiO I. SftM Po P»b ' .-..SiW> do M
4s lOOH'siOOO do «7Vi
2iW> I, I C.en 4f lO2V4 1 I*^ooo do " «7t,
15<V»O L*NCI Tr 4». 07--' PJOOO do fl7
2000 do 97*; ! 37000 W»st Md 4a *»»i
iooo do Gen «s 121 I woo do as?t
20.T00 do mined 45.. 1 02*4 25000 do a?)
IOimTO M st Rv 4s 91«4'inOOO do Wit
1000 Mcx Cent Con 4s 73 • lOf«> W*T. E Ist 4s 92
10000 do 73' i ' 4000 do OIBi
«000 do 73 i 5000 W ;• f * r k
9000 do 74 ' 4Us KM
2.VMV> do Ist 1r"... . 23% ' irww> \Vls Cent Gen 4s. «>-»S
36000 do .' 23 ' 2000 do t>2 i
Total sales of bonis. J12.430.800.
AMERICAN SECURITIES ABROAD.
London. Kov. 10, 4 p. m. -Th* market for Ameri
can securities was strong; and active. Final prices
follow:
T.on!on N. T. If. T.
etna*. equivalent. clos». Changes.
Ar.aronda ft\ 112 10R —7
Atchtaon . 9<i 4 B»>i BSV; 4 Vi
Can Pactnc IS3V| 130 129 » - ',
St Paul 17« 173 173 — *,
Erie 42 40^ 4t»i — «i
do Ist prof 75 72S 73 1 — X
111 Central 149 145^* 14JI -i- »4» 4
Louis ft Nash 139 135 1 135 -I- »,
New-York Central.. 130 13« \"\. 4 i,
Pennsylvania 71S 139 «13rtS — H
Reading 8811 754 7«S —1
Southern Pacific ... 67 «R'i «4% _ H
fnton Parlflc ll" 1 * 113 1134 — 4
V ? Steel 274 -•«*» 27 — 14
do pref 884 88 m »R% + 4
•Ex dividend.
FOREIGN BANK RETURNS.
London. Nov. 10.— The weekly returns of the Brink
of England show the following clsssshw; Total
reserve decreased £341,000; circulation decreased
£315.000; bullion decreased £655.834; other securities
decreased £4.M.000; other deposits decreased £103.000;
public deposits decreased £738,000; note.a In reserve
decreased £264.000: government securities Increase*!
£16.000. The proportion of the bank's reserve* to
liabilities is 52. 36 p»-r .»-nt. against 52 12 per rent last
week, and compared with an advance from 47*» to
<«* 4 per cent In this week last year. The rate of
discount unchanged at 3 per cent.
Paris. Nov. The weekly return of the Bank
of France shows the following changes: Notes In
circulation decreased 118.si>0.000 francs; treasury ac
counts current decreased 1.525.000 francs; gold on
hand increased 11426.000 francs; bills discounted de
creased 225.'"i25.000 francs: silver on hand Increased
2.500.000 francs.
Tierlln. Nov. 10.— weekly return of the Im
perial Bank of Germany shows the followtßS
changes: Cash on hand Increased 14,920.0<X1 marks
treasury notes Increased MMM marks; other se
curities decreased «0.»*),20i> marks; notes In circu
lation decreased 35.500.000 marks.
THE FEDERAL TREASURY.
Washington, Nov. 10.— The condition of the Treas
ury, divisions of Issue and redemption, at the be
ginning of business to-day, was as follows:
RESKRVK KINO
Gold coin an.l bullion f lAO.OiiO.u'K)
TRUST FINDS —I>I VISION' Or REDEMPTION.
1 .M.I .-oln |32«.«M.ue»
BItTCT ■ am 475. ! 4 7.«< I >,»
silver J»ll-»r» of ih(m» . v tt'zos'.SM
Silver bullion of IJ<94). :: "" £sßobl2a
T " . .. $1.019.310!9<W
DrvmoM of nsi
C. 1.1 certificates »utst<tn<ltnK . $:..•. (-SI lift)
Mlver certificate, outstandlns 478 147.000
Treasury notes OtttsUßdlaS n' v*l 00Q
Tot "' $l.O!!.3tt>o<»
OENBItAIi FVM>.
; GoM coin an : bullion J55.2,<V.*14
Gold certtrtcate* ._;.;;;;..;;;.;..;;.;;;;; *;- lllN
Mhr«r coin and bullion S.MB.IM
Sliver ccrtlflcste* i.3U1.05:
I'nltei Mates note* 4>a4.«m
Other assets 21 •■«««. w»
Total In Treasury - ■ SI I*.'« 3» 3ji
I>epo«its In national bank* 12» *>»:. lil
Total *Z».9214»
Current liabilities !«4 4»7.«JJ
Ava!!»bl» cash baianc* SI 14 »i3.4<i
RAILROAD AND OTHER STOCKS.
Shares I 1 Actual sales— - ;_ Clo*ti-«-.
•old. I (Open! High. Low. ! Fin. ; B; •:. ' a*<
— i,\d Ex e» d 4 pc; —I — —I — 1240 ia<r*
vlbony * Sus. .. f —
100' Alii.*-* .1 13Ti 13 T » WV 13 r », 134, v
: do pref ..... I — — .'..'. " «
M.soo;*Amal Copper...! 73\ 714 Ti'i 7.1 7 ,, 7.1, 74
1001 -Am Beet .-• pf. N) I m ' * S» . --
B.2o*>lAm Car & y Ir-. »S 2S«4| 2» ! »•* 2»^ ; "ou
>««■ do l-r*t 8»H»i s«i^, WH» sf.^ h,; ' .<,.•
— -'American '"oa:.. - , -- ' - ITS, ;oo
I.3f»i[Am Col Oil .ash 31 ,J 31 T .| 31',! 31 »; - ,' -
'do ex dlv Ip r 31'.^ MVji 3i^»| 3O»^ 80% jju
1 do uf ed 3p c — - - - ,- ■ W !(*»
- - An,<-r I>i.j( •,•••;. — — , — I — _• -jg^i
Anier Exprew.., — — —I— 1" 'ziP
''Am Gr Twine. . — — — I — I »•', In
3m Am Hid* .v L....J 5% K\ ."',' «■,, H v
lixt: in pref 22", 25 21;% 22% 2!' : 22?
40<i .■American le». . 7". - , 7", * ! ft 1 gu
1.250! 'do pr«f. . : SfiV 37' i; SBS 18% .;rt\ 37
li» -Amer LJn«e.e<l.. 15 19 ! » ,1" .it :»:,
. *<io pref ; I — {S3 ISp
4.800 'Am I.»onnotW«»j SI \ 31 ! SO i 3O^' .'.■><« 3011
2.100 «do pref ... 0» , I>»\ »» i' :*» :-.»S »»t
2ni 'Arner Malting... Mi] *S' $\ •% ■ I vl
4.V*>, «do<.pref .... 234 24 ; 22', 22"» 22« 4 £w,
0. "SO • Amer Sswlttec ; 73V "* 1 T."H« ~~'-i *'S 7S-,
Z'KJ «do pref 112», 112', 113 lir 2 ; 112 U2«t
■ •American Snuff] — j — I — — ;■•■ l«»
130 Mo Dref , 96*.; »*•< <*l\ 6»l\ it.'. U7
82<>|Aaier Btl F.lry., lr-j 1^ US U i 12 , iri
-— ' do pref _■_)__>— •;• „ *
24.2i>«. •Am-r Su«ar. . . IV, iHfi'.W, IViH 140-» MS^
100 M« r.e? 138% 13V, 13« T . |SB% lw 139
'Am Te: & Cable] — I — , — I — -I g|
10|>m Tel A Tel. . . 144 Vi 144«» '44--, 144 V» 143 145
1 Ainer Tob pr«f... — I — ; — ! — . 14« U7
32.370 «i o new etf». . !•;>« 1-..- »2'» l 92^: O^H W*
•Ami Woollen. l'jVa W* 18 IS 17 V »
loo 1 «do or-f. . i ■• -; »■; M -:. -^
1.» jo •Anaconda 100 1«»H 108 IKM lOnHlOt
Ann Arbor ! — — — I — . i': ,h
— - do nref I—l—l— I—l «] *+
>A*so M*r Ist ;•'. — — — ! — ■ 91», m
27.20tj Atch ex d 2 p c' ***, S«% 88% -'' . S*\ ~r,\
3.42.'. do trtt ! 1(.." l(>a h'J. , IOS^ 102S :■ ''•
40W.AU Coast Line. l.>> 141 14<» 141 li"- a 141
29.<k»l)Balt Jt Ohio 0»:'i H7 UT, IM-. i^v . \
Im-'| do prt ,M% '-'•'•'» SMfc t>s ; 3 :••'. '»?
- Boston A L D f.. — : I — I — ICO :-
11.«J3 Bklyn Ha-. Tr..' 674' BMb «-, «7U K%\ *;r
— B*klya In Gas.. — , — '. — — 2C4
770 Brunswick ; U<~ as V» »'»' 8 * : i
l<*> Buff R & Pitts (!3S\(t3ft% '.-- . IBS i IS 153
1 da pref I — , — — -- 15] j«
lßuff & sus pref. ! — — — — - . -:,
•Butterlcii C 0.. .1 — I — ; — — .'x>- 51 "
Canada Sooth.. — 1 — ' — — I«7 rat
2.^00 Canadian Pacific iia»S 12!-\.l. 12» ;.!. U9 1 4
♦<-' 4a tlitnti , 9%] .is .-,-, V± -
C ,-i So Am Tel.; — — I — I - my., _
lAv» i antral of N J.. l*rt I>7-- 180 187* i 1-. ' •--
KSWlCttai 4 Ohio • «.v. Jv, +.-.S' «> ■■ . ,-,-.
BOOtChtcasQ * fUton 8S J '-.■-■- ::: -, :;- , -
100 do „-;:' ,;..-- -■ ■:. "
Ch 4 X iil »f«l - •;-
;Chlo Bur 4- Qv.| — j — I— — 1.. ■ .:
a.560 Chic Ot W>st... 24H _. 4 2 . _- ,
I'"' <!., pr^-^ A IH2 tS C 282 U\' «*i
I.OCU 6 :.<■; v. ■ --
700 do deo I ."t« -o-, B8 -i« K)K m>
— — ''"h_lr.il &L. pf..! — ■ — , — 1 — <m. M
ULMtfCkta Mil 4st P 1724 173-, !7r» IT. 1 . :.-, ;-:\
1 tin rref — - - :-. --i
600 Chic & Kogthw.[t» •- ; (98
l<»> do aral 232 -TJ 383 2.:.
)Ch 81 V M ft O 147 U '
— do pref - _ tm —
4,"..> I 'hlc Term Tr.. 11 11 1 '•-, . , lOV I "i
i.«oo .i O pr-f asu -J-J-, :\--, as -.t_ 33
K.2(-i;Chlc Tnlon Trac 10 10 s»V fe\ — ■ —
l.ooox- c c & si i. -■»■:- x «-..-, -: : s;vj
i do ure? : — I — — | — v,:-
'Cle\- L.-.r & Wh. — I — I — I — ::»
i do : .ef.. — ' — — — &> '\2»
25.430 Col Fuel & Iron 4.V, 14 -;. , 43% >•.". •>■',
1 do pref ■ . - . - si .
3,: J c Col A- Southern. 23 l . -'.', '-".'■ 23* iU, 23 : ,
DOO dv Ist pr«f ! .V.- ■•■•. 16V 5<P» '. C 7
1,800 do 2d pref ... 104 .- . :s Z>\' tt v *
MM Col & H •: * Ir 14 : - 13 M 4 \i\ u\ U",
'Com «:abi- — 1— — - ao
;Con»ol C3mU — — ) — I — »tt 7u
4.<»54 Consol Gas. .... S Jl>« '2:7 - : , - . ..-,
1.000 -Cunt Tr,b pref.. :_ 12tV-.lL'., ia 12M, 127
-.;-•■ Corn Products..! -i' 1 -, JW» .-% j.
1.812 do pr»f . ' TW4 ::• ; "-4 :-. ■ "■ »
».7i>-> Del & HadK*B..[SM !I>7»,! I>7», iM \WI% ,
8.1.V) Del Lack & W. 833 3SI 323 331 331 333
i'Tv It \:>, Gr.l — I — I — I 81 I 33
400 ido pr-f I UN | «3H( »* S3»* -4
Das M• ft D.I — — j — ) 24; 2UH
j d.> pref I — f — i — — [SOB —
TOO D^troi: Southern SI I I ."■ ' .". 4", .'.
7tst>, A ■ pref 10 I H> : M t% f
I^.". Pet 1 cited R X 1 TS^ 7.'... »H "•"» "•"• * 7? »
2,88.1 »Di« nwilliltlw. :•■- ;\rt\ ■ ;JSV M- M ■ ■
am. Til Ho S & Atl 12>4 12\i 12 12', ll\ \2\
KIO Mo pref at, l-» S»4 -t> : . 3*4
71 060 Erie I -US' -US' -I".' «O*» 40S •*■
5 82O| do Ist pref ; 73S 734 7-J-, T3 T.'. „ 73'»
*'..)■ do 3fl pref ... .'.4 .-4'» ."I r,4-, M>i 5-t-.
70i)iE-.iins 4 T H. j 9S\% ti4 <■- . •',■_• «4
. do orel — 1 — — I— ' IS3( !•
;*Fi U- i- D City —I — ■ — [ — •4» '52
(G«a ''hem C 0... -- 1 — — I — I4>
1 do pref .. - I — — — :•" - .
N» 6*b laaetrto Oo 177' 4 1774 l'<i^ I~'-. I7C 177
|O| N rtl -r- ;.f. — I — — I — 191 KW
— — H ■ kir.s; Vall< — | — I — '_-
20.., .; , ore* ...... >:•-. -:• . •;••'- -■'- i- '-« -'•'4
TTwiMstrtn — j — I— ! — i w I —
2.7 K. Illinois Central., l4s4 14i-, 144-, 144", U^ MS
' do I^-astJ L..1 — — I — — 103 ' -
ZSOOJInt Paper . : 2*>V 20W, ID4' l' J * !>■• v .
B*f to pret 1 18% 7**4 : "-I 78\ :-\ ;.i
100)*Int Power M St SO SO , 6" | COS
Int I'unip ' 3>>4i 3>' a | 88 1 38* tS*b\ 40
; do prer i — I — — i ; 7» ;
300,1.jwa Central.... 2 1 *-, 294; 2S', 2M 2»'. .-';
MO Jo prcl ! ."-1 :»H 4H ", : 4i>V -t'«-j So
Kiuia & Mich... — I — , —
800 Kaji CttJF South 2!»V 2«% 2i»»* 23% »J - -,
1.100 do nr*r ! Bl* 524 314 ".IV MM 1 * 3i»
21X) icrsaMvi M 4 pi 1 - si4i ni • • nn
- KMk *: Dm M.| — — I — —I '■'• X
: .a. pref — —1— — « tl
100 Sn'.ck Io« o? Oh. ' 11 (11 111 11 10 ,12 -
- . So prer ■...'— — 1 — — C «
Uuledo Gas p'.l — — I — — ISO KM
■ L. E i Western.; — — I — — r.5 ,3H
- ; do ■-■■' I - — I — - X 103
:Lak» Sh.-re i — — I — —KM
200 r*>n« Island ' SI O • tl »U "1 -C
8.2001 Louis & Nash... 13:. 1".~ 1331 133 :;,H 135
Man Bea i - — .11
2.?&> Manhattan E1... 162% »< ! 34 t«2% M 3 1*2% I •
IM>i Coal pref..., — . — 1 — — :.
1.100 -Met Sec Sate.. B©4 81^ 7f , -• '•» - . 81
14.2u> -Met Street Ry. '1224 1- 12: . !.-4 1224 '-'-»
44.300 Mexican Central tSK 2u4 Is* 20 18 1 - '
'Michu-in Cent. — , ; Vio 1-iO
200 MBtVA. S8 M 61\, U% M W 91 Wk
300. do cref 14^ 14" .- I J^ 14.-,, 1484
28.060 Mo Kin i Tex. 34 , 30% T-4 ' 334, .::/ 4 ,vi
22.350 do prrf ! 6O\: H4 ; ■ 9Z\ -'» »vJ
tf7.6f*>! Missouri Paclfle. I"SS 10-34 103 1 : -, ".■.".
MorrU *. Eswr
NasM a chat. . . — ,:,T2 'li 3
200vN.it Bla alt... 3'> ; :• '■ ■ *-\ •'"
i -do pref — ■:■- 114
628 Nat Eram &St 23 ( 23*« i 23 i' 3 - - 1
; (Jo pref ... j— ' — —j -•
.■""••National Lead. | 24-,, 244. 244 --. -* « -■»'■♦
MO Mo ore? ■91 1»7 , !»7 :>7 M* •»
UN' NRKof Mpf 404 41 40 1 * 41 •»••-. +«'4
, do 2J pref ■■ I 22 ; 23* B ~4 -- ♦ -'}
New Cent Coal. -- , — 42 , •
2,<!01t *.\ V Air Brake 14« 142 140 1414 1414 143
8.&O11 N V Centra! Uft>j i • 133^|lSi4 13H, l-""4
XTChiStL. - I- — , — S81» 3H14
. do Ist r.ief ! — I — — : — m> V'">
Ido 2d pref ,— ) - —i7O ;
NT Dock — — - »I 14
do pref - _.]_]_!- 43 54
N I Each £ W. : — [ .I*o
M >N V Ac S J Tel 1.-74 131 : !"■: ■ IM . I • : . -■*
1»> N V XH 4 H. tOB la.". :;•" 180 11-**I 1 -** I**
•.800 \ V « >ni 4W. 43U *i\ 4J ~. 43 *.: "^
13.500 Norfolk & WM IWfc 744 7.:, 744 74«, 7+-»
i do . .-' I — - ■ 'J» ■ »
l'>> North American 0«4 :"'4 " - 9l
Mo N Fed MAS. ..I - ■»•'• *■ : *■' . 4-4 , -
S.M. ,1. ,r- ■'. . 80 :*• '.«■ '-»> , — ■"?„
= l Sc^o«.v ir ■■■ \z Li* U 1
Pacifi.- Coa»t =J --hg «g
do Ist pr-'
-- ! do '-■■' ■-' ; - . « I^.x
1C660 PaclAo Mail IJ *B>i *- 4b • 4"'«
40..JW i'ena R R. ..... IJH4 1..-. B3* : ;';; ' ; W: \*2fr
15.570 PaacJa & Baat. . tW'i Ul4 V*h n*' ; * *»* !&*
10.070 rv,, c,*s A ■ . ■ . , • *
fere Marquette. ; I— I ;
100 do pref 71' i >. ' -
"iwi p do p*r*. St . I :::i I>r,1 >r, tm i-- '■■ : - \k "'* '
1O"» iv pref : *
P Ft W * Ch.. — H- -
. do social ! — 1 ,
1.600 PressM Stl Car. 3-»«, H^ 3* f* »*, g*
5251 a., ml ..... S M 4 »2* *....-♦ A
- Puliruan P Cor. . _ - ' " " .-.
Nt» r B S^-urtties.! SM| WH »■■ '. ' •
3,46.' 'It. St. Spring-.. » g » g, .... „•'
1.3.x. Mo pra?
•rt.500 Reading ■• . T«* ■ ♦ ■'„• :. £?
«3*> do lal pref ... t» i*» *~>\ N>1 * gj^l Su.
do 2-1 pref 1— | Lg {_ %
- R<-ns * ...
a .«N> »H^p Iron 4 St;
2.7..0 Mo tr.-f ; «34 ;t; t '-•• •• ' -:*
103.300 Bock Island ....-, *B\ . ■ -Z %
SSojvarW. . . . . . .77 ■■■■ "-.■':-.
R.w- W i- Osd. ; .
1.100 •Robkar O«aa*.. 234 234 -- -*'- - ;1 * -*•
Ma pref ... —I— 1 *■'
200 Rut R R pref... | 634, M 6SH ■* \ — , '
St Jrm & «J.l 1.. — — lif S
45« ,1,, Ist oref.... M i»4 83% B4 M ;.'
' do 2.1 pref -- I — — — Izl -\
St UkS ■ Ist pf — — — ! 2
3.>ii)O do -M pref 08 •-.' '.7 -'74 ' .'
400 do c 4 F. I eti l-*o il^24;lN> BSSHiISO J^
- to pref 1» l S
fl.ooo St Louis Southw 13'~,. 25 234 -• Ul>», ;«-
B.SOO do pref 90%) ;■:•» .v^S, 31 51 .22
?..**> Slo.s-8h St *ir M , «U4 "4 ♦•II 151 5 «H £*
t! O pref — 1— { - : - '. • »*
96 150 Southern Pacific' •■."■'-, «». »W4 >» "4 • f
520 do :': 2.1 pa.i. llrt-i U«>; IW, H«*t '.'.••. W
Southern R R. «B*» •>»•♦ x*x '* 3SS »* £11
1.130 do pref M% W4 »44 «Wi '■ *;-»
So MAO .-If9 - ■ — , — *'4 K«
WO Stand •■■■■ ■i T 2S' 24 24 *'4 -:*: * "
49.2H0 renn « Val * Ir. 7<> | 744. « S 4 74 .»4 •**
19 900 Te«a* 4 Pacific. 35S S«S ."~4 3'i 3.^ » s^»
700 ; .1 . Land Trust ::i> 3SH 38 B . :-'.\ -*
Tnlr! \v. KR. 1: ] »5y 1
Tol Pto * W...1 — . - '-• g*
Tol Rv A I-i«Ct * 2 T *
2011 Toi st 1. & w.. ai'v, i".'^. r..hs so»k »«* .
410 Twin n:v UTr 1084 '' 1H -' '• W 1 " J> * lw Sj
SUV'rnlon B»e *I 1I 1 :•-. '•'•■ '' . I ;■ -„,*
«tT=«S ; Vn^n P |^oin • . l^.. U.i\ IU4 1124 I--- " '
' do vref ' — ; — ! — B» I.t"
100 United Fr:.t ... 101 KM MB . W , - !:.",.
I nlte.l Rv i^v»t; » fi^
600: do i>ref HI ;M\ « «% '' ln 15%
1.850 «r S . ■ i >• • r 1"\ M Is> I
2.4." Mo
■-•CVI- s Kvrr.-.s . . 11.-. 119 11- IIS |1» If
.-..«25 •!.' a leather . 13S 13^1 13S 1 »34 » ••-- /
1.100 'do vvef !'-\ :>-'\ !C' ; '■>--- —'* Jfrt
T.2SO rSRy « Imp. <S«4; 72 <>4 HH •' ' '. '
•O 8R * it DC. — I — I 2* --i»i
l.4*'<> rdo '.:■■•■< >t H< >!-. -•• » MJk M ' ;
:..-V !. pref
138.538 V s .-•.■■
1T...... .! » pref ' 864 -.". 4 »4'« »4 J*S - •
:-.12" \« Chem.. BSWj ••". M i » J" „.'.•
«.»: dowel mi '.:i 4 111 in«*ill| l )}*
MO Va I; n c .♦•-■•■--.
10SO0'\Vaha*h ! -♦ »4 - - - -
10 108 ,1,, wer ♦:• 4.-.\ 4»\ -.!]■♦ 1, ;
SSIw^rSST-ro «■, m«4 n«i ■- . " ' /I' I
TOOIWMtmOi Kfß -*. 17 »- ■ • ; - ..: {jp
■ ««hn£Ji*y»?V;' I-. 1.. ..■ • ■♦ }$?
830 do lat ire? *"\ 47. I*4 414 ♦'.- ?^ 1
1.: « w : !*-,^i L n'°c. n t S3 2s\ --'. -j J-\|
1 KM da i.r-' . 4.'.'.. 43\; U4, >■•-* <•■ '-_ILI
1.tt!4.71» Total tales (or tba «a» • BMft

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