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New-York tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, December 31, 1910, Image 9

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1910-12-31/ed-1/seq-9/

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Of interest to 'cOomen
MB OF FUSSKSS
Follows the Use of Several
Materials in One Gown.
XCitb th* sioJ) Tr!nflo '"" 5 11 "-'- ri S or, an air
,{ '«.'.'_ .- brightness and cayety. the
* Ur-T?U r-T? Of the woman who Is least in
sned"to inquire Into the f\:'>\:re must per-
L'rc« turn toward the probabilities cf the
-•"ir.g spring modes. It is said there will
£" : radical change, but this is something
&*: the most ignorant in matters of fash
i aUM fafely say before each new sea-
r \. for distinct alteration? in the prevail-
EVENING GOWNS SHOWING TWO DISTINCT MODES OF USING
TRANSPARENT VEILINGS.
toe style cf dress usually appear only as
the result of a gradual process of develop
ment.
One of the things about .which there is at
X-r«;5-«>nt much uncertainty is the extent to
■which transparent veilings will be used in
new frocks, although the effects to be ob
tained by their use are so beautiful that a
continuance for some time to come of a
mere or less absolute reign seems assured
to UMBB. It is true there are dangers in
tie p&th of those who build gowns In
trWeh BNM veilings have a part, and one
to be especially guardt-d against Is the
fussiness that sometimes comes from the
us* of several materials in a single gar
ment. There is most need of care regard-
Ing this point when one is utilizing rem
nants that happen to be on hand, but
■baa this care is given most artistic re
mits may be obtained.
The hat town illustrated to-day is rec
eniseiided as f model to the woman who
has a lace Om r. m she wishes to redeem
from a useless existence— a flounce that Is
so: deep enough for an entire skirt. Net
or Baa may be used at the top of the
cvtrskirt to eke out the length, and the
lever edge of the lace is relieved against
a band of velvet In a contrasting color. A
band c? the tame velvet, points of lace
End some of the supplementary material of
the overskirt form the corsage.
In the second gown shewn a charmingly
rlmple effect is produced by having the
veiling th- same length a? the foundation,
a method that may profitably be employed
by any who need to make the most of
every hair's breadth of height they possess.
EEGEET PRESIDENT'S DECISION
Wcmen Hoped He Would Heed Pro
test Against Utah's Silver Service.
Neither the President of the l"n:teel States
nor the Navy Department v.ill interfere- in
tte matter of the engraving of the silver
ten- C to be presented to the United States
battleship Utah by the State of Utah.
v.hjch. it Is alleged, will contain pictures
cl Lr:r!-am Youns. the first Governor or
B-BBL. and the Mormon Temple.
Mrs. llßaa dimming Story, president
C the Woman's Republican Club and of the
Manhattan Chapter of the Daughters ot
the American Revolution, both of v.-hich
Jo nf-d in the protect, said last night that
cte had no comment to make on the de
cision beyond the fact that she regretted lL
Ehe added that it was on the ground that
Ifcflgtaa-a Young was a polygamiEt— not oe
<*use he was a rebel— that the organiza
ticr which -he represents had protested
«€Bjnet his portrait en the silver service.
SOXC-S TO RISE ABOVE FENCE
Singing School Projected at Votes-for- j
Women Headquarters in 34th Street. I
if the persons who erected the fence to ;
•tat off their bOOM from Mrs. O. EL P. i
ZtkncaVs votes- for- women headquarters, i
« 80. IM East Z.V.: street, have no more j
•oal lor music tVan they. have for suffrage, |
<•>•» will be wanting to make the fence !
b&bcr and thicker. There is going to be \
£ iteming school at the headquarters every j
nirht. and everybody under i
13* age of sixteen is Imilißl to join, and ■
nothing Is said in the invitation about a j
**fae being necessary. '
■ Mi -i*. Ganlner-Barilett. director an) !
teacher, will look out for that. Choruses, ',
tf-e announcement says, will be formed for '
tinging a.l kinds of music." ■
Ifcße. Nordica is taking an interest in ;
*he ticking school, and wilL-ifive some time I
*• St. Another of Mmc". Xordica's ccntrlbu- |
"Cas x o suffrage is her consent to be the |
■^^■faer of the Artists* Musical Branch j
<tf the Political Equality Association, whicn :
■i* about to be formed. »
TO AVOID MISTAKES.
T. avoid mistakes with poison bottler. j
taj-s "I :.t Woman's Home Companion," j
r an common pins upward through the j
torks, allowing the points to project be- j
JCfcS them. Such 1,. lea will not be picked
2 P Ly •_...... in the dark.
Chopped gro^n and red peppers, with a I
|Mc raineed parsley, make ■■ effective ■
*4<UtioT. to a white sauce for **■
tXCELSIUR-NAPLES ii^-l
READY TO WOVE ON ALBANY
Suffragists Have Bill Which Will
Be Introduced at Once.
The Legislature of the State of New Tcrk
convenes next Wednesday, and the legis
lators needn't worry for fear of being lone
some for suffragists— the'^uflragists will be
v.^hx there. Many members of the legisla
tive conimittee of the Equal Franchise So
ciety, including Mrs. Harriot Stanton
Blatch, the chairman, ere going- up in re
lays, beginning on Monday, to lobby for
their bill.
The suffragists are feeling Quite perky
over the fact that for the first time in the
history of the state a woman suffrage bill
is to be introduced on the opening day of
the session. At the auspicious hour of
high noon en Wednesday Senator Newcomb
will ari.-e in his place and offer the meas
ure to strike the word "male " from the
constitution— but not the same old measure
offered at former sessions. During the last
twelve months the suffragists, aided by
several perfectly gcod lawyers, have labored
at the document, until everything the "an
tis" called unconstitutional is expunged. At
least, the suffragists fondly hope so.
The objection mode to the former measure
was that it would permit the wife of an
alien to vote by right of the citizenship
conferred by her husband's naturalization,
though she might be quite devoid of the
quallficatirns reo-.'ired for citizenship. A
clause iii the new bill guards against this.
The phrase "every male citizen of the
age of twer,ty-one years" in Section 1.
Article II of the constitution will read, if
this bill becomes a law, "every citizen as
hereinafter provided, of the age cf twenty
one years"— and the "hereinafter provided "
is as follows:
"The foregoing provisions of this section
shall not apply to a female whose citizen
ship is derived solely by marriage with a
citizen ard who does not possess like
qualifications as axe required by law to
entitle an alien male person to become a
citizen.
"The Legislature shall by law provide
ten manner in which such qualifications of
6uch female citizen shall be ascertained.
No other or further qualifications of such
citizen Fhall be required than are required
of a male alien to become a citizen."
The bill will be introduced in the Assem
bly by a Democrat, but the Democrat is
not yet fixed upon. He will be; and if
every legislator. Democrat and Republican,
is not convinced of the virtues of that new
suffrage tiil by high noon on VTedTiesday
it will not be the fault of .Mrs. Blatch,
Mrs John Winters Brannan, Mrs. EL \V.
Graham. Mrs. M. S Barger or any of the
other women who are going to Albany.
Fetus of the MarKets
Trade Dull This Week.
TTachir.gto-T Market is suffering from the
Inevitable reaction after the briskness of
the holidays, and trade is uniformly dull
: there this week.
i Fish in pfneral are down in price this
< week end. Smelts have dropped to the more
■ norn figure of 35 and 20 cents a pound;
I Spanish mackerel ore'cnly 18 cent? a pound,
j fillet of sole and seabass are also IS cents,
| halibut steaks are 20 cents, haddock and
; English whiting are 12 cents, and flounders
; and fr'istfish are 10 cents a pound. White
fish and yellow pike .-ire 25 cents a pound
i and yellow perch are 15 .cents a pound. Lob
j eters continue at SO cents a pound and
j scallops at 75 cents a quart Hard shell
j crabs are 5} cents a dozen.
i South African Fruit In.
; The South African fruit has at last made
| its appearance, but the first consignments
' now beh g shown do m reach the standard
iof last season. South African peaches are
; selling for SG a dozen and apricots «ire $3 a
: dozen. Extra large persimmons are 12 a
j cioztn. tangerines are 40 cents a dozen and
jkumouata are 30 cents a till. Mangoes are
ii, cents «?ach. grapefruit are 20 cents, alli
i gator penrs arc £3 cents each end straw
! berry pines are 40 cents each. French figs
j art; ."j cents a dozen. Concord. Malaga and
; emperor grapes are all 23 cents a pound.
Mission and Florida navel oranges are $1
* a dozen and seedless Florida are CO cents a
[dozen. Anjou pears, winter Xel'is and !-":»s
jter trinities are $2 a dozen; Cornice and De
Karri pears are Jl 50 a dozen. itzonf a
'apples and Nov. town pippins are SI a dozen,
I Roman beauties are $2 a dozen, winter ban
i oiia "apples «re 50 cents a dozen, lady ap
' plea are 41) cents a dozen and mammoth Ore
gam apples are SI cents a basket.
New Supply of Endive.
I A new supply of endive which is being
: shown at the vegetable stalls is 25 cents a
! pound. Cauliflowers are 15 and 20 cents
each fcr Caliicrnian and 25 cents for
I French. Peas and beans are 60 and 75 cents
a ouari. Bermuda potatoes ate 8 cents a
quart and sweet potatoes are 15 cents p.
; cm. art; new carrots are 0 pants a bunch an'l
; hothouse tomatoes are 40 cents a basket.
Two heads of Bermuda romalne El 25
cents, cranberries are ,35 cents for two
: quarts. mushrooms are "• to 75 cents a
■ -".ound. and lettuces are 10 and 15 cents a
!>cad. Oyster plant and knob celery are 10
Jcttus a■— Brussels sprouts are 15 cents
i\EW-YORK DAILY TRTBrrSTE, SATURDAY DECE^IBER 31, 1910.
CATS GET NEW RIBBONS
Prizes Awarded at the Garden —
Poultry Show Closes To-day.
"Thank goodness, that's over," mewed
two hundred and fifty-one cats as ,the doors
of the concert hall at Madison Square
Garden closed on the eighth annual show
of the Atlantic Cat Club at half past ten
o'clock last evening.
The four thousand chickens in the ad
joining poultry show shook their combs
sorrowfully, r.ot that they regret parting
with ihe cats, but they don't see why they
Ktevld have to remain on duty a whole
clay longer.
Tho poultry show doepr.'t close until to
night. But for some of the cats the wind
tip of this show doesn't mean private lif*
by any means.
There were cats there that spend their
li\ es tiavelling from cue exhibition to an
other in different parts cf the country. Mrs.
I". P. McCoun's champion Chiraz, for in
stance, rsclincd in a cage lined with rib
benr won from far an 1 near. Champion
Chiraz was not entered for com: utit.on
this time, end his travels may be over.
Ui;like some prima donnas, he knows when
to stop.
The final sifting cut of cats for special
avanis occurred yesterday, and it was de
cided that Mrs. D. Connolly had the best
cat in the show. Mis? Shirley Turner had
the best novice — Siegfried, a blue male —
Mrs. J. C. IVfichelson had the best female,
and Mrs. C. W. Chapin had the best kitten.
Many other awards were made, and re
ceived with amity by the women, tr.cugh. a
few blue, brown and grey eyes were ob
served to take on a greenish tint-
Judging by yesterday's crowds, the cat
show ami the chicken show could go on
fci a week and stilt be a centre of interest.
As an Englishman said yesterday, after
tailing in the chicken show with its
tbronged aisles. "Bah Jove. I didn't sup
pose, y'know, thai New York had euch
rural taste."
ROOM DEN
THE BEL
A Combination That Need Not
. Be at All Uncomfortable.
The average city apartment, in its ar
rangement of rooms, has a little nook or
den off the living room, or perhaps across
from the fining room, -which the house
keeper finds it necessary to use as a guest,
room. Just how to make this little abode
appear attractive in appearance and at the
same time have the comforts ana con
veniences of a bed room is frequently a
puzzle, but there is a young housekeeper
up in Riverside who thinks she has solved
the problem.
In setting her apartment to rights she
was confronted with an upright piano
which she didn't care to have in her living
room, so it had to go into the den and
guest chamber combination. She placed it
slightly out from the wall, near the further
corner, and across the back she had a
wooden strip fitted with hooks and coat
hangers. This proved the best sort of tem
porary closet for the week-end guest.
The bed problem in a medium sized apart
ment is always a serious one. This young
woman had a wide box couch made and
covered with a pretty pink chintz. It had
a top of the best hair, making it altogether
a thoroughly comfortable bed. It is
naturally every housekeeper's ambition to
have her guest room appointments of the
very daintiest, but city people of limited
incomes must forego much. As there is
no quaint little mahogany forr-poster to
dress up. the pink couch has the softest
ncnogramed pink blankets, an exquisite
rose-sprigged silk comforter filled with
eiderdown and pretty embroidered sheets
rn<i pilow cases, which repose by day in the
vk>let scented box, while the couch is
covered with an artistic spread of a for
eign print, in rich tans and browns show
ing conventional designs. A row of four
laree square pillows in cases of heavy
brown linen are arranged against the wall
ami the bed is dressed for society. Two of
the brown covers nre fastened with patent
snappers, and are easily removed at night,
when the white covers are slipped on over
{he pink chintz affairs which match the
couch.
The dressing table question was equally
puzzling, but it was solved by means of
a little mahogany desk, which continued to
serve Its original purpose, although the
upper port was used for the toilet articles,
while a dear little Colonial mirror was him
ovpr it Later the toilet accessories found
a handy place in an attractive low brown
basket which the hostess had arranged on
the nearby radiator, which, by the way, had
a stained wood board over it, making a
°Tre r^om' space r.llowed a desk, chair and
8 •Tmall rocker, so with a rack of books and
a high brass candlestick on the piano and
several foreign photographs framed in
bior-.1 brown frames on the wall, tßfl little
nook is not only comfortable and con
venient, but attractive as well.
ORANGE FRITTERS.
Florida oranges, which are just coming
into season, are the best for orange frit
ters. The following rule is recommended
by a high culinary authority: Peel the
oranges and cut them in thin slices. Di
vide each slice in half, dip it into a
fritter tatter and fry in smoking hot fat.
After frying and draining dip each fritter
in powdered sugai . For the ba Ia r put a
cUDful Of flour into a bowl, mix with it the
yoG Of a raw egg. a level tea ? roonrul of
Inowh water to make a batter that will
not "run/ Just before using the batter
? p i t Ve vhlte of an egg to a stiff froth
an* mix it lightly with the batter.
a b^x. ani twelve-stalked heads of celery
are $1 each.
Eirtter Is 26 cents a pound r.nd sweet but
ter Is 40 cents; e?gs are still 42 cents a
dozen.
Lamb Down a Little.
Veal shows no lowering in price, but lamb
has gone down a Little. Hindquarters and
legs of lamb ere 1C cents a pound, fore
quarters aro 14 cents and lamb chops are
22 cents a pound. Top sirloin Steak nnd
,;, ;O t roast are IS cents a pound and porter
house steak is 25 cents a pound. Veal cut
leta are 32 cents a pound, -houlders of veal
are 16 cents a pound and calves liver ia So
cents a pound. Fresh ham Is IS cents a
pound, smoked ham is 20 cents, smoked
tongue is IS cents a pound and bacon is IS
cents a pound.
There is no change In poultry prices.
Uptown Pricss.
Malaga grapes are 25 cents a pound up
town, pines are IS cenis each and red table
apples arc 18 cents for a two-pour, box
£pitzenbe?g apples are €0 cents a dozen and
Jonathans are 35 cents a dozen: Pie apples
are "5 cents a basket. Florida oranges are
35 cents a dozen, golden rueset oranges are
25 cents a dozen and California navel or
anpes are 45 cents a dozen.
MuFhrocms are 20 ctnts a till, cranberries
are 12 cents a till, brussels sprouts are 20
cents a till and two quarts of kale sell for
15 cents. Red onions are 20 cents a largo
basket sweet potatoes are 25 cents for four
quarts and cauliflower* are IS cents each.
Knob celery is > cents a bunch and celery
Is 25 cents a bunch. Red and white cab
bages are 12 cents a head and stev.ing pears
are 15 cents a two-pound box.
Poultry pi ices are about the same as last
week. Butter ball ducklings are 22 cents a
pound, chickens are 20 cents and turkey*
are 2S cents a pound. Cotton tail rabDits
are CO cents a pair.
Round steak is 20 cents a pound, prime
lib roast is 22 cf!nts and sirloin steak la 22
rents a pound. Pork tenderloin is 35 cents
a pound and loin of pork is 20 cents a
pound. Racks of lamb nre 22 cents a round.
Smelts are 18 and 20 cents a pound, white
fish are ■ cents, yellow pike 30 cents and
halibut Bteaka 20 cents a pound. Spanish
mackefel are M cents ■ pound, flounders*
-,',,. 1* cents a pound, haddock 10 cents and
t VVniit 16 cents a pound. Lobsters are
to Vn? ? a pound, hard shell crabs are 40
£hw a dozen and scallop* are H cents a
liuaiL
CHURCH IB REIMS NEWS NOTES
Summary of the Year Shows Striking Progress in All
Denominations.
, In the religrlous world the year ending 1
to-day was one of the mopt noteworthy of
n-.any years last past. The year brought
forth three definite proposals for Protestant
Unity and developed the fourth ono, start
ed four cr five yean ago. The fiplseopal
Church put forward two of the pivposals,
on-? unofficial, the Christian Unity Foun la
tion. with headquarters in this city, th?
other offlccial, a commiision created by the
church's official body. One announces
orgranic union, when it can be brought
about, the other proposes a world confer
ence of everybody to talk matters over.
L-isciples of Christ, the great Middle
vVest body, with 1. 300. 000 members, pro
posed a plan, and will soon issue a staie
ment to Christendom setting forth disci
ples' views. The formulator of the plan,
ami the head of the committee, is th* Rev.
Peter Ainslie. whose work in Baltimore is
as unusual as it is large and effective. The
Federal Council of Churches of Christ in
America, represent ins thirty religious
bodies and working on federative lines,
really looks toward Christian union. Irs
work for the year in Colorado, Maine, V/is
consin and New Hampshire and Its de
\elopment of a secretary system were the
largest since its organization.
Another feature of the year was the
coming forwr.rd of laymen. This feature
was apparent in Protestant bodies, where
in missionary campaigns o£ laymen were
formulated in nearly all, and in the Roman
Catholic one. where the largest gathering
of working laymen ever held in the Roman
Catholic Church in America was held in
Xew Orleans a few weeks ago, and vast
numbers of American laymen journeyed to
Montreal in September to pay homage to
tho Holy Eucharist In the great Eucharistie
Congress, the first to be held on this side
of the Atlantic.
The striking record of the year was a
financial one. Gifts to uplift causes broke
all records. To foreign missions gifts were
$1,000,000 larger than ever before, ani the
year saw America and Canada pass Eng
land in gifts ami stand at the top of the
list of contributors of about $25.000,000 a
jear. Ministers commended Andrew Car
negie's peace plans and took hold to make
the influence of American ministers felt
in peace directions. Careful estimates put
the sum expended by American Christians
in support of churches, their advance at
home and their extension abroad at about
$320,000,000. This ie the highest of any
year.' and a larger proportion of it came
from small givers than ever.
In theology the year developed the con
servative side. The extremists have passed
away. The American revision of the Bible
is in" great demand, and the American Bible
Society completed during the year its |i»
000.000 endowment fund. Religious bodies
that have the big campaigns in hand and
that made the striking successes of the
year were and are of the more conservative
type.
In this city an historic event -was the con
secration of St Patrick's Cathedral, in
Fifth avenue, when there visited the city
the first Papal Legate, Vincenzo Cardinal
Vannutclli. The Ethical Culture Society
opened its new building and removed to it
from Carnegie Hall. Episcopalians elected
a Bishop Suffragan, the first official of the
kind to be elected in America. Trinity
parish showed that faults attributed to it
concerning its tenements were largely un
founded and unreal, but it took, -steps to
put the condition of its tenements beyond
possible criticism. -; ■ „„.-,,.
IJ In church membership growth the ear
was normal, the percentage being about -
in some 3. which fs faster than P«P« la "
tion growth. Definite stand was tak.n
for social service, an.l a Labor Tern
uk- in Second avenue was opened. se\erai
Tmr..ortant pastorates fell .vacant, and some
of them have not yet been filled. ** rtg
r>ncv of the year, in- theory If not in prac
tice; was toward the small churches. St.
Thomas^ in Fifth avenue, started work on
a big building during the year, but ts
case is unusual. Presbyterians made strik
ing progress in The Bronx and have lunus
to do still more. The number «*£W^
tions on Manhatan island ha\ing 1,300
members or more slowly Increases, tour
having passed that mark during the ear.
ETHICAL CULTURE LECTURES.
The recently erected meeting house of
the Society for Ethical Culture, at 64th
street and Central Park West, is to be
opened on Sunday evenings from January 8
to March 26 inclusive for a; series of twelve
successive services. .Alfred 'W. Martin, who
was called from his Seattle Society for Uni
versal Religion to be an associate leader
of the New York Ethical Society is to
have charge of this series of Sunday even
ing meetings. His plan Is to reproduce the
type of meeting held on Sunday evenings
at Cooper Union, and similar to that con
ducted by him for seve:al years in the
Tacoma Theatre. His lecture course an
nounced for this series of meetings will
deal with "Great Mo al Leaders of the
Orient and Their Teachings for the Occi
dent," each lecture to be followed by pub
lic discussion. _
The dates and topics for the twelve Sun
day evenings are as follows: , '.-.
January 8, "Introducing the Discovery or
the Sacred Books of the East and lis Ethi
cal Effects": 15. "Gotaina, the Bu<idha. ana
the Path to Salvation"; 22. "Zoroaster, the
Prophet of Industry." and 29, "Confucius,
Lao-Tze, and the Problem of Good Govern-
February 5, "Moses and the Ssurces of
the Ten Commandments": 12, "The Proph
ets of Israel and the Commonwealth of
Man"; 19. "Jesus— A Person or a Myth.'
and £6. "The Sermon on the Mount.
March 5, "The Ethics of Jesus and the
Need for More Light"; 12. "Paul and the
Origin of Christianity:;': 19. "Mahomet and
the Doctrine of Submisflon (Islam), and
23. "Which Leader Shall We Follow?"
During his ministry in the Pacliic North
west Mr Martin compiled a volume or
relei-tions fom the Bibles of the worlds
great religions: also a collection of one
hundred ethical hymns, entitled ••Hymn* in
Harmony with Modern .Thought." The Sun
day evening programme will include read
ines £.om these scriptures and congrega
tional singing of one or two of these ethical
hymns at each meeting. . r **,
The society is to have a New Tear s festi
val to-morrow at v a. m. in the meeting
house. There will be a«Mresses by Perdval
Chubb Dr Henry Ifoskowita, Alfred W.
Martin and Dr. R. A^ Tsanoff.
GENERAL ITEMS OF THE WEEK
At the First Baptist Church to-morrow
the Rev. I. M. Ilaldeman will preach in
the morning on "The Secret of Life and
True Living." Tn the evening he will dis
cuss "The Infirmities of Old Age, Pneu
monia and the Death of Mrs. Eddy. God's
Final and Terrific Answer to the Claims
of Christian Science."
Dr. Behulman will Bpeak at Temple
F,.:-;h-F.l to-morrow morning on "The In
tegrity of Commerce."
The New York branch of the Interna
tional Christian Folice Assreiatlon will ob
serve this coming week as a week of
prayer at its rooms. No. 201 East 68th
street.
The Ladies' Christian Onion will hold
daily devotional meetings at the Collegiate
Church this coming week.
At the Church of the Holy Communion
Dr. Mottet will preach to-morrow raom
intr and afternoon. In the evening Mr.
Mill will be the speaker.
At the Pilgrim Church the Rev. Fred
erick Lynch i? beginning a course of eight
Sunday evening addresses on "Great Nov
els as Christian Forces."
At the Harlem Presbyterian Church the
paster will preach ;it 11 a. in. to-morrow
on "Divine Guidance: A New Year's Mcs
pn<?e." In the evrnin? he will begin a
■etief of sermons especially for young peo
ple upon the subject "Secrets of BudoaH
as Revealed in the Life and Character of
St. Paul."
f Dr. Aked's subjects fT to-morrow morn
fcbg at the Fifth Avenue Baptist Church
Will be "The P.osy Dawn of Day, a New
Year's Rcrinon." la tho evening ho will
speak on "Mary Macrdalene In Maeterlinck,
in Fd-xln Arnold, ir; Robert Buchanan and
in the Scripture?."
The Rev. Dr. Abbott E. Kitrldge will
preach in Rutsreis Presbyterian Church
to-morro-w at 11 and 8 o'clock. Christmas
music will be repeated.
The Sunday Civic Centre, recently opened
cs a part of the fortrard movement of the
Church of the Pilgrims, will be addressed
to-morrow at 12:13 o'clock by the Rev. Dr.
Josiah Strong, of the American League of
Social Service, on "The Problem of
Wealth." The friendly Sunday afternocn at
the church will be devoted to-morrow to the
third annual New Year's co-operative ser
vice of the Brooklyn Heights Church and
Civic League, in which all of the churches
of the heights v/ill join. C. M. Keeler, the
evangelistic singer, previously connected
with the laymen's missionary movement,
who has been conducting: the singing at
the friendly Sunday afternoons at the
Church of the Pilgrims, has been engaged
by the . church v/ork commission of the
Church of the Pilgrims for the remainder
of. the season. : J;;{ i
The- Rev. Dr. Ar.thCny H. Evans v/ 111
preach to-morrow at .the West Presby
terian Church on "Assurances for the New
Year" and at 8 p. m. on "The Right Sort
of Preparation for tne Voyage."
At Calvary Baptist Church Dr. Mac-
Arthur will speak on the motto chosen for
the new year, the topic being "Safety for
the Beloved cf the Lord." At 8 p. m. he
will begin a new series of sermons en im
portant Christian movements of the pres
ent time.
To-morrow morning- at 11 o'clock at the
Lenox Avenue Unitarian Church the Rev.
Dr. Merle St. Croix Wright v/ill have as
his sermon topic "Contemporary Religion—
ZangTvill."
The Rev. James A. O'Connor, v.-ho has
just returned home after an absence of five
months In Europe, will speak at the ser
vices in Christ's Mission to-morrow after
noon. His subject will be "Romanism in
Eurcpo and America."
At the Church cf the Incarnation there
will be a serm.n by the rector, Dr.
Grosvenor, at 11 o'clock to-morrow. At 4
P. m. there will be Christmas music.
Dr. Kdpar Whitaker Work will preach
the "Year Sermon" to-morrow at 11 a. m.
and distribute year text cards in the Fourth
Presbyterian Church.
"Stage Setting In the Drama of Life"
wil! be the subject of Dr. George P. Eck
man's brief discourse tc-morrow evening
at St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church.
"Another Milestone" Is the subject of
the sermon by Dr. W. Bayard Craig to
morrow morning- at the Lenox Avenue
Christian Church. Tn the evening Dr.
Crai? will give an illustrated lecture on
the Hawaiian Islands.
At the Church of the Divine Paternity
the Rev. Dr. Frank Oliver Kail will preach
at 11 a. m., his subject being: "Press On."
At the Scotch Presbyterian Church the
Rev. David G. Wylle'a morning subject wi'.l
be "Scmo Thoughts for the New Year."
and in the evening "Our Winning Cause."
At the Lafayette Avenue Presbyterian
Church, at 4:30 p. m. to-morrow, a special
Vesper servic" 1 will be held, when the Apollo
Club will sing in compliment to their con
ductor, who is the organist of the church.
At the Church of the Ascension the Rev.
Dr. Percy Btfckttey Grant will preach at
the People's Service on "Hew to Secure a
New Deal." At 9 p. m. the People's Forum
will be addressed by Elizabeth Curley
Flynn. en "The Brooklyn Shoemakers'
Strike."
"Into the Xew Year" wil! be the subject
of a Xew Year's address to be given by
William B. Fenno, international secretary
of the army and navy department, at the
Harlem Younc; Men's Christian Associa
tion, No. 5 West 123 th street, to-morrow
afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.
Those interested in the Far Eastern sit
uation will welcome the 0,-ir»rtunity to hear
to-morrcw four members of the faculty of
the Bible Teachers' Training School relate
their experiences and impressions growing
out of their recent trip through China,
Japan and Corea.
The exercises at the Madison Avenue
Reformed Church to-morrow will be in
commemoration cf the new year. Dr. Car
ter, the pastor, will preach a Xew Year's
sermon on "To have not passed this way
heretofore.'*
At the Brick Church to-morrow Dr.
Tranus Brovin. president of Union Theo
logical Seminary, will preach at 11 o'clock.
At the Church of the Messiah (Uni
tarian), the Rev. John Hayncs Holmes will
preach to-morrow at 11 o'clock a New
Year's adcress en "Some Great Cause —
God's New Messiah." Mr. Holmes an
nounces a special series of sermons on tiie
subject of "The New Religion," beginning
on January S. The union meetings of tne
Church of tho Divine Paternity, the Free
Synagogue and the Church of the Messiah
v.-ill bo resumed to-morrow evening in tho
Church of the Messiah.
The subject of the l£sson-sermon in the
Christian Science churches to-morrow will
be "God."
The Rev. Dr. A. Edwin Keigwin will
prcr.ch a New Year's Sermon at the West
RELIGIOUS NOTICES.
FEAR NOT
PASTOR RUSSELL..
The fear in the hearts of captains of
industrial, financial, educational and ec
clesiastical affairs is caused by the "Doc
trines of Devils" promulgated and taught
by creed worshippers of the pS ' Pastor
Russell gays the Lord tells us to "Fear
Not."
Sunday, January Ist. 3:00 P. If., in the
Brooklyn Academy of Muelc. Pastor
Russell, in his characteristic way, is ex
pected to tell why men are now enjoined
to "Fear Not."
No doubt those hearing him will more
courageously meet the great crisis
among men, now so nearly approached.
This sermon will help you throughout the
■ • ..- .Hi-- year. All are cordially invited.
Seats free and 110 collection to bo lifted.
:ROXZB BASS-RELIEF PORTRAIT OF
'HLi-1 UA.TE REV. DR. WILLIAM R.
HL'N'TIN'GTON.
A rr.emoiial tribute of the poor people of
Grace Church Settlement, in East 14th
street, to whom '.he rec:or of Grace par
ish had endeared himseif.
(J. Massey Knlr.d. sculptor.)
End Presbyterian Church to-morrow morn
ing. A Christmas concert wlii be given at
8 p. m.
The Rev. Dr. Walter Laldlaw, executive
secretary of the Federation of Churches
and Christian Organizations, will speak at
the Labor Temple to-morrow night on
"Can Church Men Meet City Needs?"
Special evangelistic services -will begin
at the Metropolitan Temple to-mcirovv
mcrning, continuing throughout the month
of January.
At the Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas
the Rev. Malcolm James MacLeod Will
pieach to-morrow morning and evening.;
At the National Eible Institute's Gospel
Hall No. 11l Manhattan street, Hariem, tne
Rtv." Arthur H. Allen will speak to-morrow
night at 8 o'clock.
Dr. Jay Benson Hamilton opens a Janu
ary campaign at Trinity Methodist Episco
pal Church to-morrow evening: Dr. Frank
Mason North, speaker.
••Stage Setting: In the Drama of Life" will
be the subject of Dr. George P. Eckman's
brief discourse to-morrow evening at St.
Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church.
To-morrow morning, at Carnegie Hall.
Dr. Stephen S. Wise will preach a sermon
to young people on "The Duties and Dan
gers of Youth."
At the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church
to-morrow the Rev. Dr. Hugh Black will
preach both in the morning and the after
noon. There will also be a special week of
prayer services conducted by Dr. Black
on Wednesday and Friday evenings at 8:15.
At St. Andrew's Methodist Episcopal
Church, the Rev. Dr. George Clarke Peck
pastor, the evening topic to-morrow will
be "Face Front." During the coming week
nightly services will be held In the chapel.
RtLiGIOUS NOTICES.
Madison Jours Presbyterian Church
Madison avenue and :Utn street.
Rev. C. H. PABKHUKST D. U. Pastor.
Key. G. R. MONTGOMERY. Ph.. D..
Assistant. Minister.
The Paster will preach 11 a..m.. ana
Mr. MONTGOMERY 8 p. m.
Communion service, m.
Fourth Presbyterian Church,
West End A.«. and 91st St.
EDGAR WHITAKER WORK, D. D.. Pastor.
P. EL. WOOD ERICKSON. Assistant. ..
Dr. WORK preaches the "Year sermon at
11 a m In the evening at 3 o ciock, his topic
is "Maklsi the New Year New "
BRtOK CHURCH
Fifth venue and Thirty-seventh Street.
Communion at cicse of Morning Service.
Dr FRANCIS BROWN will preach at 11.
"NORMAN M. THOMAS at 4.
Bible School and Classes. 0:45 a. m.
Midweek Service. Wednesday, 8 p. ci.
St. Bartholomew's Church
Mieison aye., comer 4-Jth st.
The Bey. LEliiHiON I'AKKS. V. D.. Rector.
83U a. m. — Holy Communion.
il a. m — Preacher, the Rector.
4 p . nf. — Preacher. Rev. Sidney N. Ussher.
9 p. re. — Organ recital
GEO. W. SCHURx'UAN.
Assistant District Attorney under Mr. MM
ASSOCIATION ULtfc CLUB.
Scrffax. 3:45. 2"d ft. Y. M. C- A., near 7?h ay«.
THE UNION THEOLOGICAL. SEMINARY
In the City of New York.
Service in the Cbspe!. Clarem^nt Avenue. be
tween 120 th and 122d 1 S.re-ns. a .eleven o clock.
Pieacher. the Key Piotessor GEORGE v ILL-
I/-M KNON. D. D.. LU D.
The attendance or all not regularly worshipping:
tlsevvr.eie is cordially invited.
"CHURCH OF ZION AND ST. TIMOTHY.
■624 West 57th Street.
Rector. Rev. HENRY LUBECK. D. C. L.
Holy cmnraunlon » A -
Mornlnic Prayer ........10 A il.
Li any: Holy CVmmunicn: Preacher, the
F». e tor ** A - "•
Evensong: Preacher. R-»v. Dr. Rughton. 8 P. M.
Tsie f ■l>n"-»i of tnr> Piv"n» Paternity.
Central Fii'V 'Vest J»H Wt» Street.
The Pastor. FRANK OLIVER HALL. D. D.,
will preach at 11 a. m. Subject: "PRESs ON. '
Vesper Service 4:rs<> p. m. Brief address by
Dr. Hall. Fub;ect: "SOW."
Music from the Cantata "Bethlehem* by
Maurder ard New Yearns Music.
CHRIST CHURCH. Broadway. Tlst St.;
Her. O. A. STRONG. Rector.
8 A.. 11.— Holy Communion, with Carols. 11
A M — Morning Service with full 'older Of Music
ani Sermon by Rector. S P. li.— Special Musical
Service. Brids's Cantata. The Cradle of Christ,
and Carols. • % ■ **
St. rAri/s vFTnr-n-sT CHURCH.
Wfst End Avenue and BC:h Street.
Rev. OEORfJK P. ECIOIA.V. D. D., Pastor.
11 A. M.— "The P.isit or Way."
9 P. M.— "StaKP-Pefins in the Drama of L!fe. *
srCCIAC MUSIC. ... . -
ST. MARK'S. I'd Are. and 10th St. Rev. Dr.
U. TV. BATTEN. Rector. Services on New
Year's pay. Holy Communion. £a. m. Moralnar
Prayer. Sermon and Holy Communion. 11 a. m.
(with repetition of -re Christmas music). Ser
vice of the Emmanuel Keeling Mission. 8 p. m.
' ALL ANe-ELS' CHURCH, wist" End At*, and
fist St.; Rev. 3 DELAXCEX TOWNSENU.
D. D.. Rector. — Hoy Communion. S A. M.t Holy
rf.r>!tirjn:on and :-erm>n -by the Rector. II .A. M.
Tracittlonal Christmas Carols anl Cantata. "The
Holy chili." 4 P. M. Sirar.^-i-:s Weleoma.
"CHURCII OF THE INCARNATION. -'f-d'son
aye. and Ssth st., Key. W. M. CROSVENOR.
I> D . Rector. — s and 10 a. m.. Holy Commun
ion: 11 a. m . Morning Prayer. Fer-non (Factor)
and Hory Communion: 4 p. m.. Evening Prayer
and^Afidjress (Rector). .
GRACE CHURCH, '^TSSSTk
Sunday Benrleei at S-11-4 £.- S.
Preachers. Rector at 11. Rev. C. W.
CLASH at 4. Rector at s P. M.
MADISON AVK. PRF.SnYrnRIAX CHCBCII.
Northeast corner of 73.1 st.
Service Nev? Year's Eve. 11 p. m.
Xew Year'" Day, 11 a. m. and R p. m.
Pr HENRY SI.OAXC COFFIN will preach.
~ saint andckw-s cnvm ii.
T'l'h Street. West <-' Columbus .> inf.
GEORGE CLMtKK PECK. P. P.. Minister.
It A. M. — New Y.^nr Meditation and Communion.
s 11.I 1 . M.~ "Face Front."
— \VE«T,PHE s BTTEJ?tAN ( 'III M. •
On 4"d Ft., between sth and 6th av*s.
Rev ANTHONY H. EVAN?. D. D.. rata t r. ■
preaches at 11 a. m. an.l I p. "i-
ciiriu!! of THK heavenly" vest.
fifth nv<*.. above -«.">th st.
P.er HERBERT SHIPMAX. Rector.
t-'ervje*?. S nnd It a. in.. 9 p. m. ___^L.
— fPNt>\ U'l.M'K UNITARIAN CHURCH.
0 , r ,. r f'tst Street. ?*rvlce at Eleven.
"CONTKMPORAHT REUOION — ZAN ;'.'■! '.l-'
Her. Merle St. Crolx WrlKht. D. D.. Minister.
8 I Bvox AVBNTR COL.I.EOIATE '":■" "' 1 1.
r« r 'r.'.v.i. R»». fDOA ft tu>ton. Jr.. D D..
Paste- 1! A. M. and 8 P. M.. r>re3chlnsr by th 9
Pastor. Christmas music will repeated by Chclr.
"~RFFORVEr> CATHOtiIC.-— ServlefW. i"^r'«f*
Mlnflon. .'*'' l W"e-t r>7th. Affenoon. 3 ;{O. Rev.
I*MF« ivfOVN'OR preaches; ji'>'.-- r "Ro
man CatTiftilclsm In Rtirop? anil America."
clirjfCH Of th« TRANPFtOunVvnONT. i i m.
_rommunlon?i. 7, •>, 0. Conconf's >bi» «O-che»-
Ira): n<->n Robbtna, Pennon. '""" •.'.!.
i-Yr>-.n^'O. ■>»!->. 4 o*rtock
' Tl-M!'!.'' rl ., Eth Art, an" T'->'i St.—
Sunday rromlrK. .t 11. Rev. Dr. ?. SCIIUL.MAJT
wi:i preach on "The Integrity of Commerce."
All welcome - •
'religious society or fuisnds —
Meetings for worship. It a. m., nt 221 East
1.-.th «.. Manhattan, and 110 Schermerhorn it..
Brooklyn.
f_ RELIGIOUS NOTICES; 0
■ THE MIDHF.E rOMWiIATB CHURCH.
"*2d Are. ar.d 7th 3t.
R«t. JOHN «. FAGG. D. D. Mtnlst^
will preach at 11 A. M. and 8 ? M.
THE >IAP"'F" roi."""'-TB CHtRCH.
Her P.WTP JAMES BUKRBU. P. D-. Mtol^
ter, will preach at 11 A. M. and BJ. JL
Morales:— ,-•- Arithmetic of Time.
Evening— "Now Pay Your D»'ots.
THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH OF Wt.
NICIIOTj\"<.
sth Aye. and 45th St.
i Rev. MALCOLM JAMES MAC LEOD. »«*•
will preach at 1! A. M. and 3 V. M
j the VCT*T r>'T> COI.f.rC.T^TT; chttucb.
West End Aye. and TTtb St.
'■ Rrr HENRY EVERTSON COSH. D D.. M!n!»
ter. win preach at ii A. M.^and 4:SO P. M-
At 4:30 P. M.. Musical Service. Handel •
"Meg.oiah." ;
: rirTiWi»=l£Pncß»mßlUol[lß
Fifth Aye. and Kth St.
' ■ Services at 11 a. m. a-i- 4 p. ex
Rev. HUGH BLAUK, D. D..
will preach.
Mornlnjt Subject: "Tae Irrevocable Past.
■ Afternoon Subject: 'Th« Op*a Door."
Bible Scbcol meets at 9:30 A. H. .' '
Men's I'.lbi* Class at lt> a. m.
Special Week of Pr^jrer Service*
will b« conducted t>v Dr. Blark.
|On Wednesday Ever.lnj at 8:15- Subject: -TB*
' Fatherhood of God." And en Friday Evening at
j 8:13. Subject: "The World's Approach to Gcd."
Every on» Invited to Jt£i'»«J>«r» *£*•;___
tre LKtes o)tis;iaa Union
will hold
Baity devotional lUeetinoa
durlnc th« Week of Prayer.
January 2J to 7th. Incluslva,
at 11 a. m. tn th« Chapel of :t»
Colleoiate CburcD
Fifth avenue and 4S:h •treat.
Ladles are cordially lnrlted .
North Presbyterian March,
l.'.Sth St.. bet. Broadway * Aoiterfia A*%
Rev. JOHN 8. MAUKsT^Ph. 0., Pastor
11 A. M.— "An Open Doer ' __^,
BP. M-— Christmas Cantata. "Tn» Xiaff .
Heralds.'- rendered by l<~.» B!bl» School
and the Church Chorus.
CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH.
(Unitarian). Park ay. and 84th «t
Ml***™: JR-; ROBERT COLLYER. Lft_ XX
Ministers, iy^ . lO h.v HAY.vES HOLMES.
11 A- M— Moroln* Service. Mr. HOLitE»
will preach. Subject: ■'SOME GREAT OaUSIM
GOD'S NEW MESSIAH; AN ADDRESS TOUT
PEOPLE." Communion service.
8 P. M. — Union service of this church. Trm
Synagogue and Church of the Divine Pai«miiy.
All seats free. Address by Mr JOHN GRAHAIf
BROOKS on "The N'exi Two Steps la Bottmi
Reconstruction."
All cordially invited to ail services.
FIFTH AV£*U? BAPTIST CHU3CH
8 West Forty-sixth Street.
Tha REV. CHARLES F. AILED, D. D^
will preach to-morrow morning and avaata*
Services at 11 and » o'clock.
: Morning— "The Rosy Da.vn of Day: X. Ifwr .
: Year's Sermon."
Evening: "Mary Mas<ialeaa — In Maatarimdk,
in Edwin .Arnold, la Robert Buchanan. an 4J»
the Scriptures."
UI6LK CLASSES TOH TOr>*O MIX A3fD
_ YOUNG WOMEN AT 9:39 A. M.
: CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION.
Fifth Avnni* and Tenth Street.
Rev. Dr. PERCY STICKNEY GRANT, R«etßK
11 A. M. — Morning: Service and Sermon OUctotV .
•4 I*. M. — Evensorar ar.d sermen.
BP. M. — People's Ssrvlce. Dr. Grant win
preach on "How to Secure a New Deal." !
9 P. M— People's Forum. Elizabeth OwrlT !
Flynn. speaker. • .
Subject: "The Brooklyn Shoemaker*" Stri*fc* :
NEW YEAR'S FTE
i 10: t — -t h Ni«r!'t «^rrlr«.
UIURltt Ot- T.it HOLY CUMMUMOM
Cth Avenue and 20th Street. ■
Watch Night Service
COMMENCING AT 11:30 P. M.,
- FOLLOWED AT 12:03 A. 11. BY TH3
HOLY COMMUNION.
Broadway Tabernacle,
Broadway and 56th Street. .
Rev. CHARLES B. JEFFERSON. D. D.. PMtoe,
1 O-\ 1 11 T 8 — - ?s- c - E - M«eilr.a.
a «-»—'* »*>•*» 9 — M-r.'B League
Watch Night 10-10:30 — Orsran Recital.
*_-„:' Jl < 10:30-11— Social Halt Hour.
Services nn — Dr. Jerferson praaches.
SUNDAY — Pastor preaches 11 A. 11. & <» P. 34.
Wednesday, 3 P. SI.. FT ■ '- Meeting.
St. George's Church
Stayvesant Square and J«th St.
Rev. HUGH BIRCKHEAD, D. D., Rector
NEW YE.Ui'3 EVE. .
Watch Night Service. 11 p. m.
- Followed by Holy Communion, at 12 ra.
Conducted by the P-ector.
All. SEATS FREE.
CENTRAL PKESSYTKKI.AN CHURCH.
West 57th st between Broadway an.; 7;h ay».
Rev WILTON MERLE-SMITH. D. D. Paster.
' Rev. G. H. SMYTH. Jr. Assistant.
Dr MERLE-SMITH preaches 11 a. m. & 3 p. m.
Ev'g subject: "THE OLD YEAR AND THB
REV."
Christian Endeavor meeting Sun Jay morning.
9:45. Touns Men's Bible Class. 10 a. m. Sun
day School at 3 o- m. Devotional meeting
Wednesday at S y. in. AM welcome.
MADISON AVENUE M- E. CHURCH.
Corner GOth Street-
Rev. WALLACE IIACMULLEN. D. IX. PMtor.
11 A. M. — Preaching by the Pastor, followed by
Service of Holy Communion.
8 P. M. — Informal Service, -with brief afifirss*
by the Pastor. ■ --
Watch >.'is'.-»t Service Saturday evening at 10^0
o'clock.
Special meetings next week from Tuesday to
Friday Inclusive, at 8 P. M.
Uuiiarsi.y P.aca *T3S^ytariai Chars!!,
Cor. of 10th St. (cne block west from Broad
GEORGE ALEXANDER. D. D-. Pastor. PuWia
worship to-tnortow at 11 a. m. ana Bp. m. At
the services to-morrow the Pastor will pz-Mca-
To-morrow being the first Sunday In th« new
year, the Sacrament of the Lord s Supper will
be observed at the close of trie morning Ml*
Wednesday =i.er.iat service at 8 o'clocic
THE~SOCiETY FOR ETHICAL CCLTT-US
Founded I*7o.
3lrctins-llouse. Central Paik XV. A Mta -ta
ll A. M.
XEW YF. ATI'S SEBVICIL— •
Addresses by
SIR. PERCIVAL CHUBB. DR. HEXT»T
MOSKO'.VITZ. MR. ALFRED W. MARTIX
and DR. R. A. TSANOFF.
Th» Public Is Wflrotng.
M»ni>OV avkntk baptist cnrRCH,
MADISON AVENUE, COR. 31ST STREET.
C. A. EATON, D. D., Pastor
Will preach Sunday mornins and everv.r»*.
It A. M. — "\ Pilgrim Song for the Paaata*
Years."
8 P. M. — "A Happy New Year — How W» C*m
Re a ll2a the Wish." ■*
West End Presbyterian Church,
COR. AMSTERDAM AYE. AND lOSTH 3T.
Rtv. A. Edwin Ke!?w!n, L'.O, Pastor,
11 A. M. New Year's Sermon by Pastor.
AT 8 P. M. A CHRISTMAS CONCERT
will be given. th« choir assisted by «J.::ttoaal
voices and the Park Sisters. corgetlaL*.
OLi) FIRST CrtUKCH
Cth .We., 11th to 12ih St.
Rev HOWARD DUFFIELD. D. D., Pastor.
Rev. ROBERT MACKENZIE, D. D.. will prwen,
11 a. m. and 8 p. m. ■
WATCH-NIGHT SERVICE
NEW YEAR'S EVE. from 11 to 13 o'etoefc.
SPECIAL MUSIC under direction Wrrt. C. Carl.
RUTGiRS PaESBYTE;m CXUitCH
Broadway and 73d St.
REV. 13BGTT E. KITTRIDQE, D. D.,
preaches at 11 ami S. and conduct* th«
Prayer Meeting Wednes'tay_e -- st 3:1&
MADISON AVENUE pv-F'VMKO CHI'BCH.
57th St. ard Ma'lscn Ay«.
Krr ff.H. CAKI'tS, U. D.. Pastor.
11 A. it. — New Year's Sermon, by Paster.
8 p. M.— Fifth in series of Sacred Tr»r»l
Talks on the Holy Land. "From Jernaftlom u»
Bethlehem." ___^__^_________
MARY CHAPIN".
New T^ovght. Berkeley Tr.eatre. \V*«t 44Ui St.,
rear flth .We.
Afternoon, 3. "L-->-tcir.« Forward."
■ _^ All welcome.
RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS i^rt^o
&>x).— .Votings for Worship. 144 East 30U> •«..
New T rk: Washington and Lafav^tr* ivm..
Brooklyn. 11 o'clock. George A. Barton pro
poses attending New York meeting.
ALL SOULS' (Unttarlin). Fourth A\«': .-«, 2Ot?\
St — Rev. THOMAS R. SXJCBR, Pastor, will
preach A NEW YEAR'S SERMON — "IN NEW
NESS OF LIFE." Communion follow* Sermca.
£ervlces_ll A. M. All cordially Invited.
£JT ' "Safety '.or God's IVopte";
H"7 /-■' «. rarr-c > Millions for Peac*."
v 4 i*£ Calvary Grand Criotr. Bowman. CcnA.
iIDVSHGE^ H>W T3SIU6HT
Mcet!-"-s at tJurven Hill. 2CO "W«t 7M St..
wil be poatpor»» until January JSlh. IQH.
~ALL r SOULS' tAnthon slemorlas CHURCH.
i«t Nicholas by«. lllth »t.. Rev. G. STARK
WFATHKU PRATT. Re<tor — Services. S. llfl S.
— p\RK PItESBYTEKI VX CHURCH. Mtb at..
*-,• r.'am «ye.-Rev. Dr. ANSON P. ATTEU-
BimY. Pa*tor. Services at 11 a. m. and 8 p. m.
~RT~~MTffH K\V" 3 ""CHURCH. .>.-■-. AC,
near Central Pnrk. Rev. ARTHtftt H. JUDOS.
Itertor. i*f r*. '■-! *. S. 11 a. m. and 9p. tn.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST. Washington Square. —
Kl.\\ ••!> JUI>SON. Pastor, will preach 1_»
Mr. PIMMONS ?-__ '
CHRIST CHURCH, r.ronilway. Tlat St.
Ttev. «. A. STRON'O. Rector.
S a. m.. 11 a. m.. Rector; 3 p. in.. Mr. ROTCR,
Brooklyn.
PLYMOUTH CHTTRCH.
Orange Street, between H'cks and Henry
Streets. :•• • pastor. Rev. Newell Dwlsrht HUltm,
will prrnch mornlne and evenlnsr. Service* at
in ;-■ A. M. ••' ' 7:4S P. M -Mornln? subject.
"YKfTERDAY FOR MEMORY: DAT FOR
WORK: TO-MORROW FOR HOPE: A Nevr
Year's Sermon fir Thn«e Who B^liev* It Is
Better Further On." Evenlnsr subject. Elev
enth Barmen In tbe Ser --> on th*» "H#>ro!c A<«
of the Republic." -rh'* MEMBERS OB 1
LINCOLN'S .•'•:-■ THE NAVAL HE
ROES. THE r'-v-i.-iAVS AND NtTWKa,
I Avn THE LESSER HEROE3 OF TH_|
I GREAT WAR."
mo-A

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