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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 05, 1908, Image 43

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l/HE JOHN HAY
/ MEMORIAL LIBRARY
GIFT OF ABOUT TWENTY
FIVE FRIENDS.
J>!«nx for the Building at Brown
I University Announced— To
Cost $250,000.
PT^riacace. July -"To my mind John Hay If
the ajwat flower of our civilization." the late
president v. (Unley once eaid. Thousands of
Ame-icflns who came into personal contact with the
distinguished literary man and statesman shared
..h.t feeling To hundreds of thousands of other
Africans who have forgotten neither Mr. Hay's
achievements in the public service nor his literary
work-for what schoolboy has not declaimed "Jim
Blu.iso "or "Little Breeches" is necessarily of
in»re«t that an enduring memorial is about to he
erected through the gifts of some twenty-five
ir'ends of Mr. Hay and of his alma mater. These
iriends had already subscribed J150.000 when An
drew Carnegie subscribed J150.000 more, and the
xz *.rr.<-'r!;ii Brill soon be erected.
Appropriately, this memorial will take the form
of a university library, the plane for which have
lUFt been accepted by the corporation of Brown
University. Honor will thus be done not only to
an individual, but to the general conception of the
responsibility of the educated man in a democracy.
>jr Hay. throughout his long and useful career,
-was always a scholar, in the productive, not in the
pedantic sense. Literature he followed profession
a" y only as he conscientiously could. His Interest
in public affairs and his sense of the duties of
.citizenship were such as to prevent his devot
3ng ell his energies to authorship. What he
•»rotr was written from conviction and from
knowledge that he. had something worth say
ing. Consequently, from the class poem at his
graduation from Brown University In ISSS. through
Sne brilliant. "Castilian Days." the first essays of
■which Mr. Howells hailed as an Important dis
covery for "The Atlantic Monthly." and on through
the celebrated, "Pike County Ballads." the life of
lincoJn and the occasional papers of the last few
years. nothing unworthy or perfunctory came from
tis p^n. More than any other man in public life
3n the Ur.ited States, with the possible exception of
3ir. Roosevelt^ of whose power of keeping in touch
■with ir.any things Mr. Hay sometimes expressed
«nvy. he was an enthusiastic student of the best
thai 'has been thought and said, delighting in read
leg in the quiet of his home at Washington, able
In ■ nation to fasts from a surprising range of
lT;ratjre.
MODERN" BOOK REPOSITORY.
Hoaxing such an alumnus. Brown University
•k',ll -witness the erection, as a very Important ad
<i;!:r to its apparatus of scholarship, of a great
modern repository of books. How glad Mr. Hay
himself would have been to see his name thus per
yctuate-a may at least be conjectured. His attach
ment to his alma mater was unwavering. It was
stown by the charming ode in which he commem
orated her centennial in 1864 in the midst of his
Qu*_ies as secretary to President Lincoln, and even
xr.o.-e directly years after in a letter which he
-wrote to the librarian cf the university to accom
yauy & copy of liis life of Lincoln, which he asks
to be accepted "a* a token of the reverence and
pr&tiuide with which I regard that ancient peat
ot teaming." This letter, framed, is now one of
Hie treasures In the office of the Brown librarian,
3i. L. Koopman.
How gre*t the value will be to the university of
tfct gilt of a memorial to this noble American Is
easily ai .predated if the details of its construction
are stuaitd. According to the plans prepared by
•the architects, Shepley, Rut an & Coolidge. of Bos
laa. who were also the architects of the John Car
eer Brown Library, already on the university
ground at Providence, and of the Harper Memo
rial Library *'- the University of Chicago, the John
Hay Library will be erected at a cost of $230,000.
The building will have a frontage of a little more
than I*o feet, facing the university grounds, and
■Kill extend 103 feet down College street. The style
ef architecture is the English Renaissance of the
period of Sir Christopher Wren. The material will
be Indiana limestone. The building will have a
fe&sesaent, ground, firs:, mezzanine and second
floors, the main enterance being Prospect street,
•with only a few Steps of ascent.
The interior of the John Kay Library has been
jlannt-d on the basis of suggestions made by the
librarian after months of study, including a tour
«f inspection made in company with an archi
tectural expert to the principal libraries of the
East. The problem was to provide accommodations
♦or two hundred readers, three hundred thousand
volumes, rooms for various special libraries, for
study and for the different branches of the library
tdcjirJetrstion.
'■ ROOMS MOST USED ON FIRST FLOOR.
• The requirements have been fulfilled in accord
"ance with the modern idea in planning libraries
ar.d museums of inviting the public to make use of
the treasures of literature and art- There was a
time when a librarian of Harvard College an
nounce', with satisfaction on a Saturday afternoon
that every book but one was back on the shelves
and that he was sending a messenger for that one.
The newer point of view is to make the literary
conection as acc^spib'.e as possible. It will be no
ticed that in the John Hay Library the rooms vis-
Jt«S by most users of the library are on the first
floor. Practically all the rooms open to the public,
la f*'t except the large exhibition room, are on
This floor. The administration of the building is
•centred on the vertical series of rooms, of which
tr,* cataloguers* room ie midway, and these rooms
ire connected with one another and with the stack
■fey a lift and by stair*. The stack will contain
some two hundred and fifty thousand volumes, and
fifty thousand volumes will be contained in other
parts cf the library. It is expected that pneu
matic cleaning wi;! be Installed throughout the
bnfMl&g The department libraries will be accom
modated in the old building, which will communi
cate with th« new. and thuf make available to
readers in either building the resources of the
other
Bbs read..-.? room has seats for ITS readers, ar
ranged so that every reader has the light over his
left shoulder and fits next to an aisle, and no
reader faces another or will have another pass
toebird him in going or coming. This room contains
the loan desk and the desk of the reference li
brarian and the catalogue. On the walls will be
Pis cad the reference booicc. the books reserved for
th* use of the .classes, the current periodicals and
sev^rai thousand volumes of general literature.
*-"■;* room is about twenty-six feet in height; it
** lifted by high windows, which leave space for
bookcases around the walls. Off the reading room
or th* north is the fourth floor of the etack. which
Is expected to contain the college library proper,
Or 4 collection of pome twenty-five thousand vol
*o»t. specially selected for the use of the under
*ra«ua»«.«: Adjoining the stack and connecting with
ti» reading room is the large, high and well lighted
cataloguing room, which front* on the court. The
**** M trays are fo arranged as to be accessible
kotb from dm cataloguers' room and the reading
room. ■ •:. the right <■■ the vestibule are the public
*t*irs. with the men and the women's coat rooms
oa the two sides of the passage, at the end of
*fcica are the librarian's two rooms, one public
■»• one private.
Ascending the Stales, the visitor reaches the mez
*«Jne floor, which contains a large and handsome
nwaumental room for the famous Harris collection
<* American pastry, a rare book room, in which
facing bookcases will be employed, and a large
•tudy room over the catalogue room, lighted from
«• court, on thai floor will be two balconies
•^looking the wins room.
Th* ■"•■»• or top floor Is devoted to special col
, l ' tes an<J study rooms. From it opens the eighth
-ocr of the stack. There are a large room and a
Rf 1 i rOOCB 1U eiCh cast for the Kider collection of
Island history and the Wheaton collection of
Uw; m. large unasslgned room, a
To i P * oOns ' ■on rooms for art folios and other art
*». and tttr«-e ttudy rooms, betides a large
™Ui On "^ "eated from above.
*«< simplicity «•« orderline** of «uch an archl-
plan exactly accords with the character of
«i«*p A f lerican whom the building commtmo
tailm Maaa *t ticzne time subsequently a
am. n^! ll mm * niUrl * J oi Htow " " distinguished alum
terJL? * a<led l 0 lm »' r « etl!1 further upon
tent- *** of student* th« worthiness of their
*"**«« from the nineteenth century.
THE JOHN HAY MEMORIAL LIBRARY.
FOR. THE BUSY MAN
Constant Reader Tells What He
Missed in Last Week's Papers.
-Well. I suppose the Presidential rampalgri Is
now under way?" queried the Busy Man, as he
accosted his friend, the Constant Reader, for a
chat over the news of the week.
"No," was the reply. "A campaign cannot be
under wav until there Is some one in charge of it
I and that IS the condition of Republican affairs for
the chairman of the national committee, »ho W
virtue of his office directs the movements W to
Election Day. has not yet been selected. The Dem
ocrats have not named their ticket although in
all human probability it will he headed, as 1 -has
been twice before, by William Jennings Br> an.
Then, the Independence League has to take ac
tion, which may result In still another ticket. The
Prohibition candidate is not yet selected In fact
only Debs. Socialist, and Watson, Populist ha.c
ac yet begun campaigning. After the selection of
the man to manage the Republican campaign,
which was In the hands of G<-org* Bruce Cortel
you. now Secretary of the Treasury, four years
ago, which will be announced on July «. will come
the formal notification of Mr. . Taft of his nomi
nation. This will take place on July S. and Cin
cinnati is to be the place. Mr. Taft will then de
vote himself to the preparation of his letter of ,c
ceptance. While there will be many ratification
meetings to keep alive political sentiment, it will
be well on in September before the active can««
is under way. unless Mr. Bryan, who is a restless
campaigner, forces the pace-
MR. TAFT'S SUMMER
"Where will Mr. Taft spend the summer T'
"He will nor go to Murray Bay. Canada, where
the Taft brothers have been accustomed to fore
gather in the past with their families in the sum
mertime. Instead of crossing the border Into a
foreign land for rest and recuperation, he will
stay at Hot Springs. Va.. with his family. To
avoid returning to Washington in the hot weather
he has arranged to have the sub-committee of the
national committee, which is empowered to act in
the matter of selecting a chairman, meet him and
Mr. Sherman, the Vice-Presidential candidate, at
Hot Springs on Wednesday, when the selection will
be announced. Meanwhile there have been consul
tations between Mr. Taft and the President and
between the latter and other Influential leaders at
Oyster Bay in regard to this and other matters
of especial importance In the coming campaign.
If the difficulties in regard to Ohio affairs are set
tled in a satisfactory manner, it is probable that
Frank H. Hitchcock, who gained the sobriquet
of the 'Steam Roller Man' at Chicago, will man
age the campaign. But if this would only cause
trouble in the state from which the head of the
ticket hails some other man will be selected. George
yon L. Meyer, who came home from the post of
Ambassador at St. Petersburg to be Postmaster
General, is mentioned as the man most likely to
be chosen if Mr. Hitchcock Is not. Mr. Taft
stepped down and out of public office on July 1.
after twenty-one years of continuous experience
therein. It was the ninth time that he had resigned
office. In each previous Instance it was to go
higher, and it is expected that the habit will con
tinue with him, and in eight months more he will
enter on the discharge of the duties of the highest
office In the land, if not In the whole world. The
new' Secretary of War." General Luke E. right,
has succeeded Mr. Taft before, taking the place he
vacated as civil Governor of the Pnllipinnes four
years ago. General Wright saw service in the War
of the Rebellion on the Confederate side, and Is
not ashamed to own it. I recall that when Judge
Augustus Van Wyck was nominated for Governor
of this state the story was told that lie had kept
his Confederate uniform and used to put it on oc
casionally. When 1 asked him if it was true
he declined to say anything about it. but in such
a menacing manner, and became so angry, that I
was convinced of the truth of the story.
MR. BRYAN'S CONVENTION.
"The Democratic delegates are gathering in the
rarefied atmosphere of Denver to ratify the will
of the man whose 'cross of gold' speech won him
a nomination at Chicago a dozen years ago. when
he was barely beyond the constitutional age for
the Chief Executive of the nation. It Is said that
in the altitude of Denver, which is 5,270 feet
above sea level, so that a delegate who sleeps ten
feet above the ground will be Just a mile higher
than on the waterfront here, the effect of intoxi
cants is euch that one drink will do the work of
about six on sea level, so some of the delegates
are anticipating an especially joyful time. As the
convention has to remain in session for four days
at least in order to make good the guarantee
given to the city, no haste will mark the pro
ceedings, although already there are reports of
cold, unpleasant weather, with snow on the near
by mountain peaks. The will of Mr. Bryan in re
gard to the platform and his nomination will no
doubt be registered. It is said he would like to
! have Judge George Gray, of Delaware, put on the
ticket with him. but the latter'B positive declina
tion is expected to leave the way clear for naming
a New Yorker to offset the Repubiican nomination
for Vice-President. John B. Stanchfield has been
the leading upstate man talked of. but his over
whelming defeat by Governor Odell in 1900 put
him out of the running. Martin W. Littleton, of
Brooklyn ■ and Texas, is also put forward;
i Judge W. J. Gaynor has been brought for-
NEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, JULY 5, 1908.
w ard, but scouts consideration of his name.
It Is more within the range of possibility
that he should be a candidate for Governor next
fall. Contrrll.r Metz would not give vp a rever
sionary interest In the mayoralty to be the tall
of the Bryan kite, but Mayor McClellan. whose
claim to hi< present office has been judicially
confirmed, would not be unwilling to leave
it to presice over the Senate after his experi
ence in the loner house, to which he may return
when his sla years in the City Hall are at an end.
There Is a .woposition to throw a firebrand into
th° Denver convention by the Introduction of reso
lutions in honor of the late ex-Preaident Cleveland
of a nature which would be sure to raise vexed
questions and stir up difference*. But doubtless
wiser counsels will prevail. It is reported that Mr.
Cleveland le.'t only a small fortune to his family,
and that Mrs. Cleveland will be in need of the
pension of $5,000 a year which Congress will doubt
less vote her in accordance with precedent, but
Mr. Cleveland, in a published statement a few
months ago. setting forth what should be done for
ex-Presidents, stated that his own circumstances
were entirely satisfactory. It seems like the irony
of fate that in honor of a man who sent a sub
stitute to the. war 'The Happy Warrior" should be
his eulogy, chosen at the Instance of those nearest
and dearest to him, no fewer than three persons fix
ing on it as his elegy. But there was another
spoken utterance, besides the reading of this poem
by Dr. van Dyke, which has come to light since
the day of the funeral, namely, that President
Roosevelt called the members of the two Cabinets
of Cleveland together beside his coffin and pro
nounced, with much fervency and eloquence, his
tribute to. McKinlej's predecessor in the White
House.
THE TALLEST SKYSCRAPER.
"Just as the public are admitted to the tall tower
of the Singer Building, which rises 6CTfeet in air,
and the work is approaching completion on the
Metropolitan Life Building, facing Ma.iison Square,
which is 700 feet high, plans have been filed for a
structure to surpass those greatly in dimensions.
The Equitable Life Assurance Society purposes to
erect on the site of its present building In Broad
way, between Pine and Cedar streets, what may
truly be called a gigantic structure. It will cover
r.n entire block, extending back to Nassau strt«t
and tower sixty-two stories In air, the roof to t«
W? feet from the curb and the flagstaff to rise 150
feet more, making a total of 1,058 feet, or 73 feet
higher than the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the tallest ;
human structure. The building is to cost JTO.OQO.rtno j
and the site is estimated to be worth $15,900,000. be
ins, as it is, close to the heart of the financial dls
tri.t of the metropolis. The plans for the structure
are said to have cost 5250.0 M. The main part of the
proposed edifice will be thirty-four stories high,
rising to the height of 459 feet. Above this will b«
a square tower of twenty-eight stories, capped by
a cupola, rising 420 feet. The present Equitable
Building was erected in 1572 and was enlarged and
improved in 18S7. In it stands a statue of Henry B.
Hyde, the founder and first prrsident of the com
pany. The building does not pay more than 4 per
cent on the investment, and it Is hoped to double
this income by the new structure. The filing of
the plan* will prevent any interference with the
work should It be decided by the city authorities
to limit the height of skyscrapers.
"Much progress In neronautlcs Is regarded as
having been made by the record flight of the Zep
pelin airship on the Continent, remaining: in the air
twelve hours and going over nearly all of North
ern Switzerland, carrying fourteen men and being
under perfect control. A distance of 130 miles
was covered. An attempt to remain in flight twen
ty-four hours is soon to be made. A museum in
memory of Thomas Bailey Aldrlch. one of the
most gmceful and versatile of American writers,
has been opened in Portsmouth, N. H.. the scene
of the Hdventurps of "The Story of the Bad Boy."
which Is largely autobiographical. While Harry K.
Thaw has not succeeded In securing a judicial
decision which will kepp him out of an ins-ar.e.
asylum, he has a chance to remain a fortnight
longer in the Dutchess County jail while an effort
is made to get a jury tria! of the question of his
freedom The facilities for subway travel are to
be increased by cutting side doors in the cars, an
experiment which v.as tried In the Brooklyn
Bridge and abandoned.
FUTILE, EFFORTS BY REBELS.
"Mexico and Persia have been in the public eye
by reason of the efforts of rebels to interfere with
government, but little has been accomplished and
affairs are quieting down. The prospect for the
election of General Obaldl-i as second President of
Panama on July 12 is bright in view of the mu
ni'" I ' pal election results.
"Mayor McClellan Is satisfied with the outcome
of the proceedings to secure a recount of the vote,
showing that he was elected by a slightly smaller
plurality than he supposed, and Mr. Hearst has
tens to make public the aesurance that he also is
fully satisfied, the proceedings (which cost him
about $250,000) being simply to assure the purity
of elections. With the schools closed until the
middle of September, teachers and pupils have en
tered on the enjoyment of the long vacation. The
members of the National Education Association
have been discussing many topics In Cleveland.
The death sentence of Harry Orchsni haß been
commuted to life Imprisonment. A record of auto
mobile accidents for the last year in Massachusetts
shows that elxty-two persons were killed and 64*
hurt. It is purposed to make a new national high
BATHING AT DREAMLAND.
way from Washington to Gettysburg, a distance of
■eventy-slx miles, as a memorial of the centennial
of the birth of Abraham Lincoln. The reported
Treasury deficit of 160.000.W0 is more apparent than
real, says Secretary Cortelyou. The title of Bor
ough President Ahearn to his office has been ju
dicially determined In his favor. The magazines
are striving for President Roo«evelt's record of
his African hunting experience*, offering a? much
as fl a word. It la aald. A statue of John A.
Roebitn*. builder of the Brooklyn Bridge, haa
been unveiled In Trenton.
The death record of the week Includes the
names of Joel Chandler Harris, whose "Uncle"
Remus' atories are known the world over; Murat
Halstead. the veteran newspaper man; George H.
Daniels, the widely known railroad man: General
O. S. Batcheller, long sitting on the international
tribunal in E«ypt. and Rear Admiral Charles H.
Rockwell, U. 8. N. (retired)."
SOME QUEER OUTINGS
Suggestions for Novel but Inexpen
sive Vacations.
There is a man now Hvlpc in Washington who
was told, when in middle life, thai he would have
to live out of doore if he hoped to live at all. He
was a government clerk, and as going to the Adi
rondacks or some other camping region would
mean giving up his Income he naturally hesitated.
Then he devised a plan. At that time Washing
ton was a much smaller city than it Is now, and
he was able to secure a lot In the suburbs, not too
far from his office, at a reasonable price. There
were several good sized trees on the lot. ,He did
not grade It and cut down the trees. No; he did
not go to that expense. He simply built a couple
of rooms up among the branches and set up his
Ebenezer in his airy home. The branches went
right through the rooms, and some of them served
for clothes racks and supports for tables and seats.
He was known all over town "as the man who
lived in a tree." He recovered his health, and by
and by he gave up work and moved out into Mary
land and continued to live in a tree, because he
liked it.
Why is It. anyhow, that there is such a fascina
tion about llxihg In a place which was not meant
to be lived in; at least, for a short time? I know
a man who never goes by the Judson Memorial
building that he does not say how he should like
to have a room up In the tower. And we have all
felt the fascination of the boathouse in "David
Copperfield" and the superannuated canalboat in
"Rudder Grange." But did you know that there
is a large and thriving towpath colony that ties up
in winter at Coentles- Slip and Is now plying be
tween here and Buffalo? Some of them, too, go
up the Harlem River and some down in Jersey. A
canalboat can make the round trip to Buffalo, al
lowing time for loading at both ends, in about
twenty-sir days. What is the matter with a party,
of young men or a family crowd hiring a canal
boat and crew and taking a vacation that way'
The Tile Club did It in the 80s. and a very good
time those artists had.
It is very good fun to make up a party of ten
or twenty for a walking trip, with a horse and
wagon along to carry supplies and use in case
of emergencies, making the trip by easy stages.
The principal point to look out for is to have
some one at the head of the expedition who knows
how to manage a crowd of that kind, and also
Bern; guide or other member of the party who
knows the road and the commissary possibilities.
There is another large open air colony In sum
mer at the upper end of Manhattan iFland. living
In tents, cooking camp fashion and enjoying life
hiueely from June to September. Incidentally, this
colony is raising its own vegetables. The settle
ment is part of a plan for helping people in poor
circumstances to take care of themselves. It costs
much le6S to live in that gypsy fashion than to
pay rent for a city apartment.
The trolley vacation is one of the most enjoy
able for a short journey. It is now possible to go
by trolley all over the New England States and
New York State and through some of the most
beautiful and picturesque scenery In the country.
There are. moreover, innumerable delightful excur
sions within a few hours of New York— and It is
possible in that case to get meals at home, which
makes it less expensive and more enjoyable in
many ways. After all, New York is a first class
summer resort In Itself, as increasing numbers of
people from every part of the United States are
finding out. And when, by staying in one's own
clean, comfortable rooms, with all the modern con
veniences, one can have the luxuries of the season,
sea air. theatres and concerts, all the latest lit
erature and home cooking, it really seems as if
the vacation tradition were getting a bit shaky.
The main point in a home vacation, however, is
that it shall be different. The woman who desires
to enjoy such a vacation thoroughly will spend
some extra money on pretty gowns and extra help,
and put away all her bric-a-brac and other worries
and give herself thoroughly to the task of having
a good time.
The man will indulge all his little fads and fan
cies about staying late in bed in the morning,
smoking good cigars and enjoying other small
luxuries. And the chances are that both will have
a more restful time than they would anywhere else
in the world.— Gas Logic.
STUDIO NOTES.
Two pupils of the New York College of Music.
of No. 128 and 130 East 58th street, recently ap
peared at public concerts with marked success —
Miss Karla Kehrweider. at St. Andrews Church.
Brooklyn, and Miss Augusta Weidhardt. at the
concert given by the Actors' Church Alliance at
6t. C'hrysostoms Chapel, New York.
Richard Arnold, vice-president of the New York
Philharmonic Society, will start for Lake Hopat
cong the early part of this month. After spend
ing a few weeks there he will go to Canada, re
turning to New York In September.
Mrß. Kidder-Pierce, pianist, who has a studio
in the Arcade Building. No. 1947 Broadway, is
arranging a series of recitals for the summer to
be given at some of the nearby resorts.
Minnie Crudup Vesey Btates she has had a most
successful season with her programme of South
ern folk songs. Her darky songs, some of
which it is claimed are over a hundred years old.
are said to be most interesting >!'ss Vesey, who
Is a Southerner by birth, has a atuaio in Carnegie
Hall.
Dr N J. Elsenheimer. of No fi22 West 137 th
street, delivered a lecture on "The Art of Pedalling
on the Piano" at the convention of the New York
State Music Teachers' Association, which was held
during the last week at the College of the City of
New York. Dr. Eltenlielmer will remain in the city
during the summer, giving special lessons in piano
coaching, thtory, etc.. at the above addrtes.
John Brody. pianist and teacher, of Carnegie
Hall studio $09, is the author of a book entitled
"Mrs. Featherweight's Musical Moments." It is
on sale at leading music and book stores.
Since John W Nichols's return to the United
Btates he haa been enrolling vocal students and
teachers from all parts of the country. Mr
Nichols's teaching is l>y the method of Jean de
Reszke, with whom he studied in Paris. Mr.
Nichols's studio is at No 1 East 4(>th street.
MOTHERS TOO STARVED TO NURSE
BABIES.
More case* of hot weather complaint among
babies reached the Children's Aid Society during
the week than at any time this year. In one day
tha society* doctors reported twenty-four cases
requiring action. In each case the society sent
a nurse at once to the house and then hurried
the baby to the Health Home at Coney Island
In many Instances the mother was too stnrve.i
to nurse it. Where there are other children
whom the mother cannot leave, the society sends
all children under six with the mother to the
Health Home, girls over six to the Bath Beach
Home and boys over six to the Valhalla School
Farm, or to the society's camp at Stamford.
During the week the society accommodated one
thousand mothers and children at Its fresh air
Institutions. The cost of keeping th*m there Is
borne by subscriptions.
N. Y. U. SUMMER SCHOOL TO OPEN.
The fourteenth summer school of New York
University will b« formally opened at noon to
morrow by Andrew S. Draper, Commissioner of
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ALL WEATMERSSB U 1 I F« HT TABLE SEATS *!.«
THE WORLD'S^IiAIA^rnANDSOMBTCfIORUS
SEATS 4 WEEKS 'N. APVANCX^WWHSBg^^cveNtNbJ AT 9-15
THE GREATEST SHOW EVER PRODUCE D ON "BROADWAY.
-■ - GENERAL ADMISSION. BEATS. _»*•
|| klaw * sjul..noc« .r *** tork theatre er«si?iQS at «.30. M
fflg BEOADWAT * «TH *T "™ ' «"* ' B"*B "* ' " C *ATS. »=>- * Z.li M
HSU
■■one big eSSßßE^Ka iii*"RlJ LAJHH
— . -mT _. j~, W.T "«-*l w-k T» *"* *-i -mr T" 1 f-m THEATRE Broadway ana »->tn »*£-£■
KNICKERBOCKER E-.»TitV»« a' - "•■'■> Matinee Saturday only. 2».
I\l\lC'l\llltt.DVrV/11.1-ll\ al. HATMAN * Proprietor*
HE KNOWS HIS A B Cs. I _, «-»c»«3 v AlirnTrD**
'1 i^'H^ . o "LIMITLESS LAUGHTER
ticn'^Aiii Xl * NDHIS "THE YANKEE
M?' COHAN PRINCE"
"•rrr'US.T ' "up Vndbr"the 'Sa JsF "■'"
P^T^^^ W UNDER THE STARS!
~* JOYOUS mw '-• a -' MM j HENRY W. SAVAGE'S Original Production. _
THE MER.R.Y WIDOW
t,m. , niTEN- OF VIENNESE OPERETTAS. Music by Trans Lehar.
(Die Lusttge Wltwe). QUEEN U( *** ATTDirTIVP THAN FVFI?
' MORE FASCINATING AND _ ATTRACTIVE THAN EVEK.
iiivsrv^ permitted. Refreshments in Delightful Open Air Gardens
New York Theatres or Attractions Directed by
SAM S. i LEE SHUBERT (Inc>.
Evenings 8:15. gr-W W Jl^fil BEGINNING
sa^i 5 HMLIiI Thurs. Eve.
SAM S. & LEE SHI-BERT fine » and LEU
FIELDS offer Their Sw M u>/M^"i?» ■
The Life of Gay New and Folly— A In a M Fu ll
Maxe of Mirth. Melody and Folly — A Stage *uu
of Gayety anl Graf-e. NOW ON SALE- ■
... SEATS NOW OX SALS
■" MMMMMMMMM«aMMI .^.^^^^^^b**™^^ 7"ye* ** 1^
Mr. Jos. M Galtes* Production of
T■ • fjajn^g^FLA a £bmhbl «~ T With
Smartest ■jj i I IL^ CRAWFORD
Magical BLBftjftJfcJ-A-KL^j BESSIE
Comedies. BHWTiWiM HBW^W McCOT.
ONLT PRODUCTION IN NEW YORK SHOWING
THE FAMOUS SHEATH GOWNS.
"nth o*mm ■!■ — ■■ ■-[ ~1 Evenings 9 15
Broadway. \* J '* T^J eat.. 2:15.
A COMEDY TRIUMPH.
CLYDE FITCH'S GREAT FLAY.
HAMMERSTEIN'S
42d St.. B'tray. Every Eve. at 5.15.
W% £% (l% £ MATIN Kf>
MS? I! II |l AS 1M \T
irt B^s-* i" POW N sTAIFS
I 1 %J? %f* ■ >> VI( TORIA
I THEATRE. --V.
GARDEN. I Fui! Roof Bill Bar.
TO-DAY HIT. g£: TO-NIGHT
INTHEATRE (Roof Bill*. t>* THE I ROOF
"the big ALL STAR roof BILL
Sinking To-morrow II h r e^ TT f E
BERNARni. who rhangeß his clothes 4^ek*r
than a woman changes her mini; ABBIE
MITCHELL and her 2."i Students: GERTRUDE
HOFFMAN. COL FRED, the horse with ft hu
man oraln- Rice & Provost. The <> English Rock
fte Chair Girls. Horace Goldln. B^^ini & Arthur.
The 5 Vvolo* 1 -yon & Parker. The Zlngari». Vi?
[ Merry-Go ßound \
V Raymond Hitchcock /
6CMMF.K -^ *100.
BRIOHTOM BEACH PARI/
BEArHEVs' 5 MRSHIP 1 FLK-HT |\
PAIN'S EXTRA GRAND DISPLAY
MMkM ROOF BURDEN ~s&-wl?
Tpvff"f. SOPAT CONCERT TO-SMiHT.
Education for the State of New York. He will de
liver ■ special address to the students of all
departments in the auditorium of the library buiM
ing at that hour. In the afternoon, from 4 to 6.
a reception 'and lawn party will be given by the
faculty to the students on the campus. Registra
tion exceeds that of last year. j
PLANNING PLAYGROUND CONVENTION,
The plans for the play congress and a play festi
val to be held tinier the auspices of the Play
ground Association of America in this city Sep
tember 8 to 12 are rapidly nearin? completion. A
score of executives have informed Dr. Luther Hal
ey Gullet president or the association, of their
intention to have their municipalities represented
hv officers from their departments of parks, health
or education. Governor Hughes will deliver an
address, and the programme already contains the
names of twenty-one speakers prominent in dif
ferent sections of the United States. Groups of
public school children will take part in folk and
festival dances, playground exhibitions and ath
letic contests. Headquarters have been established
at No. 624 Madison avenue. The meetings probably
will be held in the Museum of Natural History.
President Roosevelt is an honorary president of the
society.
RAPID SPREAD OF PLAGUE.
From the Rochester jDemocrat and Chronicle.
The aDPalling spread of the plague since It
ir v* r."i"i ts&V? h&rz
until row cases are found in fifty-three countries
1»r Wvman urg.s an international warfare against
the nla?ue ami especially advocates the extermi
nation of rat" which, with the fleas they carry,
are tSllVved to be the chief cause of the spread
nf t disease Dr. Wyman recommends that all
shins from pliKM .ports be kept at least a quat
tcr of a mile from shore until they have been
freed from rats. There is. of course, no likelihood
that the Scourge will ever obtain such a foothold
in America a/ H has in India, but at the same
time it is a wise policy to use vigorous measures
to keep it out. San Francisco's experience has
demonstrated that even in th»» country U Is cot
easily controlled.
WEDNESDAY MATS. POPULAR BOc-t.SO.
7th MONTH II 4th MONTH
NEW YORK II " CHICAGO
WAGENHALS & KEMPER Present j
By Eugene Walter.
COOLEST THEATRE IN ALL ». Y.
Fre* Vaudeville la Ballroom J^^js^YoS'fßEE
DREAMLAND mnfov.
At All Time* *
Mls» Francis an<i her Darlnr Hone DtT» from thm
» Tower 4 Times daily.
Wm. H. Reynolds. President. Tak» Iron Steamboat*.
STfcEPLE I CONEY ISLAND'S
CHASE I FUNNY PLACE
' A UtCH IS EVERY SPOT.
' A BRACING SAIL IP THE HrDBO.f. '
with flue concerts, on Pay Liners. Leaving West 434
St. 0 and 10 A. M. and 2 P. M. Afternoon Bxc«r»lo«
to West Point. .
The Turf.
I The CONEY ISLAND JOCKEY CLUB I
JUNE .MEETING. SHEEPSHEAD BAT. I
RACING TO-MORROW |
Musical.
■BaTaTil ■■ ■ ■ Summ-r Clam— In th«
981 l 2■■ I 1 R<lS "' !1 Method* of
HIi^JaLLL. Music Study. Vole*.
Ift V? ■■ ■■ ■■ Piano Theory
LOUIS ARTHUR RfSSEtL. Carnegie Hall.
Literature. Results, etc.. an regqest.
FRANK WOELBER. VIOLINIST.
Recital*. Inytrwtlon. Stnfllo. 585 Park »T9.. am* — 1
Maun >l a UAU Director Richard Mansfield's
[/AMUR Li IUN Dramatic School.
Elocution. Voice Culture. Studio. 60 Weit 99th St.
HENRY LIFF ORCHESTR.A
v»n»e*ment M E. Rogers. 69 Irvlns Place. N. T- TeL
3111 Grarrer'-v ' New fork » Favorite and Mo« Popula*
Orchestra. Receptions. Wedding*. Planer.. Balls. »tc. .
DR. CARL E. DUFF,
CONCERT ORATORIO. VOCAL I>STRCCTIO»
1 E 40th -V >. Y. Horn-. 140 It At... Mt. Tm*
STANHOPE-WHEATCROFT
Hclml Summer Term. «7 FIFTH AVERTS.
ARTH WOODRUFF,
Voice* Placing. Breathing. Preparation for Ch«<T.
Concert and Orator*, 5 West 3»th «*.. >ew York.
Summer School Washington. Conn . July. Any.. Bapt.
Brookfield Summer School if Music
Brookfleld Centre. Conn. Send tor Trorgctm.
H. tV. GREENE. »*» Carnetfe Hall. I*. V City.
JAMES SAUVACE.
SINGING IN ALL ITS BKAXCHM.
17 UNION SQCAKB.
LESLEY MARTIN
at**. -TIM *- I^
ORATORIO. CONCERT. KXPERTOIRm, •
KATHEKINE RTTnil VOCAL sail rUS9
ROSE OUilili INSTRUCTION.
The art of Ballad Singing taujrht. Votes trial ;:r.i
11. •••:>- 10 to 1. 4 to «. Studio. ?O* Eat i»tb ML
MRS. KiDDER-PEIRCE
FUao Instruction. Interpretation. Letchctlssky T«ei
ntque Lincoln Arc»d<-. 1947 B'way. &tadt» UT.
6ERRIT SMITH T: fi&»
JOHN W. NICHOLS • v,? - u^
jean D* ReszXe. Special Summer -Course. 1 E. «oth SC
SUSAHHAH iiMUUt'^H^rirsa;
Studio 303. Carnegie Hall.
#»-.„—. CM I MCI I Piano Instruction. "TbaSwlac. *
UcRTAoAUritLL * M.thod 179 W. r«th st
uyr nflDllll vocal rwrßtrcnox. *«**
■ RE* uUnAIII d«-«c Bt»<a». 20* tut in:* «t.
WA.LTER II A C C D T ML'SICAI. DIRECTOR.
il BUB I Repertoire. RecttaU «t
FOLK SONGS A SPECIALTY. •♦* *■•<»•■ At..
SAMUEL I BfILDWIH > Coac R s r =
MINNIE UCOCV Teacher of voice. *South«rn '"'"i*
CRCUCP "tut! children »ong». Camegts H&.L T».
OR. N. J. ELSENHEIMER ga&.S3?5&
• rail HEIMEL Violin Instruction. B»«» n»«»h«*>
JEAN HEI MEL n» *i> * "»* ,
HUBERT ZURMiEOEIII^^S^K:
:8. : :

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