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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 05, 1908, Image 17

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1908-07-05/ed-1/seq-17/

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I^TTtTs HAWAII, THE FIRST STOP OX THE SECOND LEG OF THE CRUISE ROUND THE WORLD.
ftllOL'S HAWAIIAN VOLCANO.
HONOLULU, WITH ITS TROLLEY CARS, BRICK BUILDINGS AND ENGLISH SIGNS.
WILL SEEM LIKE HOME TO THE SAILORS.
tFrcm -terw-graph. copyright. I**. by Underwood & Underwood, New York.)
CtA DANCER.
Mrtich ha* survived the change wrought by
•BtT.r cf tie white Ban.
tbc aid days it was practised en a board
ifflisches wide and Cto S feet long. Push-
Bilcirds before them, the Hawaiians would
H: beyond tie •.-•_-. eulta-
Lr WLes one sufficiently large for their
■ 'sns seen approaching 1 tiey would lie on
tear 2, face fiovs-cßrard, and paddle toward
■ u*:i2 tie wave overtook them. By €*-
■ir.:r~iiuos tie board was kept on the
Bi' irave and carried toward the beach
K. H F^ted. Tie mere clever ones were
mk\ ■.-...- they cculd stand on the board as
■£ed along at an angle.
f|r:.i:r.g in a canoe, -whicii Is the only
Si] that rar. be \ised in entertaining for
*yi!b iiis gwrt, cne would think less cx-
Jl-: it is said tiat it is not. More skill
lETS"i in honiir-p tie larger and clumsier
It: fci pJace .... the lighter
Bre Cirfglbk board. The canoe is '- dugr
rth r 'u:r:pgc!r?. Equipped i a pair of
l^aiilers ard a helmsman, .-.„:..
■r^h th» p-jrf and the rough water :; a
nw the waves can be taken to ad
■P Sei-ca: Tcvcs are permitted to pass,
Mr "*" • v.-.i:':r.g fcr one large encash, to
W crrr to the shore At last one is seen
■■* "Hoi: bear '■--■ paddle!")
■f:" helcsscan. and with . .. k, almost
»f.» f . Bin kes tbe canoe is rat ahead.
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, JULY 5, 1908.
The pare i= kept up until the wave overtakes
the boat. If the speed is too slow the wave will
awamp it and roll on, leaving a wet party In its
wake. The moment when the wave picks up the
canoe Is a thrilling one. The boat Ls suddenly
lifted as If some velvety backed monster had
risen from the sea b>-n*-ath the stern. The Fpray
strings back from the bow toward the great
blue-green wall of water curling overhead di
rectly astern. The pulse thrills with exhilara
tion as the canoe rushes on. It is tobogganing
withovt its blinding speed.
Another of the pleasures of the native Ha
waiians which has survived is the hula-hula
danc*. This posturing dance is not on the offi
cial programme, as its mod'-rn form is not en
tirely like Its primitive practice. That there will
be opportunities to see it is evident, however, as
the two principal purveyors of this form of
enttTtainmi nt have b**en making preparations.
Thpy have endeavored to monopolize all the
dancers on the irland l»y engaging them far in
advance for the week of the fleet's visit. The
competition between Mmc Puahi and Princess
Theresa, the native widow of Robert W. Wil
cctx, for the business of providing dancers for
th*> event reached the vituperative stage some
tim* 1 ago. and ii was th^ucrht that possibly a
hola-hula tru^-t might result before the flp^t
dropped anchor at Honolulu.
NATIVE HAWAIIANS EATING POI. THE NATIONAL DISH.
KUny of the tars of the fleet will probabfy lean, the taste of th.s dish before they leave the .slanda-
THE HAWAIIANS DELIGHT TO WELCOME THE ARRIVING
AND SPEED THE PARTING GUEST.
{From iter«>rra.ph, copyright, 190S, by Underwood & UnJerwovd. Ntw YurlLj
One of the things which travellers are sup
posed to do -when visiting a country is to t«»st
its distinctive articles of food. Every one w'.io
has read about Hawaii has undoubtedly learned
something about poi, the national disn of the
Kanakas. The Sandwich Islanders, living in
a land where many kinds of fruit grow natu
rally, are fond of eatin?. The "luan." i-r foart.
Is very dear to their heart?. This was f..rmerly
served on a mat spread upon the ground and
decked with ferns, the Hawaiian sn lax and
garlands of many flowers. There were no
knives, forks or spoons, and the dishes
were calabashes of highly polished koa wood,
shiny cocoanut shells or small gourds. This
method of serving the "luan" can still be seen
in the country districts.
The scenic features of the islands are many.
As is well known, the islands^are of volcanio
origin, and on Hawaii can be se^n two of the
largest craters, Mauna Loa and Kilauea. In
the very outskirts of Honolulu is a volcano, th«
Punch Bowl. This Is a very safe kind of bowl
for the sailors to visit, as it is no longer a
flowing bowl. What is said to be one of the
most beautiful views in the world is that from
"the Pali." This is within a half dozen mllea
of Honolulu. Here the peaks tower above th«
carriage. At an unexpected turn in the road
a broad valley spreads out hundreds of feet
below. The roadway is hewn from the
solid rock, on the edge of a perpendicular walL
The Hawaiian opera house, the museum, the
aquarium, the field sports and aquatic and
horse racing will furnish entertainment for
officer and sailor alike. Time will nut hang
heavily on the hands of the naval guests ot
Honolulu.
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