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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, June 30, 1907, Image 28

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1907-06-30/ed-1/seq-28/

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as 'some "Id scholar can road Latin, or Molapus:
J"r. ... :-.,: h •■ |.ra:ich. r only restful to piiwaiLliH-ck.
When 1 am a little indefinite in my explanations,
she gives me a look which makes me rrcmble for
her continued belief :.i my omniscience-, and -•■.
when !■•: the third time she asked me what a cer
tain bird wa> saying. I tell that 1 must .!<■ some
thing to retain her respect; So I «\'.<;n;...ri/<-.l
"This is what ho is saving,-'! 1 answiTfil : lie
quick IV quick— He quick- Quick! He quick!
Sweet! Sweet !— -Sweet ! . . . Sweet-i-ki!—
Sweet-i-ki: Swcet : i-ki! . . I'huck-chuek!-^
Twe ey Tw. .--. T- •-.•>■ ! "
This translation seemed entirely satisfactory t>>
Kv.. aii'l she !i:.t'!<- me repeat it several ;:nn-s. so
ilia: with I'.er rapacious baby memory she might
ret ■■: i.v heart She presently disconcerted me,
however; by asking me t«. tell ller what that other
bird ■ 'ii the b< nigh there was saying.
"It diK-sn't sound the sii'me;as the other," slie
said, of meant in more babvlike words The real
ism ••: baby talk i am obliged ;•■ leave to greater
writers
"I 1 means ju^t tr.e same, t hough. '•' ! said. "All
the birds are s:iyiiig the amc thing, "iily they -.;y
it in iliffereht languag*
I must explain thai ICva has been somewhat of a
traveler, and realizes that you can ask for the same
thing" in Unglish"; I'rench or Italian Therefore^ the
explanatii 'ti seemed to 1 ng her some, '. !.- ugh i 1 1 >ul«l
set- n< it entire, •■< ■!-.•.•< li< 'ti
However, i ivas siiVetl further, embarrassment by
our arriving at our ■.■■•■• i\i-.iliv I
don't know which of us was more quietly excited
as v.i- stood in fr< nl <>f the bank where the imgry
little prisoner churned h:^ venom in the darkness.
Kva. who had been vivrn an illustrated natural his
tory for a present the Christmas before, was evi
dently expecting .1 boa const rictorr— that, 'or ;» beau-
tiful sei"i>ent, such as a luridly pictured Hible sent
her by a pio'as aunt had taught her ti> associate with
the garden of ICdcn.
Wit 1 almost as much caution as though leva's
imaginations were likely !•• be realized and some
winged dragon snorting Hume was ready to lean
out upon us, I removed the stone and peered
into the tiny dungeon, Kva standing at mv side,
her blue eyes serious with exjiectanoy. Yes,
my prisoner was still there! Apparently he ad
not moveel since 1 had shut him in; and ins 1 lull
wicked eyes gleamed at me with concentrated
hate nit of the darkness. Hi showed no dis
position to escape, so there was n> > difficulty in my
usinj^ my glass pickle jar, as I had proposed to
myself hen I stole with it from the kitchen.
EMacing its bnnid mouth in the trance to the
little cave, I banked it securely 1 mil with earth ;
Eva, meanwhile, an admiring^ mystifying spectator
Thus Ihe adder had no choice but to stay ere he
was or to remove into the glass jar. the hospitality
of which, however, he showed no disposition to
accept; He till at on, mystic, unmoving, making
no sign. Eva and I watched him a long while in
silence.^ and then at length] his immobility growing
AMERICA BOILED DOWN
AMERIt'A ] ■ • ■ •me heen a. lin eil
•■: being unduly (uimpnus, thai -in- claims
all in sight, the largest, smallest, longest,
ortest rich. I mi : heautiful, as ! : .'- case ma y
)■<■. of evei • ii] and that :he the I'nited " I
thai i ■ ■ en appropriated to hei indi\ idual
use :i di gnai 11 • ■ ■• hii h Canada and Mexico had
« 1 ni.il 1 11 !< ' Amerii
8111 ''■•'■> after all doesn'i he 1 ... k up mosi . ■;"
:• • . ! .,:::. deliver I lie go* >ds? Ol ci >ur c it mighi
i c argued thai ;i '.. < • handkerchief mighi !•<■ worth
more than ; I anket ; hut a citizen feel thai he am
■ n he reflects thai I 'n< le
Sain - <!■ >■: ' ard ■ mhra< >■• . ■<• -•• square miles:
■ ■ ■ ■ Iy, over the S
I n t h ; 1 1 . 11 • .■■ t1 > the
population . . a numtier w hich ■• mild
sea reel; : • m • i' • • th< S4.1 54 -, ■
eni il.i- \\ • don'l feel crowded in mosi seel
ri 2; tants t-> the si |uare mile ; -.. 1
that it must have st-i I ■ • • ■ j 1 a!
ti.r Lieginning nf the i neteenth century.
And when I ■ ■ • les i< ■ the almight\ dollar, I
is where Amerii i certainh shines She is vorth
$i 7.i04,2ii,Qi7 in real and personal properi
$i..5i 11 per capita, h you haven'i goi your
to aye " up 1 ' of the $2. 7,?h, 646. hjS .• cm ula -
' ■ '; > S ;-■ -_• ■ • nemher of the family,
■ ! . ■ particular, you may
eit oui of : ■.• S< <-.-;,. 75 of gohi . |
' - 572 of silver; th< - (> 1.840 of gold < ertifi
cates; the $471,52 . ertil the
$335,04 2: f United Stal I SS4S 1,
23S 1 '. natii ■!...! bai ■ r in small changi
the $7,337 Irifi ■ art.
It :- true in interest hearing .!■
$805,1 50.140, the annual • eh amounts
to $23,248,064: but no one worries much about
n it amount 1 ml; to 1 enty-eight 1 ents
a year 1 I ■ I ci .:!!.! the peanui crop]
I Besides, certain ::■ . ident nu mb« r■ •: ;hc
SUNDAY MAGAZINE FOR JUNE ?o. 1907
■■'■ ■ • ■ '

■ I
■ I ■
■ . 1
lot 1
,id. anil • it I i'H
: . „-... ■ f nil!

t tn I come at last 111
• ■ ■ I I pinned
■ ■
i I ' :
: I mil
All the Sjmc. W« lUJ .> Gf»d Time.
By EMMETT C HALL
community have depn itcds4, >5- } *7.>-' > .?7 '
hanks, ami > 27,10.2 have put 53. 200.544.1
sa v injjs !■.:•
Th. n thi •■■ art 1 tin. 1 farmei There are 10. 438.210
■■I them, with ;.;,>).<•; 7 farms -.<.>■■• £ . : ■
S; 8, the product - . ■- - <•.
and w In 1 fi ed not ■ >nh I hem elves ami ' hi
■four million Americans, hut send 1 17.71 S. 057
■ •■;■ he] ■ not hing ol .-'■.:■
■1 Hour, tn t"i ireigners The '.< >n .• ■ ■
Sh2.ofn.Ssh for the corn, and 525.757.517
$s«>.i <<.S'"i for the wheat and flour
That the national Go\ ernment \\ ill :
keep up the payments of interest on
debi without having to call on the individual citizen
:': ' •:' his twenl v eighi cents is evideni n it is 0 >n
idered thai although the net ordinan expenses ot
■'lrr.il machine amount to $544,476,22;,
is .iii incon f J 1.454.122
That our "infani industries" are at least :■•■ ■
ing !'.iU->. is evidenced by the fact
un<] in 2 16.262 manufai turing • 1
lishmi • • ; , turn oui goods to the amount of
$i4.S 2.147.087. Thai there were a few sickly
youths, however, is proved b> the fad I
pa ed away lasl year, for « hi. h tin re
ing to tiu- umr of Si 19,201 .515.
We always were a scrappy lot, and have also
always been willing to pay for it. For the contests
already held, we have paid $3,459,860,311 in pen
sions, and arc paying Sl4l, 1*4,562 .1 yeai n<
nothing of the $117,946,692 to the army and
Vr! .474.264 to the navy— those are their yearly
salaries who are kepi on hand in case of need
Americans seem t.-iut ..t riding, and for this pur
pose and to haul their freight operate some 217 hi
miles -,t railroads. Of this opportunity for rapid
I don't ki • ■ ' - -
!• • I Eva's 1
■ ■ ■
... . i ■
... . . . ;
1 . . ■ • ' .

"Really it 1 !
■■ ' ■
her
• \\ " . ■ 1 • ■
her.
■ !. i :'.•.. 1 1 :
1
. . . ...
S. > t hen ■ ■ ...

on • - ■
he
...
. •
. . ...
frei
Ala P • ■ • :
v■ ; •
li We ga\ ■ ' ' ■
. . . I. S> t
I to S
!
authoi
in the vv'i odUnd, 1! c I 1
shifting of scenery, 745.446.671 ...... ■' •-
vantage last year; conveyed m 30,773 oars. The
freight hauled ore mile amonnted to 157.3J5.621*? -7
tons,* which required 1,767.657 cars. If these frei: c
cars were coupled hito one tram.it would make :
very heat belt for the earth at the equator. We ha i
twenty-three miles of railroads in 1 > ;c
We appear to write a few «m-re letters in these
days than in 1S03; at least.* at that time there were
only no ; post offices, as against (<>.f>co at the present
time, which bring in receipts of 5167.932.753. as
against $280,804 for that ancient year/ The ex
penses «■! operating the postal service are some^
thing in excess of receipts, being 5178,449.779: v *
this Isn't bad, considering the fact thai 475.** 1
miles of post routes are covered, and :..a a letter
miirht travel the whole distance for two cents.
But even the mail doesn't move quickly enough
for the American; so he sends 96,087.146 telegrams
a year, <>r something over one :•> the citizen- .»
good proportion <>i these are considerably abqvej
the quarter limit t.>,.. being news despatches to the
:-•..;.'(' newspapers which manage t<« find subscribers.
Like a certain ancient people, we are always
seeking something th-w, and the Goyerntnent ad
mits t" ;i.i,f; a year that they have don* so, ana
issues them patents.
It is ranch to be regretted that we have 6,246.^57
illiterate eiti:.cr.s. ten years ot age and upward; but
there is a ray of hope in the fact that we are spend
ing annually some S^o 1.6 16,660 on public schools;
which are being attended by if>,4r>s,;oo pupOs^ who
receive instruction from 4f>o..?r>i) teachers. And
then there are 453 colleges and universities.
Of course ii may be true, as they say. that we
brag a bit ; but America must look goodito the
foreigners after all — more so every year, as in iS^a
only 8,385 immigrants thought it worth while to
give us a trial, while last year 1.1 .735 entered our
ports.
No, after all, we don't brag — merely state tacts.

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