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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, September 20, 1905, Image 11

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NORMAN B/S FAST MILE.
Trots in 2 #6 1-4 ot Grand Circuit
Meet ot Columbus.
CMnmboa. Ohio. Sept. S -Norman B.s feat of
JmiljlllirTftt rolumhu? track in tl»e Brat b«at of the
•<■& tro: in SSVi "aa th« feature ■' th« opening of
t»« Grind Circuit races here to-day. Zephyr was
farorite ard Angiola Per-nd choice.
M;m AdbeD. favorite for the Kentucky Stork
Fanr. Futuritj-. for three-year pacers, was
bseim :n straight heats by the only Other starter,
Pat T seeßßd cbefee to Myrave in the SiDl trot.
won after he had Coat th- third heat by r»r"at<-d
bseaktßC Hal C had the small seld to the H-tel
h ,-. M b take for 13* pacers outclassed, and n
the tut twn heats ta slow time. He lost the first
I.!, hv a break at tbe bead ot the «a«tch.
The Ho«ter-Col«mbi:s Stake, the W5 snd -.11
r.a-''c -a'.-s. were onflnlahed on acepant of a
tZ r,- rainstorm Nine thousand people saw the
S^£t ims: cf the ftaSb« w^e Cos, _The track
was i- fIW condition. The summaries follow.
vrv~ -XT BTOCK F^HM FTTTRITT -VACING —
'kpi*E-TEAn-OLrS -TWO TN THREE»-PLT«E
tl w . .
«oB*i" IT. '•• by Bw«s»-D*P«« «B«"rmn> ■•" I 1
*■" Tims. 3:t«V: Ml'«
Ht»llCre— >:tt CUUK .THREE TN FTTEV-JTIKSB
Si.ono
P.. t h ff br Pal vnamm (Pattemw I 1 2 1
giiSc p«teh« bik.r rratatttae) | 3 .
Kci%tSß^sni: \ Il.j
flStSm. hum. ti.ocTr.ts. till 7 -
SSTsiri. b ~ >Gb-ttet>. • 12 10 dr
'„"i«-'i fr — rrinMipwm) ...i* 14 <lis
tf _ .-„""" b _ h iHaydMJ) fi 13 dr
M^Mtte '>"!! b. m. fßenyon) ci»
p,— .- -:-. m .Penn>-k> <31s
"* ?.m. i:ll^*. 2.12. 2:11=». . 12.
ACrNG JhM <,=P— HOTEI, HAH'MAN ETAKE--
F T RSE II.WW I Hill 1 HEATS.
n-i r a- it. fc T Bal Dntart (Sfasak) 2 1 1
A>ci.' b. h.. t- ~iaao tWalker* 1 = J
j- "• Par^ b. h OVOn) f » -
*>_-<« -~t—— m iSudert 4 4 4
■'""" T^TT>». 2:12»». I ISH. 2:l3Va.
TKOr --v.-5—2-M> CXABB--CrjMJltBC6 fTAKE-Pi'RSE
13.000 THREE HEATS.
v— a.- E Wk. p. by PhaJlas (McCarthy 111
M^ro Hk. h. .r>:ck«r«on) 3 2 5
S I— ::■::::::::::::::::::::•::: 5 | §
a ! i
-.-» ;.!»;:,. 2:07 V 2:i"«V
THOTTING-2 •" ■■:-=..-.= -HOSTEK-'-oi.uMBTJB BHKWT
KBTIMS FTAKES. HO.OW— THBEE HEATS. itn
♦r:si-.ed )
Gi-iwood M . >r i- . . hv Bntbr Bwrna t.. BbXtonsU). 1 2
SSSS ro g. . by &Ofai • fiWwson 2 1
SSt Vfftkm. b. Jt Nicolsl * 3
Aar'e. c- - (SMnAers).. .—. — b 5
T-.rr... SKWV. 2 10.
rA CD«6-*:l« CI-AS&-P T JH : ?n JI.OOO-THKEE IS
five. fUaßalshedO
v«nh« -~-c -- IE-. tar Ma.rt:r. roans CVtai>lii«9 ■ 1
oajßua G.. bn m. 'Vai-T.tir.e,' |
Elic'-ric Siorrc. c g. iH»ir!c».i • r
TT!U^= C bii- i .FTumea'i 2
Z'jrcse. b. »i CBearton . ■_ •••-•■ • • •
M.» K;r?:ir.g. Uk. bl ghqtert .
A!'« Br-ok-e. b m. CWljsonj «
Sn9 Bnxaa. b. s. v^ i-7V' v 8
v<>— 2:ll n.\i=S^-Pi"RSE W.nno— TITRBBB IN
rrvß, (Chniiishsaj
-«*9 Boolfr X r . by Texas Jack fUKSBwenl...... •- 1
The Jndae. s> f <3 " - i
KM leuMfla. tr- n»- <O*rrtt^ • £
Bn WtlkaSj hr. s. (Seocktonj i,
Ethel R;oc b. m. rwhjr*. «
Dakota Da* gr. p. (CbrlstJ -- " 2
F^r-a. - - •-* i
WM Br.re. Jr_ b. h. >MasP*y) - - o
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AOmitm. eh. m. 'H»cr--K - g
rioroJora. br. - 0W1W..--» -
6 -x-
FEW, "AUTOS' ON COVBSE.
Roods in- Bod Condition for Trials—
Christie Car Ready.
[By Te!«r-ae- to B* Tribune.]
Miaeate- Lens Island Sept. IS.-Owlng to the
miwlcy condition of the roads, few cars entered tr.
tbe Vanderbflt Cup elimination trial on Saturday
went ever tha coarse on-day. The White rteamer.
w : -r. TTalter White at the wheel, was out. It s
much heavier than the machine driven by Webb
Jay. ar.d clears the ground by l»>s? than a foot.
110-iiorsepower Christie car arrived here
• v 's afternoon. ar,4. white the car was not driven
_„- t>. e coune, both Aobinson ar.d Owen, who
are rivals 'or the honor of pfloting the machine.
Buest much tjnae at the steeri:^ wheel on the way
down to the course. .
Robert Lee Morrell. chairman of the racing board
o**the American Automobile Association, received
c* telephone rr.eeeage from the Premier people, aak
♦ng if their car might Btart ir, rue mUmiaar race.
pToniislcg to reduce th« weignt af--?-waxd to the
--guiatiori limit if the car should quality
* There ls a rumor That the Mattheaon car is over
weight ard. therefore, may not start on Satt:rdav
Thet»o Pcpe-Toledo cars will probably go over
the course to-morrow.
ENGLISH RUNNER MAY COMPETE.
J. M. Morton Granted a Permit to Eace in
This Country.
Jsmes E Sullivan, chairman of t—« nssUonal nm
i-a: 'on committee. bai received Cram Secretary
Herbert oi th* Amateur Athletlo Association of
Oreat Britain. a cable announcing that J. M.
i^ZF- g.^toSV^SS to ,or:p^ in this
50VEL CONTEST AT APAWAMTS.
Handicap Open Only to Players Fifty-five
Years OH and OreT.
■n- nfSdate of The Apawajnii Golf Olub ar Bye
h^TpSS a novel contest in the fall schedule.
rv,irrv six has':
3^3^. ot age ar.d eve', at handicap fix^d b,
L I TLmbettv-a tot be* gross and second b<-t
- 5 * *, fnr y-est nf #. ar:<s second best n<?t
?
. .«.~,>^r 2&— Ea^Steeri ~*m rne^; play
•SOS 7 "-"J cT VV b *' -^jTTcur bail m!xP<l foursome;
lasdicapa over short co^.se.
v '" --'. _ — m/t.tmmt, --'<■ liandlcap. Third
S»tartl»y Sep'err.ber -3— "F'
■b rhanipionsiiip. t;.---.'- ho i es me4a! rla7
Wednesday. September w .-our-om^.
£%*s&£« '
r. «•• . , «_».,»#- >.ol^s -r.-ial play hajvil
""■ -
- .hoI-b «cra'.rh ( £"'- r *=^« ■ r ./ r ' , r .« cr . T -d by AB.
- - ■ E-orea to qpaßtr tor two
'- • •« SW . October !»-««*«« &£*£"*■ *"
-■^v. October 3-- \V; r ' r ' f »«r.. i»th>n clnfc* *nd
■fl |«Md ciube. Ottr-e-t :-«arF rj _a^e a.4 - r and
oea{ groe* !«ro!>-i and prize* i<
qLSSgSS&r 14-Seccra Wainwrlgtt c U p.
•- ub handicap*. on» hci« -da: "lay
v«-"(!^aDe over ■fcor' '-r.urß*: two bal! [mnofne. ..^_
=a-urSy Ocobfr 2S— Final? TttaiaUlß CIU»: ••£■ ■■'■•
kielM i»tch raj" a^ainft bod« chd> hsadlcafM .
Twsdsr. November "— "!"iirrv- e ix hole* BseOaJ P«J
h&cilcii» Priier DM bs«t gross 3d Ml E^->r»?.
COFET Df THEOES OF MAIIDI GRAS
Throwing Confetti May Be Stopped Float
Set Afire by Wire.
Captain Dooley. ef Coney Island, threatens *■•
■tap the use of confetti at the Mardl Gras carni
val at the island. Last nierht th«»re »af so mucli
enfetti thrown in the faces of women and jrir?«
rrd f r - rna.ny horses frightened by ruffians Hint
'aprain Dooiey ha? aboat d*"id»d that the thing
must fr,p Many • r .-.pi^.' ta w»re made in the
course of *he evening at the Coney Island station
by women whose feel had been scratched and!
#•>••• injured by the confetti
The parade lasi night was watched by hundreds
■* *p» «or:s there being a r»»jruiar Sunday crowd at
trie md all nieht. There w^e nineteen (teas*
:ated Coats, each r»pr«*s*-iiMng a diff^r-n? country.
As the Transvaal f!>>ai was at Burf-sve. and \\'.»s!
] -•n-'et 'h#» trolley win iir.d^r which it w;»r ph;;.
in* Brapr*>i "£' r flv'r.e "'"is 'tru^k the fiu-i 1 .
«*trinr it a?lre and causing ■ wnal! panic in fh>
nHphborho<«d N« on- ■*■ liurt. wltli !ft«- excep
tlon of a Brooki.vn R':P>'l Transit Inspector, f"
«v sUghtJs burned on 'he hand !:: petting the
broken wire uut cf the waj*.
NEW-YOta£ ifAILV TRll^T?^. WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBEK L'O. 1905.
COAL OPERATORS FIRM.
Determined Not to Grant Eight
Hour Dm f to Miners.
Bcmnten, Pena., Sept. in.— of th» biesrest
roal operator? in this rrgion who has Just come
from Philadelphia, where h- had a conference
with President Ba«r. of the Rpadingr. to-day
declared unhesitatingly. and for publiration.
that th^ operators will not. under any consider
ation, grant the demand of the mine workers
for an fight, "hour day. and that they propose
that the present agreement shall b*» continued.
Announcement to this effect Trill be made, he
said, after the miners hold their convention in
Shamokin. December 14.
"An eight hour day." the operator continued,
"wouid be equivalent to a 111 p^r cent in<-reas<»
in thf» miners" wages. If we granu-d that it
would be necessary for v? to raise tne price of
coal, and the public would not stand for that.
We ar» willing', however, to readopt the pres
ent agreement with the miners, perhaps with
some modifications that can be mutually decided
upon.
"1 was speaking to President Baer the oth»r
day. He F.ild that nothing would be done until
the miners nnaly formulate their demands, pt
the Shamokin convention on December 14. and
present *h«Mn to us for our decision. Tb<» op°r
ators will not entertaln the eight hour day
proposition . that is a certainty."
CHILD CHOKED BY MUD.
Falls Head First Into Shallow
Pond Dead When Rescued.
Harry Goldberg, lese than three years old,
slowly suffocated to death in the mud of a small
Brooklyn pond yesterday.
The child had been playing with his brother.
a year older than be. and Linea Farlmg. only
four years o'.d The home of the children is at
No. 1.232 67th-st., Brooklyn They chose for
their playground the edge, of Pond,
near Bay Rldge-ave. and 13th-ave., Brooklyn.
Harry's brother <">scar suddenly gave the
little velocipede which tha former was riding
a push, and his ther and the machine
toppled over Into the pond. The water
is shallop- at that point, but the mud is deep.
The «'h:id sank head first in the mud to the
middle of his body, his le?s= struggling above
the water. There were several men about, but
none of them paid any attention to the child.
Finally Fred Hillendorf. of 67th-st and 11th
av«.. waded out and brought, the boy ashore, but
he was dead.
Dl KE GEMS IX COURT.
Doctor Say* Mrs. B. L. Exaggerated
Value in Asking Loan.
Dr A. Pasternak, of No 91 2d-ave.. was com
plainant in the Tomhs Court yesterday against
Mrs. Brodie 1,. Duke, on a summons obtained by
the doctor six weeks ago as tne result of a
transaction in jewelry. Mrs. Duke, her attor
ney. H. C. de Bryun. said, was ill in Boston.
According to Dr. Pasternak, Mrs. Duke ob
tained from him a loan of $175 on pawntickets
for Jewelry valued, she said, at $4,000, on which
loans amounting to $1,000 had been obtained.
Dr. Pasternak found, he said, that there had
b^en a misstatement as to the value of th' 3
jewelry. He produced a string of pearls, on
which Mrs. Duke had obtained $500. and which
he said, sir 1 had told him were worth $1,000 or
$2,000, and a diamond ring on which Mrs. Duke
had obtained $110, and which she had told him
was worth $600.
"I found after redeeming these articles." said
the doctor, "that I would lose from $400 to $4f>o
on Their.. The pawnbroker refused to giv<»
more than $360 for the necklace after I had re
deeme it."
"Let me see the pearL? and the. ring." «a.id
Magistrate Mayo. h» examined both carefully.
"I would not say that this ring is worth $600,"'
he continued, "but! t is a beauts-, and if you
got i: for $110 you got a bargain. It is easily
worth twice that. As for the necklace, I do
not se« how you can make a charge against
Mr?. Dulce because after a. pawnbroker had once
loaned $500 on it he refuses to loan more than
$350 the next time. Mrs. Duke is not responsible
for that; that is. unless there was a substitu
tion "
"That is what I mean," Interrupted the doctor.
"Do you w ni to large the pawnbroker with
substitution?" rnanded the magistrate.
Dr. Pasternak did not The case was ad
journed for a week to allow th« court to ascer
tain the ondltlon of Mrs. Duke.
TO SAFE COXSTITUTIOX.
Proposition tn Hare Brooklyn Chil
dren Buy Old Frigate.
Insp^^d by patriotic motive*, th» firm of A. D.
Matthew?' Son?, owners of one of the big <ieprir-
- «-• stores in Brooklyn, on seeing a dispatch
from Boston that Oie%istor!c <Md frigate. Consi tu
tion was gradually going to pieces ar the navy
yard th«^ sent a dispatch, addressed to Secretary
Bonaparte of the Navy rvpsrrment at Washmg
ton, asking if he would eonsidei the sale of rhe.
frieat* "Old Ironsides" Uirough a fund to be raised
by Brooklyn school children.
Mr. Matthews, head of th« firm, believes that the
preservation of the frigate •would be a gTeat in
spiration to • -.. children of the present and coming
generations and looks on the possibility oi h«*r
falling to pieces as deplorable. Just wha*. dlsposi
tion of the boat would be rr.="?e if the school chii
dren should buy her Mr. Matthews has aol con-
Bid^ed as yet. but hp be!--- some an for pre
serving the old vessel aa an historical mecca in
Brooklyn could b<» devised He is sure, there would
ho no trouble in getting enough money for the.
purchase of the vessel fmm the children in small
amounts, in cas« the Navy Department should con
sent to the jdea.
Secretary Bonaparte, when seen by a Tribune re
porter at rh« Hot-J AlNmn'-li' yesterday, said m
regard to this:
No communication on the subject ha? as - •-- b»en
brought to my attention. Assuming that such an
Inquiry has been sent to Washington, I -nay only
say that there might be some legal obstacJ<s. I
coijl'i n'-> r say :is to that, though, of course, Jh«
Cedei -'- statutes prescribe the manner in which
government ships may be s<-.i(j. Assuming' that
there would he no legal obstacle, I should, of course,
be confronted by the question of policy. I cer
tamly believe that any disposition made of the his
toric old vessel should be made with due -egajr]
for the memories it embodies, and the associations
which give it ntimentaJ value. I saw the C^n
?rit;ition or. the occasion of a visit to th* Charles
town Navy Yard a •■ ■■ days ago, and there learned
that while there i? a careraker In charge of her.
Cor,::-' - h:«=: made no appropriation for ncr r»s
toratiofi or preservation.
Ut •■our«e I could only »ake under conriJeratlon
an-.' proposition that may --to m<?. and when
T iim advised of the disposition propr ff >,i t 0 be.
niacie of the frigate would then determine if it
was. in my (udgmtnt. the best that could be made
of tH everything • on?idered.
The Dolphin, on which Secretary and Mr? Ei-:-a
narte came from Boston, arrived at the Brooklyn
jfavy Xard about noon. Mr?. Bonaparte went di
rectly to the. Albematie, while the Secretary rr.;i!^
a tour °f Inspection Of the navy yard. H» went
nu board the Pennsylvania, the flagship of A<}
mird.l Brownson's squadroi which Is getting h"r
hrishing touches i-.=>forr ring- into commission
q'-'hß Seer-Mary took luncheon with the commap..]
snt, Bear Admiral Coghlan.
DISTURBED CHARITY RESTAURANT.
Waiters Wanted a Raise in Pay Got Only
Jail.
Morris Levtne, of No. 33« Monroe-st . and Louis
r>rnian of No. 69 Monro«-.«t.. were arr»stf-d yes
terday afterßoon on the complaint of Moses H.
Rothstein, cf No. 13« Ea-st Broadway, fnr creating
*t-tnrbanca and for threatening htm with bodily
■ Rothsteixi ' s wcretary -,f the People
. Hon. which opened a r^ftaurant In
. * KoVn« East Broadway on June ».
aJma to be whony philanthropic
a l.c tail n^eals at nv<? cents each to orderly
a £ d t^r^ A3 i he placp yields no profit, in* wait
char;er 'hefrtoard and only ■60 each a week. The
era sr"t ••"■., ;(rrPSt w j.h two ..-hers wei PT n
pKer«^ !tfr? ni the pia< " uuin iast Band * y
morning. -toi's FYidav evening they had asked
OnthS t n P »iUkana better board, and pro
la , the rri.-e o f meals be raised to ssven
posed th«- ■•>?^ r« • ■ fhat ha, rt^r,
'" >nt ", rrf,,l"d to comply. They pressed their
the place refused ™gg rooming Mr edman,
demands and «» •Id them . Tnev threaten^
the manaß<;Plv^rda"vm anaß< ; Pl v^rda"v afternoon .ton* In from nf
rro'ib . . alld , > rf,^ to a crowd of two hundred or
t:i« place and talkM '"^ or ,, l<s( -.^ tr, s** uhat
thrsjr hundred r-;; _„ ; drore , h^ ni aW ay, out
would happen. T . I*.,*1 *„* arre£ts followed.
THE "PARAGRELE."
French Method of Protection
Against the Hail
<,
Paris, September 4.
-.■-■-- a O ng spell of hor. dry weather, from
which France has been suffering, a fresh cause
of anxiety Ironts the atrriculturist here. One
crop succeeds another, and so. unluckily, does
one enemy take th» place of the last. All
through the year the utmost vigilance Is re
quire^ to protect the young fruit trees and the
vines from the attacks of an infinite variety of
noxious bugs, from excess of temperature, from
death by drowning or from parching with
drouth. Once set. the fruit is attacked by
caterpillars innumerable, and. even worse, bj
rats, against whose onslaughts many inventions
have been tried. The best would seem to be the
little bags of wire gauze, which, while success
fully baffling the live marauders, yet adm! .
the air and sunshine to the fruit within, and
■whoip vineyards may be seen thus protected.
The expense on large oprafeF is. of course, con
siderable: it is. however, richly compensated by
the improved condition of the fruit.
But the enemy that follows in the wake of a
long hot summer is more te-rible than any of
these, and its attacks are harder to parry. It
is the hai!. Already in the southeastern dis
trict?, that of Burgundy, fearful havoc has been
worked by three storms of short duration,
which have destroyed the wine crops so care
fully tended till within sieht of the vintage.
The, heavy losses to proprietors accruing from
a fall of hail makes them eager to welcome
any invention that promisps to protect them
from this si-ourg°. Any scheme of protection
is obviously out of the question. In a recent
Ftorm the hailstones were so large that the
roofs of houses were crushed and old tr^s wej-p
beaten to earth. Th<=- district afterward pre
sented a scene of desolation not to be described.
Three hundred acres of wheat were totally de
stroyed by hail just, before the recent harv<
An ingenious Norman farmer has conceived
the idea of fighting the hail in its own element,
that is to say. in the clouds, while in the process
of formation. Basing his experiments upon the.
theory that hail is formed by a sudden fall of
temperature in the r°ei>>ns of the atmosphere
through which a heavily charged cloud is travel
ling, he endeavored, by means of the action of
electric currents, to destroy this condition of
high pressure, and thus prevent the congelation
of the suddenly condensed vapor. T'stng the
funnels of old locomotives, the enterprising
agriculturist discharged into threatening clouds
enough gunpowder to cause a powerful detona
tion and disturb the atmosphere as hieh as he
could attain with his instruments. At The same
time, in the Cote dOr, the Burgundy wine
country, M. Vermorel has been conducting sim
ilar experiments. He has organized a carefully
planned system of defence against ihe common
enemy, using a ring shaped projectile, dis
charged by a powerful cannon, called a "para
greJe" (hail conductor). The projectile travels at
a high rate of velocity when it first leaves the
cannon, diminishing as it rises; at the height of
300 yards it ceases to exercise any appreciable
action.
To remedy this defect. Dr. Vidal, of Hyeres,
h&» invented a charge which explodes at a high
altitude, and thus materially extends the sphere
of influence of the "paragrele." He relies for
the results of this explosion not alone on the
disturbance of th° atmosphere produced by the
detonation, but on the gases which are diffused
by the bursting of the bomb. With his fates'
improved apparatus, Dr. Vidal succeeded in
throwing a petard to the height of 500 yards,
which then explodes Into thousands of frag
ments
Throughout the preseni summer a long- p^rt
of experiments with Dr. Vidal's "parasrrele," or
hail conductor, have be**n carried on, under the
auspices of one of the agricultural colleges.
and as poon as the results warrant such a
course syndicates of protection will be formed
to organize the adoption of the method In every
district of France. Po far, some signal suc
cesses have been obtained. One large storm
area was observed arriving from th^ sea and
spreading across the Landes of the west coast.
Thirteen poets of observation installed in the
district fired off a succession of petards, som»
of which reached an altitude of 7'm> meters,
and in ten minutes the storm clouds wer< dis
persed. n the neighborhood of Auch a storm
burst on the same day. and three discharges
were fired by th° post stationed there. The
first produced no effect, the second dispersed
the storm centre, but the third effectua dis
posed of it, and no more hail fell.
nparison of the experiments carried on with
Dr. Vidal's invention shows that thr"* dis
charges are invariably sufficient to disperse any
storm c^ntr*. Ir is in the direction of increas
ing the range in altitude that improvements of
the apparatus wanted are being sought for.
Recently a proposition was laid before the
Society of Aerial Navigation in Paris by an
inventor. M. Leloup. who proposed to utilize
for this same purpose of dispersing storm clouds
a kind of kite which should <-arry explosives into
ttK; very heart of the storm.
The Idea of producing disturbances in atmo
spheric conditions is only new In connection
with hailstorms. For years past the market
gardeners of certain districts oi France ha\ c
been wont to fire heavy discharges of gunpow
der or. still autumnal nights wh*»n there is a
menace of a white frost. This has been so
successful that watchers are regularly appoint
ed on BtiH evenings, when the frost, bo danSCT
ous to delicate vegetables, may be expected, and
they give the signal to a whole district, as
the gardenen employ no special apparatus, how
ever they cannot insure the desired effect*
without repeating the explosions at frequent in
tervals But th< manage to save their crops.
In the wine districts these frost signals are
discharged automatically, by means of a fall
ing column of mercury, which, graduated ro a
hermometric scales, fires off an alarm cannon
when the peasants rush to The vineyards and
light bonfires that reduce the temperature.
ARCAXVM STILL FIGHTS.
Executive Committee to Take
Charge of Protest Against Rates.
4 mee'ing of the representative* of the State
committee, from subordinate councils of the Royal
Arcanum wa» held : esterday at the Hor. Man
hattan to take such action as was deem-d ad
visable m reference to the Dreseni situation m
that order s W Reynolds, of Boston, was elected
chairman. and William J. Moody, of thl city, sec
'TTommittee of "in* lawyers waa appointed to
mn .M*r the entire situation and report nack to
conference a feasible plan nf action.
Tb. - comm . reported a resoJution for an ex
ecutive committee of fifteen, wl ' h full rower to
act The committee was to be instructed m cause
such proceedings to be taken for injunction and
other /provisional relief, as It may deem best nl.
elated to gel an early adjustment of the "lUegaitty
ud invalidity of the n^ laws concerning assess
ments." The resolution continues:
-r-i- -^ consider the wijdnm Of ad-
, Thnt M id SSmber^o tender to the coUec of
vising each mem rier <- pre vious rate, but to
pay such J*",.* 1 ppvmem with a signed protest
company -v' n pp „v rTlPn, ,&&!] be credited to
d»manding tl-at v i i that ; ,p prnv^
gaj^TiS Sr?^ 1 ommended *™"*°*-
!i'4-V v, «T»cnti-» committee be in?trurt»d to
I hat tne t jy M tlor the question of procuring
'• ik : ln '° conPiJ'-.au the law. of the Ron gm
mien aniendtn'-tit t • Massachusetts that the
canum and of tne^ oun ,- shall be limited to
Se^g^ta^v^eie&a thereto.
The ehalrmM appointed ss members of th- cXe X -
P ul .o cotr.rrJttee of Bfte. Messrs. Leahy, of
ocuttve corr _ h or Brooklyn: HoweU r>r
Massachusetts: "» „/ • rork; Bruits, or Ohio:
Xew-Jersey: «»f * rk . ur»e, of Massachusetts!
Weeks, of ew : 1 T-ian<i: Uamigan. of Brooklyn
Barnes. of PRSfdujan. Walsh, of f New-fork
Barnes, of; Jj^y^nU; Bpomwr. of Sfew-Tork
•.■•Tn^nthus'u of New-J- ana iluOabe. of
ii.O'jKli'li.
PRECEDENT FOR RULERS.
French Comment s on President
Roosevelt's Telegrams.
Paris, September 5
President Roosevelt's < ah]e messages In reply
to the congratulation? sent to him by the various
heads of state on the occasion of the conclusion
of peace at the Portsmouth conference elicit
widespread comment from the leading political
writers in th" French newspaper*. In diplomatic
circles rh^ nddress and style adopted by the
President are highly commended, and, in the.
opinion of M. Peica?s:o and M. Hanotaux, ex-
Mlnlsters of Foreign Affairs, as well as of Sen
atora rTEstournelles de Constant. 'lemenceau,
Saint-Germain and H^brard. the simple wo-rijn?
of the Presidential mrimngrn rr^aies something
approaching a revolution, and offers a preredem
Thar should hf» fnilnweri by the r"h)*»f Masristrat*
of rhp Fr^n^h rppuhli^. c-hi. In arcordari'-* with
thf» "protocol." 6tiH adhTfs to th» courtly
phraapniojty of th» monarchy.
It is nofpd that President Loubet addressee
Prp?id<=nt Roo!w>vf>ir aa your excellency," while
th° latter in his reply uses with true republican
simplicity th° colloqaial personal pronoun "you "
M. Leon Bailhy. in n io;).line article on the sub
"■■• in "La Press* ." pxprppppp rppr^t "that the
French republic should be po far behind tile
times as to retain the diplomatic v»rhiajf«» of the
dynastic regime which the loaders of OUT parlia
mentary majority prof*>«:t: to hold in su<-h abject
ahhorr^nce." M. Bailby g<->f>n on to say that
"excellency" is nowaday* a mere commonplace
expression, assumed by little one hor?» Egyptian
beys and minor functionaries, and. although in
usa?» for Ambassadors, is nevertheless alto
gether Inadequate when applied to a head of
state. The consensus of French opinion is that
President Roosevelt was rieht in discarding the
formula of "excellency" in addressing bis col
league, the President of the French republic
It Is also joyfully recorded by The Parisian
editorial writers Thar President Loubet, ■'-hen
writing to the Emperor of Ru?Fia. to the King:
of England. or to the German Emperor, never
employs th*? pronoun "you." but invariably ad
dresses rhem In the third person, making use of
the term "your majesty." President Roosevelt,
imbued wirh the genuine spirit of lihej-tv. demo
cratic dignity and fraternity, treats the sov
ereigns on a footing of equality, with the un
pretentious, businesslike "you." stripped of un
republican "bsequiousrif Liberal organs, such
as the "Rappel." the "Stecle," the "Petite Re
publique" and the "Matin." urge the President
of the French republic to follow President
Roosevelt's example in this respect.
Diplomatic formalities, like straws, often show
from which direction the wind blows. The
"Gaulols," the "Liherte." the "Eclair" and the
"Presse" attach great importance to two rel^
grams exchanged between President Loubet and
Emperor Nicholas. President Loubet. after con
gratulating the Czar on the great wisdom
evinced by his majesty in the work of peace at
Portsmouth, adds: "France, the ally of Russia,
is rejoiced to see the war. that has been illus
trated by so many heroic deeds, terminate^ by
such an honorable peace " The Czar replied to
p >«;irierit Loubet with frigid precision, which,
a? M. Ernest Judef says, would "at any other
moment have provoked popular emotion." The
message of Emperor Nicholas was word»d as
follows: "Very sensible to the feelings (senti
ment) expressed in your telegram of yesterday.
I sincerely thank you for It Nicholas " It is
needless to point out that the word "alliance,"
even since the visit of the French fleet to Cron
stadt. eight years ago, has been an obligatory
expression in all public messages between the
Czar and the President of the French republic
The son of Alexander 111, who found this pact
In his inheritance, religiously adhered to th«
phraseology adopted by his illustrious father.
Nicholas IT delighted In repeating the significant
word "alliance." as a sort of warning and object
lesson to the rest of the world. The term "al
liance" seemed to gain weight and importance
with each fresh affirmation. Now. for the first.
time in the exchange of messages between the
Czar and the President of the French republic,
this word is absent. The omission, In view of
the significance of such matters in European
diplomacy, [ S evidently intentional. Tt is all the
more emphasized by the fact thar President
Loubet. tn complimenting "his majesty on his
hau'e sagesse." was joyful, spontaneous and en
thusiastic Moreover, according to established
custom, when one head of state makes u*e of th»
term -friend' or "ally." the game word is al
ways repeated In th<= reply. This Is a fair sample
of the present iikewarm phase of the Franco-
Russian alliance
French writers, with pardonable glee, point
out that, whiie President Roosevelt's message to
Emperor William was accurately published in
sh in the B- ■' with fhe republican
"yon." nevertheless, in tbe German translations
that appeared side by side with the English
text the "you" was freely rendered by the ex
-, "euere majestat"
< '. T B.
Eti ropea n A dvertisem ents.
a desirea to represent ta United States
A „ Europear horn*, familiar with e«n»trx At
ian^lr S Panflr- also Nova Scotia. Canada. r^S
Columbia and Vancouver. Address J. A. F.. Tribune
Office. ___^ .
LONDON SHOPS.
f Tiffany &Cq
221 AND 22t A REGENT STREET
LONDON
•KGLISH BRANCH OF THE IfFH'YOttK HOC 8«
JEWELLERY PRECIOUS STOKES
-WATCHES AND SILVERWARE •
a VISIT IS 9OUCTTED
WO IMPORTUNITY TO PUBCHA»B
PARIS
36™ AVENUE DE L'OPERA.
! .
*fi VRB
Goldsmitiis & SilYersmitbs Company,
LTD,
112, REGENT ST., LONDON, W.
Chcfcest Stock in Jie WorUI at
DIAMONDS, PEARLS,
RLBIES, SAPPHIRES,
EMERALDS, OPALS, &C*
AT MERCHANTS' PRICES
The
Goldsmitiis 4 Silversmiths Company. IW,
111, REOENT ST.. LONDON. W.
Depot for Irish Peasant Industries
r fnder Tlr<yai f'tronase
(|g THE IRISH WAREHOUSE
/C^^>. W Rsgint Street, LOHOOI, W.
(& MM SEASOOOVELTIES
VTv J T^lTtnu: "Shamrock. Lor.don."
f Telephone: 2*' i Gerrara.
IKl?>H— lrish Lar« dlrert from our own worker*.
IRlMl— lrish Ho.t*rr— BalbrtMM.
I K IMI -I ri-h HanU hrrrhlef*— rant f»«rtrtT
IRISH— Tal»lr Ltato-^ to«,t 4^j»J"«"
IHI-Il— Iriih poplto—'.ol»r»_«BdJitae»
',47 Regent St.. London.
THE IRISH WAREHOUSE
Foreign Retorts. Foreign EesorU.
TV^ t iTF* Zl • Proprietors: The
Hotel Victoria, oordonkotel l
TRAFALGAR «QrARE CXOVF. TO BrCKIXGHAM I W «
PALACE WESTMINSTER ABBET AND AIL PLACES _r*_ _T_\ «-<S|
INTEREST TARIFF FREE FROM I PTOWN g g\ JTR gg-3J II
OFFICE NEW YORK TRIBINE ." 13«4 BROAD JL-rf VF 1* V* ll*
WAY. N. Y. I
iden-Bnden, Hotel Regina
Hm^%& „ , rw ] IJM. Thr m««t !jp-fo-d;it^. *nlt«»« and •Inclf Aato-garag? Splendid \ is— Bl a « k _£^T!l*
m\\W-—JSS kchmti* with Bnfh». Beautiful fiardrn. 12.(100 >guarr '■fountain*. and Town. .Jt'LES I.IPFEKT.
mBSoBr yard*. Private Villa* French K«-«taoranf- frnprlftor, ■!».> <-.t I\nt*l MlCTHf.'aa R»7no.
F" r RANKFORTS j The Imperial
AM OPCRWPUATZ.) ) PRIVATE BATHS THROUGHOUT.
O A OIC Hotel Continental,
WLm—W f__\ IfV B -;> ji v luiuriou and comfort julc boti-i in Par!». tieattb
l~ If ■ -<?■• A. ¥ i«it l..«ati.>n md »lnr»t vjrw. orerlooktoc Toilerie*
P, jft JsV A. Jsl *"' „,rritß». steam h«.t throughout. 2M private b*tb-
roiiDn _
European Advertisements.
LONDON SHOPS.
MUSEUM SPECIMENS
-a. c% *>_ Of Rare Old English and
faLJSwIyL French Furniture. Ruga
xJyiffJEf^JsS art Curio* can always
«B*S<£*^^ MAPLE n & a CO'S GALLERIES
TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD LONDON
PARIS SHOPS.
£*6iraud-
TRQUSSEAUX. UTETTEB. ROBES
tC CANNES: I PARIS t
33, Bim dAntibes. I 9. Rim Oa.tlflHon*.
Foreign Resorts.
For the convenience of Tribune readers
abroad arrangements have been made to
keep The Daily Tribune on file in the read
ing roons of the hotels named below:
LONDON HOTELS.
SAVOY HOTEL, LONDON
HOTEL DE LUXE OF THE WORLD.
The rooms are bright. fresh and air 7.
*nd drtU&truUy quiet. Bathroom to avery Suit*,
SAVOY RESTAURANT.
the Opera Supper.
rnTARiDTE'S HOTEL,
Tbe Centre of Fashionable Lopoon
" The Las'. Word " cf SModem
Hotel Laraiy. Charming suites <wi:h prruatt
entrance, tathrcom, etc.! C<ve- 300 rooms.
Nearly 100 bathrooms.
A magnificent Royal Saite.
Unrivalled Position In London
TANGHAM HOTEL,
. Portland Place & Regent St W
"^ Family Hotel ot the Highest Class
Modern Appointments. Moderata
THE CARLTON
Hotel. Restaurant,
and Grill Rootß.
LONDON.
HOTELS IN ENGLAND.
LONDON
MIDLAND GRAND HOTEL
MANCHESTER .
MIDLAND HOTEL
LIVERPOOL. ADELPHI HOTEL
LEEDS QUEEN'S HOTEL
BRADFORD. MIDLAND HOTEL
MORECAMBE BAY ...
MIDLAND HOTEL
DERBY . . - MIDLAND HOTEL
w TOWLE Manager. UiUlaad K*Uw»y Hot«l» and
Uutel. Loodom.
HOTELS IN THEJRITISH ISLES.
MOOT Er^Ani-XLNBKinGE^^l^^^^
g£S5-3ffi^_«_«::::: :::::■* i^.*
BETTWS-Y^OED (SORTB H QTmX
HOTE^LiIN^COTIANDr
ci.ASCOw-81. t>ocu Ho«a. wejje __ HlthUurfg>
AVK— STATION HOT|^ _ am _ Cottalr _ BlrtlipUce) .
DCMTFJES-STATIOX HOTE^^^ Man.K.knm. e>
-_ ,<r ~r ttui it,,tel!> »nd fall partieal&rs a« to rontn
J?b?h.d Ku«P«« oace. of "TU. Trlbu,,,.
iTli» Fleot Street. London-
UDoer Norwood Queen's Hote!.
« ar ftvati! Fa.l*c«- London. -.-.:»«: siruacion In
■■ »'incL "Lovely cardena, Boardiiii; t*rm» irom 1^.5»
. r *m-- SDeclal termi for large parties. Conv«oliQt
ESln l^rnce tor City ana W* aI geu London.
ETJEOPEAN EAILWAYS.
London & North Western Ry. Hotels.
EUSTON HOTEL - - LONDON
LIME ST. HOTEL - LIVERPOOL
QUEEN'S HOTEL -
BIRMINGHAM
CREWE HOTEL - - CREWE
STATION HOTEL - HOLYHEAD
PARK HOTEL - - - PRESTON
NORTH WALL HOTEL, DUBLIN
GREENORE HOTEL - IRELAND
.___ FREDERICK HARRISON
London, 1905. general manager.
EUROPEAN RAILWAYS.
MIDLAND RAILWAY.
Tta*- I'lctar«>«QU^ Kontr of l.nrat Britais.
the centre of linsl^no lai-KoxttU i^d-KSSB JUMt
vii.-E.- i i viißj'u'jL n.:enu-»ii to L.UNDON ud PKI.N
CIPA' TOWNS and LIVERPOOL iSicnanj^i to Scot-
SSI BREAKrA.vr. LCNCHEO.V « DINING CAM*.
and THRot.GU CARRIAGES b-twe«n LIVBRPOO
7c°nt-;T and LONDON (3.. ! accr«*). THROCOH
TICKETS to LONDON. PARIS and ail part* BAO
qagE rHSi'KED tbrou«U from hotel, resldsae* or
p >r in »* York to any part of Lon<lon. AppUr f»r
i^d-a. ■m- tab!*s. mapa. *c. to the Compan^j Fm
c g-r hrenta. Mes»n. T Coolc * Son. I«l Uftllll
Broadway and 6:9 M»<l.fon-iw, t "l <e H2LlT!i
u.^i,,,, A Co . 87 B«vw 3t-. Midland Ajsau far
Fr^shr Traffic, fw fr.ieht rat«« to ail part* o« Omt
Britain
FRANCE. BELGIUM AUD HOLLASB.
Grand Hotel
PARIS
BOULEVARD DCS CAPUCI»£B AM) rtAOf—
0E L*OP£RA. I.CCC ROO5»8 WITH PRIVATE
BATHS. TARIFF 0W APPLtCAHO*.
OARIS «FiT«ftßAm«rte»aHons*4
Hotel Chatham,
DARIS. Hotct ac I'AQicncc
r iß.i B . RUE SCRIBE,
I OPPOSITE THE ORAND OPER*.
TW Modem Hotel of ParU
B. AKMBHtISTER. Wiiip*.
ERCEDES HOTEL.
"1 PLACE DE LETOILE. PARIS
EnllrWy new ro»»Tnrted flr«t-«IaM Hotyl; •"••••••
roodprn linproT«-m*n«» : luxuriou*ij fanuahwt; »j3_ > »2
%untagc>u»Ty Mtiiatcd. opened May 1. I—*;. — ■»»■*■
batb-dreaalms mom i» attacn«l to e*«*T »■■• ■■■ ■■■■
bedroom^
PARIS
HOTEL CE LILLE ET ALBION,
C 3. Ra»9t. Qanore. close to Place Vacdaai*. Flnt elaaa. AD
■odem iT>orrr»-m«nt«. Zterj txaaa oooifort. Laru featt.
Bastmarani. luncbrans *ad dinner* >i &i«d price or k la aar*a>
Trtatmn . Lili^lbiox. r^aia.- Harm Atadia. PraariaMr.
11 A DTC ( HOTELS BT.JJWES
PAKISI ETDALBAHY.
R&ml FROM 4 F«S.. WITH > BEX». * FSS
Ut+NCH 3 FRS.. DINNER 4_FR3.. AT .SEPARATE
TABLES. fJjLi! PENSION >ROm FRS. •».»».
„ , , I Mi* Tuix 28, Coot de b tdsc
Hotel do Palais gsA?aaitSg
HOTEL VIOLET-PARIS. -«£»
3»-39, Fbr" Ptiissonim— near' northern. EaUara St.
Lazjre Stations. Erery modera earatart aat saattaiy
t«qusilte. Mo4«r»ttclurg«». PtariottlacTtrtalflDMa.
DDIIQQCI 0^ LE GRAND HOTEL
ullUOOlailaO 6ri!lßoom. American Bar.
HOTELS IN GZRMiLNT.
AIX-LA-CHAPELLE
Nuellens Hotel
DRESDEN.
HOTEL BELLEVUE
Distinguished Mouse of old reputation. Unlooe
position. R Ronnefeld, Gen. j^anajer.
DRESDEN-SAVOY HOTEL.
Ist Class Family Hoots.
Turkish, an< Private Baths. f. Rfargnf.
FRAHKFORTaFURSTEBHOF
Htwly opened Ist class Family Haiti "tgS]i
£nrj mod*™ co-fart— 80LLE-RITZ.
AUSTRIA. HUNGARY & SWITZEBLA2rD
(AUSTRIA)
VIENNA \*%£*
v HOTEL BRISTOL
Located on the Fashionable Kanrtherrlnz.
and the favorite r?«ort of Americans. Per
fect French Cuisine and choice wines.
ITALY AND SOUTH OF FRAKCB.
Rome. Italy.
Cd Hotel Quirina!
OPEN THE YEaR ROUND.
Highly reputed and fashionable I«t c\a*» Hecrl ia t
faeuiiliirnt uml ttn>-»t yart ot lioaie ETery iMIMMra
omfort and lusnry. GranJ Hall. Band. Krirata batU
roumi. IVrf«-rt «anifatinn. __.«—
HIGH CLASS FRKNCH HE!»TArRA>x.
STEAM HEAT rHKOCGHOCT.
nryna m beautiful
CIIUAa hivate PARK.
U "EDEN PALACE."
HOTEL DE LA VILLE
ILA ii. i!m^ l Eii*sr t tjiJ«.
HOTEL DE LA VILLE
ipicE Hotel : n "%zz\*-.
Venice Hotel ' Deetrtc Visht.
Electric H«ht.
W Royal Danieli f *- ****•
W llUyul UQIIICII ! stemm BMt
41 i MODFRN rWUWtW Railway Tlcllrt*.
VEWXV REFITTUD. J
Venice. ~ b«in| tb*
GRAND HOTEL "-"..^ST*
11.. a rr«.ta«. mt too Wm* -• FIAKTA.
mm ta» ami C«— l. ** IM| M"i
•*

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