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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, July 05, 1908, Image 5

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"feCAlfjp-FALLS; 25 HURT
Occident at ball game.
bleachers Collapse with 1,500 Per
sons at New Bedford.
__ Bedford, Mass.. July 4.-Flve persons
overely Injured and a score others suf
l£ Siaor hurts by the collapse of a bleacher
*A- N>« England Baseball League ground
?rS the gam* between the New Bedford and
Oliver teams this afternoon. Fifteen hun-
Sd baseball enthusiasts who were on the
SScWr were thrown into a etniwlin* heap
j£aVhe structure grave way. Those taken to
tUe hospital were as follows:
-BOITOU Th«n». . F r Haven: both .boulders
!!j?r nC^^TpS e>rvic vent. New Bedford.
SSOOK. b £;£,,£'Y a( . k imnlr wrenched, contusion* about
*?£ : c£arf«T C^ 'south** Dartmouth; prostrated by
v-*?' KS^fSmB.W "»« tajnrl-. to bark. "
rAIN Sv i H ■«• Bedford; le«s wrenched and bu»
**££■ Venous 'rtock.
A " Uoliday crowd of 4.500 persons, of whom
«y»0 were in the bleachers back of first base,
«re cheering the players in the first inning and
V viiig fla**- when the forward part of the
bleachers bepan to ft** The settling gradually
veciwe more and more noticeable, until it
ed if the whole bleacher was swaying.
* Suddenly the timbers in the centre of the
structure cracked, and with a crash the stand
rave way.
* several physicians who were attending the
rime hastened to the scene of the accident, and
police quickly formed a cordon about that
-Irt of *" c Pounds. The ball players were
on g the first to rush to the assistance of the
r-a^irctricken crowd. Men, women and children
'wight their way out from the fallen timbers,
and many were trampled on.
Final 1 -?'- «ever, order v.a? restored and the
Physicians attended to the injuries of the vic
tjjss. Ambulances took the most seriously in
♦nred to the hospitaL About an hour had
e^psed before the game was completed.
Patrick Connolly, treasurer of the ball club,
« d to-night: "The bleachers and grandstand
were all inspected by Inspector of Buildings
j L. Gibbs not long ago. He told me that they
ver? a.: .-^.'' 5 "
la his excitement and anxiety to save his
etna when he felt the boards giving way. George
Leir.rn:r.ir. of Fall River, picked ip his three
year-old son and tossed him over the heads of
tfce persons in front of him. A man who had
jast leaped to the ground from the bleachers
caught the child, who was uninjured. The
father had his face cut and side wrenched, and
wis taken to his home in a carriage.
TWO BATHERS DROWN.
Coney Island Szcinuners Sink with
Help Near at Hand.
Two Coney Island bathers were drowned eater
4"»y afternoon. Felix Simmons, a porter, thirty
seven years old, employed in a hotel at Neptune ave
nue and West 12th Ftreet, was seized with cramps
while swimming in Coney Island Creek, at West
J2* rtreet, and sank, in spite of the efforts of Pa
trolman Bongard, of the Coney Island station, to
give tim. Bongard plunged overboard in full uni
form, but Simmons sank before he could reach him.
Cornelius Brocken, twelve years old, of No. 273
Franklin avenue, Brooklyn, while bathing in
Cruvrtftnd Bay. at West Sod street, was seised witJt
cr&TT.ps and sar.k before help could reach him.
Both bodies were recovered later and taken to tha
Coney Isiand morgue.
POUE DROWN ON SEBAGO LAKE.
Sailboat Capsized by Squall — Man Saved by
Clinging to Craft.
Portland. Me.. July 4.— Four toune people were
drowned when' a sailboat i:. which they were en-
JoyKP an bating on-Sebaso Lake was capsized by
a squall to-day.
The dead are Margaret Hawkes, twenty years
eld; Gertrude Lowell, twenty years old; Harvey J.
Aquis, txier.ty-f.ve years old, and Benjamin Larra
bee. twenty-nine years old.
All the young peopie were from Windham Center
and had come to tht- lake to attend a picnic.
Gecrje Moses, who was in charge of the boat, saved
fcmself by ciir.ging to the bottom of the craft.
LAD DROWNS. 'PALS" RESCUED.
Ycunpters Set Fire to Their Little Craft
Shooting Crackers.
John Crogin. of No. BN R bates avenue. The
Bronx, was drowned yesterday afternoon in the
East R:ver at Oak Point, while his two com
panions, John Laporte. of No. 579 Robbins avenue.
and Otto Chnstenson, of No. •_ Clinton avenue.
were rescued by K>:n and McGeuarney, of New
York Central Railway barges 44 «'.d 45.
According to the police, the boys were shooting
firecrackers in a rowboat. when there was an ex
plosion and all of their crackers went off at the
*arae lime. They (prase overboard to escape the
fames. Klein and McGeuarney. seeing the boys'
plight, plunged overboard and went to their rescue.
Th«ry rearhe^i Laporte and Christenson. and after
brirjEirig them to shore went back after Crogin.
A« they reached him he sank, ar.d although they
dived repeatedly tor him. could not recover his
body.
HOW DYNAMITE WORKS ON CANAL.
TVstshir.ginn. July i-An illustration of the work
that is b^irg dcrse on the Panama Canal is found
la a report tl a: has juKt reached Washington. At
>"onh HUL in the Baa Pabio district, a discharge
of (Jyr.arr.itfe i«a June 12. amounting to 13 1 i tons,
dislodged BMOO cubic jards of earth and rock, and
on June 20 a discharge of 5.6 tons was fired,
which loosened £J,:»6 cubic yards. The work at
Ean Pabirt is to make a channel SCO feet wide «■
tending through the Chairts River on the south
to the TiibeiTiiila tangent, a distance of 4,600 feet.
WIPE WON
Husband Finally Convinced
Some men aie wise enough to try new food?
*nd beverages and then grenerous enough, to give
others the benefit of their experience.
A very "conservative" Ills, man, however, let
tes good wjfe Snd out for herself what a blessing
Postum is to those who are distressed In many
*Vs. by drinking coffee. The wife writes:
"So slave in chains, it seemed to me, was
owe helpless than I. a coffee captive. Yet
tiwre Vere innumerable warnings— waking from
* troubled Fleep with a feeling of suffocation,
*t times dizzy and out of breath, attacks of
Palpitation of the heart that frightened me.
"Common sense, reason, and my better Judj?
rnent tcM mo that coffee drinking was the
ytajbl*-. a last my nervous system was so dis
*rra a?ed that my physician ordered 'no more
coffee.'
"He knew fc«» was right and he knew I knew
Jt. too. I capitulated. Prior to this our family
fcs-d tried Postum but disliked it. because, as we
k^nifed later, it wa.« not made right.
"Determined thi.« time to give Poatmn a fair
trial, I prepared it according to directions on
~J *** •— is. boiled it 1.1 minutes after
oeujjig commenced, obtaining a dark brown
liquid with a rich enaps>y flavour similar to cof
tlee. When cream and sugar were added. It was
»ot only good but delicious.
Noting i; s b*«npfieial effects in me the rest
v** he family adopted it-all except my hus
band, who would not admit that coffee hurt
Elm. Several weeks elapsed during which I
crank Postum tuo or thn-<» times a day, when,
cM*!l y eur l»ris<\ my husband said: 'I have de
fied to drink Postum. Your Improvement is
PpaT^ Rt ~ you have surh fin * color— that I
En» ' c lo glve *?"** < J lt where Tc-dit is due.' And
"|J •* ar « coffee-slaves no longer."
ifVK « g!ven by postum Co. Battle Creek.
•«r h " ■ ad " The Road to Wellville." in pkgs.
»ner*s a Reason."
DefX ce V eid * h * abov « letter? A new one ap
* «nd fu» of human interest.
AUTO FALLS: SEVEN HURT.
Machine Climbs Bridge Girder and
Turns Turtle.
S«vcn persons were seriously Injured In an auto
mobile accident late on Friday night on th«» Boule
vard bridge across the Central Railroad of New
Jersey tracks near West Sth street. Bayonne.
They are Frank R. Brown, who conducts a garage
at No. 17 East 34th street: his wife, Mr. and Mrs.
Louis Frlcke. of No. 5€ Park avenue, Hoboken;
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Albert and their daughter.
Miss LJUian Albert, of No. 535 Garden street, Ho
boken.
The car climbed up the centre girder about ten
feet and. turning turtle, crashed to the floor of
the bridge. Mr. and Mr?. Brown were pinned be
neath the car. and the others were hurled in dif
ferent directions. Their cries brought several per
sons, and soon half a dozen physicians were en
the scene. AH were hurried in ambulances and
patrol wagons to the City Hospital.
It was found that both of Mrs. Brown's arms
were broken, her face was gashed and her body
cruised. Mr. Brown's face and legs were cut and
his right eye was gashed. Mrs. Fricke suffered a
broken knee cap. and Mrs. Albert and Miss Albert
were cut. Mr. Fricke and Mr. Albert were not
seriously hurt. The automobile was wrecked.
Mr. Brown said the Boulevard lights were out,
,and this the police verified. No lights are burned
on the bridge, and the spot is considered a dan
gerous one by autoists.
EAST RIVER TUBES OPEN.
P. R. R. Tunnels Relieved of Air
Pressure Amid Celebration. .
A Fourth of July celebration took place under
the East River yesterday afternoon, when the
compressed air in tubes C and D of the tunnel
system being built by the Pennsylvania Railroad
Company was shut off, making it possible to walk
the entire distance from Long Island City to and
through Manhattan to the railroad company's
terminal station under ordinary atmospheric press
ure.
Three hundred workmen employed in the tubes
and the officials who participated in this under
river celebration, Including Allen Molr. engineer
In charge of the work, took part In the celebration.
Mr. Mason, resident engineer for the Pennsyl
vania Railroad, having charge of the Manhattan
end of the work, and Mr. Woodard. resident engi
neer for the railroad, in charge of the Long Island
City end of the work; Patrick Ryan, chief as
sistant superintendent,' and Superintendent C. H.
Van Dusen also were present. When the air
pressure was abandoned news of the event was
telegraphed and cabled around the world to engi
neers employed by the Pearson company, the con
tractors, In other parts of the globe, while the
main offices of the Pennsylvania Railroad were
also informed that another stride in the comple
tion of its costly undertakings had been success
fully accomplished.
Both tubes were reported to be absolutely water
tight. There was neither crack nor seam in the
immense iron ring, twenty-three feet in diameter,
which forms the unconcreted wall of the big tubes.
Before the end of another two weeks the com
pressed air also will be taken from tubes A and B.
According to engineers, the largest compressed
air plant ever assembled in the world's history of
tunnel building or mining was brought together
for the building of these four tubes. Within the
next few months it is understood that the com
pressed air will be taken from the North River
tubes, thus making it possible to walk from Long
Island City to New Jersey underground in ordinary
atmospheric pressure. It is understood that the
four East River tubes will be turned over to the
railroad for track laying by the first of the year.
S. L. P. AGAINST HEAEST.
State Convention Declares Movement Has
Alienated Socialists.
The Socialist Labor party held two conventions
in this city yesterday— national and state— but
nominations were not made at either. At to-days
-session of the state convention Robert auhope,
the Socialist writer, wtll probably be named for
Governor.
The rational nominations will be made to
morrow.
At the national convention several hours were
con«umed in discussing a 'minority report of the
committee on party press, submitted by Mr.
O'Neill of Rhode Island, denouncing the way in
which the party press was conducted and recom
mending that Daniel De Leon, the present editor
and founder of the Socialist Labor party, be dis
charged and replaced by a new man.
De Leon defended himself, and the minority re
port was rejected, only O'Neill voting in its favor.
A majority report of the committee, vindicating
De l^on and declaring that the party press had
made a good showing, considering the business de
pression, was then carried.
It was decided that members of the Socialist
Labor party who had to join the American Federa
tion of Labor unions in order to obtain work at
their trades were not necessarily disqualified for
membership in the party, and it was also decided
that while th* Socialist Labor party disapproved
of the principles of the American Federation of
Labor unions it would stand by members of these
unions who were on strike for a bona fide
grievance.
At the convention- one of the delegates present
mmm Robert Hunter, who was mentioned last week
as a possible candidate, but who yesterday de
clared for Mr. Wat. hope.
The report of the state committee will be sub
mitted to-day. It will state that the Hearst move
ment when it started attracted a great many dis
satisfied persons, who were ripe for socialism.
Two years later. it will say. these dissatisfied per
sons had their eyes opened to the Hearst move
ment when the Independence League fused with
Tammany Hall, and they are now joining the So
cialist party.
FRIGHTENED BABY FALLS TO DEATH.
\rthur Garrison, two and a half years old,
frightened by the explosion of a toy pistol cap
while he was standing on the fire escape of ms
father's home, at No. 360 East 67th street, lost
hi« balance yesterday afternoon and fell five stories
to" the courtyard below, fracturing his skull. He
died ten minutes after he was carried into Flower
The father was sitting on the windsow sill beside
the baby and an older brother was standing be
side him on the fire escape, when the toy pistol
cap. which was lying on the stonework or the
window sill, exploded.
OFFERINGS AT THE STORES
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONSULT THE AD
VERTISEMESTS IN TO-DAYS TRIBUNE.
HEAR.V in 14tfi street, west of Fifth avenue,
will begin to-morrow an extensive sale of white
goods and wash dress fabrics at special midsum
mer prices. a feature at thla store during the
week will 'be a. series of morning sales in ail •!••
partments.
BLOOMING DA LBS', at SSth street an.] Third
avenue, announce the annual July mill and fac
tory Mit of drypoods. Princess dresses, taffeta
pongee coats, English Repp suits and many sea
sonable designs in outinK dresses are among the
items of interest. Embroideries and wash laces at
great reductions are also advertised. %
BONWJT, TELLER & CO.. in West 23d street,
«•>-,'.»■ attractive bargains In lingerie waists, prin
cess dresses, smart summer jumper frocks anti
mandarin suits. Automobile c-cr.it* and other gar
ments suitable for outdoor i owner wear are also
to be had there -.-■•■ variety.
THE O'NEILL-ADAMS COMPANY. Sixth ave
nue, M to 22d "street, will begin to-morrow Its
early summer clearance "■• ■■ of women's and
mines' dress*-*, suits and coats, and also the an
nual July sale of furniture. Summer dress silk*
and other reasonable dr*ss materials, in attractive
designs and at reduced figures, mill be shown.
MACY'S, Broadway at Sixth avenue, will offer
rj-^ry aivsatages in their various department* <iur-
XEW-YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, SUNDAY, JULY 5, 1908.
July Sale of Housekeeping Goods
We are offering the following «t»ple merchandise cheaper
than eyer b«for« ecd at les« thau manufacturer*' co»t.
E.NGLEWOOD SHEETS. PEQIOT SHEETS.
Size 34x00.. Value .50.. 5a1e Price .42 ! Size 54if»0 Value 65. bale Pr ; -9 £,
" 63xW) " -58. " " .47 : " «3xiK> .. •«»• .. .. 68
•• 6ii9o:::. :.:::.:. - 73. •• •• .«3 i - 81x90 ; «».
MOHAWK VAIXEY SHEETS. * PILLOW CASE*
Sire 54x90....... Value .55, Sale Price .45 | Size 4.-,x2R Value 12' 5 . Sale Fnce .j J
" 72x»0 " T.-». " " .5» " 50x3« •» „ >{^
"' 81x90 " -83. " - .66 I " 54x36 20.
INITIAL BATH TOWELS, red borders; value 17c 12V 2 c
EXTRA LARGE BATH TOWELS; value 29c 18c
IS-INCH PURE LINEN CRASH, heavy quality; value 12^c, at »C
&4-LNCH FINE BLEACHED LINEN DAMASK; value 69c. at 49c
70-INCH EXTRA HEAVY BLEACHED DAMASK: value $1.10, at....... Toe
FULL SIZE SPREADS, damask patterns; value $1.00, at.. .' "75c
EXTRA HEAVY SPREADS, value $1.50, at 1.00
"CLARENDON" BED SPREADS, extra large; value $1.75, at 1.19
West 125 th St., 7th & Bth Ayes.
TRAIN WBECK KILLS 4
Ten Injured in Collision Near Boon
ville, N. Y.
Boonville, N. V.. July 4.— Northbound passenger
train No. 55 on the Rome, Watertown & Ogdens
burg Railroad was in a head-on collision shortly
after 5:30 o'clock this morning, one and one-half
miles east of Boonville. with a southbound freight
train. No. 90. Four pemns were killed, while eight
or ten were injured. The injured were taken to
Utica.
The list of dead follows:
HAOEMAX, A. TV., of Tti^a. brakeman.
MICHAEL. J. H.. of Edison. fir«man.
O'BRIEN. S. G.. of Utica. engineer.
IUEBER, A., of Utica. engineer.
The list of injured, now at St. Luke's Hospital, is
as follows:
BENNETT. F. W.. of 'Watertown.
rXX'KPTADER. E.. of N>w York.
BXTGHES. George, of Utica.
KEARNEY. J'+n, of Utica.
LIXGE.NFELLER, <". A., of Watertowr.
:--KER. George, of Utica.
O BRLEN, John, of Glenfleld.
SHAFF. C. D., of Watenown.
WITTE. John, of Utica.
WOOD, W. H., of Utica.
The cause of the w»eck has no. been deter
mined. Both trains were regularly scheduled,
and it is thought that there was a misunderstand
1 ing of orders.
The northbound passenger train left L'tica at
4:10 o'clock, drawn by two passenger engines,
owing to the heavy grade. It was made up of
eight cars, five of which were Pullmans. A com
bination smoker and baggage car followed the
engine. It was in this car that most of the in
jured were.
The wreck occurred shortly after the north
bound passenger train had left Boonville. The
impact was terrific. The two passenger engines,
with the weight of the heavy passenger train
behind them, plunged into the freight train, and
the leading passenger and freight engine buckled
up and went plunging over an embankment.
Inside the cars the confusion was terrible.
Passengers were thrown about in their seats, and
the injured were jammed against seats and
against car windows.
George Hughes, of Utica, engineer of the freight
locomotive, was seriously hurt, both arms being
broken. C. D. Shaff, road foreman, of Watertown,
was one of the passengers on the northbound
train, and be received serious injuries. The pas
senger train carried more than the usual com
plement of passengers, owing *to its being a holi
day.
MOORS AND INDIANS FIGHT OVER GIRL
Coney Island High Pressure Hose Called
Into Use to Separate Belligerents.
The romance of a Moor and an Indian girl near
ly resulted in the death of Shaib, one of thf Mo_
roccan brigands with Hassan Ben A.i at Dream
land, Coney Island, when for an hour yesterday
Moors and Indians fought until employes parted
them by using the high pressure hose.
Treble has been brewing ever since Shaib and
Sunrise, the daughter of Black Hawk, who is chief
of the Sioux Indian camp, became acquainted, ani.
through interpreters, carried on conversations. Al
though tho Moor and the Indian girl often left
r>ream!and together, they were unable to converse
without the aid of an interpreter, though they
used signs to convey affectionate thoughts.
Shaib and Sunrise were conversing through the
medium of <"ailos and Hassan Ben AU yesterday,
when Black Hawk and his followers appeared. The
Indian leaped at the Moor, and, as both sides soon
had reinforcements, the battle became general.
Aft*-r the fire hose had been used Black Hawk
carried Sunrise to camp.
STOLEN JEWELRY CAME BACK AGAIN.
Los Angeles. July 4. — E. C. Converse, a wealthy
resident of Pittsburg. reported to the authorities
last nighr that during his absence at dinner hta
room at the. Hotel Hollywood, at Hollywood, had
been entered an.l a vnlise containing Jewel ry
valued at. 110.906 had been removed By the time
officers from the city reached the scene the stolen
property had been replaced. Converse's father Is
a director of the United States Steel Corporation
and an officer of various banks in the East.
TOTS' BAIL BUREAU OPENED.
The new bail bureau In the rooms of th* Chil
dren's Society, 23d street and Fourth avenue, was
opened yesterday in charge of Lieutenant William
H. Ward. It will remain open on week days from
4 p. m. until midnight, and on Sundays and holi
days from noon until midnight. The bureau was
the joint idea of Superintendent Jenkins, of the
society, and Commissioner Bingham, and was es
tablished to save bother and trouble for station
lieutenants and parents of children. Shortly after
I o'clock the first prisoner was brought in, in the
person of Samuel Bremer, fourteen years old, of
No. 68 Wiilctt street, who was arrested for firing
off a pistol in th- street. Yesterday was his birth
day, in addition to being the nation's, and he Just
could not help celebrating. He was balled out by
i.is father.
In* the week. A feature will be the sale of men's
shirts and of women's silk dresses. Other items
of interest will be the sales of bathing suits, misses'
"tub" dresses, waists in great variety of material
and colorings and silk petticoats.
ABRAHAM & STRAUS, in Fulton street. Brook
lyn, announce the July clearance sale of custom
tailoring, and will make a feature of this men's de
partment, beginning to-morrow. They also wili
, ff. r bargains in dress materials and women's
hosiery.
ARNOLD. CONSTABLE & CO., Broadway and
IKb street, will offer during the week unmade
piqu* robes and- light weight summer silks in
foulards, ponseea and other materials. Lingerie
waists, suits, coats and skirts are also advertised.
STERN BROTHERS, in West 23d street, have
made a special purchase of women's white and
colored waists, which they will offer during the
week. Bathing suits. Irish. Scotch and German
linens at great reductions and a sale of women's
shoes ire other notable shopping advantages at
this •■ire.
LORD & TAYLOR, at their stores at Broadway
and 20th etreet and Fifth avenue and ISth. street.
will offer •* compute line of footwear for womea,
children *r.d men, and many special offerings in
hosiery
DIVES OFF HIGH BRIDGE.
Hundreds See Man End Life by
Plunge Into Speedway.
In view of more than three hundred persons
an unidentified man jumped from High Bridge
to the Speedway below at 2 o'clock yesterday
afternoon. Nearly every bone in his body was
broken and death followed instantly. Nothing
was found in the man's possession which could
help identify him. The body was taken to the
Harlem Morgrue.
The man attracted attention by talking to
himself. Suddenly, when no one was near him,
he climbed up on the railing and with a wild
scream plunged forward. In the fall of about
115 feet the man's body turned over several
times, falling in the road Just in the rear of a
runabout, driven by a man. The police believe
that the man was homeless and out of employ
ment. He was about thirty-eight years old, 5
feet T inches tall and weighed about 150 pounds.
He had dark hair, blue eyes and was clean
shaven, and wore a black coat, vest and trous
ers, blue outing shirt, black socks and a straw
hat.
MARINE INTELLIGENCE.
MINIATURE ALMANAC.
Sun rises 4:35,5 un sets 7:33;M00n rises 11:42, Moon's *ge 7
HIGH WATER.
A.M.— Sandy Hook 11*7 1 Gov Island 'H*U Gate
P.M.— Sandy Hook ll:s2iGcv Island 12:21^6-1 Gate 2:14
t I
WIRELESS REPORTS.
The Minnetonka. which was 6*) miles east of Sandy
Hook at 1 p m yesterday, is expected at her dock, about
7:30 to-morrow morning:.
The Vaderland. reported 717 miles east of Sandy Hook
at nocn yesterday, will probably dock about 3pm to
morrow.
INCOMING STEAMERS.
TO-DAY.
Vessel. From Line.
•Segruranca ... Santiago. June 29—.. ._ Ward
•Trinidad Bermuda, July 2 Quebec
•Verde Barbados, June 27 Lamp & Holt
•Carolina San Juan. July 1 N" T & P R
iloltke Naples. June 22 Hamb-Am
Calabria ._. Gibraltar, June 23 Anchor
Wofflindo Hamburg, June 24
City of Savannah . Savannah. July 2.- Savannah
Algonquin Jacksonville, July 2 Clyde
MONDAY, JULY 8.
•Madeirense Para, June 24 Booth
•Maracaibo Curacao, June 2S Red • > D"
•Saramacca Barbados. Juno 20 D W I
Mtnn^tnnlta .„. ..London, June 27 Atl Trans
Vaderland Antwerp, June 27 Red Star
R-T'iam Rotterdam. June 27 Holland-Am
City of Everett Barry. June 20
Proteus.. — New Orleans, July 1 So Pacific
TUESDAY, JULY 7.
•Kronprinz TYllhelm. Bremen, June 30 N G Lloyd
•Flnanc Colon, July 1 Panama.
•Saratoga. Havana. July 4 — Ward
Grosser Kurt first . . . Bremen, June 27 —. . X G Lloyd
Carpathia Gibraltar. June 27 Cunard
Denver Gaiveston. July 1..... Mallory
•Brings mail.
OUTGOING STEAMERS.
. TO-MORROW.
Vessel
Vessel. For. - Line. Mail closes. sails.
Coppename. Paramaribo. D W I. . . . 11:00 a m I :f>o p m
Jefferson. Norfolk, Old Dominion 3;oopm
TUESDAY, JULY 7.
X --zpssln Cecille, Bremen, N G Lloyd 6:30 am 10:00 a. m
Korona, Martinique, Quebec 3:30 am 12:00 m
Imogen, Argentina, Norton 11:00 am 1:00 pm
Huron. Jacksonville. Clyde 3:00 p m
City of Savannah, Savannah. Savannah 3.00 pm
WEDNESDAY. JULY 8.
Lucania Liverpool. Cunard 6:30 a m 10-00 a m
Teutonic Southampton. White Star.. «:30 a m 10:0O a m
Aurora. Curacoa, Red D B :3J> a m UK*) m
T de Larrinaira. Argentina -.. 8:00 am 12. n0 m
Maraval. Grenada. Trinidad 10 ;(T0 a m 12:06 m
P E FTiedrich. Haiti, Hamb-Am n.Wam 1 .00 prn
Hvades. Argentina ll:O'am Ino p m
Alllanca. Colon. Panama ,M£?* m |$ g £
New Amsterdam. island Clyde ......12:00m 1- 00 m m
New Amsterdam. Rotterdam Hol-Ara h^>m
San Marcos. Gaiveston. Mallory U.OOm
TRANSPACIFIC MAILS.
Destination and steamer Close In New York.
Hawaii. Japan. Cored, china and Philip
pine IBlands-<vla San Francisco,—
H<,n»- ICons Maru ■ New " Zealand/ July 0,0.3«pia
Auit "la X (« cept Vt> New Zealand
Samoan Islands. Fiji Islands and New
Caledonia— (via Vancouver and 1 lc- . -„ «.«jom
torla, B O Marama . .July l*, 6.30 p m
Hawaii. Japan. Corea, China and Philip-
Co""* W "^^*. • ** ■ ■ ••"" ~ July 18. 6:30 m
Tahiti an'd"Marqu»sa9 Islands— (via San .„ nr n
Francisco)— Au». 1.6.30 pa
SHIPPING NEWS.
Port of New York, Saturday, July 4, 1908.
ARRIVED.
Steamer Delaware. French. Philadelphia, to th» Clyde
Ss Co with mdse. Passed in Quarantine at 12:15 p m.
' Steamer La Touraine (Frl. TourPette, Havre June 27.
to the '.'ompagtile Generale Transatlantlque. with 161
cabin and - " steerage passengers, malls and rndse. Ar
rived at the Bar .it 8:12 a m. g
Steamer Hawaiian. Sw.-etser. Puerto Mexico June 19
via Philadelphia July 3. to the American-Hawaiian S3
Co with m.lre. Arrived at th- Bar at ■ a m.
Steamer Calabria <Br>. Coverly, Lpghorn June 13.
Naples 17 and Palermo 13, to Henderson Brothers, with
passengers and m.lsr Outside the Bar at B:4S pm.
Steamer Moltke (Ger), Dempwolf. Genoa June 21 and
Naples 22. to the Hamburg-American Line with pa»
-e:iK»rs and mdse. East of Fire Island at 8:35 pm.
Steamer Madeirense (Br). Por.tet. Para June 24. to the
Booth Ss Co with mdse. Pa««d In Sandy Rook 820 r 1 m.
Steamer Jefferson. Dole, Newport News and Norfolk,
to the Old Dominion Ss Co, with passengers and mdse.
Left Quarantine at 2:40 p m.
earner New York. Roberts. Southampton and Cher
bourg June 27. to the American Line, with I+s cabin
and 07 steerage passengers, mai'.s and rndse. Arrived at
the Bar at 3:24 p m. ,
Steamer Satilla. Mason. Brunswick, to the- Brunswick
Ss Co with mdse. Left Quarantine at ." "•< p m.
Steamer Verdi ♦Rr). Byrne. Rio de Janeiro May 1?,
Buenos Ayres June 10. Santos !ri. Bahla 27 in I Bar
bados 29. to Busk & Jevons. with 102 passengers, mails
and mdsi. Arrived at the Bar at A p m. *
Steamer Yale. Grove. Boston, to the Metropolitan Ss C*.
with passengers and mdse. Passed in Quarantire at
8:20 a m. _ .
Steamer Lucanla (Br). Warr. Liverpool June 27 and
Queenstown » to the Cunard Ss Cn. with 27S cabin and
22!t steerage passengers, mails ana BMM Arrived at the
Bar at 1:30 a m. .' ' ■- '■■■ -'"
Steamer Monterey. Smith. Vera Cruz June 25. Pro
rr^so 27 and Havana 30. to the New York and Cuba
Mall Ss Co. with i»4 passengers, malls and mdse. Ar
rived at -the Bar at 12:40 am.
Steamer Aurora (Nor). Chri»topher»en, iUracalbo June
22, curacao 23 and Porto cabello 25. to Boulton. Bliss
& Dallett with m.if.-. Arrived at th*- Bar at midnight. 3d
Steam«r San Marcos. Teuo«, .;*h>-st..n June 27. to the
Mallorj .. c s i^o. with passengers and aadaa. Left Quar
antine at 6:37 a m-
SAILED.
Steamer* Minneapolis (Mr). I-ondon; Pretoria (Gen,
Hamburg via Plymouth and Cherbourg; Frutera (Nor).
Belize Puerto Barrios, etc; St Leoaarde (Bri. Antwerp;
El iMd Gaiveston: 'olumbla (Br>. Glasgow via Movllle;
Etrurla (Br». Liverpool via QxitWl Finland. Ant
wern via Dover- SI Paul, Southampton via Plymouth and
Cherbourg; Koenlgln Lota "'•"■> Naples. Genoa, etc;
Arapuhoe Charleston and Jacksonville: Prim Joachim
roer. Kingston. etc; Havana Havana: Mmniis New Or
leans' Philadelphia. San Juan: Concho. Key "Rest and
Galv«Mon; Chesapeake. Baltimore; "*"i Juan. Ponce,
Ouanlco. etc; In.lral^ma (Hr». Melbourne. Sydney, etc;
Hkarrtes ,Bn Shanghai, "to: ' »'■ ■■ Memphis. Savan
nah; Hamilton. Norfolk and Newport News.
STEAMERS AT FOREIGN PORTS.
ARKI\ EL>
JLiM-Jo July I— Comertc. «Br). New York via La Plau.
Gen % July 2— Elite (Ger). New Yorli vU Newport
3e» N «"a*n« July 4— Baron Pllwpj. <ja>. New York via
Xt Vincent C V Sabangr. Cheroei et- 1
6ue^ July 4-SaV.uin* {&>. Yokohama, Hicffo, etc.. Su
S. Altaian $c (to.
WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S GARMENTS. MEN'S FURNISHINGS
AND MANY ARTICLES OF HOUSEHOLD UTILITY.
ADAPTED FOR CITY OR COUNTRY HOMES,
AT PRICES LOWER THAN USUAL.
ORDERS RECEIVED FOR FINE DECORATIVE WORK
FOR NEXT AUTUMN
DESIGNS AND MATERIALS SHOWN FOR WINDOW DRAPERIES.
■ WALL AND FURNITURE COVERING, AND INTERIOR
HANGINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION;
ALSO FOR FLOOR COVERINGS AS WELL AS GENERAL
,i DECORATIVE SCHEMES FOR ENTIRE INTERIORS.
ESTIMATES SUBMITTED.
A SPECIAL SALE OF
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S MUSLIN DRESSES
WILL BE HELD TO-MORROW (MONDAY). AT THE FOL
LOWING LOW PRICES:
MISSES' GINGHAM AND LAWN DRESSES . ' . $3.50
MISSES' WHITE LAWN DRESSES . „ • "* - 7.30
CHILDREN'S WHITE LAWN AND COLORED MADRAS DRESSES 95c
CHILDREN'S WHITE AND COLORED LAWN. DIMITY AND
GINGHAM DRESSES M - - $1.90, 2.25 & 3.75
■ MM
WOMEN'S GOWNS MADE TO ORDER
. OF SUPERIOR QUALITY MATERIALS AND WORKMANSHIP.
SILK DRESSES . $62. $68, $75 AND UPWARD
TAILOR-MADE GOWNS $58. $65, $75 " *
A NUMBER OF WOMEN'S GOWNS. READY FOR IMMEDIATE
DELIVERY, AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
1 (DRESSMAKING -OTD TAILORING ROOMS)
r:i3iJ. ' 3 *!
A SALE OF WOMEN'S & MISSES' TRIMMED HATS
T IN SIMPLE STYLES. ADAPTED FOR IMMEDIATE WEAR. <\
$•1 WILL BE HELD TO-MORROW (MONDAY) , . t J^'.
AT THE SPECIAL PRICE OF . - T - $4.75 r-ACHr -ACH
(FIRST FLOOR) '~:
A SALE OF HANDKERCHIEFS TO-MORROW ..MONDAY)
WOMEN'S HEMSTITCHED LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS. ""* '
USUALLY $2.50 & $3.50 PER DOZEN . AT $1.50 & 230
WOMEN'S INITIALED LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS.
USUALLY $1.50 PER DOZEN . - . AT $1.00
WOMEN'S SHAMROCK CLOTH HANDKERCHIEFS. SELF -PLAID
EFFECTS.
USUALLY $3.00 PER DOZEN ' . - . • AT $135
MEN'S HEMSTITCHED LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS,
USUALLY $3.00 PER DOZEN . . . AT $1.50
MEN'S INITIALED LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS.
USUALLY $2.50 PER DOZEN. . . . . . AT $1.85
m
#
MOURNING OUTFITS FOR WOMEN AND MISSES. INCLUDING
GOWNS. WRAPS. HATS, VEILS. GLOVES AND
SIMILAR REQUISITES.
GARMENTS MADE TO ORDER OR ALTERED AT VERY
SHORT NOTICE.
MEN'S MOURNING NECKWEAR. GLOVES. HANDKERCHIEFS. ETC..
SUPPLIED.
MOURNING STATIONERY EXECUTED UPON SHORT NOTICE.
%
34th £tmt. 35tir £tmt anb sth At»nu*. si'rm f nrk.
ptLL REPORTS of the
Grand Prix
Will be cabled THE TRIBUNE by the Great
American Driver.
LOUIS STRANG,
Winner of the Savannah and Briarcliff Races.
HEAT) THE T*R IBV JV E
n ju,y Ne 4-Ca7manU (Br>. New Tor for Uv-
L^.SW U^^Ara^ r W^wS,r, vU Queens
town; Oeor«l,- .Br.. New York.
Antwerp. July 3— Mohawk -Br>. New Tork.
Plymou'h July *— Philadelphia. New Ynrk for Cherbourg
and Southampton. saIUKD
Antwerp. July 4-Z*«laa<l ißr). New York vU Dover.
London. July 4-Mesaba «Br). New \ork.
iitwerp. J^J 3-!* Ha***« &*+ ■ N#. Tort.
TrtntdaJ. July I— Crown of Navarre (Br). New Tart.
Copenhagen. July 2— % F Tletgun »Din). N«w T-«i%.
Movtlle. July 4— Calll&mia (Bri (from niiseje 1 1 ma
York.
Havre. July ii — L* Brttafne »Fr>. New Tee*.
Southampton. July — St Louti New Tack *t* Chertwu-.
Patra*. June 27— Alice (Aunt) (from Trteete). Vow Tart
Libia. Jane 29 — Eatoaia iXumi. New T^ak «ta lettej
dam.
fAS*«D
Gibraltar July ♦— UltonU «•»». Ron He, for Sew Tor*.
But: of Lewis. Ju:> *-*«••< OUv iVv*\ Hew \ack tat
efcrntmjgta
'•

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